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The Guide to Intown & Outdoor Adventures in

Maine’s Kennebec Valley Learn more at KennebecValley.org


EXPLORE Maine’s Kennebec Valley Busy towns bubble with life along the entire length of the Kennebec River, each a lively hub for the surrounding community. More than simply places for the comings-and-goings of life, they are a vibrant backdrop to the excitement of intown happenings, all within earshot of the river as it carries a legacy of wilderness from the north. And what of those wild places? They offer up an escape where the woods engulf you with silence or where you can unleash your more primal side on world-class rapids, in pursuit of an elusive quarry, or simply enjoying the warmth of the summer sun. Whoever you are, whatever calls to you, Maine’s Kennebec Valley is a place where anyone and everyone will find an adventure to call their own.

Photo by: Benjamin M. Williamson Photography

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Learn more at KennebecValley.org

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Downtown Hallowell, Photo by: Dean Abramson


LEGENDARY ADVENTURES & Storied Main Streets With more than 5,000 square miles of towns, rivers, trails, and roads, there’s lots of ground to cover in Maine’s Kennebec Valley. That’s a plateful of classic diners, golden summer sunsets, countless adventures in the home of the original American sportsman, the best whoopie pies ever, and more than enough happy trails to wander all year long. The Kennebec Valley—running from the region’s southern towns of Winthrop and Gardiner to Jackman in the north bordered by Canada—is a place of long-established contrasts. Where plunging mountain waterfalls sit just up the river from towns that have elevated the idea of “small Maine town” to an art form.

Where Adventure Begins This is a place where you can climb with the sunrise to the peaks of ancient mountains, or paddle beneath a full-moon across the mirror-still surface of a pond. Where you can cast your line into swift, cold waters and catch excitement, or thrill to the intoxicating rush of the longest stretch of whitewater in the East. Here you can hike a segment of Appalachian Trail, even crossing the swiftly flowing Kennebec River by boat along the way. Each of these activities helped shape the modern American idea of adventure. Today, Maine’s Kennebec Valley offers limitless activities for visitors to experience: trips along age-old waterways, birding, moose safaris, hunting expeditions, mountain biking and hikes to awe-inspiring vistas like Moxie Falls (Maine’s highest) and the Attean Overlook at sunset. At day’s end, there are sporting camps, lodges, and even backwoods camping to offer you more than just a place to put your head.

Find it on Main Street Roam into our downtowns and along Main Streets and you’ll find that they are a near-perfect counterpoint to our wilder, wooded side. These are places where visitors will find events and festivals of all kinds. Museums packed with over three centuries of American treasures and theaters delivering performances to amuse and delight. Summertime is filled with brass band celebrations and gatherings of all shapes and sizes. Tidy downtowns, crowded fairgrounds, and great happenings all around the town. Memorable times to be had—along classic Main Streets or in distant and beautiful hamlets where families hand down vacation traditions from generation to generation. The river, with its twists and turns through the valley, has long connected the towns and villages here, embodying the creative spirit they welcome all to share. Whether it be a day spent town-hopping and window-shopping or pondering sculpture and Shakespeare, in Maine’s Kennebec Valley you can write your own story.

Spring 1976 Beginnings can’t happen without endings. Forty years ago, after more than a century of log runs down the Kennebec River, the practice of transporting timber by river from Moosehead Lake to lumber mills in Winslow came to an end. This forever changed the face of Maine’s Kennebec Valley. This was the same year that a guide by the name of Wayne Hockmeyer went in search of a great new fishing spot on the Kennebec River, but was limited by untamed rapids coming through the river’s gorge. One thing led to another and pretty soon Wayne was making the first descent of the Kennebec River by raft with a spurof-the-moment crew of bear hunters. None of them (not even Wayne) really knew what they were doing. They survived the exhilarating thrill ride and whitewater rafting on the Kennebec River—and in Maine—was born. Today, thrill-seekers from around the world make their way down the Kennebec and Dead Rivers each summer between May and October, making lifetime memories of a ride unlike any other.

Learn more at KennebecValley.org

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CONTENTS 3

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Maine’s sweetest little (and only active inland) lighthouse sits on a small island in Lake Cobbosseecontee.

Whether on a mountain path, intown trail or the open road, the choice is yours. Follow our advice or blaze your own trail.

Welcome to a place of quaint riverside communities and deeply-forested places, each filled with wonders to behold.

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Great tips on the best places to spot the Maine moose—our region’s most popular

From a roadside stand to Farmers’ Market, taste some of the freshest food around.

Legendary Adventures & Storied Main Streets

Spring 1976– A New Beginning

With the last log run down the Kennebec River a new breed rode whitewater

The Ladies Delight

Wildlife Watching

mammal—and all his forest friends.

Stop by a Farmers’ Market

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Real Maine Maple

into adventure tourism history.

Real Maine maple syrup is some of the best anywhere. Come see how it’s made every March on Maine Maple Sunday.

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On the Water

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From the epic thrill of whitewater rafting to peaceful days paddling to a blissful escape, your adventure on the water awaits.

Arts and Culture

Stellar performances, cinematic bliss, and rich storehouses of art make the cultural scene worth a second look.

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Eat, Drink & Be Merry

Enjoy everything from donuts to diners. Taste our finest finds for dinner or drink the best brews and beverages.

Hiking & Biking Trails

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Shopping

From retail therapy to browsing for antiques and Maine-made crafts, we’ve got the 411.

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Ride Maine’s Finest Trails

Don’t miss out on one of the best trail systems in the country; Maine’s Kennebec Valley is right in the center of it all.

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Deer, moose, bear, rabbit, and even upland birds, the traditions of hunting are passed

Here’s your guide to patriotic parades, musical mayhem and festivals to celebrate every manner of this and that.

Hunting

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Great Fishing All Year Long From hardwater and fly-fishing to the star of the summertime cast, bass, you’ll get hooked on fishing in Maine’s Kennebec Valley.

down from generation to generation.

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Let’s Go Camping

Deep-woods backpacking, RVing or setting up camp from the trunk of your car— there is no wrong way to camp.

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Calendar of Fairs & Festivals

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Scenic Drives

A great way to see all the beauty of the region is from behind the wheel. These are four trips that show visitors our best sides.


