Issuu on Google+

KENNETH G H O 385987

STUDIO AIR ABPL30048

SM1 2012 GWYLL&ANDY

A SURREALITY


CONTENTS

“AND IT IS THROUGH THE CONSIDERATION OF ARCHITECTURE AS A DISCOURSE THAT ONE CAN ENGAGE IT WITH IT AS VISUAL CULTURE” RICHARD WILLIAMS 2005 PART 1 : EOI PART 2 : PROJECT PROPOSAL PART 3 : LEARNING OUTCOMES

01

STUDIO AIR

02-26 27-44 45-46


PART 1: EXPRESSION OF INTEREST

ARCHITECTURE AS A

DISCOURSE THE THRESHOLD BETWEEN DREAMS AND REALITY How can we translate something as complex as an idea into a reality? The natural laws that govern us limit the forms that architects can create. The numerous amounts of factors such as materiality, fabrication techniques etc. has limit us architects to settle for something simpler. In dreams we are unlimited, The complexities of the human mind have no restraint on how or what we can produce. Digital tools are like a dreamscape, we may not have the ability to create paradoxes structures but technological advancement has enabled us architects to create forms that were deemed impossible in the past time. Like the domino effect the advancement in other areas of knowledge increase the range of forms an architect can make.

Such innovation has made architecture a trend, a discourse. Ever exposed to many systems and subsystems, architecture will be constantly changing and developing. Through this, new forms of architecture are being appreciated among society as a visual culture. Continuously expanding and optimizing forms that were made accessible through the development of architectural tools. Striving for for optimisation, and intertwined between complexities of functionality and form. “Form follows function� or vice versa, It seems that one has submit to one another, but why settles for one or another? A performance driven architecture tries to relate the interconnection between different factors and optimized their features. This result is such a sublime play between form and function touching a new generation of architecture. I want to express my interest on how building can performs at the threshold between ideals and realities.

STUDIO AIR

02


The Body Space is a course structured on a practical project that explores existing precedent that underlines the concepts of digital design. This project was a creative way of exploring creative thinking in reference with ourselves. There was a throughout process of research, design and fabrication techniques that gives us architecture student grasp the syntax of the virtual environment. My design is based on the idea of refraction and the human eye. The exploration of the notion of how light converges at an infinite point allowing us to reconstruct the relative distance of two or more objects. Using digital tools has allowed me to renovate this process in an abstract form, At federation square this project has also been displayed as a major cultural event-Light in Winter festival 2011. 03

STUDIO AIR

PERSONAL PROJECT: B O D Y S P A

C

E

“IT IS GENERALLY ACCEPTED THAT ARCHITECTURAL CHALLENGES BECOME INCREASINGLY INTERDISCIPLINARY AND DESIGN TASK REQUIRE INTEGRATION OF MULTIPLE CONCERN. AN INABILITY TO CREATE AN ENVIRONMENT THAT FOSTERS SUCH INTEGRATION IS A RECURRING CRITICISM OF STUDIO CULTURE.” STANISLAV ROUDAVSKI 2011


MIKE TONKIN & ANNA LIU THE RINGING SINGING

TREE

This sculpture won the national award of the Royal Institute of British Architects for architecture excellence. This tree is constructed with stacking pipes of varying lengths. Each layer turns at 15 degree that retorts to wind patterns. Flowing from one end to another each layer plays a chord that harmonizes with another reacting differently with the changing environment. Tonkin and Liu plays not only with the form of the building but demonstrates how the building interacts with the environment to enhance the overall performance. The sculpture captivatingly plays between its aesthetic and functionality.

