Page 1

The

Kent Stater

@KentWired

THE INDEPENDENT STUDENT NEWSPAPER | MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 10, 2018

Pages 8-9

Black Squirrel Festival tradition lives on, brings together Kent community 2nd Floor Mezzanine September 13 11:00 am to 2:00 pm


2 The Kent Stater

Monday, September 10, 2018

Guest artist shows students power of individuality in artwork Alex Sobczak Art and Architecture Reporter Kennedy Deen, a freshman art education major, thinks artwork should be personal. Deen sat in the audience during the First Friday Lecture Series with print media artist Erik Waterkotte, who spoke to students and faculty about his work at the Center for the Visual Arts on Friday afternoon. “His history was his great-great grandparents and religion,” Deen said. “Find that one thing that you can identify with and put that in your artwork.” Waterkotte began his lecture with an image of his great-great-grandparents. He said his artwork features recurring religious themes because he has a personal connection; his great-greatgrandparents were Catholic, and his great-great-grandfather built churches. “Being raised Catholic, I’m fascinated by religion,” Waterkotte said. “I’m not necessarily a practicing Catholic, but as you’ll see in my work, religion and the iconography from religion is really interesting to me.” Waterkotte showed images of his artwork, ranging from standalone prints to full exhibition rooms. Janice Lessman-Moss, a professor of textile arts and the scheduling coordinator of the First Friday Lecture Series, said the hour-long artist talks are meant to offer audience members unique viewpoints

about how to pursue art. “Because art is such a creative field and everybody has their own kind of perspective or access into that creativity … (the series) is trying to give the students a broader range of perspectives on art and thinking and different things you can do with art,” Lessman-Moss said. Waterkotte said he reaches his viewers by using subjects they can connect with and creating soundtracks to go with pieces of art. He backlights his work in hopes the piece will be reflective and reach back out to the viewer. Waterkotte said he is always thinking of new ways to approach his audience. “(Art) is always who we are,” he said. “I want everybody to come and see it. … I want to try to do whatever I can to keep people there longer and have them come back again.” After the lecture, Deen had one important takeaway from Waterkotte: Artwork can be engaging but still remain personal. “The one thing I would take from this is creating art that has background to it rather than just creating it for someone to view it,” Deen said. The First Friday Lecture Series holds artist talks on the first Friday of every month, with additional lectures on other Fridays. The next lecture will feature filmmaker Heather Lenz on Sept. 28. Contact Alex Sobczak at asobcza2@kent.edu. Print media artist Erik Waterkotte discusses his artwork on Friday in the Center for the Visual Arts. Alex Sobczak / The Kent Stater

Schedule for the Student Multicultural Center’s 50th anniversary celebrations Monday, Sept. 10 Drumming Event with Baba Okantah: SMC Lounge 4 p.m. to 6 p.m.

TheKent

Stater

240 FRANKLIN HALL KENT STATE UNIVERSITY KENT, OHIO 44242 NEWSROOM 330-672-2584

Tuesday, Sept. 11 Cultural Celebration Cook-off: Ballroom Balcony 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Henry Palattella hpalatte@kent.edu

DESIGN DIRECTOR Addie Gall agall7@kent.edu

OPINION EDITOR Nicholas Hunter nhunter6@kent.edu

MANAGING EDITOR Cameron Hoover choove14@kent.edu

SPORTS EDITOR Ian Kreider ikreider@kent.edu

COPY DESK CHIEF Lauren Sasala lsasala1@kent.edu

DIGITAL DIRECTOR Olivia Eastly oeastly@kent.edu

FEATURES EDITOR Valerie Royzman vroyzman@kent.edu

CARTOONIST Joseph McGrellis jmcgrell@kent.edu

PHOTO DIRECTOR Melanie Nesteruk mnesteru@kent.edu

ASSIGNING EDITORS Brynn Pennell bpennel1@kent.edu

Wednesday, Sept. 12 History of the SMC Game Night: SMC Lounge 5 p.m. to 7 p.m.

Thursday, Sept. 13 Soup and Substance 2.0: the Student Multicultural Center Next 50 Years SMC Lounge 4 p.m. to 6 p.m.

STUDENT MEDIA BUSINESS OFFICE • 330-672-2586

Shelbie Goulding sgouldi1@kent.edu

STUDENT MEDIA DIRECTOR

Kevin Dilley

330-672-0887

kdilley@kent.edu

Simon Hannig shannig@kent.edu

ADVERTISING MANAGER

Tami Bongiorni

330-672-6306

tbongior@kent.edu

PRODUCTION MANAGER

Jacyna Peña

330-672-0886

jortiz4@kent.edu

OFFICE MANAGER

Lorie Bednar

330-672-2572

lbednar@kent.edu

BUSINESS OFFICER

Norma Young

330-672-0884

njyoung@kent.edu

330-672-2584

szake@kent.edu

Madison MacArthur mmacarth@kent.edu

GENERAL ASSIGNMENT EDITOR Dylan Reynolds dreyno18@kent.edu McKenna Corson mcorson2@kent.edu

STATER ADVISER

Sue Zake

ADVERTISING • 330-672-2586 SALES MANAGER Christian Caudill SENIOR ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES Maddie Scalzi Hayden Seddon SPONSORED CONTENT WRITER Madi Baughman

ads@ksustudentmedia.com


Monday, September 10, 2018

KentWired.com 3

‘You talked, we listened’

Meal plan changes come to campus

Valerie Royzman Features Editor Last week, Dining Services — on social media and through Vice President of Student Affairs Shay Little at an Undergraduate Student Government meeting — promised to hear students out on their frustrations regarding meal plans and dining changes this fall. Those promises are now becoming a reality. Dining Services took to Twitter on Thursday and wrote: “You talked, we listened!” The tweet announced Dining Services will now provide free, reusable to-go containers for students who don’t have time to eat their meals in the dining halls. This only applies to students with the all-access plans — the Gold Plan or the Blue Plan — and block plans.