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Map of the Region

Waterville

Seboomook Lake

Canada

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A detailed map of the region featuring our campgrounds, scenic drives, waterfalls, 201 and the Appalachian Trail.

Map Key Dining. Film. Festivals. Art. Theater. Co u n t y L i n e ThisDR Ibustling downtown is officially the V I NG LOOP S cultural epicenter of mid-Maine. Ol d C a n a d a Ro a d

Canada Falls Lake

(See page 27.)

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S c e n i c L ow e r S o m e r s e t

Moose River

Holeb Pond

Wood Pond

Jackman

Rockwood

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Voy a g e In t e r n a t i o n a l

Skowhegan

Moosehead Lake

Long Pond

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Ap p a l a c h i a n Tra i l

6/15

Attean Pond

No r t h e r n Fo re s t

Lake Parlin

Somerset County

Greenville

6/15

10 The Forks

Pierce Pond

To Katahdin

Bald Mountain Pond

Pleasant Pond

A well-matched pair of Maine towns, a little off the beaten path, that make an ideal 16 base camp for any vacation.

Austin Pond

Kennebec River

Abbot

Mayfield Corner

Wyman Lake

To Saddleback

Canaan and Pittsfield

Moxie Pond

9 Caratunk

Flagstaff Lake

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Moxie Falls

West Forks Dead River

Grand Falls

C a n o e Tra i l With public art, a funky vibe, and other C a m p g ro u n d Wa terfall great events happening all year long, this riverside town is hitting all the marks.

Indian Pond

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Spencer Rips

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Houston Brook Falls

Moscow Bingham

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Embden Pond

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CampMaine.com om With over 200 Campgrounds and RV Parks to pick from and access to diverse planning resources, the Maine Campground Owners Association welcomes you to Vacationland.

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Anson

Harmony

Start of Old Canada Highway

Lakewood

Gardiner

Riverside Towns

Solon

Your Maine Camp Connection

Hartland

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Madison

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One of our finest. Walk along Water Street, 2. Augusta West Resort Norridgewock enjoy galleries, shops, and restaurants. 2 3. More to Life Family Campground 1. Beaver Brook Campground

Great Moose Lake

Norridgewock, Bingham, Solon, and Moscow all have great stories to tell and hold some 2 6 of the region’s beautiful secrets.

Athens

Wesserunsett Lake

Skowhegan

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, Winthrop

This is a Maine riverside original.

Sebasticook River

Winthrop

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4. Green Valley Campground Vassalboro

32 Skowhegan

Skowhegan

Long Pond

The Winthrop Lakes

Real summer find in the heart of Vacationland. 10. Indian Pond Campground 9. Northern Outdoors Adventure Resort, The Forks

Maranacook Lake

Wayne

Manchester

Indian Stream Township

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Androscoggin Lake

11. Jackman Landing Campground Jackman

Winthrop

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12. The Last Resort, Jackman Visit CampMaine.com or call 1-888-274-9030 for a FREE 2016 Maine Camping Guide.

Hallowell

Monmouth

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Cobbosseecontee Lake

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Sydney

Belgrade

Kennebec adventures are what County Readfield Echo Lake

Winslow

Messalonskee Pond

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Mount Vernon

8. The Evergreens Campground & Restaurant, Solon

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Waterville

Oakland

Great Pond

6. Skowhegan/Kennebec Valley KOA

you’ll

Kennebec Valley Tourism Council PO Box 5242, Augusta, ME 04332 (207) 623-4883 info@KennebecValley.org

Clinton Fairfield

Rome

5. Two Rivers Campground

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Hinckley

Farmington

Pittsfield

Canaan

Kennebec River

North Monmouth

7. Yogi Bear’s Jellystone Park–Yonderhill, Skowhegan

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China

For information about advertising in the 2017 Kennebec Explorer Vacation Planner or membership in KVTC, please contact Executive Director Tanya Bentley.

Vassalboro

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China Lake

Kennebec River

Augusta Hallowell

Windsor

Pittston Gardiner

Litchfield

By day a bustling river town filled with shops 95 201 and restaurants, by night a rockin’ little Auburn

Lewiston

The paper for this project was provided by Sappi Fine Paper NA.

riverside city. Big things, small package.

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Augusta

Set alongside the beautiful Kennebec, our capital city offers visitors much more than they expect.

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Belgrade Lakes

Explore boundless recreation and endless natural beauty in Jackman and Rockwood. This is a paddler’s dream come true.

It Ta ke s Mox i e

Brassua Lake Little Big Wood Pond

Jackman & the Moose River Valley

A classic enclave for rest and relaxation perched on the edge of some of the finest paddling and fishing in the region.

This publication was paid for in part by grants from the Maine Office of Tourism, Kennebec County Commissioners, and Somerset County Commissioners, and by the support of local businesses in the Kennebec Valley Tourism Council and their efforts through membership dues and advertising.

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Madison

Take a left off Route 201 and visit small-town Maine. At its heart is the classically-styled Somerset Abbey.

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©2016 Kennebec Valley Tourism Council

Home to the best white-water around on the Kennebec and Dead. Hike to a waterfall. Land a big one. Spot a moose.

Cover photo by: Mark Picard

The Forks

Publication design and content by: Thalo Blue, ThaloBlue.com

Learn more at KennebecValley.org

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ON THE WATER: A Journey to Adventure

With unlimited ways to grab your paddle, Maine’s Kennebec Valley is an open invitation to get out on the water. Imagine a day spent gliding across lakes, exploring a meandering stream, or paddling a gently flowing river. From the pulse-racing thrill of a weekend rafting our famous Kennebec and Dead rivers to a day of kayakfishing on Cobbosseecontee (a top bass angling destination), the waters of the Kennebec Valley are ready. Are you?

The Kennebec River trip begins upriver on Indian Pond and roars through the Upper Kennebec Gorge with rapids up to Class IV. Along the way you will pass through thrilling drops, waves, eddies, and holes like The Rock Garden, The Three Sisters, and Big Mama. You’ll visit the Goodbye Hole and then pray for your life in The Cathedral Eddy before getting tumbled by Maytag and descending into the Hell Hole.

