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Kennewick School District Annual Report 2012-2013

Kennewick School District 17


2 Table of Contents Our Mission 2 North Star Goals 3 Letter from Superintendent 4 Staff Development 6 Early Learning 8 Secondary Education 11 Student Demographics 15 Student Achievement 16 Maintenance and Operations 19 District Finance Budget 20 Levy Dollars Support Student Learning 20 Your Tax Dollars At Work 21 Parent and Community Involvement 22 Board of Directors 23

Our Mission

To provide a safe environment in which every student reaches his or her highest potential and graduates well prepared for success in post-secondary education, work, and life.


North Star Goals 3

North Star Goals

Our first priority is the safety of Kennewick School District students and staff. Our commitment is to the academic achievement of all students. Our focus is to graduate all students prepared for post-secondary education, work and life. Our pledge is to employ a world-class staff and operate in a fiscally sound customer-focused manner.

90

Ninety percent of students report they feel safe at school on our annual student safety survey.

90

Ninety percent of third graders read at grade level by the end of their third grade year.

90

Ninety percent of students in grades three through ten meet grade-level standards in math.

%

% %

85

%

Eighty-five percent of parents state that the Kennewick School District provided their students with the opportunity to prepare for their declared post-secondary education, training, and work objectives.

40

75

%

Annually, reportable injuries by staff are held fewer than forty, and accepted claims are held to fewer than forty-five Seventy-five percent of students who are below grade level in reading and math are caught up within three years.

80

%

Eighty percent of incoming kindergarten students enter prepared for kindergarten as measured by the district’s Kindergarten Readiness Test.

Algebra

Algebra 1-2 will become the standard eighth grade math class.

75

90

5

Students continue to have opportunities to participate in co-curricular programs and both competitive and non-competitive extra-curricular programs.

th

The Kennewick School District is in the seventy-fifth percentile of all districts in achieving annual growth for its students.

%

Professional development, training, and growth opportunities for staff are offered on a continual basis. The Kennewick School District maintains an unreserved, undesignated fund balance that is at least five percent of the total budget.

%

The five year cohort graduation rate for the district is at least ninety percent.


4

Letter from the Superintendent

W

elcome to the Kennewick School District. Innovative is a word that describes the heart and soul of the Kennewick School District. Nationally recognized amongst our peers, we are known as a results-oriented district at the forefront of emerging trends in public education. We earned this reputation by being forerunners in the early childhood education and literacy movement, as developers of new school concepts that offer choices to students and families, as trailblazers in professional development, and as leaders in the use of data to drive instruction. The End of One Size Fits-All Education Kennewick School District recognized years ago that not all students thrive in the same educational environment. In response, KSD opened Phoenix High School, a small project-based high school emphasizing rigorous, self-directed learning in 2006. The school welcomed students this year to its new home on 4th avenue. The newly renovated facility will also house our Legacy Advantage Online program. This is another option we began offering in 2007 for students who want to take their classes online, but also have the value of an on-site tutor they can meet with regularly. Staunch

supporters of the Delta High School partnership from its inception, we take pride in the success of this new STEM high school and look forward to a new facility being built in the near future to better serve its students. When parents asked us to support their home-based education, we responded, opening the Mid-Columbia Partnership (MCP) in 2004. The school supports the home-based education of K-12 students through enriching experiences in classes held at MCP as well as off-site field trips and online classes. These types of parent/school collaborative programs are gaining in popularity and we are proud to have been at the forefront of making this option available to Kennewick families. Pioneers in the Early Learning Movement In 1996, the KSD took the bold step of implementing our Third Grade Reading Goal. The goal states that 90% of our third grade students will demonstrate the ability to read at grade level. A massive undertaking, this required enormous effort on the part of our teachers and a paradigm shift in the kind of work performed by our para-educators. In 2006, we hit 90% and have been above 87% ever since. This continues to be the district’s fundamental learning goal as it sets the foundation for a student’s ability to be successful in school.

In 2002, the Kennewick School District helped launch the Ready! for Kindergarten program. At the time, it was one of only a handful of programs that focused on teaching parents how to work with their children to prepare them for kindergarten. Now, through a decade-long effort, parents are internalizing the message that reading to their children for at least 20 minutes a day and preparing them for kindergarten is as much a parental responsibility as feeding and clothing their kids. The Ready! program has since gone national along with the National Reading Foundation, two ideas born right here in Kennewick. Master Teachers Mentor New Teachers KSD is unique in having one of the most robust mentoring programs for new teachers across the nation. Our Peer Assistance and Review (PAR) program, a collaborative effort with the Kennewick Education Association, took off in 2000. The program taps the expertise of two master teachers who serve four year terms as mentors to up to forty new teachers each school year. PAR has received numerous awards, including an invitation to present at the International Mentoring Association Conference in 2010. The program has succeeded in assisting hundreds of new teachers in furthering their knowledge of instructional strategies, classroom management and all other aspects of becoming a K-12 educator.


A Letter From the Superintendent 5 Data Drives Classroom Instruction and Curriculum KSD was one of the earliest adopters of using data to guide instruction. When the district signed on to do Measures of Academic Performance (MAP) testing through the Northwest Evaluation Association in 1995, we began a journey toward individualized instruction for students. Beyond MAP, additional regular assessments enable our teachers to address the skill level and needs of each student by adjusting the instruction they receive throughout the school year.

course – another example of the Kennewick School District leading the way forward.