Students who already paid $5 for a container — which the original policy called for — will be refunded. If students used Declining Balance Dollars or FlashCash to purchase the container, they will be refunded the same way. Students who paid with cash will receive their refunded money as FlashCash. According to Dinings Services’ post, students are told to visit the cashier station at any of the all-you-can-eat dining halls — Eastway, The Market and Prentice Cafe — for their containers. Students will receive a flag on their FlashCards, indicating they have one and must return it during their next visit. Dining Services will provide a properly cleaned container for students’ next to-go meal. If students forget to bring their containers with them, they can purchase a biodegradable takeout box for $1. This option has existed since the meal plans officially changed at the

beginning of the semester. Early last week, Dining Services expanded the Meal Exchange features to include meal options at Rosie’s Market, Munchies Market in Prentice Hall and the deli on the first floor of Eastway Fresh Food Co.

Meal Exchange — advertised on Dining Services’ website as “an added bonus to the All-Access and Block meal plans” — can swap a meal swipe for another food option at other dining facilities. Before Little shared the newly added swipe locations at the USG meeting on Aug. 29, Meal Exchange only applied to Rosie’s Diner, the George T. Simon III Cafe and The Cue Express in Olson Hall. At the meeting, Little addressed angry social media comments and concerns over the new meal plans that erupted at the start of the semester. “Our students deserve better,” Little said last week. “I demand better from our partners to deliver that to students, and I want you to know that every effort is being made to hold those expectations to a very high level.” KentWired contacted Little for comments on the dining updates, and she forwarded the email to Eric Mansfield, the executive director of university media relations. Mansfield said the university wasn’t caught off guard by frustrated students who wanted to see changes to the new dining experience. “We anticipated with any new program that there will be some growing pains and that we’ll make some modifications and changes,” Mansfield said. “We were prepared to see how it went for the first week, two weeks.” He said the changes taking place are

‘‘

Junior business management major Hannah Robinson (left) talks with junior marketing major Kelly Corey (bottom right) about the new meal plans in front of Rosie’s Diner in Tri-Towers on Aug. 24, 2018. Melanie Nesteruk / The Kent Stater

I demand better from our partners to deliver that to students, and I want you to know that every effort is being made to hold those expectations to a very high level.”

based on feedback from students, and they will continue throughout the semester in order to meet students’ needs, whether that be time of day or access to food. “When people have good ideas, we listen to good ideas,” Mansfield said. “We hope that people will continue to give us feedback. While some of the negative feedback certainly stood out, we got positive feedback from people about the changes too. It’s

– Shay Little Vice president of student affairs always an ongoing process, and we hope that we can make it better in the first month, first semester, first year.” Students can continue to give Dining Services feedback by filling out a survey at www.yourdiningvoice.com. Comments or concerns can be sent to Dining Services’ email, dining@kent.edu.

Contact Valerie Royzman at vroyzman@kent.edu.


4 The Kent Stater

Monday, September 10, 2018

Kent State Museum’s

‘Beyond the Suit’

exhibit features contemporary twists on menswear Ashley Johnson Fashion Reporter

Since its opening in 1985, the Kent State University Museum has explored a creative variety of trends, ranging from fringe elements on costumes and textiles to South African fashion the elegant style of late movie star Katharine Hepburn. “Beyond the Suit: Contemporary Menswear from the Collection of Alexandre Marr and Dominic Iudiciani” — the latest exhibit at the museum that opened in July — continues that exploration. Sara Hume, an associate professor and the museum’s curator, has been apart of the exhibits in the museum for nine years. Interested in the dynamics and perceptions of what’s fashionable, Hume said she was drawn to this collection because it is something the museum hasn’t featured before. “A lot of our costume exhibitions focus on the history of dress, and this one is contemporary fashion and it’s also menswear,” Hume said. “These are two things that we don’t have as much of in our permanent collection, so it was really exciting to have an opportunity to showcase both menswear and contemporary dress.” Kent State alumnus Alexandre Marr said he thought it would be a great opportunity to share his collection, and he emailed Hume with the idea of lending it to the museum. Marr and his partner, Dominic Iudiciani, met as high-schoolers in 2005, and they have accumulated designer pieces together since. Julius_7, along with Rick Owens and Gareth Pugh — who draw inspiration from punk and goth styles — are just some of the designers displayed in the exhibit. Marr said he sees himself as a collector who follows avant-garde menswear designers. “Most menswear seemed confining and lackluster until in 2010 when we found new designers who created different pieces,” Marr said. “Rick Owens is one of my favorite designers, (and he) references a lot of conceptual things like nature.” Marr said he likes the concept of wearing ideas rather than clothing, and he thinks his goth take on menswear showcases this.

Parker Bosley views pieces on Sunday in the Kent State University Museum’s latest exhibit, “Beyond the Suit,” which features contemporary menswear from the collection of Alexandre Marr and Dominic Iudiciani. Melanie Nesteruk / The Kent Stater

Instead of classical button-down shirts and slacks, the exhibit features all black garments, such as skirts and long coats with tall necklines. While the collection is not what most people would consider everyday wear, Marr said it reflects modern trends, and he and Iudiciani are just some of the people who

wear bold clothing pieces. “I hope people can see that there’s more to menswear,” Marr said. “Yes, proportions are changing in womenswear all the time, but it’s also happening in the menswear market.” The exhibit runs through June 30, 2019. Admission to the museum is $5 for adults, $4 for seniors and $3 for children under 18.

The museum is open to all from 10 a.m. to 4:45 p.m. on Wednesday, Friday and Saturday; 10 a.m to 8:45 p.m. on Thursday; and noon to 4:45 p.m. on Sundays. The museum is free to the public on Sunday.

Contact Ashley Johnson at ajohn254@kent.edu.


Monday, September 10, 2018

KentWired.com 5

Illustration by of Joey McGrellis.

