Page 1

+ REMEDIAL Landscapes

restoration of communities + processes in crisis

ken smith

m: 510.610.7558

h: 510.654.7548

e: kensmithsf@sbcglobal.net sketch of urban meditation garden wall enclosure


+

A PATH OF HERITAGE

rebuilding a school destroyed by floods in mexico

photo: diego collazos


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A PATH OF HERITAGE

tiles in local artisanal saddlery motif


entrance

+ downhill

3 classrooms

A PATH OF HERITAGE

“cube” seating existing 2 classrooms + bathrooms climbing wall

multi-sport pitch “cube” seating

3 classrooms

uphill

children’s community garden office, computer lab + bathrooms fire pit reading area 2 classrooms

outdoor classroom


+

A PATH OF HERITAGE


+

A PATH OF HERITAGE


+

TREE MUSEUM

raising awareness for threatened habitats


+

TREE MUSEUM

air

migratory bird flyway struggling endemic flora + fauna poor setting for rich architecture blight viewed from above by users

earth industrial heritage 12 traffic lanes barricade lake access fetid conditions chaotic bus, bike + foot routes neglected civic infrastructure

water choked tidal channel lake requires mechanical aeration lots of garbage struggling aquatic ecology

joseph cornell-style site analysis box


+

TREE MUSEUM


+

TREE MUSEUM

riparian section

kaiser auditorium

new transit hub chaparral section

oakland museum of california courthouse

consolidated 12th street

beach

alpine section

bicycle path

desert section + restored axis restored channel


+

TREE MUSEUM

undulating tops emphasize ‘hillside habitats’ exhibition


+

TREE MUSEUM

cardboard study


+

NAZCA LINEAGE

new life for a school destroyed by earthquake in peru

photo: diego collazos


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NAZCA LINEAGE

photo: limahotelperu.com

+

=

nazca lines as circulation


+ bathrooms

NAZCA LINEAGE

4 classrooms

sports pitch back entrance

children’s community garden

main entrance nazca murals, tennis walls + benches office + 2 classrooms

2 classrooms

surfer’s club reading area

informal sunken amphitheater shade garden stage

4 classrooms + bathrooms


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NAZCA LINEAGE informal sunken amphitheater

stage children’s community garden

main entrance

multi-sport pitch

back entrance

surfer’s club reading area

layout nazca murals, tennis walls & benches shade garden


+

NAZCA LINEAGE


+

NAZCA LINEAGE

nazca tile murals

december 2012: the end of the world

sidewalk

classroom

corridor

sunken amphitheater

nazca murals

classroom

sidewalk


+

NAZCA LINEAGE

disgarded surfboards + inexpensive hammocks provide an outdoor library

peru has one of the oldest surf cultures in the world


+

THE PERFECT STORMWATER

a best practices approach for the city of berkeley


THE PERFECT STORMWATER: High Performance Streets & Landscapes

berry

Cr e

100-year flood 100-year floodzone zone

ek

Extreme weather

500-year flood 500-year floodzone zone Co dor

h School

nic es C

Cr ouse

re

Require new developments to contribute to public open space. • Allow green alternatives to current regulations (i.e. on-site parking)

Runoff

eek

Poor water quality

Cre

Flooding ek

t ter

e

Po

Cr rby De

e

IMPERVIOUS PAVEMENT

BERKELEY GENERAL PLAN

Stra w b erry Cre ek

Drought

k

3,000

1,500

0

3,000 Feet

Flood zones and creek locations: City of Berkeley GIS data Sea level risk area: United States Geological Survey, CASCaDE Project

Habitat and property loss

INCENTIVE STRUCTURES: Best Practices

Green Streets transform impervious street surfaces into landscaped green spaces that capture stormwater runoff and replenish the groundwater supply. They also create attractive streetscapes and urban green spaces, provide natural habitat, and help connect neighborhoods, schools, parks, and business districts. Functional: space- and safety-related constraints Drainage: starting at the source for runoff treatment Grading: topographic variation within and among sites Aesthetics: options to reflect the diverse preferences of local residents Maintenance: ways to ensure design longevity and functional success

Develop incentives and financing tools to encourage green building in the private sector. • Coordinate actions with partner organizations

Areasprone prone to to creek Area creek blockages and blockages andflooding flooding

ek

• Sidewalks and parking lanes provide opportunities for installation of pervious pavement along the street.