40 Years of Whitewater Rafting on The Kennebec and The Dead

Up for some more? Round two takes you to the Dead River—the longest stretch of continuous class III-IV whitewater located in the East. Seasoned rafters know this 16-mile trip is loaded with intensity. Right out the gate you travel through Spencer Rips and the Minefield. A little further down, Humpty-Dumpty will leave you in pieces. You’ll have just long enough to pull yourself together before hitting Mile Long Rapids. Be wary of Little and Big Poplar Falls. This ride is no day in the park.

With two wildly popular rivers—rides of up to 8,000 cubic feet per second of water—the thrill of rafting here is immeasurable. For 40 years the Kennebec Valley has been Maine’s favorite whitewater rafting destination. Make it yours, too! Rafting is an original extreme sport. Thrill-seekers should hop aboard an iconic whitewater raft where just a few millimeters of rubber and a shield of bravado stand between you and the millions of gallons of water that wildly churn below. Down you go and then up again; the raft hurtles up over the brow of a massive wall of white water. Tension mounts and gravity slams you screaming into the foam. With each drop the boat erupts with delighted howls and laughter. This might just be the perfect welcome to the world of whitewater rafting.

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Thanks to the growing thirst for adventure, there are now many rafting companies and guides here, all well-suited for passengers of all ages and skill levels. Some offer convenient day-trips and others provide visitors with access to full-service resort amenities and an unlimited variety of other outdoor experiences.

Canoeing, SUP, and Kayaking Paddling is an escape, the ideal but temporary disconnect from


our world’s manic pace. Being on the water allows you to simply go with the flow. Life from this vantage point is great for spotting wildlife and birds. Adding some remote paddling to autumn foliage tours makes for an unforgettable trip. While we offer countless locations for excellent paddling in the Kennebec Valley, we’ve highlighted a few inspiring trips to get you on your way to planning your next paddling adventure. FLAGSTAFF LAKE: A large shallow, man-made lake set beneath the commanding presence of the Bigleow Range and just to the north of the Appalachian Trail, Flagstaff makes for a great oneday family paddling excursion, or a longer multi-day exploration when you combine the lake with the 12-mile excursion along the Dead River to Grand Falls. Put in at Long Falls Dam. THE MOOSE RIVER BOW TRIP: One of the most famed paddling trips in Maine is the Moose River Bow Trip. Spectacular scenery and great fishing make this a truly enjoyable trip for all paddlers. The 2- to 5-day wilderness paddle begins on Attean Pond, hooks to the Moose River, then goes back around to where you began— with only one portage. Add a quick hike to the top of Sally Mountain to see all of Attean Pond before you. THE BELGRADE LAKES: Easy to get to, and even easier to enjoy, the Belgrade Lakes have all the makings of a classic Maine

paddling trip. Using Belgrade Village as your base, try either Great or Long Pond to explore many coves and islands. Hike the hills at the north end of the area for a panoramic view. Tour the south end of Messalonskee Lake for birding and don’t miss the Antique Boat Parade held here each Independence Day. THE KENNEBEC RIVER: The river slows its pace as it widens to the south. Skip packing a lunch and grab something tasty along the way in Augusta, Hallowell, or Gardiner. Simply tie up and walk into town. Visit Old Fort Western, spy bald eagles, or watch for massive prehistoric sturgeon as they breach the river’s surface.

Other Great Trips CHINA LAKE: West of Augusta the beautiful shoreline and deep blue waters of China Lake make for an excellent day of paddling and a nationally-recognized bass-fishing destination. WYMAN LAKE: This large and beautiful lake, easily accessible from Moscow’s town dock, extends 15 miles to the north. Visit the Carrying Place Stream and Houston Brook Falls, and explore the islands scattered around the lake. NORTHERN FOREST CANOE TRAIL: Offers paddlers 347 miles, including some of the Kennebec Valley’s iconic experiences: Flagstaff Lake, Dead River, Attean Pond, Big Wood Pond, Moose River, Long Pond, and Brassua Lake.

Learn more at KennebecValley.org

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EAT, DRINK and Be Merry

Photo by: Tom McPherson Photography

America travels on its stomach and we’ve got miles and miles of roads in Maine’s Kennebec Valley, leaving way too many things for us to serve up here. So enjoy some of these suggested bites.

Diners. Something for Everyone Belly up to the counter, grab a coffee and dig in. These are what diners are supposed to be: the Augusta House of Pancakes, Rebecca’s (a little bit east on Route 17) and The Downtown Diner all rate pretty well, but so does the Hi-Hat in Farmingdale. Try Holly & Doug’s in Norridgewock, Bee’s (near Fort Halifax) in Winslow, and Flatlanda in Fairfield. Gardiner’s Dave’s Diner is as classic as it gets and you can count on a great cup of joe at Café at 130 in Winthrop. Last but not least, we’ve heard that you can get anything you want at Alice’s Restaurant in Skowhegan.

Looking for Some Delish Donuts? Frosty’s is Gardiner’s destination donut shop. Augusta has Doc Hollandaise, with over 30 varieties of crazy-flavored donut concoctions. Bolley’s (Hallowell and Waterville) is also a recommended donut stop. Dip into Hillman’s in Fairfield as well.

Lunchtime Favorites As a rule you shouldn’t skimp on lunch; if you want to go big, hit Big G’s in Winslow, head to Augusta’s Bagel Mainea, or the

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Red Barn—it’s simply the best fried seafood around. Try Damon’s in Augusta or Day’s Store in Belgrade for a great sandwich. Also try Kel-Mat or Old Mill Pub in Skowhegan. In Gardiner? Stop into Lisa’s Legit Burritos or the Food Co-op as both do lunch well. Try Juiced in Hallowell for some healthy eating.

Road Notes on Places to Stop Try Thompson’s in Bingham. You can blow by this place and never think twice, unless it’s meal time, because then the street is all parked up. Kniffin’s Custom Meats and Smokehouse in North Anson is the place to stop for some of the best chops and bacon, and it’s a hop, skip and jump from Maine Maple Products on Route 201 in Madison. Jorgenson’s in Waterville has great coffee and treats. We also just learned the mayor of Waterville has taken over the old Barrels Market space and turned it into an excellent Italian deli called Napoli.