“STORIES OF ITS SONG WOULD PASS FROM MOUTH TO EAR. IN CARS AND ON FOOT PEOPLE WOULD MAKE THEIR WAY FROM CITY UP THE HILL. JOURNEY WOULD BE MADE TO HEAR THE WIND MAKE MUSIC WITH THE SINGING TREE.” TONKIN & LIU 2006 STUDIO AIR

04


“HOW DO YOU STANDOUT IN THIS CHAOS? VISUAL STIMULUS, SO WE SENSE WE HAVE TO DO ONE THING AND ONLY ONE THING.” THOMAS HETHERWICK 2010

From the exciting trend of digital manipulated architecture, Heatherwick Studio explores the other factors that would provide a more unique look among other pavilions of the Shanghai 2010 Expo. The design, focuses on the how to exhibit the seed that were provided by the collaboration of the the Kew’s seed bank. Not only it became the top 5 visited pavilion it won the 2010 RIBA Lubetkin Prize. Provoking discussion and bridges the gap between cultures. This pavilion was even nickname the ‘pu gong ying’ meaning the dandelion in Chinese. The optic fibre filaments are arranged in a cube like structure place in a direction that exports 05

STUDIO AIR

light from the sun. This unique play between light and materiality illuminates the seeds within the pavilion. The fibre optics is also responsive to the light condition, so unseen movement of shadows from clouds give of a fluctuating luminosity. The idea of the building being able to perform a certain task is explored in this architecture. Not only had it let people interact with building but the building manifest light in an innovative way. The Seed Cathedral timber, steel and 60,000 optic fibres which are pass through drilled precise holes in the steel frames.


HETHERWICK STUDIO SEED CATHEDRAL Such techniques can be trace to the help of digital design. The tedious placement of optic fibres must be place with great accuracy and precision that it may display the correct light intensity inside the pavilion. Also the using performance driven architecture the Seed Cathedral explores the factors such as wind and light to its structure, letting the wind ripple through the structure affecting the luminosity of the fibres. Digital fabrication is such an innovative tool that helps create precise structure that excludes human error. This means the performance will be optimized through the accuracy of computers. digital design not only enhances the form of the building but it also can enhance the functional-

ity and the overall performance of the building. This idea of optimization will be explored in the gateways project. The optimization of a factor to enhance the overall performance of a building can seen as an architectural discourse. it enforces a particular outlook to which a building would want to express. absoulute optimization may not exist but optimal driven building offers a more unique play between form and functionality of the building. performance base architecture offers such exclusiveness that I hope to present this case through the gateway project.

STUDIO AIR

06


MARK

O PERFORMANCE T TO POLOGY M IN O V A T I O N Z A T I O N “THOSE 3-D MODELS HAVE BEEN VITAL TO GAUDI’S SUCCESSORS TO CARRY ON HIS VISION.” MIKE BURRY 2010

Mark Burry the director of RMIT’s Spatial Information Architecture Laboratory (SIAL), has been establishing an interdisciplinary research in broadening out the environment devoted to contemporary spatial design. He seeks innovation with computational design by introducing rapid prototyping of ideas. In 2006 Mark was granted an Austra-

07

STUDIO AIR

lian Research Council Federation Fellowship and also recieved USA Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) Award for Innovative Research.


E

BURRY

STUDIO AIR

08


COMPLETION

OF

THE

SAGRADA

FAMILIA

FROM NEW TO OLD

09

STUDIO AIR


“IF ANYBODY GOES TO THE SAGRADA DE FAMILIA AND ADMIRES ON WHAT IS BEING BUILT SINCE HE DIED (ANTONIO GAUDI). THEY ARE LOOKING AT A MANIFESTATION OF SOMETHING HE NEVER EVER SAW FROM HIMSELF AND BECAUSE OF THAT HE NEVER IMPARTED WHAT HIS INTENSION WERE IN TERMS OF MAKING SCALE MODELS INTO WAYS OF BUILDING.” MARK BURRY 2009 THE PROJECT The Sagrada Familia Church in Barcelona has become one of prominent piece of architecture in the modern times. Designed by Antonio Gaudi, it procured 43 years of his life and yet it still hasn’t been completed. Left unfinished the works of Antonio Gaudi is passed on to its successor Mark Burry who uses digital practices to complete the Sagrada Familia. By using parametrics design, Mark Burry is able to construct the designs which are consistent with available material left by Antonio Gaudi in a much faster rate. Through the use of new technology, topology optimization has allowed Mark Burry to complete the Sagrada Familia with Antonio Gaudi’s design intent. TOPOLOGY OPTIMIZATION The complex structure of the Sagrada Familia needed a much more advance designing environment that can allow factors associated with the design thus