Sleep plays significant role in academic success, decision-making Paige Bennett Science Reporter Attending classes, participating in student organizations, studying for exams and working jobs. For college students, managing these priorities often means losing out on sleep. 60 percent of college students report not getting enough sleep every night, according to a 2014 study published by researchers at the University of Alabama. However, a lack of sleep can contribute to academic and health issues, said biological science professor Eric Mintz. Sleep deprivation reduces a student’s ability to learn and retain information. “We consolidate memories when we sleep,” Mintz said. “If you’re very tired and you’re trying to learn, it’s very difficult to retain those memories.” Research shows a strong connection between sleep patterns and academic performance. A study published in August 2018 by. Monica Hartmann and J. Roxanne Prichard of the University of St. Thomas in St. Paul, Minnesota, found sleep problems to

be a critical indicator of academic issues. According to the study, “sleep disturbances were found to be a significant independent predictor of academic problems; on average, each additional day per week that a student experienced sleep problems raised the probability of dropping a course by 10 percent and lowered the cumulative GPA by 0.02.” Other factors associated with poor academic performance, such as binge drinking, stress and illicit drug use are equally or less influential than sleep disturbances. Sleep deprivation also weakens the immune system, which makes students more susceptible to sickness, Mintz said. Researchers believe the interaction between sleep deprivation and the immune system could contribute to neurodegenerative diseases and worsen learning disabilities, Mintz said. “Even things like cancer can be affected by sleep deprivation,” Mintz said. “It’s not like the sleep deprivation makes you get cancer, but it makes your body’s response to that sluggish.” An insufficient amount of sleep can

negatively influence a person’s judgement, as well as their ability to make decisions, said Colleen Novak, an associate professor of biological sciences. Studies show basic brain functions like decision-making are “not optimal when you have sleep deprivation,” and that sleep deprivation impacts people even if they feel OK, Novak said. “Our feelings don’t really match up with function,” Novak said. “Your function is still compromised.” Although personal and academic obligations can make it difficult for college students to get enough sleep every night, they can take measures to combat sleep deprivation. Students can improve their sleep by practicing a series of habits meant to increase sleep quality, known as “sleep hygiene,” said Jeffrey Ciesla, an associate psychology professor,. Some common sleep hygiene practices include exercising regularly, having a consistent wake up time and staying away from cellphones and bright screens before bed, Ciesla said. Additionally, students should limit the

amount of time they spend napping. While naps can help students catch up on sleep they missed, taking them on a regular basis to make up for a poor sleep schedule is not in their best interests. “Doing that regularly as a way to patch up a bad sleep practice is not a good thing,” Ciesla said. “You’re training the body to only get four hours of sleep because “I’ll pick it up later.” Some people also have a tendency to view lack of sleep as a measure of success and boast about their ability to function on a small amount of it. “It’s almost like a badge of pride on how little sleep you can get,” Novak said. However, infrequent sleep is unhealthy, and people should acknowledge the importance of a consistent sleep schedule and make it a bigger priority in their lives. “But we aren’t functioning well,” Novak said. We don’t drive as well. We don’t think as well. We don’t perform as well. We don’t make good judgement calls in that state.” Contact Paige Bennett at pbennet8@kent.edu.


6 The Kent Stater

Monday, September 10, 2018

Kent State implements formal sorority recruitment changes

Ashleigh Shepard, the assistant vice president of recruitment and retention (left), and Courtney Carpenter, the vice president of recruitment and retention. Photo courtesy of the Panhellenic Council Instagram page.

Hannah Kelley Dean of Students and Greek Life Reporter Starting this fall, Kent State’s Panhellenic Council implemented changes to the sorority recruitment process, focusing even more on a values-based recruiting system. The length of this year’s fall recruitment has also changed from one week to two, providing more time for the values-based recruitment method originally used by the 2017 council to take form. “The goal of value-based recruitment is to help break down stereotypes new members might have about specific sororities,” said Courtney Carpenter, the vice president of recruitment and retention, said. The Panhellenic Council emphasized values should be the topic of discussion between potential new members and active members, and all marketing videos and social media should showcase chapter values as well. Carpenter and Ashleigh Shepard, the assistant vice president of recruitment and retention, in March 2018. It was eventually voted on by sorority chapters in April. The change of dates was proposed so women could have more time to focus on academics while also going through the recruitment process, Shepard said. This year, events will be broken down into two weekends. Sept. 15 and Sept. 16 will kick off open house rounds in the Student Center, followed by sisterhood round on Sept. 21 and preference round on Sept. 22. Recruitment will end with bid day on Sept. 23. “If I could tell anyone considering going Greek anything, it would just be that I’m so much more confident in myself because of the opportunities I’ve had and people I’ve met,” Carpenter said. “Kent is the secondlargest university in Ohio, but I feel I’ve been able to find my purpose and a way to make an impact on campus. I always encourage people to go through the process for all the experiences it comes with.” Shepard and Carpenter said their goal is to get at least 600 women to sign up for recruitment this year. The bar was set at 596 last year. Kent State currently has eight sororities

on campus: Alpha Phi, Alpha Xi Delta, Chi Omega, Sigma Delta Tau, Phi Mu, Delta Gamma, Delta Zeta and Sigma Sigma Sigma. “It’s super important to keep an open mind and have fun with it,” Shepard said. “It’s important to know not everyone’s experience is the same. You’ll end up where you’re meant to be.”

Photo courtesy of the Panhellenic Council Instagram page.

The link to sign up for formal recruitment closes on Sept. 10. at 11:59 p.m. To register, go to kent.mycampusdirector2.com. Contact Hannah Kelley at hkelley2@kent.edu.


Monday, September 10, 2018

KentWired.com 7

Alumni Association cuts due-based membership program Krista Renaldo Homecoming, Alumni Affairs and Fundraising Reporter Kent State students will now get free benefits from the university just for graduating. Starting in November, alumni will no longer have to pay for exclusive membership benefits such as merchandise discounts, special rates on hotels and rental cars. Kent State’s Alumni Association previously offered discounts exclusively for paid members, but beginning Nov. 1, there will be no more membership program, said Brenda Hudkins, the director of alumni marketing and communications. “The alumni association has always provided programs and services for all alumni,” Hudkins wrote in an email. “But when we had the membership program, we provided enhanced communications and a few discounts to members through various partners. We have now been working with our partners to begin offering previous member-only discounts to all alumni.” Member-only benefits include discounts on Kent State merchandise, sporting events, recreational memberships, home and auto insurance, car rentals and hotel rooms. The Alumni Association also offered a program called “Find a Flash,” a directory to help locate old roommates or classmates that have fallen out of touch. According to the Alumni Association’s website, Kent State’s membership programs include new graduate membership, annual, senior life, three-year and a membership for life. New graduate members received full membership benefits for a full year for $25. Graduates could receive this rate up to two years after graduation. Annual members paid $45 for an individual membership and could renew their benefits every year. Senior life members could receive this membership at 62 or older for $375, and members were recognized as life members. Three-year members paid $125, and the benefits lasted three years, while life members paid $750 for full benefits. Life members who joined before July 1, 2018, have automatically been accepted to the new Flashes Forever Society. On Aug. 28, life members started to receive their information packets, which included a Flashes Forever card, a window decal and a lapel pin. Annual and complimentary members are still able to enjoy their benefits for the remainder of their term. After that, many of the benefits and discounts they