It’s Time for Dinner Here is a collection of bright spots for your day’s biggest meal: Gardiner has a tidy little downtown that offers up a few of our favorite dinnertime haunts, including Pastaz, The Depot, and the A-1 Diner—a classically-styled joint that has turned “diner” into “dinner.” With downtown Augusta on the rise, we want to tip our cap in the direction of Charlemagne’s, Downtown Diner, and the


Riverfront Barbecue. Sweet Chili (located at the Augusta Airport) surprises for a tasty Thai diner. Finally, Cloud 9 at the Senator Inn & Spa is a retreat from everyday dining. If you find yourself in Waterville at dinnertime, check out Silver Street downtown—from the Silver Street Tavern and the Last Unicorn to 18 Below for sushi, there is no going wrong here. Amici’s Cucina is a great Italian meal, as is Mexican at Buen Apetito. And while it is technically in Fairfield, make the drive to The Dancing Elephant for spicy and tasty Indian food. Skowhegan offers up big flavors. Families looking for a tasty table can count on Ken’s Family Restaurant or try the Heritage House. M-Thai, right on Water Street downtown, is always packed. If you are in Belgrade for dinner, head over to the Village Inn for the duck. We also recommend either the Sunset Grill or Wing’s Hill Inn. The Forks only has a few restaurants, but these three are tops: The Kennebec Brewpub, The Boatman, and the Riverside Pub.

Treats for You Scrummy Afters in Hallowell is the spot for nostalgic sweets. The Bankery in Skowhegan and Waterville’s Holy Cannoli offer up sweets like nobody’s business, and Gifford’s Ice Cream stands in Skowhegan or Waterville cannot be beat. Want a frappe? Try Winthrop’s Fast Eddies (Wednesday is cruise night). Finally, Al’s Pizza in Skowhegan is the spot for a whoopie pie.

Let’s Quench That Thirst In 1996, Oak Pond Brewing Company opened up a brewery just outside of Skowhegan and it’s still at it today, joined by tasty upstart Bigelow Brewing Company. Sit down for a pint at the Old Mill Pub in town. This year, Main Street Skowhegan also presents the Skowhegan Craft Brew Fest on the first Saturday in September. Waterville is home to tasty suds at Mainely Brews. Looking for a drink in Hallowell? Try The Liberal Cup, offering an ever-rotating menu of beers, as well as The Quarry Tap Room and The Maine House. Kennebec River Pub & Brewery, located at Northern Outdoors Adventure Resort in The Forks, offers great seasonal brews and some of the finest IPAs in the state. Gardiner also has a brewer, or is it cider-er? Either way, look for Lost Orchard Brewing/The Crooked Halo, running a tasting room out of a converted church. In Fairfield, a new wine and specialty shop called Meridians recently opened its doors to great reviews, so stop in and stock up. Tree Spirits makes award-winning distilled beverages in Oakland, turning Maine’s best apples and maple syrup into superior wines and distilled spirits. In 2014 they also introduced absinthe—becoming the only state-licensed absinthe maker in Maine. Right across the street is Riverside Farm Restaurant & Wine Market, for a night of fine dining and music or the area’s best brunch.

Learn more at KennebecValley.org

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GREAT FISHING: All Year Long

One Cast and You’ll Be Hooked Any time of year is a good time to go fishing in Maine’s Kennebec Valley. Fly anglers love the northern Kennebec River for its springtime hatches and the chance to read the whirls and eddies. In winter, our hardwater offers a very chill kind of thrill. And if you didn’t already know it, when summer rolls around it’s all about the bass.

Fly Fishing Spots…To Start With The beautiful and storied Kennebec River beckons to the most talented fly anglers for good reason. The upper Kennebec offers them their best chances in the early morning and late afternoon. A word of caution: the river undergoes controlled releases on a published schedule. Along the Old Canada Road between the top of Lake Wyman and The Forks, there are abundant spots that perform best in the fall with brightly colored flies. From The Forks north to Indian Pond, spring fishing will include brook trout and salmon until the warming waters of summer drive the fish north to Harris Dam. Between the dam and the gorge, anglers will find good-sized fish (over 12”) up for a fight. Moving to the waters below Wyman Dam can be a rewarding experience, with season-long tail-waters for two miles between the dam and the Austin Stream inlet—even spots below the turn of

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the river south of the old Gadabout Gaddis Airport. While fishing near the dam, try using Weeping Willows and Kastmasters. Moving south, there are good but hard-to-reach areas along the Kennebec from the Solon Bridge south to North Anson. Fishing for beautiful brown trout from a kayak makes the best sense here. The river is alive with insects, so try your luck with match the hatch fishing. Fishing below the Shawmut Dam down into Fairfield is considered terrific for big browns (it’s also a great birding spot).

Hardwater Winter is hard in Maine, and from December through March it’s even harder for devoted fishermen to give up their favorite sport. If that’s how you feel, then hit the ice! Get an auger and a few tip-up traps, maybe even drag a house onto the ice. Bring the right tackle and bait for what you are after as well, remembering that pike have very sharp teeth. Choose a pond or lake, or maybe wait for a local derby. Then give it a go. Mostly, you end up doing a lot of waiting, but the time goes quickly when you are among friends. Fishing on the ice is a completely different cultural experience from other inland sport fishing here. If you love to fish, this is an amazingly fun and community-based experience worth giving a try.


The Ladies Delight Light

Photo courtesy of Maine Man vs. Bass Trail

Lake Fishing for Bass Maine’s Kennebec Valley is the perfect destination for your fishing vacation. But as its popularity grows, don’t be surprised if you find yourself fishing alongside a pro bass boat with a TV crew in tow. No joke: In August 2014, Major League Fishing spent several weeks crisscrossing mid-Maine, filming The Summit Cup Series. This summer, the popular Maine Man vs. Bass Trail series continues to reel ‘em in, too. Whatever calls to you, there is no denying our bass status when Bassmaster Magazine’s Top 100 Lakes lists three here in Maine—Cobbosseecontee, Moosehead, and China (2014)— which all happen to be in the fishing-friendly Kennebec Valley.

Free Fishing Days New to fishing, but want to give it a try? Twice each year, the Maine Department of Inland Fish and Wildlife offers individuals looking to fish for the first time the chance to do so without a license. This is a great opportunity for families with young children to give fishing a go. But, if you are coming with kids who have never fished before, leave your own gear behind so you can give your full attention to helping them with their gear.