1885: First sewer lines constructed. All sewage was carried untreated into San Francisco Bay

In the example on the left, approx. 11,000 sq ft can be converted to pervious pavement.

• Strawberry Creek is an ecological corridor that connects habitat in the hills with Bay wetlands • Studies have found poor water quality due to pollutants from runoff

1945: EBMUD treatment plant created to manage stench in Bay

• Existing daylighted sections of the creek offer habitat and recreation opportunities that can be expanded

HIGH-PERFORMANCE LANDSCAPES OVERALL BENEFITS: VEGETATED SWALES

• “Heart of the city” project that would connect downtown civic buildings to Strawberry Creek Park along Allston Way

1961: Storm sewers separated from sanitary sewer lines

Stormwater management: • Provide water filtration • Allow infiltration into underlying soils • Reduce stormwater flow velocity

Strawberry Creek

Stormwater separation takes pressure off sanitary sewer lines and reduces treatment volume, but stormwater enters the Bay unfiltered and untreated

Open Stream Culverted Stream Historic Trace Habitat

STORMWATER MANAGEMENT BEST PRACTICES: • Contribute to habitat restoration • Reduce flooding & erosion

Mimic natural flow of water, can be used for recreation

Source: Aukland City Concil, stormwater services website

2,000 1,000

0

Marlene Lopez-Perez, Caroline Orsi, Ken Smith, Mariel Steiner, Andrew Tate

THE PERFECT STORMWATER: Green Streets

Instructors: Kim Suczynski and Gil Tal [IN]CITY 2010, CED, UC Berkeley

ALLSTON WAY: Existing Conditions MULTIFAMILY DWELLINGS

MATERIAL

SUITABLE LOCATIONS

PERVIOUS CONCRETE & ASPHALT

PERVIOUS JOINT PAVERS

REINFORCED GRAVEL

REINFORCED GRASS

Interstates and other limited access roads where there are no turning vehicles.

Small and large areas-- can be easily repaired because small sections can be removed and replaced. Interlocking unit pavers offer flexibility in color, style, paving pattern, etc.

Low use areas that still require a rigid surface.

Low use areas and those where soil, drainage, sunlight, and other conditions are conducive to plant growth. Illustrations courtesy San Mateo County Sustainable Green Streets and Parking Lots Design Guidebook

Good for high-density areas, can be installed above ground

Minimal intervention to slow runoff along streets

Flexible dimensions, can be installed at a small scale

Traffic-calming mechanism, increases pedestrian safety

Source: Portland Bureau of Environmental Services, Stormwater Solutions Handbook

Source:San Mateo County, Sustainable Streets Guidebook

Source:San Mateo County, Sustainable Streets Guidebook

Source: Portland Bureau of Environmental Services, Stormwater Solutions Handbook

Source:San Mateo County, Sustainable Streets Guidebook

Marlene Lopez-Perez, Caroline Orsi, Ken Smith, Mariel Steiner, Andrew Tate

THE PERFECT STORMWATER: Green Roofs

Instructors: Kim Suczynski and Gil Tal [IN]CITY 2010, CED, UC Berkeley

 

 

T

BANCROF

Impervious Asphalt

300

150

0

300 Feet

Wide lanes, abundant pavement and poor tree coverage characterize the existing streetscape along Allston Way

ALLSTON WAY: Proposals PROPOSED STREETSCAPE #1

Green Gutter Bike Lane (Pervious Pavement)

PROPOSED STREETSCAPE #2

Proposed interventions incorporate verdant native vegetation that will make the street a more pleasant place to walk and provide habitat for wildlife species. The addition of a bike lane provides recreational opportunities and a link between downtown Berkeley and Strawberry Creek Park.