We also look at grade-level data to inform our decisions on instruction and curriculum. Recently, we discovered a trend in our sixth grade math scores on the MAP test that clearly identified that our sixth grade students weren’t showing the growth that we wanted. We deduced that our sixth grade math curriculum was too much of a repeat of what students were learning in fifth grade and have since realigned our curriculum. This was a critical step as we move forward with our plans to make Algebra the standard eighth grade math

Sincerely,

Innovation is a word that describes what to expect from the Kennewick School District in the future. Finding new ways to continuously improve our practice as educators is ingrained in our culture. It’s who we are and will continue to be. We are honored to be entrusted with the education of our youth and will always strive to deliver the best possible experience for each and every one of our students.

Dave Bond Superintendent


6 Staff Developement Professional Developement

Professional development in the Kennewick School District is based on the belief that each school will strive to meet the specific educational needs of its students by providing the highest quality of professional development for its staff.

Peer assistance and review program

We recognize the need to assist and support new teachers in the early years of their careers. The goal of the Peer Assistance and Review Program is to help new teachers entering the profession by offering mentorship and guidance by “Master Teacher” consultants. These teacher mentors devote many hours to direct classroom observations and conferences with individual teachers. They also offer group training and workshops in both classroom management skills and best instructional practices.

National Board Certification

One hundred of KSD’s teaching staff have earned National Board Certification. Certification is a challenging process requiring the investment of many hours in developing four portfolios. Three are classroom based, where video recordings and examples of student work serve as supporting documentation. The fourth relates to accomplishments outside of the classroom – with families, the community, or colleagues – and how they impact student learning.

TEACHER PRINCIPAL EVALUATION PROJECT The State of Washington has adopted new legislation that will redefine the evaluation process for teachers and principals beginning with the 2015-2016 school year. As a result,

and in compliance with State Law, the KSD Board of Directors has officially adopted the Danielson Instructional Framework and the AWSP Leadership Framework as the basis for new evaluation formats for teachers and principals. A cooperative group of teachers and administrators have been working throughout the past three years on developing new evaluation procedures and the District will continue to pilot these procedures this fall. The evaluation is focused on developing the skills of our classroom teachers. More information can be found by accessing the state’s Teacher/Principal Evaluation Project website at: http://tpep-wa.org

Eighth Grade Algebra Goal

In May of 2011, the Kennewick School Board adopted a new strategic plan that includes the goal that Algebra 1-2 will become the standard eighth grade math class. To that end, middle school math teachers and administrators spent many hours this past school year researching, planning, and ultimately designing a “compression model” to ensure that sixth and seventh grade students will have all the foundational math skills and knowledge they need to be ready for algebra by the eighth grade. The compression model they developed takes the math standards for the three middle school years and compresses them into two years. Students who have learned these mathematical concepts and procedures should then be ready to acquire higher level math. Together the school board and teachers agreed on a three year phase in of the goal.


Staff Developement 7 Sixth grade implemented the compression model in the 20122013 school-year. Seventh grade implemented the compression model during the 2013-2014 school year. When these students are in eighth grade, they will have algebra as their math class.

Instructional Academies and Conferences

For the past seven years, the Kennewick School District has held Instructional Academies and Instructional Conferences for teachers and administrators. The academies focus on the art and science of excellence in instruction and how data is used to personalize learning around the District’s instructional framework. Teachers from similar grade and subject areas meet to analyze and discuss lessons and watch videos of their peers delivering lessons to students. Instructional Conferences bring together principals and administrators to discuss and practice providing constructive feedback to teachers in support of their work in the classroom.

Curriculum Adoption

As part of KSD’s regular seven year curriculum adoption and renewal cycle, new world language materials for grades 6-12 were adopted in 2013. Parents and community members worked with teachers and administrators on the curriculum adoption committee. Teachers are receiving training in the new materials to ensure their confidence and competence in delivering the instruction to students. This year, the process continues with a K-12 fine arts curriculum adoption.

Professional Learning Communities (PLC’s)

In the 2012-2013 school-year, several schools continued working toward the development of Professional Learning Communities for their teachers, certificated staff, and paraeducators. District-wide, our vision is to create opportunities for teachers to collaborate with other teachers within and across grade levels and subjects, using a common language and framework. This will continue to be a priority in 2013-2014 as we support professional collaboration at all of our schools.


8 Early Learning Early Learning

Scientists who study the brain have found that from birth to age three children learn at a rate that is unsurpassed in later life. Experiences before kindergarten are tied to future academic success. Unfortunately, children who start behind tend to stay behind. Our goal is that children enter kindergarten with age-level skills – ready for a successful and satisfying education. When children score low on entering kindergarten assessments, this is often due to having had limited opportunities to learn. We want to narrow the “opportunity gap” for students.

Early Childhood Education and Assistance Program

The Early Childhood Education and Assistance Program (ECEAP) is a state-funded program offered to families based on financial need. The program provides children with an exciting pre-school learning environment and families with educationally-based home visits. ECEAP currently operates in five of our elementary schools and Keewaydin Discovery Center.

Kindergarten Readiness

All KSD parents and guardians are invited to attend free “READY! for Kindergarten” classes, based on the age of their child. Each class is packed with activities that develop literacy and language, math and reasoning, and social-emotional skills. Parents choose which activities to use at home based on their child’s interests and abilities. Special training is offered for childcare providers and teen parents. For more information, call 222-5035 or visit www.readyforkindergarten.org.

Special Services

The Special Services Department provides specially designed instruction for eligible students with disabilities from birth through age 21. These services are individualized to meet the unique needs of the students and are available in a variety of program models.

Keewaydin Discovery Center (KDC)

Keewaydin Discovery Center is a specialized preschool program for students between the ages of birth to five years of age who have a developmental delay or disability. KDC provides developmental services in the areas of cognitive development, communication, adaptive, motor, and social skills. To better serve the needs of the students and teachers of the program, a new facility was built in 2009. The Keewaydin Discovery Center is located at 425 Conway, behind Westgate Elementary.