Hire a Guide You will without a doubt get more out of your fishing experience if you invest in the services of a Registered Maine Guide. Maine has one of the largest and best-tested group of guides around. But that’s no reason not to do your homework. Ask questions. Build rapport. Then make your decision on whom to go with. More than anything, make sure that the guide’s credentials are up to date and that they are responsive to your needs before your first cast hits the water.

As Maine’s only fully-operational inland light, The Ladies Delight Light sits at the north end of Lake Cobbosseecontee, a narrow and shallow but highly-popular southern Kennebec Valley lake spanning the towns of Manchester, Monmouth, West Gardiner, Winthrop, and Litchfield. Designed by Frank Morse, a Boston marine architect, the lighthouse was erected in 1908 by the Cobbosseecontee Yacht Club to protect boaters and ferries that regularly crossed the lake at the time. A centennial celebration for the light was held in 2008 and exterior restoration work was completed in 2011, securing the structure’s position as the crown jewel of the recreational boating, swimming, and fishing lake. While the dainty 25-foot-tall lighthouse is inaccessible to the public, those looking for the best view can spot it from various shoreline locations. It is, however, best viewed by boat. Lodging establishments along the lake are known to offer boat rentals or private lighthouse cruises to visitors for a small fee.

Learn more at KennebecValley.org

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COME CATCH THE EXCITEMENT Whether you are out for the day or out for glory, fishing on the ponds and lakes of mid-Maine delivers endless excitement. This summer, come watch the Maine Man vs. Bass Trail fishing tournaments—New England’s premiere open competitive bass fishing events—including the Tournament of Champions in October, where the top half of the field competes for a chance at fishing in the Bassmaster Classic. Great Pond - Belgrade - April 24 China Lake - China - August 6 Messalonskee - Oakland - September 24 Long Pond (Wild Card) - Belgrade - October 8 2016 TOURNAMENT OF CHAMPIONS

Maranacook Lake (Day 2)- Winthrop - October 16 Cash Prize: $ 5,300 Site of a Major League Fishing 2014 Summit Cup Event

FMI: MaineManvsBassTrail.com These Events Sponsored By

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Photo by: Daniel Marquis

WILDLIFE WATCHING: Bring Your Camera In Search of the Maine Moose

Birds, Birds, and More Birds

Marshy roadsides and abundant heavily-wooded areas in the upper Kennebec Valley place it among Maine’s best locations for spotting Maine’s perennial favorite social media star—the moose.

With 275 identified species populating dozens of locations here, our waterways, bogs, farmland, and forested mountains are a welcome haven for birds and birders alike.

During spring foaling and then again in the autumn, you will find these beloved giants wandering and feeding along the Route 201 artery above The Forks. Route 15 between Jackman and Rockwood can also be great for moose-spotting.

Augusta’s Viles Arboretum is a treasure, with 165 documented species. Other popular “in-town” locations up and down the river include the waterfront in Gardiner, the Kennebec River Rail Trail, and the Hallowell waterfront. Around Waterville, check out Fort Halifax and the campus of Colby College.

Late autumn may be the perfect time of all to search for moose, because each year male moose grow a new set of antlers that get shed around the time snow starts to fall. It goes without saying that moose are wild creatures. Please keep your distance at all times—especially when there is a bull moose or cow with her calf(s). The best moose viewing experience has to be seeing one in its element: out in the woods while you are hiking, or riding an ATV or snowmobile. The region has many professional wildlife safari guides who have spent years sharing the world of these animals with visitors.

Just north of Fairfield, the Shawmut Dam is a birding hotspot, as is the entire area of Belgrade—from the hills in the north to the bog and stream at Messalonskee Lake’s southern end. Further north, be sure to visit the Appalachian Trail’s intersection with the south end of Flagstaff Lake. For more excellent birding info and resources, check out the Maine Birding Trail Guide, Maine Audubon, and eBird.org.

Learn more at KennebecValley.org

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SHOPPING: A Different Kind of Adventure

Shop Big The secret is out that Augusta has some of the best shopping in Maine. It’s close to the highway and all the big national stores are represented. The biggest place of all to get some shopping done is at The Marketplace at Augusta: It offers a great blend of national retailers like Barnes & Noble and Old Navy, with brands like ULTA and Christopher & Banks, too. You can also shop for bargains at Kohl’s or grab a bite with friends and family at Chipotle or Elevation Burger. Whether it is shopping for something you forgot at home, or maybe you just want to treat yourself while on vacation, you are bound to find what you need.

Shop Small Sometimes the big stores don’t have the cool creations or local finds you desire. That’s why shopping small has so many benefits. The towns and villages along the Kennebec Valley have been welcoming visitors to the region for years. So whether it’s a bike repair, a whoopie pie, stylish earrings, artwork from a local gallery, or a new coffee mug, local artisans have their finger on the pulse of all the things you might be seeking. Looking around, you’ll notice that all our towns have done a marvelous job creating areas to attract local merchants of all kinds. Snuggled between the area’s finest eating and drinking

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establishments, you will find new fashions, collectibles, and things that go zip and zoom for the kids. But keep your eyes open as you travel our byways, too: Delightful out-of-the-way shops are in the most surprising places.

Where to Shop? Well, Start on Main Street, Of Course! As the centers of the community, they have all the “local stuff,” so it is always a good idea to begin your search along the main streets, then work your way out from there. Interestingly enough, the main street in many of our Main Street Maine communities is Water Street (Gardiner, Hallowell, Skowhegan and Augusta). Waterville has an actual Main Street at the center of town. In Fairfield look for Upper Main Street and in Skowhegan it’s both Madison Avenue and Water Street. Pittsfield shopping will be mostly along Somerset Avenue. In Winthrop head to Main Street off Route 202.