optimizing it’s form ergo topology optimization. Antonio Gaudi did not have such factors to be explored in a smaller scale. He can never grasp a variety of options that can allow him to build the building without the problematic issues that appeared in the construction of the Sagrada Familia. Materials are hidden with construction information; through digital environment; materials can be exposed to a more integrated environment; narrowing the process of trial and error and hence toplogy optimization can be achieved. EXPRESSION OF INTEREST In architecture, some factors suppress form, architects have settle for a simpler form just to allow accommodate its function. However like how Burry optimized Antonoio Gaudi’s Sagrada Familia form with the use of parametric design. I would want to optimize the Gateway Project form. By rapid prototyping, topology optimization can be achieved in a much quicker rate. STUDIO AIR

10


S C R I P T I N G

11

STUDIO AIR

CULTURES


SHIZUKU

SOFTlab created by Mike Szivos and Jose Gonzalez is a company that allows people from everywhere to experiment with their ideas in the virtual environment. being able to produse a form that can be fabricated or rendered. they argue thst scripting a design is best way to test an idea, if it doesnt work they can change one aspect of parameter that generates a new idea. they want to ex-

S O F T l a b

plore an uncontaminated idea. the fact that coporation of other factors may distort their ideas, that why it could way that their idea’s are always performative, at the point of optimization. however it can be argue how can their idea’s translated to a bussiness mind set. How can generated forms without a practicle funtion drive the demand for scripting cultures?.

SOME OF IT CROSSES OVER AND WHEN IT DOES, IT IS GREAT BECAUSE IT USUALLY PRODUCES NEW AND EXCITING RESULTS. YOU PROVE THAT IDEAS YOU HAD HERE WORK IN ANOTHER ENVIRONMENT. MIKE SZIVOS 2010

STUDIO AIR

12


CHROMA esthesiae

S O F T l a b By scripting rapid prototyping can be achieved and therefore many ideas can be explored and critic in a faster rate. This implies to the business world too, “time is money” and that what scripting saves, it plays around different interesting ideas and see what works and what doesn’t ,how Szivoz would put it ‘if it doesn’t work move on to the next’. SHIZUKU and CHRO-

13

STUDIO AIR

MAeathesiae are example of ideas that were fabricatied through computational design. these experiments were created by exposing different techniques to different materials. Exploiting different techniques at a much more faster rate thus optimization can be easily achieved through computational design.

IN THE STUDIO WHEN WE SIT DOWN EVERYONE HAS IDEAS AND THERE NEEDS TO BE CRITERIA. WE NEED TO QUICKLY TEST IDEAS. THE RENDERING IS ONE FORM OF TESTING AND GIVEN A SHORT TIMEFRAME THAT MAY THE BEST WAY, BUT IT IS JUST ONE WAY TO TEST IT. YOU DON’TKNOW IF IT WORKS UNTIL YOU BUILD A PROTOYPE. MIKE SZIVOS 2010


S C R I P T I N G

DISCOURSE THE DESIGNER GIVES THE POTENTIAL TOWARDS THE PRODUCT THE USER LIMITS IT THROUGH IGNORANCE

Scripting cultures allows us to manipulate form in a more rapid way. It decreases tedious work by integrating such factors into the design. However a designer must be fully aware of the tools in order to completely in control of their design or else they face the consequences of being influence by the programmer. However that may be scripting culture is a very innovative tool that can be used in the Gateway project. It allows rapid analysis of different forms and gives complex designs with different types of fabricating techniques. Time is a great factor in terms of business and scripting cultures allow the exploration and manipulation of form in smaller time frame. Such forms can be seen in these two examples by SOFTlab, the way the materials are operated are bases on precise calculation thus minimizing the risk of failing. Such geometry can be achieved just because of scripting cultures.