Choices for Elementary Students:

Dual Language Program

The purpose of Kennewick’s dual language program is to develop bilingual, biliterate, and bicultural students. Students start out learning reading and writing in classes taught in Spanish, while math, social studies, and classes such as PE, are taught in English. The students then transition to English for reading and writing and Spanish for other courses. Our first cohort of students is now in eighth grade as the program begins its third year


Early Learning delivering the program at the middle school level.

Mid-Columbia Partnership

The Mid-Columbia Partnership (MCP) works with families of students in grades K-12 who are home-schooled throughout the Tri- Cities. A variety of enrollment options, ranging from fulltime alternative learning experiences to part-time enrollment for home-schooled students wanting supplemental classes, are available to meet the needs and desires of our families. Classes are provided on-site at MCP and at off-site community learning centers.

Kennewick Opportunities for Gifted (KOG)

The district’s elementary gifted program serves students in grades

9

3-5. Kennewick Opportunities for the Gifted, known as the KOG Program, is a full time program designed to meet the needs of academically advanced students. The KOG Program offers a differentiated curriculum to meet the specific academic and social needs of gifted students. The program offers breadth, depth, enrichment, leadership opportunities, and parent involvement. The program is housed at Vista Elementary. The program has been in place for more than thirty years in the district.

The Importance of Early Literacy

Students first learn to read and then read to learn. Our elementary schools focus on finding the most effective curriculum, such as the “Imagine It” reading curriculum used in many of our elementary schools, to provide a strong foundation in reading that sets students up for success throughout their school careers.

No Child Left Behind and state esea waiver

In July 2012 Washington State applied and received a waiver from the United States Department of Education. The waiver exempted the state from many of the requirements of the Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) regulations and gave Washington the opportunity to implement new reforms around standards and accountability. The flexibility waiver has replaced AYP with Annual Measurable Objectives (AMO). This means that schools are now identified by where they rank with all schools in the state on Washington’s state assessments. This system has been replaced by one that identifies schools as; Reward, Emerging, Focused, or Priority. For the 2012-13 school year the bottom 5% of schools in the state are considered “Priority” schools. The next category is “Focused” schools. This represents the bottom 10% of Title I eligible schools. The last category is the “Emerging” schools. Emerging schools are the next 5% from the bottom of the list used to identify Priority schools and the next 10% from the list used to identify Focus schools. For the 2013-14 school year, Westgate Elementary School has been identified as an “Emerging” school, Park Middle School has been identified as a “Focused” school, and Amistad Elementary and Edison Elementary have been identified as “Priority” schools. Amistad, Edison, Westgate, and Park Middle School must adhere to a set of requirements that include providing strong leadership; reviewing assessment data; ensuring that all staff are highly qualified and effective; providing on-going job-embedded professional development for teachers and staff; implementing a tiered intervention system that helps students who need the help the most; and utilizing data to help guide instruction and professional development for staff. The principals and staff of these schools continue to work diligently to prepare students to meet high academic standards and most of the indicators of student academic progress show that students at all four of these schools are making good progress.


10 Early Learning Intervention Strategies

Ongoing diagnostic assessments given throughout the year help us identify individual strengths and weaknesses in each student. In reading, for example, we can identify if a student has mastered or needs work on comprehension, understanding the sounds of language, or fluency. We can then focus on delivering instruction tailored to helping each student grow and master specific areas.

English Language Learners

Last year, KSD spent time evaluating our programs that intentionally teach students in two languages, our Bilingual programs at Amistad and Eastgate and our Dual Language programs at Hawthorne and Edison. The goal was to review and adjust our practices based on the latest research. As a result, the district is moving from sequential to simultaneous literacy instruction. The reasons are twofold. Today, 75% of students who are English Language Learners are exposed to both English and Spanish. These students use both languages to learn and they are often misidentified as not having a dominant language. The research shows our students are multilingual, not mono-lingual. They are mixing languages at home and this approach mirrors this. Second, we’ve come to understand that bilingual students benefit by learning what is the same and what is different between their two languages. By keeping the instruction separated, we missed opportunities to use strategies such as teaching cognates. The new approach allows students to build their literacy skills in both languages simultaneously.

Third Grade Reading Goal

Our signature goal in our elementary schools is to have 90 percent of our third graders reading at

grade level. We know that learning to read opens doors to many other academic areas and also affects brain development. Students who learn to read fluently and with good comprehension in the primary grades are typically successful students in all academic areas in the years that follow. In order for our instruction to be as effective as possible, our teachers and administrators are highly trained in the use of a variety of assessments and instructional strategies. Students are assessed frequently to measure the development of their reading skills throughout each school year. The results of these assessments are used to assign students to the instructional programs that will best meet their needs. The result is a highly successful reading program that has drawn attention from school districts across the nation for its ability to develop young readers and young minds.

Third Grade Reading Goal Percentage of Third Grade Percentage of Third Grade Students Reading at Grade Level Students Meeting Annual Growth

2011

2012

2013

2011

2012

2013

90%

88%

86%

78%

76%

77%

Kennewick School District 2012 Family Survey - Elementary School I feel welcome at this school.

I am treated with respect by the staff at this school.

I feel like I can talk to the school principal and assistant principals. I have a high regard for staff at this school.

Strongly Disagree

Disagree

Agree

1% 1%

5%

1%

5%

34%

5%

34%

1% 1%

My student feels safe and comfortable at school. My student is challenged to be successful.

My student believes that teachers and staff care about him or her at this school.

1%

5% 5% 5%

34% 34% 34% 34%

Strongly Agree

60% 60% 60% 60% 60% 60%

1%

5%

34%

60%

My student understands the reason for doing work in his or her classes.

1%

5%

34%

60%

My student’s teachers communicate with me as needed.