‘‘

The Center for Philanthropy and Alumni Engagement on Saturday. Krista Renaldo / The Kent Stater

receive may be available to all alumni who graduate from Kent State. Kent State is one of several Ohio universities that has made this change. Other schools include: the University of Akron, Bowling Green State University and Youngstown State University, which decided to make the transition to a “nondues society” last summer. The Ohio State University still has a paid membership program, but it did discontinue its lifetime membership in June 2012. For more information on alumni benefits and former membership program, go on to www.ksualumni.org. Contact Krista Renaldo at krenaldo@kent.edu.

We have now been working with our partners to begin offering previous member-only discounts to all alumni.” – Brenda Hudkins Director of alumni marketing and communications


37

8 The Kent Stater

Monday, September 10, 2018

Monday, September 10, 2018

th annual Black Squirrel Festival highlights

KentWired.com 9

On the cover: Students talk during Black Squirrel Festiva on Friday. Carter E. Adams / The Kent Stater

student organizations, community businesses

Robyn Berardi Diversity Reporter Kent State students and community members took over the Student Green and Risman Plaza to celebrate Black Squirrel Festival on Friday. Black Squirrel Festival benefits campus organizations and new students alike by connecting them through their mutual interests. A variety of student organizations, including the Kent Student Education Association, Muslim Students’ Association and Construction Management Student Organization, set up tables to engage students and provide information about their organizations. For many student organizations, Black Squirrel Festival helps increase membership. “Black Squirrel Festival is an opportunity for either new students or any student that wants to get involved in our organization to get a chance to know that we exist,” said James Satrape the president of Students Against Sexual Assault. This annual event builds off the momentum BlastOff held on Aug. 22. “We actually got over 200 sign-ups from BlastOff,” Satrape said. “I would like to get more emails on our email sheet today.” Black Squirrel Festival offers a different way for student organizations to interact with students, said Elise Carney, a Kent Student Ambassador. “You do get to talk to a lot of people and reaching out via social media and sharing posts that way isn’t the same as talking

Students visit a table to learn about student organizations at Black Squirrel Festival on Friday. Stephanie Nguyen / The Kent Stater

to people in person and answering their questions,” Carney said. The festival appeals to new students who may have missed the opportunity to get involved at BlastOff. “I came because it looked like a fun activity to participate in my new home community,” said Emma Prince, a freshman exploratory major. Local businesses and organizations —

including Raising Canes, Plato’s Closet and the Planned Parenthood Kent Health Center — were also in attendance. Organizations like the League of Women Voters of Kent attended to help students get involved beyond campus. “We’re passionate about everybody being involved in the political process,” said Jane Preston Rose, a board member for the League. “We’re non partisan, so we want to make sure

Junior fashion merchandising major Jill Whitesel helps paint a “big red bookshelf” for kids in waiting rooms and other places they can spend time reading at Black Squirrel Festival. Carter E. Adams / The Kent Stater

first, people are registered. Then they have information about voting.” The first 1,000 students to visit 10 tables received a free Black Squirrel Festival T-shirt. Prince said her favorite part of the event was the free merchadise given out. “I’ve gotten shirts, a beach ball, cups, writing utensils and stick-on nails,” Prince said. The festival also featured the Fork in the

Road food truck and a photo booth. “I think it’s a time where new students and organizations can further their relationship with each other and interact on another level,” Prince said. Contact Robyn Berardi at rberard2@kent.edu.

Angela Deibel, a senior mechanical engineering major, hula hoops to music during Black Squirrel Festival on Friday in hopes to start her own hula hoop club on campus. Carter E. Adams / The Kent Stater


37

8 The Kent Stater

Monday, September 10, 2018

Monday, September 10, 2018

th annual Black Squirrel Festival highlights

KentWired.com 9

On the cover: Students talk during Black Squirrel Festival on Friday. Carter E. Adams / The Kent Stater

student organizations, community businesses

Robyn Berardi Diversity Reporter Kent State students and community members took over the Student Green and Risman Plaza to celebrate Black Squirrel Festival on Friday. Black Squirrel Festival benefits campus organizations and new students alike by connecting them through their mutual interests. A variety of student organizations, including the Kent Student Education Association, Muslim Students’ Association and Construction Management Student Organization, set up tables to engage students and provide information about their organizations. For many student organizations, Black Squirrel Festival helps increase membership. “Black Squirrel Festival is an opportunity for either new students or any student that wants to get involved in our organization to get a chance to know that we exist,” said James Satrape the president of Students Against Sexual Assault. This annual event builds off the momentum BlastOff held on Aug. 22. “We actually got over 200 sign-ups from BlastOff,” Satrape said. “I would like to get more emails on our email sheet today.” Black Squirrel Festival offers a different way for student organizations to interact with students, said Elise Carney, a Kent Student Ambassador. “You do get to talk to a lot of people and reaching out via social media and sharing posts that way isn’t the same as talking

Students visit a table to learn about student organizations at Black Squirrel Festival on Friday. Stephanie Nguyen / The Kent Stater

to people in person and answering their questions,” Carney said. The festival appeals to new students who may have missed the opportunity to get involved at BlastOff. “I came because it looked like a fun activity to participate in my new home community,” said Emma Prince, a freshman exploratory major. Local businesses and organizations —

including Raising Canes, Plato’s Closet and the Planned Parenthood Kent Health Center — were also in attendance. Organizations like the League of Women Voters of Kent attended to help students get involved beyond campus. “We’re passionate about everybody being involved in the political process,” said Jane Preston Rose, a board member for the League. “We’re non partisan, so we want to make sure