Street enhancements

Asphalt

Stormwater facility

Cement

Pervious paving

Pavement is replaced by open space and vegetation to create a walkable street

PROPOSED TREE COVER  

                

                                               ALLSTON                                         

 

GRANT

T

BANCROF

Green Gutter

EXISTING CONDITIONS

300

150

0

300 Feet

Mature trees should be spaced 25-35 feet apart to provide a broad canopy to intercept, filter, and absorb rainwater. Roots aid infiltration by breaking up soils and increasing porosity

Marlene Lopez-Perez, Caroline Orsi, Ken Smith, Mariel Steiner, Andrew Tate

THE PERFECT STORMWATER: Strawberry Creek Park NEIGHBORHOOD ATTRIBUTES:

KING JR

 

MC GEE

 

JEFFERSON

          

  

MC KINLEY

SPAULDING

NORTH VALLEY

SACRAMENTO

ACTON

BONAR

WEST

 

                                                          

CALIFORNIA

Culverted Stream

MARTIN LUTHER

ROOSEVELT

ADDISON

Open Stream

Pervious pavement and stormwater facilities allow infiltration of runoff into the natural watershed

Instructors: Kim Suczynski and Gil Tal [IN]CITY 2010, CED, UC Berkeley

PROPOSAL NATURAL FILTRATION AND FLOOD CONTROL

UNIVERSIT

Overflow Basin Filters While Preventing Flooding

Vegetated Bioswale and Check Dams Slow and Filter Stormwater

Water Enters Culvert

Permeable Parking Surface

KING JR

MC GEE

Cleaner Water Enters Strawberry Creek

T

MC KINLEY

JEFFERSON

(Sketch: Ken Smith)

DAYLIGHTING OPPORTUNITY: - Child Education Center

GRANT

SPAULDING

CALIFORNIA

SACRAMENTO

BONAR

NORTH VALLEY

WEST

ALLSTON

MARTIN LUTHER

ROOSEVELT

ADDISON

BANCROF

ISSUES TO BE ADDRESSED: - Untreated stormwater in natural systems - Flooding - Underutilized natural landscapes - Loss of vital freshwater resources

300 150

0

Berkeley General Plan

BENEFITS

HIGH-PERFORMANCE “NATURAL” LANDSCAPES

EQUITY:

- Tyron Creek, Portland - “Room for the River” Program, The Netherlands

- Access to nature and improved open space - Gathering spaces for residents - Neighborhood beautification - Livable streets and encourage walking and bicycling

Creek and Overflow Basins

Observation Bridge

Left and center: The Ray and Maria Stata Center, Cambridge, Massachusetts; Olin and Associates (Source: Topos Magazine, 2007). Green walls cool and provide interest to a community. Musee du Quai Branly: architect, Jean Nouvel; living walls: Gilles Clement and Patrick Blanc. (Photo: Ken Smith)

OUTREACH AND EDUCATION

ECONOMIC: - Independence from mechanical water systems - Reduced runoff through absorption - Protection of life and property from flooding - Neighborhood beautification and property values - Health benefits through recreational opportunities

Vegetated Bioswales

ENVIRONMENTAL: - Groundwater recharge - Improved stormwater quality - Water conservation and efficiency - Habitat creation - Green streets and open spaces cool environment - Projects consumers can implement at home or work Addison “Green” Street

Floor Area Ratio (FAR) Bonus

Fast Track Permitting

Municipal Building Resolution

• Between 2005-07 over 70 grants up to $5000 were awarded from Chicago Dept of the Environment.

ext

int

gravel

trad

• Favored Practice; allows developers 3 extra ft2 per ft2 of green roof that covers a minimum of 60% of the roof.

• Passed in 2005; requires all city owned • Faster construction permitting process buildings to install Green Roofs when reenabling developers with green roof project roofing or on new buildings. proposals to easily aquire necessary permits for building. Indicators of Success: • Supports and encourages developers to Over 130 roofs since 1996. include living roofs in their proposals.

Roof type Annual runoff for various types of roofs as a percentige of the total annual rainfall (from cummulative of existing literature, compiled by J. Mentens et al., Landscape and Urban Planning 77 (2006) 217-226).

Indicators of Success:

1. Implement Fast Track Permitting and FAR Bonus Incentives, Municipal Building Resolution and research funding options for Berkeley’s own Green Roof Grant Program.