The school’s environment is positive and supportive of students.

1% 1%

5%

33%

61%

The school makes it easy for our families to communicate with teachers.

1%

5%

34%

60%

5%

34%

60%

Answers based on 390 responses from the 2012 Kennewick School District Family Survey- High School


Secondary Education 11

Choices- Secondary Education Legacy High and Legacy Advantage Online

Legacy High and Legacy Online are two options students and parents may choose instead of a traditional high school. Personalized instruction in small classrooms, one-onone mentoring, and personal accountability are the hallmarks of Legacy High. KSD’s Legacy Advantage Online is our “Virtual High School.� The curriculum is delivered entirely online with in-person tutoring and advising support for students. Unlike a traditional classroom, the pace of the lessons depends on the individual student. It allows students to move more quickly through mastered concepts and spend more time on areas in which they need more work. The program attracts a wide range of students, from those wishing to fulfill core credit classes online and take advanced placement classes for college, to students who must work during school hours to support themselves.

Mid-Columbia Partnership

Mid-Columbia Partnership (MCP) works with families who home-school their children throughout the Tri-Cities. MCP now serves students and parents in grades K-12. Many enrollment options, ranging from full-time to parttime enrollment for home schooled students wanting supplemental classes, are available to meet the needs and desires of our families. Classes are provided on-site and at off-site learning centers.

Phoenix High School

Phoenix High is now in its seventh year. This small project-based high school emphasizes responsibility, flexibility, and choice. Students are engaged in designing projects that match their interests while developing marketable communication, citizenship, and life skills. These projects also include the essential knowledge and skills outlined by the state for each core subject. Students at Phoenix must meet the same state requirements as our traditional high schools, including passing state assessments to graduate.

Tri-Tech Skills Center Tri-Tech Skills Center is a branch campus of all Tri-Cities area high schools offering advanced technical


12 Secondary Education and professional training. This tuition-free training is available to all area public, private, and home-schooled students ages 16-20 who have yet to receive a high school diploma. The goal is that all students enrolled in career and technical education classes are equipped to enter the world of work upon completion of their high school career or continue on to post-secondary education. Through a partnership with Columbia Basin College, the curriculum is aligned to allow students to work toward certification and degrees while at Tri-Tech. Many programs offer college credit.

Delta High School

Delta High School is a small, public high school focused on Science Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) for students living in the Kennewick, Richland, and Pasco School Districts. It is designed to develop students highly literate in STEM fields and is appealing to students who seek a small-school approach to learning where academic subjects are connected and students engage in learning beyond the school walls. For more information visit www.thedeltahighschool.com.

CBC High School Academy

The High School Academy at CBC is an innovative school on the college campus that provides students an educational opportunity to achieve a Washington State high school diploma through an accelerated academic program. The pace is three times as fast as high school, so students cover as much in one quarter of college as in one year of high school. Students ages 16 through 20 who have

Kennewick School District 2012 Family Survey - Middle School I feel welcome at this school.

I am treated with respect by the staff at this school.

I feel like I can talk to the school principal and assistant principals. I have a high regard for staff at this school.

Strongly Disagree

Disagree

Agree

Strongly Agree

1% 1%

6%

52%

40%

1%

6% 6%

52%

41%

1% 1%

My student feels safe and comfortable at school. My student is challenged to be successful.

My student believes that teachers and staff care about him or her at this school.

1%

6% 6% 6%

52% 52% 52% 52%

41% 41% 41% 41%

1%

6%

52%

41%

My student understands the reason for doing work in his or her classes.

1%

6%

62%

41%

The school’s environment is positive and supportive of students.

1%

6%

51%

41%

My student’s teachers communicate with me as needed.

The school makes it easy for our families to communicate with teachers.

1% 1%

6% 6%

52% 52%

41% 41%

Answers based on 322 responses from the 2012 Kennewick School District Family Survey- Middle School

Kennewick School District 2012 Family Survey - High School Strongly Disagree

Disagree

1%

10%

52%

38%

I have a high regard for staff at this school.

0%

9%

53%

37%

My student is challenged to be successful.

0%

0%

I feel welcome at this school.

I am treated with respect by the staff at this school.

I feel like I can talk to the school principal and assistant principals.

1%

0%

My student feels safe and comfortable at school. My student believes that teachers and staff care about him or her at this school.

1%

My student understands the reason for doing work in his or her classes.

0%

The school’s environment is positive and supportive of students.

1%

My student’s teachers communicate with me as needed.

The school makes it easy for our families to communicate with teachers.

9%

10% 9% 9% 10% 9%

Agree

53%

52%

52% 52% 53% 52%

Strongly Agree

37%

38%

38% 38% 37% 38%

1%

10%

52%

38%

1%

10%

53%

37%

10%

51%

39%

Answers based on 390 responses from the 2012 Kennewick School District Family Survey- High School


Secondary Education 13 dropped out of high school may be eligible to participate. Eligibility requirements are available on the CBC website at www.columbiabasin.edu/hsa.

Graduation

Graduation rate represents the class of 2012 cohort graduation rate. The state-calculated graduation rate represents only those students with an expected graduation year of 2012. These students would have started grade nine in 2008 and were expected to graduate “on-time.� The five year cohort graduation rate includes students who graduated within a year from their expected graduation date.