Antiquing: Looking for that Good Old Stuff Many diehards compare their search in terms of “the hunt.” We are proud to have more than a few spots across the region that have attracted “pickers” looking for a perfect piece of American farm history, a country table, or a vintage road sign that helps to complete that room. Using Route 201 (and 202) as a great place to begin, keep your eyes open for the word “antiques” on old signs. Hot spots include

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Photo by: Tom McPherson Photography

Hallowell’s Water Street, running along the riverfront. It is densely lined with a small but well-groomed collection of antique shops, art galleries, and boutiques, all packed to the gills with the best stuff (old and new) you have ever laid your eyes on. Along Route 201 above Augusta, there’s a place called Jellison’s, but for the most part you need to head up 201 to Fairfield for a day’s antique adventures at the Fairfield Antiques Mall, Poulin’s, The Trading Post, and James D. Julia’s. Each is as different as the next. In fact, if you plan your trip right, you might witness the world’s foremost firearms auctioneer, James D. Julia—an Antiques Roadshow regular—in action. So if you are on the hunt, keep your eyes open and your ears perked up. Bargains and surprises will meet you at every turn.

Crafts A couple years back, the Maine Turnpike Authority entered into a wonderful relationship with the Maine Crafts Association and opened the Center for Maine Craft at the West Gardiner Travel Plaza. No matter what time of year, if you stop in you’ll get the chance to pick up something special created by one of Maine’s hugely-talented crafts workers. You can also stop in at the Maine Made & More stores in Belgrade and Waterville for more Maine craft and gifts that truly “speak like a Mainer.”

Fiber Art “Only in Maine” is a phrase heard from time to time, but with the annual Fiber Frolic, they might be right. This early June festival, held at the Windsor Fairgrounds, is a mecca for the fiber art world. It is a marketplace “celebrating fiber, fiber animals, and fiber arts.” Not too baaaad!

Native American Culture For visitors with an interest in the crafts of Maine’s first people, make the trip to the southwestern part of Somerset County along Route 27, where you’ll find Nowetah’s American Indian Museum. The owners offer a free glimpse into what might be one of the larger private collections of American Indian crafts, pottery, and baskets in all of New England. With over 600 examples of basketry and bark containers, it truly is a sight to behold.

Stocking up for Camping From Gardiner up to Waterville, there are numerous options for groceries. But Skowhegan is home to the last big grocery, a Hannaford, before you head into the Maine woods; you’ll also find a Walmart here for odds and ends you left at home. Farther up Route 201, there are terrific family-run places, and if they don’t have it, you don’t need it. These include the Solon Corner Market, Jimmy’s Shop & Save in Bingham, Berry’s in The Forks, and Bishop’s in Jackman.

Learn more at KennebecValley.org

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COME RIDE Maine’s Finest Trails

Riding an ATV can take you from a secluded waterfall, private lookout spot, and deeply-wooded wildlife habitats to magnificent lakesides where breathtaking sunsets are followed by the haunting call of loons across the water. Maybe you dream of a week spent bundled up against the cold as you travel by sled through one of the best trail systems in the country. Our region offers hundreds of miles of well-maintained backcountry trail opportunities for all skill levels. Whether you’re looking for a short, relaxing family ride, a day of mountain trail exploration, or perhaps a longer overnight excursion, snowmobiling and ATVing are a classic Maine experience you shouldn’t miss out on.

A Winter’s Day Journey Through the Snowy Landscapes of the Upper Kennebec Valley Visitors have been coming to Maine’s Kennebec Valley for years to experience world-class snowmobile riding. Throughout the region, resorts and lodges offer packages allowing you to ride trails to and from their back doors. In fact, one of the best ways to enjoy wintertime here is to climb aboard a snowmobile, rev up the engine, and ride to your heart’s content across the frozen landscape. Travel through snow-covered forests of fragrant spruce and balsam, and along frozen streams and rivers. Traverse wide-open fields and vast expanses. Those looking to do some ice-fishing often drive onto frozen lakes and ponds. Check locally for safe ice conditions.

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Toward the Canadian border, you’ll discover snowmobile-friendly towns that you have probably never heard of. Historic outfitters, camps, and resorts can provide you with complete rentals (should you need them) and guide services so you don’t have to explore on your own. Most are well-equipped with riding gear and supplies. Plan ahead and make reservations, or take a chance and show up for an impromptu outing. Those seeking camaraderie can take part in numerous club activities, like pancake breakfasts, trail lunches, region-wide social rides, and competitive events. Guided sled tours are also available. Choose from half- or full-day outings for families, friends, and business associates, or from extended trips of a few days or more. Whatever package you choose, always count on a truly memorable outdoor adventure.

Summer Through Late Fall, Zig-Zag Through Remote Woods and Fields In warmer weather, those with a hunger for the trail can easily find adventure in Maine’s Kennebec Valley, because many trails are multi-use (summer and winter). Sitting astride an ATV has so much to offer: exhilaration, endless vistas, and raucous fun. The best part about touring on an ATV is that the farther you get from civilization, the more relaxing life becomes. So go on, head north and dig deep into the seemingly unexplored forests of the


Photo courtesy of: Northern Outdoors

region. The vast network of accessible trails will take you beyond the boundaries of your imagination. One piece of advice to always remember when you spend time traversing the Maine woods: Much of the land you are traveling on is not state or public. It belongs to private landowners who have generously agreed to allow recreational use of their property. We ask that you please tread lightly. Making snowmobile or ATV adventures part of your vacation is not hard to do. Local chambers of commerce or snowmobile and ATV clubs can hook you up with outfitters, or join club rides and events to make your visit successful. Visit MESnow.com or ATVMaine.org to do your research first. That way, when you arrive, all you’ll need to do is hit the gas and have a blast.

Three great rides in Maine’s Kennebec Valley: 1. Pittston Farm Trail Location: Jackman

Beginning at the trailhead in Jackman, this scenic 60-mile ATV or snowmobile day trip to Historic Pittston Farm takes riders past several breathtaking vistas. For ATVs, terrain varies from gravel and skidder trails to true forest terrain.

2. Greenville Trail Location: The Forks

This loop ATV/snowmobile trail covers about 100 miles total— depending on the route you choose—with diverse sights along the way, including Moxie Falls, Lake Moxie, Moxie Bald Mountain, Shirley Bog, Greenville, Moosehead Lake, and Little and Big Moose Mountain. Trail conditions are 85% gravel roads and 15% skidder trails. Parking is available at Northern Outdoors or Berry’s Store in The Forks.

3. Sugarloaf Mountain Lookouts Location: Bingham Information regarding trail riding is sponsored by the Maine Department of Agriculture, Conservation and Forestry.