Over 600 roofs (7 million ft2) in just 5 years.

2. Incorporate green roof technologies into Berkeley’s RECO and CECO (Residential and Commercial Energy Conservation Ordinances, part of Climate Action Plan). 3. Include list of green roof benefits and strategies on all seismic retrofit packages for unreinforced masonry buildings.

NEW MUNICIPAL INSTALLATIONS: Berkeley High School Roof Gardens

Berkeley

University of California Berkeley

Berkeley Marina

4. Federal money for seismic retrofits could incorporate green roofs a modest cost requirement to achieve beneficial environmental effects. Such a program could become a model for all California cities participating in state mandated retrofit programs.

Rockridge Emeryville

Ingrid. “Policies for Living Roofs and Rainwater Catchment.” Bay Localize. www.baylocalize.org/ projects/rooftop/policies.

Cisterns technology could retain over 1 million gallons annually, preventing 70% of runoff.

DESCRIPTION

Kensington

Hybrid Installation consisting of: • Intensive Green Roof Organic Vegetable Garden • Extensive Green Roofs with native wildflowers and grasses

Albany

COST

Based on California Academy of Sciences Installation: 126,345 ft2 x $17 per ft2 = $2,147,865 Total Additional Factors: Integrated Cisterns, Vegetable Plantings, Weight Load Determination and Potential Retrofit. *Ideal Installations on well-fit city roofs needing replacement

New Software would require very simple and inexpensive modifications. The same programmers could be utilised to further simplify the algorythmic additions to the existing code.

COST BENEFIT ANALYSIS

Simplified Formula: [Installation] + [Maintenance] - [Watershed mgmt costs] - [Energy use costs] - [Replacement costs for replacing traditonal roof ] = net benefits of installations

FINANCING

Berkeley already has an online solar roof program. Modifications would allow residents to:

• Recovery Act Funding • Grant from City of Berkeley • Grant from NIH or programs combatting childhood obesity • Model could be exported to schools across the country

• View existing green roof installations • View their own roof • Calculate possible installation size correlated with annual energy bills • Choose from intensive or extensive • Determine tax rebates and incentives available • Determine if their building is due for a seismic retrofit • Choose from a list of available installers

Intensive Green Roof Vegetable Garden Installations

Bicycle Parking

Grants: • Available for demonstration projects • Clean Water Act Section 319 • Department of Housing and Urban Development Community Development Block Grant program

Instructors: Kim Suczynski and Gil Tal [IN]CITY 2010, CED, UC Berkeley

PARTNER ORGANIZATIONS

Berkeley General Plan

Federal Capitalization Provides Initial Funding Wastewater Treatment

State Match Federal Capitalization Grants (20% of federal capitalization)

Low- st re Inte s Loan

nd Bo ds ee Proc

nd s Bo ed ce Pro

Re

L pa oan ym en ts

Estuary Protection Bond Holders Provide Additional Funding

Source: USEPA, Managing Wet Weather Green Infrastructure Municipal Handbook

ACTION

Climate Action Plan:

Climate Action Plan:

1. Require new developments to contribute to public open space.

1. Explore effects of modifying zoning regulations to allow new multifamily dwellings to replace on-site parking requirements with open space that contributes to stormwater management or GHG mitigation.

2. Promote tree planting, landscaping, and the creation of open space that helps restore natural processes.

2. Determine feasibility of incorporating high-performance landscape concepts into street repair projects and new steet development.

3. Develop incentives and financing tools to encourage green building in the private sector.

3. Examine potential fee structures for stormwater management as a property assessment as well as rebates based on mitigation measures.

4. Reduce the property damage associated with flooding and coastal erosion due to rising sea level.

4. Develop best practices to redesign open creek beds and adjacent park space to provide better flood control.

5. Encourage the development of green roofs by providing outreach and guidelines consistent with the building code.

5. Research combining green roofs with seismic retrofits. Investigate private green roof incentives, public policies, and web-based assistance software.