Junior fashion merchandising major Jill Whitesel helps paint a “big red bookshelf” for kids in waiting rooms and other places they can spend time reading at Black Squirrel Festival. Carter E. Adams / The Kent Stater

first, people are registered. Then they have information about voting.” The first 1,000 students to visit 10 tables received a free Black Squirrel Festival T-shirt. Prince said her favorite part of the event was the free merchadise given out. “I’ve gotten shirts, a beach ball, cups, writing utensils and stick-on nails,” Prince said. The festival also featured the Fork in the

Road food truck and a photo booth. “I think it’s a time where new students and organizations can further their relationship with each other and interact on another level,” Prince said. Contact Robyn Berardi at rberard2@kent.edu.

Angela Deibel, a senior mechanical engineering major, hula hoops to music during Black Squirrel Festival on Friday in hopes of starting her own hula hoop club on campus. Carter E. Adams / The Kent Stater


10 The Kent Stater

Monday, September 10, 2018

Rankin rumbles in home opener as Flashes score most points since 2008

Ian Kreider Sports Editor The run game was the key component in Kent State’s (1-1) rainy home opener,a 54-14 win over visiting Howard, and junior running back Justin Rankin was the catalyst. He finished the game with a careerhigh 147 yards on the ground, including a 61-yard untouched burst up the middle for a touchdown to extend the Flashes’ lead to 33-7 midway through the third quarter. “We just stuck to our fundamentals,” Rankin said of his performance. “The offensive line, I mean really it’s the offensive line. We just run the ball. We do the easy part.” The team ran 81 plays, 52 of which were runs. Fellow junior Jo-El Shaw also had a career game, rushing for 105 yards and three of the team’s six touchdowns on the ground, including a touchdown on his first career carry. Sophomore quarterback Woody Barrett had a quiet game, finishing 14-for-27 for 156 yards, a touchdown and an interception. “He’s a great playmaker,” Rankin said of his quarterback. “He puts us all in our places that we need to be. He knows the offense; he goes through his progressions. Woody’s a good ball player.” The defense was also a big part of the win, containing Howard sophomore quarterback Caylin Newton, who lit up Ohio last week for 439 yards through the air as well as 93 yards on the ground. Senior linebacker Matt Bahr had a solid game, finishing with 11 tackles, including two fourth down stops. “We knew coming into this week — ­ we watched the tape against Ohio — that those guys are very explosive,” Bahr said. “They have a great offense, especially a great quarterback in Newton. We just trusted the defensive coaches and the plan they put forward. (Defensive coordinator Tom) Kaufman and his staff do a great job of breaking down the tape. They put us in positions to be successful.” The Flashes’ neutralized Newton, who finished the game 11-for-25 for 159 yards with two touchdowns and two costly interceptions. The defense forced Howard (0-2) to go 0-for-6 on fourth-down conversions in the first half. Bahr even forced a turnover in the red zone, poking the ball loose on a quarterback dive by Newton. Just as the ball bounced in the opposite direction, so did the momentum, as Howard only mustered two garbage-time touchdowns en route to a 54-14 thrashing.

Kent State running back Jo-El Shaw jukes past Howard defenders during the second half of the Flashes’ matchup against the Bison on Saturday. The Flashes won, 54-14. Kayla McMillen / The Kent Stater

“It starts with stopping the run,” coach Sean Lewis. “We were able to do that early on. The guys defensively did a great job of identifying the formations; they really put a lot of stress on you. There was a stretch of plays where they had two quarterbacks on the field. They really force you to be sound,

and the defense played with great eyes and did a great job of executing the plan.” Although the scoreboard may not have indicated it, the Flashes have improvements to make. They finished the game with 15 penalties, totaling 150 yards, tripling what they had in last week’s loss to Illinois.

Kent State continues its season as it takes on Penn State (2-0) at noon Saturday at Beaver Stadium.

Contact Ian Kreider at Ikreider@kent.edu.


Monday, September 10, 2018

KentWired.com 11

Slow starts cost Flashes in La Salle Invitational Sean Blevins Sports Reporter Early deficits struck again this weekend as the Kent State volleyball team (6-5) finished the La Salle Invitational with a 1-2 record. Rider 3, Kent State 2 Kent State started off stagnant and dropped its first two sets before falling short of pulling off a miraculous comeback. Rider (4-3) started off strong and scored seven straight points in the first set to give itself the 11-4 advantage. The team closed out the set 25-20. The set stayed close at first, but the Broncs eventually pulled away, winning 25-16. Kent State dominated the third set and started up 17-1, which was a massive momentum builder for the Flashes as it only Then-junior Lexi Mantas (9) and then-sophomore Myla King block the net during the volleyball game against Ball State on Oct. 13, 2017 in the M.A.C. Center. Kent gave up five points total. lost, 3-1. Samantha Karam / The Kent Stater The Flashes won a marathon fourth set, 30-28, that featured several lead changes. Kent State trailed, 14-10, at one point during Kent State 3, NJIT 0 this set but pulled out the win to force the Kent State controlled its last game in the deciding set. tournament against NJIT (1-9) from start to finish. Rider led most of the fifth set and ended up in During the first half of the first set, the Flashes victory, winning 15-13. were up, 11-10. Kent State flipped a switch and La Salle 3, Kent State 0 went on an 8-0 run, eventually closing it out, La Salle (5-4) won a very intense game in straight 25-19. sets, but it was closer than the scores indicated. “We got a lot of digs throughout the The Flashes jumped off to a 7-1 lead in the first tournament, but we need to work on improving set, but La Salle tied it up at 15. After several lead our service pressure and our blocking at the net,” changes, the Explorers ultimately pulled away and coach Don Gromala said. won 25-21. The second set was closely contested, but Kent La Salle began the second set up 10-4 and State ended up on top, 25-20. continued dominating, eventually winning The Golden Flashes will face Santa Clara at 4 p.m. 25-14. on Friday in the first of three matches in Indianapolis. The third set was down to the wire, as no team could muster the slightest bit of separation. The Contact Sean Blevins Explorers ended up downing the Flashes, 30-28, to at sblevin4@kent.edu. sweep the field on their home court. Kent State freshman outside hitter Kathryn Ellison reaches for the ball during Kent State’s matchup against Youngstown State on Aug. 28, 2018. The Flashes won, 3-1. Carter E. Adams / The Kent Stater