Learn more at ParksandLands.com

This trail, which starts in Bingham on a section of the Kennebec Valley Trail, has a loop distance of 25–35 miles and offers several pull-off areas with river views and unequalled opportunities to spot bald eagles, ospreys, loons, deer, and moose. Once at the overlook, catch a glimpse of the Sugarloaf Mountain range and the Moxie Mountains. Trail conditions are 80% gravel roads and 20% backcountry trails.

Learn more at KennebecValley.org

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HUNTING: A time-honored tradition

Registered Maine Guides There are nearly 4,000 licensed Maine guides—most operating as small independent businesses—who offer highly personal and customized experiences, taking you to places you wouldn’t have otherwise found, offering equipment, advice, and instruction. Once you’re ready to go, they step aside and let you enjoy the action. When you explore the woods and waters of the Kennebec Valley in the company of a Registered Maine Guide, you can be assured of a first-class outdoor recreation experience. Cast for native brook trout on a remote pond, hunt for deer on a frosty autumn morning, raft a roaring river, hike a quiet wilderness trail, pitch a comfortable camp in a forest of spruce and fir, canoe a scenic stretch of river and watch for moose. The list goes on and on and on. Find a professional guide at MaineGuides.org.

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There’s a reason that sportsmen continue to take advantage of the traditional relaxing hospitality and hunting experience that Maine’s Kennebec Valley has to offer. Consider yourself invited to come and enjoy these time-honored traditions for yourself. Our Kennebec Valley sporting camps, guides, lodges will make your hunt memorable. From black bear to white-tailed deer or even our mammoth moose, no matter how you hunt or where you stay, our region has a longstanding tradition of making guests feel comfortable. Those who prefer bird hunting will find prime opportunities to hunt for ruffed grouse, woodcock, and other species in wide variety throughout our varying landscape. Lakes and ponds provide excellent waterfowl hunting. Pheasant hunting is found on upland preserves. Finally, Maine’s wild turkey population is strong once again, providing experienced hunters with yet another challenge. And what would the hunt be without a great place to hang your cap at the end of the day? The superb hospitality here keeps sportsmen coming back every year to warm beds, ideal trailside locations, and home-cooked meals. What more could a sportsman want?

Before You Hunt As always, we encourage you to be prepared. Find a place to stay that fits your style and suits your needs. Plus, with hunting taking place almost year-round, there are nearly endless opportunities. Don’t limit yourself to just one quarry or one season. Visit Maine.gov if you wish to purchase your license before you arrive (or get one while here). Lastly, we highly encourage anyone new to the sport of hunting to consider using a Registered Maine Guide. Working with someone who knows the terrain can greatly improve your success and the chances that you’ll be back next year for more.


The Endless Variety of CAMPING From rugged fun to relaxing in the sun, you’re sure to make wonderful memories when you hit the road with all your camping stuff. Bring your sense of adventure and a plan to have no plans. Get out and have fun. You’ll be amazed what it can do for your soul.

The Lakes in Monmouth Cool, clean waters welcome you to our region. Fish for bass that take home the prize and panfish with a sweet sizzle over a hot fire. Sleep soundly to the chirrup of peepers and crickets. Then go for a dawn hike, or maybe even sleep in for awhile.

Canaan and Beyond From Canaan, along Route 2 and north up 201 to Solon and Bingham, you’ll find centrally-located family campgrounds

that offer the quintessential Maine camping experience. Explore Lake George Regional Park. Paddle, swim, hike, bike, repeat.

Sportsman’s Original Head north to the Moose River Valley for a bit of four-season camping and uncover a special part of Maine. Be careful though. The moment you set up camp, you may never want to leave. Do everything or nothing. Hunt in the grand tradition, cast into swift streams, or paddle the famous Moose River Bow Trip.

Notes for Newbies Check out the many resources online, like CampMaine.com. Plan ahead and make reservations. Look at next year’s spot on this year’s trip. Pack light: You really don’t need that extra stuff.

Learn more at KennebecValley.org

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Photo by: Tom McPherson Photography

HIT THE TRAIL: Great Hiking is Surprisingly Close By Even we have trouble keeping up with the number of places to spend time on the trail in Maine’s Kennebec Valley. It would take a lifetime to travel, or even to describe every mile of hiking, biking, or skiing.

The trailhead for this enjoyable hike is about one mile north of the intersection of Routes 27 and 225 in Rome. Bring a camera.

Rest assured the scenery is beautiful whether you walk along the river, hike our huge collection of rugged trails, or take to the numerous scenic wooded roads well-suited for a country ride.

This well-tended collection of short in-town trails for all experience levels is an excellent add-on to a day in Waterville. Future plans include an in-town boardwalk along the Kennebec. Beautiful views, woods, and open spaces.

For biking, try the Bond Brook area in Augusta, the Hallowell Reservoir, Lake George Regional Park in Canaan, Kennebec Messalonskee Trails in Waterville, Kennebec Highlands in Belgrade, or the DeBe Park River Walk Trail in Skowhegan. Hikers should prepare by researching trails that best match their skill level and plans, at MaineTrailFinder.com and MapMyHike.com/US/ME. Here are a few suggestion to get you started, in case you’re short on time.

French Mountain Trail

Location: Rome Length: 0.8 Miles Challenge: Easy

Anyone looking for that classic view of Belgrade’s stunning lakes should make this hike to the 716-foot summit of French Mountain.

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Kennebec Messalonskee Trails

Location: Waterville Length: Varies Challenge: Varies

Moxie Falls

Location: The Forks Area Length: 0.6 Miles Challenge: Easy

The reward of this beautiful hike is Maine’s highest waterfall and swimming hole. An inspiring way to end a day of whitewater rafting.

Sally Mountain

Location: Attean Road, Jackman Length: 4.8 Miles Challenge: Moderate Located a couple of miles out of Jackman, this trail climbs to a summit boasting beautiful views of Wood Pond and the magnificent Attean Pond with its collection of islands to the west.


FILL YOUR BASKET AT A FARMERS’ MARKET Bright and colorful signs advertise the “freshest corn ever,” apples that bite back, and brilliantly hued pumpkins of a thousand shapes and sizes. This is the story of roadside stands and farmers’ markets. So when you are on the road, keep your eyes peeled—you might come across a pile of heirloom tomatoes stacked high and priced to sell on the honor system, or boxes of “Fresh Eggs” waiting to become tomorrow’s breakfast. The list below shows the many farmers’ markets across our region. Each has its own personality and appeal. All offer the finest and freshest from the hardworking farmers throughout Maine’s Kennebec Valley.