General Plan: Policy EM-27 Creeks and Watershed Management

General Plan:

1. Seek funding to acquire and preserve land within creek corridors for restoration.

1. Identify underutilized public space along creek beds for potential watershed restoration projects.

2. Establish pedestrian and bicycle paths along creekside greenways to connect neighborhoods and commercial areas. 4. Ensure that creek day-lighting proposals include appropriate landscaping, allow for adequate access, and carefully consider the urban context, the impact on existing recreational spaces, and the economic impact on the property and nearby properties.

Brower Center Friends of Strawberry Creek Friends of Five Creeks Urban Creeks Council UC Berkeley City Comminsioners Berkeley Unified School District East Bay Municiple Utility District Other COB Depts CalTrans

Nonpoint Sources

POLICY

3. Encourage day-lighting of creeks on public lands.

(Model: Ken Smith)

“Restore a healthy freshwater supply to creeks and the bay by eliminating conditions that pollute rainwater and by reducing impervious surfaces and encouraging swales, cisterns and other devices that increase infiltration of water and replenishment of underground water supplies that nourish creeks.”

Loans: USEPA Clean Water State Revolving Fund • Funds provided to states through EPA grants • States add matching funds which are then loaned to communities for water quality improvement projects • Low- or zero-interest, with flexible repayment terms • Repayments and interest are returned to the fund for future projects

Extensive Green Roof Installations

Marlene Lopez-Perez, Caroline Orsi, Ken Smith, Mariel Steiner, Andrew Tate

THE PERFECT STORMWATER: Conclusions

300 Feet

“Adequately fund sewer system improvements necessary to maintain water quality in natural areas and reduce public health hazards.”

DYNAMIC DESIGN

Incentives:

Green Roofs Grant Program

WEB-BASED ASSISTANCE PROGRAM Action: Modify existing SolarMap Software for Green Roofs

Stormwater Fees: • To property owners based on lot size, so those who create the greatest runoff incur the greatest cost • Discounts and credits can be provided to property owners who implement stormwater management and reduction measures, such as rainwater collection and rain gardens • Assistance programs for low-income residents

Y

ACTON

(Source: all existing conditions photos, Ken Smith)

- Large park with open creek - Middle class neighborhood - Mixed land use - Near University Avenue commercial corridor

Incentives: 25

FUNDING

CONTEXT MAP

±

Case Study: Portland

Tree UNIVERSITY

Strawberry Creek

Parking Lanes (Pervious Pavement)

Case Study: Chicago

PROPOSALS POLICY

Vegetated Swale

300 Feet

50

0

Cisterns reduce runoff by collecting rainwater. This water can be used for irrigating gardens on the ground as well as the roof.

0

Implementing Action: Encourage the development of green roofs by providing outreach and guidelines consistent with the building code. Can Berkeley do more?

http://gulfcoastrenewableresources.com/rainwater_harvesting

• Living Roof retains 2 million gallons of rainwater annually • Prevents 70% of runoff • Runoff is collected in basement-level cisterns and reused for roof irrigation • No potable water used to irrigate roof

300 150

75

Cons: $20/ft2 or more More Maintenance

California Academy of Sciences “Living Roof” (above left):

MC GEE

 

 

KING JR

 

MC KINLEY

 

BANCROFT

MARTIN LUTHER

 

 

Pros: Less Runoff Significant Carbon Sink Thicker Insulation Layer Can Grow Food

ALLSTON

JEFFERSON

 

 

       

            ALLSTON

 

 

   

GRANT

 

  

  

KING JR

 

 

               

MC KINLEY

       

 

 

 

MC GEE

 

JEFFERSON

 

 

 

 

  

 

 

 

MARTIN LUTHER

SPAULDING

                

CALIFORNIA

NORTH VALLEY

 