STUDIO AIR

14


INVENTING

& DISCOVERING

THIS PROCESS REPEATS ITSELF UNTIL THE CONSIDERED SOLUTION IS DEEMED SATIFACTORY IN ALL RELVANT MANNERS. YEHUDA E. KALAY 2004

In correspondent with Kalay 2004, the process of computational design requires some sort of trial and error. You can explore one particular solution and manipulate it to its logical conclu-

15

STUDIO AIR

sion ’depth first’, or explore the different solution and come up with a logical solution ‘breadth first’ these are some experiments showing the techniques and manipulation of parametric design.


1

2

3

4

5

6

2. Using surface grids, mathematical function The effect it has on the size of the polygons and data driven extrusion this form was created. The effects of the mathematical function on the extrusion cannot be as distinguish as the effects of it in the size of the polygons. 3. Using multiplyer on the math function,

can be clearly seen . This component enhances the effect of the mathematical funtion and gives a sense of drama towards the form. 4. Similar to the last definition , instead of the size of the polygons the effect was place on the extrusion size. the change in linear activity gave a sense of contouring. 5. This type of exploring is base of the axis in which the extrution takes place. Using a surface attractor the extrution , the form has more movement than the previous candidate STUDIO AIR

16


2D SURFACE TOR +

GRIDS DATA

7

SURFACE TEXTS

8

+

+ CURVE ATTRACDRIVEN DIMENTIONS

GRIDS + POLYGON

STREAMING COMPONENT

SURFACE POINT +

11

GRIDS DATA

+ DRIVEN

OVERLAPPING PATTERNS + ING TEXTS + DATA DRIVEN

12

ATTRACTOR ROTATION

STREAMROTATION

SURFACE TOR +

15

GRIDS + DATA

G R A D I E N T

BOOLEANING FUNCTIONS +

16

CURVE ATTRACDRIVEN ROTATION

PATTERNING + MATHS DATA DRIVEN ROTATION

E C H O

SURFACE NORMALS + IMAGE SAMPLER POINT + DATA DRIVEN COMPONENTS

9

SURFACE GRIDS + FUNCTIONS + DATA

10

SURFACE TOR POINT

13

MULTIPLE MATHS BOOLEANING DRIVEN SHADING AGE SAMPLER

14

NORMALS + DATA

+

+ DRIVEN

ATTRACROTATION

BOOLEANING PATTERNING + IMAGE SAMPLER+ DATA DATA DRIVEN DIMENTIONS

17

PATTERNING + IM- SURFACE DATA DRIVEN SHADING PLER +

18

O R G A N I C GRIDS DATA

+

IMAGE SAMDRIVEN SHADING

C O L O U R

17

STUDIO AIR


SURFACE GRIDS + FUNCTIONS + DATA

C A N D I D A T E

19

CIRCLE

D

20

MULTIPLE MATHS DRIVEN EXTRUSION

RADIUS

SURFACE MULTIPLE

23

NORMALS MATHS

+ SURFACE FUNCTIONS STREAMING

3D + TEXTS

27

AMPLIFIED

DIFFERENT

GEOMETRY

AMPLIFIED

DIFFERENT

GEOMETRY DATA

AMPLIAMPLIFIED

DATA

24

GRIDS

DIFFERENT

GEOMETRY

28

E P T H 1 EXTRUSION

D

21

HEIGHT

29

25

DRIVEN

EXTRUSION

E P T H 2 EXTRUSION FIED +

D

22

CIRCLE

HEIGHT RADIUS

26

DRIVEN

SHADING

DIFFERENT

30

GEOMETRY

E P T H 3 STUDIO AIR

18


R E S T A U R A N T

B A N Q

The BANQ interior design by dA Office used contouring. the wave like effect from the drip and slump of the contours actually organises the pace, allocating the exits and lighting features. The used of contours in a one directions was a smart way to hide the internal structure of the room. The pipes drainage and lighting structures were hidden in these contours. The used of material wood place more emphasis in the slump and drip effect of the contours, the age rings of the wood was an effective and cheap way to enhance this. Light was also use as a backdrop to emphasize this effect. The play between shadows light in intervals dramatizes the contours overall enhancing the form. What I like about the BANQ restaurant is that it uses unconventional techniques to create form. Contouring lines are hidden but dA Office used this line as a fabrication technique to define the wave like form that they desired. The use of contours in one direction also gave another visual effect. The change in perspective results in the form to disappear and reappear. This is interesting because it makes the form move without it actually moving. This “ripple� of appearance and disappearance can be used in the gateway project as many cars dive through this area thus this effect would be seen throughout the site.