Four Year Cohort Kamiakin Kennewick Southridge Graduation Rate

Legacy

Phoenix

District

State

Class of 2010

82.3%

68.8%

82.0%

18.2%

21.7%

73.4%

75.4%

Class of 2011

82.9%

70.7%

82.0%

16.1%

47.1%

73.6%

76.6%

Class of 2012

87.0%

73.3%

82.7%

8.3%

23.8%

71.5%

77.2%

Legacy

Phoenix

District

State

Five Year Cohort Graduation Rate

Kamiakin Kennewick Southridge

Class of 2009

83.5%

74.8%

75.6%

19.0%

20.0%

74.4%

77.2%

Class of 2010

87.3%

78.9%

88.3%

23.2%

56.0%

79.6%

78.2%

Class of 2011

87.8%

83.3%

86.4%

21.3%

61.1%

77.4%

78.9%


14 Secondary Education Prepared for Success in Post-Secondary Education, Work, and Life

At Kamiakin and Southridge High, AP courses are available to offer students an opportunity to experience college-level course work and test taking while earning college credit in high school.

International Baccalaureate (IB) Program

Kennewick High offers the IB program, recognized as one of the most academically rigorous, college-preparatory programs in the world. Students may pursue a full IB diploma, IB Scholar, or IB certificate.

Navigation 101

Navigation 101 empowers students to take charge of their own future. Students will graduate with a specific plan for life after high school that involves college, work, military, technical school, industrial certification, or another option. At conferences, students, rather than teachers, take the lead by presenting their plans to parents or guardians.

Kennewick School District Performance on the 2012 SAT College Entrance Exam Compared to State and National Results Subject

KSD Avg.

State Avg.

Nat’l Avg.

Reading

490

515

496

Writing

468

499

488

Math

509

523

514

ACT results: average scores Subject

KSD Avg.

State Avg.

Nat’l Avg.

Reading

23.9

23.3

21.1

English

22.5

22.1

20.2

Math

24.2

22.8

20.9

Science

23.0

22.5

20.7

Composite

23.6

22.8

20.9

Advanced placement tests

Total AP Enrollment

Number of Tests

Number of 3+ Scores

Kamiakin

518

460

309

Southridge

364

260

149

Spanish Math English History Higher International Full Higher Standard Standard and Baccalaureate Diploma 7 point scale Level Level Level Standard Level Kennewick High

33%

4.05

4.4

3.5

5.23

Worldwide

78%

4.77

4.11

4.55

5.28


Student Demographics 15 Average Class Size Student to Teacher Ratio K - 5th 6th - 8th 9th - 12th

Staffing

2012-2013 19.7 - 1 22.8 - 1 22.6 - 1

Classified Staff

606

Certificated Staff

932

(Paraeducators, secretaries, managers, bus drivers, nutrition service workers, maintenance personel, custodians, etc.) (Teachers, counselors, librarians, program specialists, etc.)

Certificated Administration

56

(School principals, assistant principals, and central administration)

Highly Qualified Teachers

The Kennewick School District continues to be committed to hiring and retaining “Highly Qualified” Teachers. The average teacher in Kennewick has over fourteen years of experience and possesses a Master’s Degree. In addition, all KSD teachers are encouraged to pursue National Board Teacher Certification. Under the new Elementary and Secondary Education Act, part of NCLB, parents have the right to request information on the professional qualifications of their child’s teachers.

Paraprofessionals and qualifications:

Under certain circumstances, paraprofessionals who may work with your child must possess an AA degree. For more information, contact the KSD Human Resources Department at (509) 222-5010.

Student Ethnicity American Indian African American Asian/Pacific Islander Asian Caucasian Hispanic Multi-Race

2007-2008 2012-2013 0.8% 0.6% 2.4% 2.4% 2.4%

2.6%

2.2% 65.5% 26.4% -

2.2% 65.3% 27.3% 1.7%

English Language Learners Students

Non-English Native Languages Spoken Amharic, Arabic, Bosnian, Burmese, Cambodian, Chinese, Creole, Ethiopic, Farsi, French, Italian, Korean, Lao, Marshallase, Nuer, Persian, Romanian, Russian, Somali, Spanich, Tagalog, Thai, Turkish, Ukranian, and Vietamese.

Social Economic Free/ReducedPrice Lunch

2007-2008 2012-2013 42.7% 53.2%

Based on income, percent of students who qualify fo free/ reduced meals.

Homeless

2007-2008 2012-2013 1,457 2,139

104

331

Number of homeless students for reporting purposes.

Special Education

2007-2008 2012-2013 Students Served 1679 2171

Based on June Enrollment Figures

Teacher Information (2012-2013) Classroom Teachers Average Years of Teacher Experience Teachers with at least a Master’s Degree Total number of teachers who teach core academic classes Total number of core academic classes % of classes taught by teachers meeting ESEA highly qualified (HQ) definition % of classes in high poverty schools taught by teachers who meet ESEA HQ definition % of classes in low poverty schools taught by teachers who meet ESEA HQ definition.

871 13

68.1% 556 3650 99.2% 100% 98.9%

Student Enrollment

Grade Kindergarten First Second Third Fourth Fifth Subtotal K-5 Sixth Seventh Eighth Subtotal 6-8 Ninth Tenth Eleventh Twelfth Subtotal 9 -12 Total Headcount Running Start RS Only (not in K-12)

2008-2009 1102 1139 1180 1160 1163 1110 6854 1163 1083 1149 3395 1214 1213 1203 1173 4803 15,052 212 78

As of October 1 (Headcount)

2012-2013 1339 1275 1221 1257 1223 1235 7550 1232 1305 1281 3818 1227 1269 1142 1327 4965 16,333 209 76


16 Student Achievement ANNUAL MEASURABLE ACHIEVEMENT OBJECTIVES FOR ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEARNERS Title I and Title III of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA), include English Language Learners (ELLs) in the state accountability system and require states to set performance targets referred to as Annual Measurable Achievement Objectives (AMAOs) for English language proficiency. Under section 3122(a) (3), Achievement Objectives and Accountability, the AMAOs for English language proficiency must include:

AMAO-1: Annual increases in the number or percentage of children making progress in learning English. AMAO-2: Annual increases in the number or percentage of children attaining English proficiency. AMAO-3: The number or percentage of students meeting AMO targets in the reading and math ELL cell (under ESEA flexibility waiver request).