SACRAMENTO

ACTON

BONAR

WEST                 

ROOSEVELT

ADDISON

Culverted Stream Open Stream

http://www.canpages.ca/blog/?p=402

Intensive Cons: More Runoff Less Significant Carbon Sink

GRANT

Tree UNIVERSITY

Pros: $10-30/ft2 Less Maintenance

SPAULDING

 

http://sistersastray.files.wordpress.com/2010/07/p4262965.jpg

http://www.greenroofs.org/baltimore_files/awardsimg2008/hiresimgs/CAS_Hill.jpg

Extensive

ADDISON

CALIFORNIA

300 Feet

UNIVERSITY

SACRAMENTO

0

± BONAR

300 150

Strawberry Creek

POLICY Berkeley Climate Action Plan

Improved Stormwater Mgmt: Runoff Reduction

NORTH VALLEY

Zoning regulation requires off-street potentialy superfluous parking at multifamily residences, contributing to a lot of impervious surface

WATERSHED BENEFITS 100

EXISTING TREE COVER

- Portland Water Pollution Control Laboratory - Bay-Friendly Landscaping and Gardening

Compacted subgrade

CURB EXTENSIONS

Cistern Technology

• Creek is mostly below-grade, passes beneath street and homes • Area prone to flooding • Traffic volume is low, no traffic between Bonar St and West St • Street is a designated bike path but no facilities exist for cyclists.

300 Feet

The Allston Way corridor is primarily residential and connects downtown civic buildings with schools and parks at the west end.

- The Ray and Maria Stata Center, Cambridge - Musee du Quai Branly, Paris

Base course

WEST

MC GEE

0

Left: Terraced vegetated bioswales filter pollutants, recharge groundwater and form a habitat and neighborhood focal point. Right: Vegetated bioswale filters parking lot pollutants. (Source: Landscape Architecture magazine; photos: City of Portland).

Light weight-load, low traffic

Heavy weight-load, high traffic DIAGRAM

KING JR

ALLSTON

JEFFERSON

MC KINLEY

GRANT

CALIFORNIA

BONAR

Commercial

NORTH VALLEY

Vacant

SPAULDING

Park

SACRAMENTO

ACTON

Government

EXISTING STREETSCAPE

DYNAMIC DESIGN

Fast-track permitting: Projects that trap at least 95% of stormwater from impervious surfaces will be reviewed in 5 days.

RAIN GARDENS

MARTIN LUTHER

ROOSEVELT

ADDISON

Multi-Family Residential

PRECEDENTS

Philadelphia, PA

The city reimburses up to 50% credit for practices that address stormwater quality and 50% to 100% credit for practices that address stormwater quantity.

GREEN GUTTERS

Y

BANCROFT

Flow-through Planter

Minneapolis, MN

The county levies a stormwater utility assessment as a property tax line item. Rebates are available for a variety of mitigation projects.

ACTON

UNIVERSIT

Community

WEST

KING JR

MC GEE

GRANT

MC KINLEY

JEFFERSON

SPAULDING

CALIFORNIA

SACRAMENTO

BONAR

NORTH VALLEY

WEST

ACTON

MARTIN LUTHER

ROOSEVELT

Open Stream

Land Use

Single Family Residential

Parking Lane (Pervious Pavement)

Montgomery County, MD

ROOSEVELT

Culverted Stream

Flow-through Planter

Example

FLOW-THROUGH PLANTERS

DESIGN

±

Strawberry Creek

ITY

T BANCROF 300 150

Create non-monetary incentives via improving quality of life, property values, and business profits.

CONCEPTS AND PRECEDENTS

LAND USE

ALLSTON

Community-based

Compensate developers or property owners for incorporating green street and parking lot elements into their project.

2,000 Feet

Source: City of Berkeley GIS data

ADDISON

Reward-based

Require developers or property owners to employ green street and/or parking lot strategies or their on-site stormwater management fee will be levied or increased.

Open space & livability: • Provide wildlife habitat and visual enhancements • Contribute to livable streets

• Filter pollutants

Source: City of Berkeley website

Mandate-based

Image courtesy US EPA

• Flood zone along corridor will be impacted by global climate change

1951: Due to wet season sewage overflows, the city required disconnection of roof, basement and yard drains

UNIVERS

• Incentives can be used to encourage pervious pavement for residential parking.