IF THE LONGITUDINAL AXIS EMPHASIZES THE SEAMLESS SURFACE, THEN LATERAL VIEWS OFFER STRIATED GLIMPSES INTO THE SERVICE SPACE ABOVE, AND DEMYSTIFY THE ILLUSION. dA OFFICE 2010

S 19

P STUDIO AIR

A

C

E


R

E

V

E

R

S

E

ENGINEERING I started with a form drawn in rhino. This form is created by creating curves and lofting it into a surface. The sudden change in curves is what gives the dramatic form of the BANQ restaurant.

After the initial step extracting the contour lines was the second priority. This was done by using planes and the section component in grasshopper. What I realize is the more contours the form has the more define it becomes.

The last step is to turn the contour lines into a surface. This was express in the BANQ restaurant so no holes can be seen on the contours however when looking for a different angle the form suddenly disappears, this is because the contours are only place is one direction.

The performance of the BANQ restaurant has been an interesting one. This is because it uses the unconventional lines of the contours. Contour lines are everywhere however these lines are not seen but felt. Bringing the lines to a visual level is what interests me in this BANQ project. The line enhances the form by the movement given off by the visible contour lines.

STUDIO AIR

20


A R T I C U L A T E D

CLOUD The faรงade of the Articulated Cloud by Ned Khan uses kinetic structures. The faรงade of the building gives of a rippling effect that makes them seem like moving clouds. Being controlled at one edge the panels rotates at an axis. This rotation reflects light give of a glinting effect as it moves. This panel not only provides an aesthetic but provides a function to reduce heat in the interior of the building. The fun play between the functionality and form is explored through the motion and materiality of the faรงade. by incorporating the responsiveness of architecture and performance architecture is used in this building. Ned Khan explores the idea of how natu-

ral processes can be conveyed in a dynamic structure. He explores the idea of fluidity in motions, experimenting with water and wind. Ned Khan tries to show how can these motion can be projected in a architectural scale. His sculptiures are unconventional because it dynamic and responsive towards the site. Wyndham being a windy city, this effect can be easily transferred to this site. Using the responsiveness of the architecture to convey a performance is quite an intriguing idea. HOW INTERESTING IT WOULD BE TO APPLY IT (NATURAL PROCESSES) INTO AN ARCHITECTURAL SCALE. NED KHAN 2010

D 21

Y STUDIO AIR

N

A

M

I

C


R

E

V

E

R

S

E

ENGINEERING

1

2

1.PATTERN WITHOUT WIND 2.PATTERN WITH WIND, INDIVIDUAL PANELS FLOWS WITH THE WIND GIVING OFF A WAVE/ RIPPLE EFFECT.

To create the effects of Ned Khan’s Articulated Cloud façade effect I used 3d rotation. In order to create the effect by the wind I used an image sampler. The effect of wind on this façade gives off a ripple like motion also seen in water. This façade is unique since it is dynamic and uses wind to generate such effect. how ever this technique may be at fault because it doesn’t consider the complex movement of the movement. The achievement of the image sampler only gives off an effect like Articulated cloud. In order to this other plugins may be used in Grasshopper such as Kangaroo physics.