AMAO-1

AMAO-2

AMAO-3

2011-2012

2012-2013

2011-2012

2012-2013

2011-2012

2012-2013

State

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

N

District

Y

N

Y

Y

N

N

National Assessment of Education Progress (NAEP) The Kennewick School District participates in the National Assessment of Education Progress (NAEP), the largest nationally representative assessment of students across the country. Administered by the National Center for Education Statistics within the U.S. Department of Education, NAEP provides a common measure of

student achievement across the country. The results of NAEP are released as The Nation’s Report Card, which provides information about student achievement to educators, parents, policymakers, and the public. For information and data, please visit the OSPI website at: http://www.k12.wa.us/ assessment/NAEP/default.aspx


Student Achievement 17 ANNUAL MEASURABLE OBJECTIVES

Flexibility Request. AMO’s replace the state uniform bar used under Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) as prescribed in ESEA. For more detailed information, please refer to pages 119–121 in Washington’s ESEA Flexibility Request, found at: http://www.k12.wa.us/ESEA/ PublicNotice.aspx.

Annual Measurable Objective (AMO) are unique yearly targets in reading and mathematics for each subgroup, school and district, as described in Washington’s Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA)

AMO

Reading

Math

Reading

Math

Other Indicator On/ Above

Proficiency

Target

Met Target

Proficiency

Target

Met Target

Met 95% Participation Target

Met 95% Participation Target

All

70.1

69.5

On/ Above

54.7

56.4

Below

On/Above

On/Above

American Indian

74.6

75.6

On/ Above

50.7

55.4

Below

On/Above

On/Above

Student Group

Asian

70.1

72.5

Below

59.4

63.0

Below

On/Above

On/Above

Pacific Islander

77.4

80.1

On/ Above

61.3

61.8

Below

On/Above

On/Above

Black

50.6

50.8

Below

32.9

36.1

Below

On/Above

On/Above

Hispanic

55.6

54.9

On/ Above

39

40.6

Below

On/Above

On/Above

White

78.2

77.8

On/ Above

63.5

65.4

Below

On/Above

On/Above

Two or More Races

68.4

63.3

On/ Above

48.1

45

On/ Above

On/Above

On/Above

Limited English

30.4

29.7

On/ Above

14.5

21.9

Below

On/Above

On/Above

36

40.3

Below

26.8

33.5

Below

On/Above

On/Above

56.5

57.2

Below

39.8

42.6

Below

On/Above

On/Above

Special Education Low Income


18 Student Achievement Measurements of Students Progress: Grades 3-8 High school Proficiency Exams: Grade 10 State Assessments: Spring 2012

In 2010, the Washington Assessment of Student Learning (WASL) was replaced by the Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) for grades 3-8, and the High School Proficiency Exams (HSPE) for high school students. Students at our middle schools have been taking most of the tests online since 2010. Students at some of our elementary schools are also testing online. In 2011 and 2012, all students that are enrolled in a high school algebra or geometry course took the new End of Course (EOC) Year 1 (Algebra) or EOC Year 2 (Geometry) test. In 2012, the new End of the Course (EOC) Biology test replaced the 10th grade science test. Standards-based tests are used in Washington State to measure how well specific groups of students are meeting state grade-level standards in their ability to read with comprehension, write with skill, and use problem-solving strategies in mathematics and science.

The following charts compare district results with state results on the 2012 and 2013 MSP, HSPE and EOC exams. State & District

2012

2013

2012

2013

2012

2013

2012

2013

3rd Gr. State

69

73

65

65

3rd Gr. District

70

71

59

59

4th Gr. State

71

72

59

63

61

62

4th Gr. District

74

72

54

55

66

67

5th Gr. State

71

73

64

63

65

66

5th Gr. District

67

72

52

54

65

66

6th Gr. State

71

71

61

59

6th Gr. District

67

63

45

42

7th Gr. State

71

69

59

64

71

71

7th Gr. District

69

64

52

54

73

67

8th Gr. State

67

66

56

53

66

65

8th Gr. District

68

59

47

43

57

57

10th Gr. State

81

84

85

85

10th Gr. District

80

84

84

82

Reading %

Math %

Writing %

Science %

End of Course Exams

All All Grades Grades District State

State & District EOC Math Year 1 Algebra EOC Math Year 2 Geometry EOC Math Year 1 Biology

2011

64%

66%

2012

71%

69%

2011

74%

74%

2012

79%

73%

2011

N/A

N/A

2012

64%

64%


Maintenance and Operations 19 NEW HVAC SYSTEM INSTALLED AT HIGHLANDS

The Kennewick School District was awarded a $1.0M Energy Grant from OSPI to assist us in purchasing and installing a new HVAC system for Highlands Middle School. These state grants are intended to produce longterm energy and operational savings for districts, improve the indoor air environmental qualities of schools, and help stimulate construction-industry jobs. The project was completed in the fall of 2012 at total cost of $2,261,802.

MAINTENANCE AND OPERATIONS DEPARTMENT

Kennewick maintenance, grounds, and custodial staffs are on the job and on-call year round to keep Kennewick schools safe, well-maintained, and comfortable for students and staff. Our crews work behind the scenes to provide an optimal environment for students to learn and staff to work.