12 The Kent Stater

Monday, September 10, 2018

OPINION

Microaggressions:

JOSEPH McGRELLIS’ VIEW

The roadblock to racial identity Adriona Murphy A question I’ve been asking myself since I was little is, “Who am I?” I knew my name was Adriona, my mom’s name was Kim and my grandparents were Richard and Louise. I knew my address, my school, my favorite animal and favorite color. I could probably tell you every little detail about myself, but truth be told, I didn’t know who I really was, especially when it came to my racial identity. To give you some perspective, of the 841 students enrolled in my high school during my senior year, 95 percent of the students identified as white. These kids were my friends, and I never really thought too much into it when they’d make little comments. I remember being told on multiple occasions that I was “the whitest black girl” my peers had ever met and that I “wasn’t, like, a real black girl.” It took me a while to understand what they really meant. I wasn’t what they perceived to be a “stereotypical black girl.” I wasn’t “really black” in their eyes. They unknowingly slowly tore down a vital part of my identity to the point where I didn’t really consider myself to be black anymore. I don’t think most people ever intended to be rude or offensive when it comes to language like this, although some can definitely be more malicious. (One time someone told me that I was “awfully smart” for a “girl like me.”) Sometimes I can feel like I’m just overreacting or being petty because I know others have it so much worse. It gets more difficult when it comes from a friend or a loved one. You want to tell them how badly it hurts or bothers you, but you know they don’t know any better. They don’t truly understand what the implications are. Thinking about it now, those little comments probably contributed to me developing what is referred to as “racial imposter syndrome.” According to NPR, it’s the “feeling of being ‘fake’ or inauthentic to some part of their ethnic heritage.” By making comments reducing my blackness, it makes me feel like that part of me

shouldn’t exist, or that it’s not a legitimate part of my life when it is. A lot of outsiders don’t look at me and think, “Oh, she’s mixed.” They don’t really pay attention to the white part of me. And the people who know me don’t pay attention to the black part of me. So, if some people don’t recognize the white part of me, and others don’t recognize the black part of me, then who am I? Identity is not solely race, but it makes up a part of it. Those little microaggressions, especially targeted at mixed individuals, can be absolutely detrimental to identity formation. You have to be careful when you make little comments like that, even if you think it’s funny or you don’t mean anything by it. A few little words can do a lot more damage than you think. Contact Adriona Murphy at amurph30@kent.edu.

‘‘

It gets more difficult when it comes from a friend or a loved one. You want to tell them how badly it hurts or bothers you, but you know they don’t truly know any better. They don’t truly understand what the implications are.” – Adriona Murphy

SUBMISSIONS: The Stater hopes to encourage lively debate about the issues of the day on the opinion page. Opinions on this page are the authors’ and not necessarily en­dorsed by the Stater or its editors. Readers are encouraged to participate through letters to the editor ­— email them to nhunter6@kent.edu­— and guest columns. Submissions become pro­­perty of the Stater and are subject to editing without notice.


Monday, September 10, 2018

Heartbreak of final cuts

defines ‘Hard Knocks’ finale

Jake Adams

With the Browns finishing the pre-season last Sunday, Hue Jackson and General Manager John Dorsey were left with the tough task of trimming a team down to 53 players. This is a grueling process because you just spent all summer with the guys, and now you have to let them go. Sadly, every player that was extensively followed by the crew was cut. Devon “Juice” Cajuste was shown making catches and delivering blocks in their final preseason game against the Lions; however, with three flags called on him, it was not enough to impress Jackson. Brogan Roback played in Detroit, just miles away from his alma mater, Eastern Michigan. His girlfriend and family came to watch him play, and seeing them after his first NFL touchdown pass was a heartfelt moment; they knew how much football meant to him and were with him after he got cut by Jackson. For most, it seemed obvious he’d be cut, as

the Browns have two veteran quarterbacks and a first overall pick in that position. Most viewers and fans knew either Nate Orchard or Carl Nassib would be gone, as they were fighting for the same spot. It was a shock when both were released by Jackson. Both have experience in the NFL, and Nassib was claimed by Tampa Bay the next day. Orchard was told by the front office his versatility and athleticism will land him on another team. Ryan Talbot from 24/7 Sports recently reported he met with the Buffalo Bills. Orchard was in a tough situation: He was a second round pick in the 2014 draft, but has worked under a slew of different coaches since then. He was bounced around by different coordinators as a defensive end and an outside backer. Someone as athletic and versatile as him could have been beneficial to the team. Nassib was a surprise because Orchard got cut, but his dip in production last year could have been the cause for his release. He has the size and raw power to be a dominant pass rusher, and the Buccaneers saw potential in him. The episode included Jackson announcing Mychal Kendricks’ release, who could face up to 25 years in prison