STUDIO AIR

22


1

2

3

4

5

23

STUDIO AIR


1. FORM AND SPACE 2. LIGHT 3. SHADOW 4. LIGHT AND SHADOW 5. STRUCTURE AND RIB

FABRICATE prototyping Prototyping the effect of the BANQ restaurant is created using laser cutting. The precise fabrication offers minimal errors. The material used was wood given the fact that the original design used wood as well. A rib structure was used in order to fix one contour so they space out evenly also the ribs provide a reversible fixing so change can be easily made. The model was later tested with light and how it reacted towards the change in perspective. Image one shows the how space is define in the model. The slumping effect provokes sublime effect throughout the form. The second photo shows the effect of light and perspective. The light escapes through the holes of the structure but restraint in a certain direction. In this photo it shows how the form slight disappears as seen from another angle. The third photo explores

the effect of shadows; this effect dramatizes the form by insinuating the lines of the contours. The contouring gives of a dramatic effect of form with efficient use of materials. However the peaks tend to sway as strong winds passes by.

STUDIO AIR

24


This model is created to explore fabrication techniques for 3D shapes. The form is created by the layering technique explored in the previous contour model. The idea is to place holes in a transparent material and layer it together. This results in form within a form. 25

STUDIO AIR

as the light bounces and refracts inside the material a 3D visualization of the model can be seen. this effect is more dramatizes when place under extreme light condidtion


This model is fabricated in order to test out patterns in a more tangible factor. The intricateness of the patterns gives of a gradient and perforating light. Another interesting effect is give is that the pattern changes the material properties of the plastic. Some areas

a more fragile than other areas resulting it to bend and move. The idea of materiality being change without changing the material is one of the unique this grasshopper can do a short amount of time.

STUDIO AIR

26


EXPL Part 2 Project Proposal

SPANISH PAVILION MIRALLES

We decided to explore the idea of how patterns and intricate lace can affect materiality. One particular precedent, the Spanish Pavilion in the Shanghai Expo 2010 design by Miralles explores the idea of weaving in the materials. This technique is similar to lacework in terms of the effect. The more connections the pattern has the more un malleable it becomes. 27

STUDIO AIR


LORE lace

PLASTIC MATERIAL WITH LACEWORK. WHEN STRETCH PATTERNS BECOME MORE 3RD DIMENTIONAL. STUDIO AIR

28


2

EXPERIMENTS 1

3

WAX Attempt of detail for main model. An interesting attempt to form a design however it is very brittle and easy to melt. PLASTIC A flexible detailed experiment however the material did not hold its shape. Shadow and light in materiality is explored 29

STUDIO AIR

PANELLING A rather thick piece of metal however it was difficult to make detailed patterns with such a small peace. It was also difficult to distort and change the geometry of it, making it hard to work with.


1

4

2

5

3

6

The design was create by a number of fac- into malleability of metal towards lace work. tors. First the pattern was constructed in the The main notion is to create something intriprogram grasshopper. We decided to use this cate and in result of that intricacy a materiality. pattern because it offers the potential towards the site. The waves of lines connecting to each other creates and intricate pattern of lace work that offers the potential of complementing the site. The outline is then modified so it fits in a particular area of the site. This step cannot be predicted systematically because we have no knowledge of implementing physics

STUDIO AIR

30


A A

SECTION AA 31

STUDIO AIR


SITE PLAN

1:5000

ELEVATION STUDIO AIR

32


33

STUDIO AIR


With experimenting with lace, we understood that our designs can be bent drastically or minimally. it is interesting to see how the distortion of a simple flat structure by bending certain points can make it more of a three dimensional design that can now show the detail from every angle as opposed to just being able to view it from the above or below. By bending the structure our model explores the effect of detailed patterns as well as materiality and change with force. STUDIO AIR

34


while exploring the effects of water on the model we notice how the the lace gathers water droplets. the water works with the metal and refracts lights giving a sublime effect.