Allston Way

Type Strategy

PERVIOUS PAVEMENT: Comparing Materials

PERVIOUS PAVEMENT: Potential locations

Policy EM-27 Creeks and Watershed Management • Seek funding to acquire and preserve land within creek corridors for restoration • Establish pedestrian and bicycle paths along creek-side greenways to connect neighborhoods and commercial areas. • Encourage day-lighting of creeks on public lands • Ensure that creek day-lighting proposals include appropriate landscaping, allow for adequate access, and carefully consider the urban context, the impact on existing recreational spaces, and the economic impact on the property and nearby properties

DEMONSTRATION CORRIDOR

BERKELEY STORMWATER HISTORY

Instructors: Kim Suczynski and Gil Tal [IN]CITY 2010, CED, UC Berkeley

Annual runoff (%)

ck

Reduce the property damage associated with flooding and coastal erosion due to rising sea level. • Create greenscapes for retention and infiltration of stormwater • Plant trees and maximize permeable surfaces to reduce runoff

Marlene Lopez-Perez, Caroline Orsi, Ken Smith, Mariel Steiner, Andrew Tate

THE PERFECT STORMWATER: Green Streets DEFINITION & KEY ELEMENTS

Promote tree planting, landscaping, and the creation of open space that helps restore natural processes. • Improve stormwater quality and retention • Promote green roofs

Area vulnerable Area vulnerabletoto 4.9 ft 4.9 ft sea sealevel levelrise rise

r Marin C eek

Instructors: Kim Suczynski and Gil Tal [IN]CITY 2010, CED, UC Berkeley

BERKELEY CLIMATE ACTION PLAN

CLIMATE CHANGE IMPACTS Recreating natural systems can play an integral role in improving Berkeley’s stormwater management and mitigating the effects of Climate Change. Climate Change Berkeley BerkeleyCreeks Creeks Bla

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THE PERFECT STORMWATER Marlene Lopez-Perez, Caroline Orsi, Ken Smith, Mariel Steiner, Andrew Tate

2. When implementing bicycle plan, consider retrofitting streets with high performance landscapes and safe routes for pedestrians and cyclists 3. (See #1 above) 4. Conduct cost-benefit analysis of replacing or augmenting water-intensive landscapes with high-performance and drought-tolerant alternatives Integrate univeral design concepts into future creek-side park projects to support greater flexibility of use and access.

BENEFIT ONMENTAL VIR EN

ECONOM IC

Decrease runoff volume and temperature

Carbon sinks reduce GHG

Reduce water management costs

Prevent flooding

Vegetation reduces heating and cooling costs

Improve water quality

Decease dependence on mechanical solutions High-performance landscapes Improve public health Reduce air & water pollution Neighborhood

Protect habitat

beautification and pride

Increase access to green space Create safe bicycle & pedestrian routes Intimate spaces encourage socialization

EQUITY


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THE PERFECT STORMWATER

creek + overflow basins vegetated bioswales observation bridges

addison ‘green street’

Dynamic Design

new bicycle parking

an urban park naturally treating runoff for a polluted creek


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INDUSTRIAL EVOLUTION

balancing re-development + ecological remediation


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474-car parking silo

third street ‘t’ line

former science pg+e elementary plant school

re-created islaisita creek

underground parking

new civic area

restored wetland

muni maintenance yard

INDUSTRIAL EVOLUTION new new ferry hotel pier pier 80

market + community garden

a creek-side, walkable community with no cars + no grid


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INDUSTRIAL EVOLUTION


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construction details

fern grottos under bridges

INDUSTRIAL EVOLUTION


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INDUSTRIAL EVOLUTION

paving details


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INDUSTRIAL EVOLUTION

an urban mixed-use environment in nature

corporate complex

steven holl architects; photo: mason white

topos, bureau alle hosper, berrie van elderen, marike oudick; photo: pieter kers

high-density housing

public parks + preserves


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INDUSTRIAL EVOLUTION

space utilization

1,854,650 square feet new development 1,973 parking spaces

hotel + retail (509,813 s.f.)

r+d + office (540,486 s.f.)

native plantings

residential (614,161 s.f.)

civic + parking (190,190 s.f.)

wetland plantings

landscaped gardens


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INDUSTRIAL EVOLUTION

landfill exhibit


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INDUSTRIAL EVOLUTION

movement


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INDUSTRIAL EVOLUTION

Source: City of San Francisco

existing third + illinois street corridors

10’-0”