Social Media and the Minefield Cameron Gorman I hadn’t expected this summer to blow through the well-reported “Bad Blood,” by John Carreyrou, as quickly as I did. (The book, about the rise and fall of blood testing company Theranos, was wonderfully juicy.) In its wake, I decided to go for something I had been wanting to pick up for quite a while — “So You’ve Been Publicly Shamed,” by Jon Ronson. When I brought the book up to a Kent State alum at a NYC diner this summer, she knew what I was talking about before I had the chance to mention the title. It details several cases of exactly what its name suggests — well-known instances of social media’s mob mentality. I bet you’ve heard of Justine Sacco — the woman who, after boarding a plane to Africa, sent out this tweet: “Going to Africa. Hope I don’t get AIDS. Just kidding. I’m white!” By the time she got off the plane, her phone blew up. She’d become a hot topic all over the internet — and a hashtag had been born: #HasJustineLandedYet. I know. I can’t possibly be asking you to

have sympathy for that, can I? Well, is the tweet inexcusable? Undoubtedly so. Was Ronson’s follow up on her depressing? Yes. Sacco is never going to be able to escape that tweet. In the New York Times article, she insists it was a joke. Still, it’s forever going to be the first thing that comes up when you search her name. There’s a certain kind of schadenfreude that bubbles to the surface with this kind of thing — a feeling of, “What kind of idiot would you have to be to start that kind of mess?” Well, probably not any more of one than most of us are. Let’s consider a more recent example — remember Plane Bae? Rosey Blair and her partner documented the unfolding “romance” of two passengers in front of them during a plane ride. People ate it up. Soon though, Blair was encouraging her followers to track down the woman they’d been documenting. The internet, ever a fickle beast, turned on her. She apologized, and, well, she still is. On Sept. 5, she posted a statement which said, in part, “A couple months away from the planebae action and I am still ruminating on the poor apology I gave.” Just like Sacco, if you Google Blair’s name, the second result is a Washington Post article detailing the story’s turn from “meet-cute” to “creepy.” Nothing ever disappears from the internet, they say. They’re probably right. Even things first embraced by the warmness of Buzzfeed and other feel-good sites can

for insider trading. It also covered Jackson assigning Drew Stanton his role as the third string quarterback, and Baker Mayfield’s role as the backup. Overall, I thought this was one of the better Hard Knock series, and many people have said the same thing because people got an inside look at a dysfunctional organization trying to turn into a stable contender. The film crew, however, could have covered second-year and other rookie players more extensively. We didn’t see much of anything from David Njoku, Jabrill Peppers or Denzel Ward, all of whom have character and talent viewers would have wanted to see. I was especially surprised Ward didn’t get any coverage, considering he was the fourth overall pick this year and an Ohio State product. The documentary did a great job capturing the essence of Cleveland on screen. They incorporated some blue collar aspects of the city and pegged Cleveland as a place that wants a successful football team. Could this be the year for the Cleveland Browns? Let’s hope so.

Contact Jake Adams at jadams86@kent.edu.

quickly turn to condemnation. Is it earned? Maybe. But we, like Ronson has, have to ask ourselves if it’s something that should weigh on someone for the rest of their lives. After all, I can recall times I’ve hesitated to comment, to voice my opinion, to retweet something for fear it might be taken the wrong way. The threat of the mob looms over us on social media sometimes — if we’re smart. If not, we might end up the next person mentioned to oblivion. After all, saying something is much different than posting about it. The web of social media never, ever forgets. Lately, though, I’ve also found myself on the flip side of this. Seeing an angry stream of tweets, it can feel validating to agree with the condemnation. But I’ve been pausing. If it were me on the other side of the screen, how might this stack up? When we feed into this anger, what kind of thought are we suppressing? Does that mean, then, that I don’t think calling out serves a purpose? No. That’s dialogue. That’s the freedom to respond to something you don’t agree with. But pause the next time you see a pile-on on social media. Is it worthy of this kind of virtual execution? As Ronson muses, does the punishment fit the “gleeful savagery of the punishment?” And, well, how close might we have come in the past to the same fate? Contact Cameron Gorman at cgorman2@kent.edu.

KentWired.com 13

17K 30 dollars

In her losing effort in the finals of the U.S. Open, 23-time tennis Grand Slam winner Serena Williams was fined $17,000 for getting in an altercation with the umpire and receiving coaching from the sidelines during a set.

stolen bases

Cleveland Indians third baseman José Ramírez notched his 30th stolen base of the season, making him the first Cleveland player since Grady Sizemore in 2008 to have 30 stolen bases and 30 home runs in the same season.

Cheers to ... good hiring policies. The coffee-based fast food giant Starbucks recently opened a store in Mexico City, Mexico, exclusively staffed by people aged 50 and over. Jeers to ... questionable academic policies. In an attempt to improve academic production, Purdue University will be blocking popular streaming services such as Netflix and Hulu in its four largest academic halls.


14 The Kent Stater

Monday, September 10, 2018

Review

‘The Nun’ abandons storyline, leaving viewers with nothing but empty scares

Courtesy of Warner Bros.

Alex Novak Entertainment Reviewer “The Nun” is a clear step down from the petrifying and critically acclaimed “The Conjuring” films, which provided coherent narratives and vivid horrors in both the original and second take. A spin-off of the second film of the series, “The Nun” aims to keep the momentum of its predecesors. But in amping up the amount of jump scares, it trades off the eerie build-up the previous installments executed so well, forgetting the necessary cues the audience needs to connect the dots. The narrative of the film struggles to stay consistent because of its sporadic pacing and a script that contains mostly illogical actions by the characters — often a shortcoming for horror films — which leads to hardly any character development. The film tells the story of investigative priest Father Burke and Catholic novitiate Sister Irene, played by Demián Bichir and Taissa Farmiga, respectively. The characters are assigned to visit Romania to briefly investigate the recent selfhanging of a nun. During their stay, they encounter strange occurrences from a powerful dark force roaming the castle at night, disguised as a nun called Valak, played by Bonnie Aarons. Unfortunately, the audience and the movie’s characters alike seem to be left in the dark for most of the film. Both have no idea what they’re walking into, and once characters get a sense of it, they act irrationally and pay the consequences — a true letdown for viewers.

‘‘

One of the few notable aspects of this film is the atmosphere; it creates an unsettling tone and supplements the dark themes that come with the territory. Jump scares are particularly constant throughout, but ultimately lose their impact with awkward sequencing. The film’s storytelling often disrupts its many fast-paced scare scenes with calmer ones, resulting in the film never reaching its climax properly. There are jump scares in almost every scene, which aim to do nothing more than frighten. This redundancy creates a pattern for viewers that, over time, lessens the effect. Most horror films are made on the premise that this will make them better, but the best ones are often those with fewer expected gags and a stronger sense there are high stakes concerning the characters. Instead of building on the danger characters face, “The Nun” only suggests kneeling in the middle of a room and praying as possible ways to avoid the terror. Horror films that build tension and suspense — while also creating characters who make smart decisions to avoid possible doom — are often the best ones. They incite panic slowly, which expands through the use of extended silence, camera angles, lighting and planned clues in the audio. Ultimately, this technique leaves the bigger scares for perfect moments. “The Nun” doesn’t really add anything new creatively to the film series. It fits into the unnerving atmosphere, but it fails to find the same terrifying, blood-curdling effect its predecessors achieved.