TRANSPORTATION DEPARTMENT

We are committed to the safety of all students and our drivers. The Kennewick School District Transportation Department has received numerous safety awards from the Washington State Patrol, having passed their twice-yearly inspections for the past 17 years. We perform emergency evacuation drills with

students twice a year. Drivers are required to inspect their bus prior to the start of every shift. Bus Rule cards are sent home during the first week of school to be signed by all student riders’ parents or guardians. On a regular school day, KSD runs 75 buses on 55 regular and 20 special education routes. Including morning and afternoon runs, 10,000 students are transported each day. We have 81 bus drivers, 20 bus attendants, and 15 substitute drivers. We run 94 diesel buses and travel more than one million miles each year.

New Security Systems

Over the summer, KSD installed an electronic locking system in 11 of its 14 elementary schools. This system allows locks to be controlled remotely through web-based software from anywhere. Three additional elementary schools that already had electronic locks will be converted to the new system by the end of 2013. New security cameras have been installed to allow views outside the building as well as staff and public entrance doors in 13 of 14 elementary schools. We did not install the new camera system at Eastgate Elementary as that upgrade will take place when the building is rebuilt in 2014-2015. At our middle and high schools, we are converting all of the existing security cameras so they can be accessed remotely as well. During the 2013-2014 school-year, we will begin installing the new electronic locking system in our middle schools.


20 District Finance and Budget REVENUE AND EXPENDITURES

General fund revenues for the 2012–2013 school year totaled $149.2 million as compared to total expenditures of $147.1 million. Efficient fiscal and resource management are essential to the mission of the district. The additional revenue over expenditures realized for 2012–2013 was used to offset capital fund costs incurred over the summer of 2013 associated with the addition of 17 portable classrooms. To achieve our academic goals, we leverage and focus our resources to assist all students in reaching the high standards of our state and district. Chart 1 (top right) shows the sources of the district’s $149.2 million in revenues for2012-2013. Of that amount, the state provides approximately 68.6 percent of the funding, with the local levy and levy equalization accounting for another 20.8 percent. Chart 2 (above right) is a breakdown by activity group of the district’s $147.1 million in expenditures. Close to 70 percent of total expenditures goes toward teaching and teaching support. Kennewick School District ranks

above average when compared to other districts in Washington in terms of the percent of total expenditures associated with classroom activities.

LEVY DOLLARS SUPPORT STUDENT LEARNING

We are thankful for the support and approval we have received from the community on our school levies over the years. We appreciate the trust you have invested in us to use your tax dollars wisely. Local levy dollars comprise more than 14.0% of the district’s total operating budget. Levies must be renewed with the approval of tax-payers every two to four years. While school bond monies are used solely for building and major repair projects, levy funds are vital to support student learning. Levies support staffing, student safety, technology, extra-curricular activities and programs such as art, physical education, and music. Levy dollars also provide funding for facilities maintenance, custodial support, grounds keeping, utilities, equipment, fuel, and student transportation.

KENNEWICK’S TEN YEAR FACILITIES PLAN

Kennewick School District’s Facilities Planning Committee is comprised of community members from business and industry, district maintenance and

2012-2013 District Revenue Chart 1

State Appointment

55.6%

Local Levy

14.3%

State Equalization

6.5%

Special State Funding

13.0%

Federal

8.6%

Local Non-tax

1.5%

Special Grants & Other

0.5%

2012-2013 Expenditures Chart 2

Teaching Activities

60.5%

Teaching Support

9.2%

Other Support

19.7%

Central Administration

5.3%

Building Administration

5.3%

Expenditures Per Student

$8,754

Kennewick School District’s administrative expenses, as a percent of total expenses, are among the lowest in the state when compared to districts with more than 10,000 students.

operations personnel, and school administrators. The committee meets to analyze and evaluate the internal and external condition of our schools, support buildings, play areas, parking lots, technology, and infrastructure. The committee also considers growth trends in student enrollment and project needs for additions, remodels, and new school facilities. The Ten Year Facilities Plan is available online at: www.ksd.org/departments/capitalprojects.


Your Tax Dollars at Work 21 DISTRICT CELEBRATES CASCADE REMODEL

In May of 2009, voters approved a $68 million school bond. The passage of the bond allowed us to move forward with the first phase of our Ten Year Facilities Plan. Work began immediately in the summer of 2012 to renovate Cascade Elementary. Completed on time and under budget, the school celebrated with a ribbon cutting on August 23, 2013.

RENOVATION COMMENCES AT LINCOLN ELEMENTARY

At the end of the school year, the staff at Lincoln, along with the district’s maintenance and operations crews, got right to work on “boxing up” the school and moving everything to the district’s Fruitland Building. Students and staff will spend the 2013-2014 school year at Fruitland while the school undergoes its renovation. Already, the major systems have been torn out to be replaced with new and more efficient electrical, plumbing, climate control, and fire suppression systems. Interior walls and flooring have been removed as the building is reconfigured to our established specifications. When Lincoln opens for school next fall, the old gym will have been converted to a new multi-purpose room/cafeteria and a new gym added with a full sized wood floor to better serve our students and community.

EASTGATE ELEMENTARY REBUILD

The Kennewick School Board voted to add Eastgate Elementary to our list of remodeling projects included in the 2009 school bond. This was made possible due to three factors. First, estimated costs for building Cottonwood and renovating Canyon View, Southgate, Sunset View, and Cascade came in millions below our projections per building. Second, due to the recession in 2009, we had concerns about how quickly the state would be able to make funds available, so we budgeted conservatively for those. In fact, the opposite occurred as the state aggressively sent out matching funds in an effort to stimulate the economy. Third, because our poverty level increased during the recession, along with other factors like enrollment growth, our state assistance match rate was higher than expected. Therefore, we received more state matching dollars than we had projected back in 2009. As a result, the district recognized that we had enough funding to complete the scheduled Lincoln elementary project as well as remodel an additional elementary with our remaining funds. This past spring, our Facilities Committee examined the condition of our schools and made a recommendation, approved by the school board, to use our remaining capital funds from the 2009 bond to rebuild Eastgate Elementary. Work will commence on the school in the 2014-2015 school-year.