28’-0”

24’-0”

28’-0”

10’-0”

15’-0”

7’-0” 6’

100’-0”

24’-0”

6’

7’-0”

15’-0”

80’-0”

third street (typical section)

illinois street (typical section)

a new street configuration

restricted access 10’-0”

20’-0”

restricted access 10’-0”

5’

variable width islaisita creek

5’

10’-0”

20’-0”

10’-0”

restricted access = emergency, service + transit vehicles + resident loading only


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INDUSTRIAL EVOLUTION

bicycle parking garages

stop with 1/8 mile radius walking distance

muni ‘t’ line 474-car garage new transport architecture, ingenhoven architekten; photo: arup associates, christian richters

new transport architecture, vmx architects; photo: jeroen musch

vehicular traffic


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INDUSTRIAL EVOLUTION vehicular emergency + service vehicles, taxi, + stickered residential (for drop off + pick up only) emergency + service access only traditional road

pedestrian pedestrian only illinois street + bay trail bicycle routes

transit the ‘revolution’ hybrid transit connects hotel + neighborhood with muni, bart + caltrain muni ‘t’ line ferry services to downtown s.f., east bay + marin county water taxi


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‘SCAPE

natural habitats + agricultural remnants in sprawl


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‘SCAPE

agricultural heritage providing food for those in need


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‘SCAPE

+ canal reclamation re-establishing habitat


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TENSION

balancing ecology‘s struggle with settlement


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TENSION

finding beauty in the conflict


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TENSION


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TENSION

nature appears to flow through structures


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VERTEBRAE

potential parks paving bayfront parking lots


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HAPPY MEDIUM

emotional remediation from landscape exposure


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HAPPY MEDIUM As artists, we choose a medium in which to work because it captures our souls. We surrender to encroaching fascination as the medium takes hold deep inside and won’t let us go. There is a warm, scintillating sensation that gently moves and takes root somewhere between our eyes, our hearts and our hands. Oil paints, for instance, entice us with their rich texture, explosive color, and luscious ability to merge and blend into new obliging subjects. The canvas and brushes may guide us into the representational or the abstract. Graphite pencils and other drawing instruments give us flexibility in weight, refinement and value. We may choose to smudge our charcoals, dig in with our conte sticks, or surgically place fine lines into the objects of our creation. Sculpture gives us a third dimension. Our works may choose to reach out to us or retreat in defense or into hiding. They give us the ability to circumnavigate, to look inside or communicate with the touch of our fingertips. Photography allows us to interpret objects that exist in finite dimensions in time and space. Like the ethereal, the moment is fleeting, never to be exactly the same again. What we choose to do with our capture of that place and time is up to our interpretation. The beauty of these media is they are in a state of stasis, reflecting moments of intuition, expression, and emotion. The sensual texture of the oils, the precision of the drawing instruments, the tactile character of the sculpture and the encapsulation by the lens lay in wait for the interaction of their creators. The medium of the gardener is a master negotiator, for it belongs to and awaits no one. It teases us with all the characteristics of these other forms of expression. The artist in us, using simple or elaborate circles, triangles and other geometric figures, attempts to capture this medium and project it into a proposed living landscape. We are forever contemplating its images in different seasons, and in different stages of its life cycle. As our medium negotiates with its true environmental masters, it pulls us into a relationship of perpetually changing emotions. It may choose to frustrate us like a difficult child, and just when we feel we can take no more, it teases us with the beginnings of something potentially phenomenal. It has the ability to control and mesmerize us for long periods of time. It can make or break our mood with a glance. It forces patience upon our impetuous and distracted existence. How lucky are the artists who have little control over their medium? How lucky are we to choose a craft in which we are eternally compromising with our organic canvases as they stubbornly take their preferred shapes, twisting and twining with their neighbors as they lure in other biota for their own selfish purposes? Without us, they would continue to change and flourish, never giving a second thought to those who purportedly gave them life. Yet their pull on our souls intensifies over time leaving us helplessly infatuated. They erotically charge every sense.

Landscape Design Portfolio (long version)  
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