Contact Alex Novak at anovak12@kent.edu.

There are jump scares in almost every scene, which aim to do nothing more than frighten.” – Alex Novak Reviewer


14 The Kent Stater

Monday, September 10, 2018

Review

‘The Nun’ abandons storyline, leaving viewers with nothing but empty scares

Courtesy of Warner Bros.

Alex Novak Entertainment Reviewer “The Nun” is a clear step down from the petrifying and critically acclaimed “The Conjuring” films, which provided coherent narratives and vivid horrors in both the original and second take. A spin-off of the second film of the series, “The Nun” aims to keep the momentum of its predecesors. But in amping up the amount of jump scares, it trades off the eerie build-up the previous installments executed so well, forgetting the necessary cues the audience needs to connect the dots. The narrative of the film struggles to stay consistent because of its sporadic pacing and a script that contains mostly illogical actions by the characters — often a shortcoming for horror films — which leads to hardly any character development. The film tells the story of investigative priest Father Burke and Catholic novitiate Sister Irene, played by Demián Bichir and Taissa Farmiga, respectively. The characters are assigned to visit Romania to briefly investigate the recent selfhanging of a nun. During their stay, they encounter strange occurrences from a powerful dark force roaming the castle at night, disguised as a nun called Valak, played by Bonnie Aarons. Unfortunately, the audience and the movie’s characters alike seem to be left in the dark for most of the film. Both have no idea what they’re walking into, and once characters get a sense of it, they act irrationally and pay the consequences — a true letdown for viewers.

‘‘

One of the few notable aspects of this film is the atmosphere; it creates an unsettling tone and supplements the dark themes that come with the territory. Jump scares are particularly constant throughout, but ultimately lose their impact with awkward sequencing. The film’s storytelling often disrupts its many fast-paced scare scenes with calmer ones, resulting in the film never reaching its climax properly. There are jump scares in almost every scene, which aim to do nothing more than frighten. This redundancy creates a pattern for viewers that, over time, lessens the effect. Most horror films are made on the premise that this will make them better, but the best ones are often those with fewer expected gags and a stronger sense there are high stakes concerning the characters. Instead of building on the danger characters face, “The Nun” only suggests kneeling in the middle of a room and praying as possible ways to avoid the terror. Horror films that build tension and suspense — while also creating characters who make smart decisions to avoid possible doom — are often the best ones. They incite panic slowly, which expands through the use of extended silence, camera angles, lighting and planned clues in the audio. Ultimately, this technique leaves the bigger scares for perfect moments. “The Nun” doesn’t really add anything new creatively to the film series. It fits into the unnerving atmosphere, but it fails to find the same terrifying, blood-curdling effect its predecessors achieved.

Contact Alex Novak at anovak12@kent.edu.

There are jump scares in almost every scene, which aim to do nothing more than frighten.” – Alex Novak Reviewer


Monday, September 10, 2018

CLASSIFIEDS All real estate advertised herein is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination because of race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, or national origin, or intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination.” State and local laws forbid discrimination based on factors in addition to those protected under federal law. We will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate that is in violation of the law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised are available on an equal opportunity basis. If you feel you have been wrongfully denied housing or discriminated against, call the FHAA at 330‑253‑2450 for more information.

$1,200 4 Br. Available Now. Spacious Rooms. Hardwood Floors. Full basement for storage. Close to Downtown Kent. On bus line and free parking close to campus. Some utilities included. Call to schedule showing. 330‑678‑3047 www.buckeyeparksmgmt.com

Guidos Pizza and Catering of Ravenna is hiring for line cooks, hosts/hostess, front counter, salad prep, and servers. We offer flexible scheduling and free shift meals. Apply in person at 214 West Main Street Ravenna. Open interviews Thursday September 13 from 2‑4 p.m

WORD SEARCH

LANDSCAPE LABORERS WANTED! Hudson Landscape Design‑ Build company seeking full and part‑time landscape laborers for softscape and hardscape projects. Pay based on experience. Apply in person at 1936 Georgetown Road, Hudson, Ohio 44236.

PARTA is NOW HIRING Drivers! Paid CDL training w/bonuses & raises. Flexible schedule. Apply online partaonline.org. PARTA is an Equal Opportunity Employer & Drug Free Workplace.

STATER SCRAMBLE

TIC TAC TOE

Stownut Donut & Diner hiring servers and bakers. Apply in person. 3055 Graham Road Monday‑ Friday 7‑2

Single Rooms available. 1 out of 4 to share Kitchen and Bathroom and Living room. Private Bedroom. Some utilities included. Call to schedule showing. 330‑678‑3047 www.buckeyeparksmgmt.com

2 bedroom 2 bathroom condo in Broadview Heights. Excellent location between campus and the podiatry school. Located close to various shopping centers. 1st floor end unit. Call Denese for details (216)773‑1774

HOW TO ADVERTISE For information about placing a Display ad please call our offices at (330)672-2586 or visit us at 205 Franklin Hall, Kent State University. Our office hours are from 8:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m. Monday through Friday. Classified ads can be placed at bit.ly/kwclassified, over the phone at (330) 672-2586 or by e-mail at ads@ksustudentmedia.com. If you e-mail an ad, please be sure to include run dates, payment info and a way for us to contact you.

College living

just steps to campus. Secure your space today! UNIVERSITYEDGEKENT.COM See office for details.

KentWired.com 15


KNOW THE STORY FIND YOUR VOICE GET INVOLVED TODAY KentStateStudentMedia.com

A Magazine | The Burr | Uhuru | Fusion | Black Squirrel Radio KSUIF | The Kent Stater | Luna Negra | TV2KSU | SM Advertising & Marketing

The Kent Stater - September 10, 2018  
The Kent Stater - September 10, 2018  
Advertisement