22 Parent and Community Involvement Parent Portal

A powerful tool for parents and guardians, KSD’s Parent Portal provides up-to-date information on student assignments, grades, and attendance. In addition to being able to track student progress, the portal opens a direct line of communication between teachers and parents. Teachers may add comments about assignments or tests, and parents can email teachers directly from the site if they have a question or concern. Other features include access to school lunch menus and nutrition information. A user name and password are mailed home to all parents and guardians at the beginning of the school year and may also be obtained in person at the school office.

Volunteer Opportunities

District Committees and Advisory Groups. Much of the work accomplished in the school district is the result of committees and task forces. Interested parents and community members are encouraged to apply to serve on these committees. District examples include the Kennewick Business and Marketing Advisory Committee, Community Education Advisory Council, the Facilities Planning Committee, the Title I/LAP Advisory Committee, and the Citizen’s Bond and Levy Committee. If you are interested, please contact the district office at 222-5000.

Community Education Instructor

The district’s Community Education program holds classes for adults in our schools on evenings and weekends. If you have a talent

or skill you would like to share, contact Terry Andre at 222-5080. More information is located online at: http://communityed.ksd.org.

In Our Schools

At the high school level, you can help judge senior culminating project presentations. This is a graduation requirement for all seniors that helps students demonstrate their learning and connection with the community via projects that match their interests. Elementary and middle schools also need your help to provide mentoring or tutoring. Team Read’s one-onone volunteer tutoring program operates in the Kennewick School District October through May. All volunteers are paired with first, second, or third graders who are specifically selected by their teachers for reading support. Contact Team Read at 222-7324. You are are also encouraged to participate in the PTA or PTO at your child’s school.

School Board Meetings

School Board meetings are held at the Kennewick School District Administration Center located at 1000 West Fourth Avenue. Business meetings generally occur on the second and fourth Wednesday of the month at 5:30p.m. Meeting dates, agendas, and minutes are posted on our website.

Parent Partnerships

Amistad, Eastgate, Edison, Hawthorne, Sunset View, Vista and Westgate Elementary Schools as well as Highlands and Park Middle Schools are members of the National Network of Partnership Schools (NNPS) at Johns Hopkins University. NNPS provides a framework, tools, and a team approach these schools can use to form strong partnerships with families and the community in an effort

to raise student achievement. Parent partnership programs at the Kennewick School District, Park Middle School and Amistad, Eastgate and Westgate Elementary Schools were recognized in the 2012-2013 school year by NNPS for demonstrating leadership in developing comprehensive programs for school, family, and community partnerships. In addition, Park Middle School and Amistad and Westgate Elementary Schools each received $500 in award money they can use to further their programs this year. For more information, contact one of the NNPS schools or Sarah Del Toro, Parent Involvement Coordinator, at 222-6462 or sarah.deltoro@ksd.org.

BRIDGES Business Sponsorship Program

Kennewick School District’s Business Reaching In to Do Good for Education Sponsorships program (BRIDGES) seeks to involve and publicly recognize organizations and businesses as partners in education. By offering the business community a way to interact with schools, both parties are able to develop relationships that benefit each other. As a BRIDGES partner, your organization can participate in school events and spread the word about the products or services it provides.

Your sponsorship of $500-$1500 goes directly to the school to support the school’s learning improvement plan – focusing on student achievement in reading and math. Kennewick School District can provide businesses with a letter of donation for tax purposes. Please contact the Director of Communications and Public Relations at 509.222.7424.


Board of Directors 23 Greetings from your Kennewick School Board of Directors! We are honored to serve the families and students of the Kennewick School District and invite you to contact us with any of your questions, comments, or concerns regarding the education your children are receiving in our schools. We are preparing our children to live and work in a world that will demand much of them. Not only must they be proficient in reading, writing, science, and mathematics, they must also be adept at using technology, communicating, and problem solving. We are preparing them to compete for jobs against the best and brightest students from around the globe, not just from neighboring communities. It is our mission, and the aim of each teacher, administrator, and district employee, to help every student achieve at higher levels than ever before. To accomplish our mission, we have developed “North Star Goals” that chart our direction and guide the work of the Kennewick School District. Those goals include ensuring that our schools are safe and orderly for students and staff members—our number one priority.

Kennewick School District Board of Directors

Student learning goals include an emphasis on reading proficiency by third grade, annual growth in reading and math, and increasing our graduation rates. As your Board of Directors, we are privileged to serve in a district that has great support from the community. We see this in the number of parents and community members serving on district committees, the passing of our school bonds and levies, and the level of engagement in our schools. In addition to being involved at school, we urge you to take an active role in the education of your children at home. From reading with them at least twenty minutes every day, to showing interest and monitoring their progress on homework assignments in PowerSchool, your influence on your child’s educational career is the number one factor in ensuring your child’s success in life. We encourage you to attend our regular School Board meetings, which are generally scheduled for the second and fourth Wednesday

As pictured from left to right: Dave Bond, Superintendent; Dawn Adams, President; Brian Brooks, Legislative Representative; Heather Kintzley, Vice President; Ron Mabry; and Ben Messinger.

of each month. They begin at 5:30 p.m. in the district’s Administration Building, located at 1000 W. Fourth Avenue. We also hold an annual academic workshop with parents and community in the fall. Contact the district office for more information on our meetings. Again, we welcome you to our school district, and extend our best wishes to your children in their classes. Sincerely, The Kennewick School District Board of Directors


Read and download a copy of the 2012-2013 Annual Report at:

www.ksd.org/AboutUs

Kennewick School District Annual Report 2012-2013  
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