35

STUDIO AIR


The lace interacts with light giving a unique shadow. The light passes through the negative of the lace can be seen it’s shadow. the bending resulting from the lace glints and dims of light. moving cars at night may make the model perform. STUDIO AIR

36


37

STUDIO AIR


STUDIO AIR

38


39

STUDIO AIR


STUDIO AIR

40


41

STUDIO AIR


STUDIO AIR

42


43

STUDIO AIR


STUDIO AIR

44


“HOW DO YOU STANDOUT IN THIS CHAOS? VISUAL STIMULUS, SO WE SENSE WE HAVE TO DO ONE THING AND ONLY ONE THING.” THOMAS HETHERWICK 2010 Our argument was to use the innovating techniques of digital design to create a discourse in the visual aspect of architecture. Performance architecture is a very diverse category for it evaluates different aspects of factors and tries to optimize. My truth behind performance architecture has change from the beginning. From the starts of this exploration I perceive performance architecture to be a dynamic structure however architecture does not need to be in motion in order to per-

form. Through the research of precedents performance architecture tend to exploit one particular factor thus making it iconic. This optimization can introduce to this projects since iconic is one of the specification of the brief. Thomas Heatherwick who designed the Seed Cathedral explains that in order to make something iconic a focus is needed.

REFLECTION So how can we create such criteria for an iconic look? Digital fabrication and scripting offers us to explore and invent designs in a rapid rate. From fabrication to initial ideas can be generated rapidly thus a criteria can be created in order to test them quickly and a certain optimization can be met. Through the concept derived from Kalay, the use of computational design can be explored in a linear approach or a more zig zag direction. Digital design offers effective use of time and criteria can be met

45

STUDIO AIR

through the experimental process of fabrication. For instance when one form doesn’t work you can try to develop it, or move on to another prototype. Scripting is another way of generating certain; effective use of codes to randomly generate forms can result in quick testing and prototyping. The use of computational design and digital fabrication allows form to be optimized through rapid generation.

THIS PROCESS REPEATS ITSELF UNTIL THE CONSIDERED SOLUTION IS DEEMED SATIFACTORY IN ALL RELVANT MANNERS. YEHUDA Roudavski, Stanislav (2011) Tonkin & Liu, Mike &


LEARNING Parametric modelling is really something new to me. It is very unique tool that allows you to manipulate form and patterns in a short amount of time. But just like any other tool, it must be learn thoroughly in order for one to be in completely in control of it. These needs to be accomplished or else the forms that derived from it are less complex and more chaotic. However transferring the forms from the digital world to the real world is fascinating. By visualising in the virtual is not enough and thus modelling in real life has become of a challenge as well as a great experi-

OUTCOMES

ence. The advantages of parametric are that it allows really intricate patterns to be created in a flash. Thus a wide exploration can be seen in reality.

We face problems in the constructions areas of the this course because the physical properties of lace changes as material and scale changes thus a realistic representation cannot be achieved just purely by creating it in a smaller scale. Physics and manufacturing techniques offer a limitation towards our design. However this didn’t stop us exploring the idea of lace work.

Lace can be a difficult to work with in scale however the intricacy made through parametric is captivating. For further development we would like to explore a more realistic approach of lace with compromised. Since our model is 1:200 the small scale representation required some compromise in order for it to be manufactured. The actual size of it makes the idea unbuildable because joints on the lace would destroy the properties of the design.

STUDIO AIR

46


Bibliography Roudavski, Stanislav (2011) Tonkin & Liu, Mike & Anna (2006), Hetherwick, Thomas (2010), TED talks, Burry, Mark, (2010) SIAL, Softlab, (2010) Suckerpunch Interview Kalay, Yehuda (2004) Office dA (2010) Khan, Ned (2010)

47

STUDIO AIR


STUDIO AIR

48


ADS3 S M 1 2012 K G


Final Journal