Augusta Farmers’ Market

East Vassalboro Farmers’ Market

Fairfield Farmers’ Market

Farmers’ Market at Mill Park, Augusta

Gardiner Summer Farmers’ Market

Downtown Waterville Farmers’ Market

Mid-May to Mid-October

Mid-May to Mid-November

Viles Arboretum Farmers’ Market Year-round

Belgrade Lakes Farmers’ Market Mid-May to Mid-October

Canaan Farmers’ Market May to October

May to October May to October

Gardiner Winter Farmers’ Market November to April

Pittsfield Farmers’ Market May to Halloween

Skowhegan Farmers’ Market Year-round

Mid-May to October

May to Mid-November

Waterville Winter Farmers’ Market November to April

Wayne Farmers’ Market June to Halloween

Winthrop Farmers’ Market May to October

Thanks to the Get Real, Get Maine website—GetRealMaine.com—for the content in this listing. We encourage you to check there or call ahead for specifics on locations, dates, and times.

Learn more at KennebecValley.org

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TREE-TO-TABLE: Real Maine Maple Syrup The Facts About Maple • The year 1557 marks the first written account of maple sugaring practices, including those used by members of Maine’s native tribes. • 12 million taps are used by Somerset County maple producers—making it the top-producing county worldwide. • 40 gallons of maple sap are needed for every gallon of syrup produced. • One cord of wood will boil down enough sap for 15-25 gallons of syrup. • Of the 200+ maple tree species, only about a dozen are suitable for making syrup (sugar and rock are the most popular). • 30 to 40 is the prime age for a tree to be tapped, with a 40-year-old tree producing 10 gallons of sap per season, resulting in only 1 quart of syrup.

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While maple producers have been working hard all winter long, the abundant sugar and rock maple trees that make up the vast sugar bush of the northern part of Maine’s Kennebec Valley have been enjoying a long wintery nap. For the growing legion of backyard farmers and commercial sugar makers of the region, late winter is a busy time of year. Around the middle of February, frigid nights and slightly warming days send the message that spring is on its way down into the tree’s roots. Soon after, excitement and wood smoke fill the air as maple sap gets boiled down for hours at a time into sweet, delicious maple syrup. Maine maple syrup reflects tradition, science, and innovation, all while relying heavily on the everchanging weather. At its core, it is an age-old process, from bucket to evaporator to bottle. But every sugar-maker has stories that describe why their syrup is the best you’ve ever had. Maine, most especially the Kennebec Valley, is proud of that tradition and annually welcomes the season by celebrating Maine Maple Sunday on the last Sunday in March. Sugar houses across the region open up the doors to their barns and welcome visitors to get a taste of that sweet stuff. The welcoming town of Skowhegan, the heart of Maine’s most active sugaring community, celebrates this delicious food with an annual festival on the days leading up to Maine Maple Sunday. Once you’ve got some syrup of your own, pour a little on your waffles, mix a spoonful into your yogurt, or glaze a salmon filet.


Photo courtesy of: Theater at Monmouth

Photo courtesy of: Waterville Creates

The Arts are Everywhere You Look From a classic American theater perched upon the edge of a sparkling Maine lake to a gleaming modern museum showcasing the finest American artwork of the past three centuries, our arts community keeps shining brightly. The arts and culture of Maine’s Kennebec Valley offer numerous reasons to visit.

Theater and Musical Performance There is no denying that the Kennebec Valley offers many exciting options for live performances. Waterville Opera House now offers performances year-round. During the summer visit the majestic Snow Pond Center for the Arts in Sidney. Lakewood Theater in Madison raises its curtain every season, as does the Gaslight Theater in Hallowell, Johnson Hall in Gardiner, and Theater at Monmouth. Hallowell has many year-round music venues, including a stage right on the banks of the Kennebec. Lovers of country and bluegrass should also check out the Blistered Fingers family bluegrass festival and Country Fest in Litchfield.

Art Museums and Galleries The Colby Museum of Art continues to impress visitors with its vast collection of American art housed in a gorgeous new home. The 2013 opening of a beautiful pavilion—making it Maine’s largest art museum—is a must-see stop (and it’s free!) For art on a smaller scale, take in the work of talented artists showing at Gardiner’s Monkitree, Hallowell’s Harlow Gallery, or Common Street Arts in Waterville.

Cinema & Festivals The Maine Film Center offers year-round showings and annual events like the acclaimed Maine International Film Festival. For a little more “action,” travel to The Forks in August for the Maine Outdoor Film Festival: a perfect venue for watching films made about the great outdoors as you sit beneath the summer stars in the Maine woods.

Learn more at KennebecValley.org

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Step Right Up, Folks!

Welcome to the Fair When was the last time you spent a day at “the fair?” Saw the bright blue ribbon on a perfectly-grown cabbage? Rode the bumper cars or watched the demolition derby? Chowed down on a deep-fried “something” that was deliciously decadent? How long has it been since you held your sweetheart’s hand and sang along to your song? The draw to buy your ticket and pass through those magical gates is simply magnetic. Give in—let your senses be overwhelmed by nostalgia. Celebrations surrounding community, food, and commerce have medieval, even ancient roots. Through the passage of time they have evolved into the kinds of fairs now in Maine’s Kennebec Valley. Each of our fairs has a character all its own—filled with fascinating livestock competitions, educational demonstrations, and entertainment of every kind imaginable. Beginning our season at the Windsor Fair Grounds in early June is the Fiber Frolic—Maine’s premier sheep and wool festival. Then we offer about a dozen other community, traditional, progressive, and small-town fairs that roll on all summer long and into harvest season—including the Skowhegan State Fair, America’s longest-running fair at nearly 200 years. Check out our event calendar to the right for a full listing of all the fairs that celebrate our region’s agricultural roots. Walk the events, take a chance in the midway. Heck, even jump on the carousel for old time’s sake. Brass ring, anyone?

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Fairs, Festivals, and Special Events Come celebrate with us. Most every sizable city and town in Maine’s Kennebec Valley will play host to an annual Memorial Day and Labor Day parade, fall harvest festival, and Christmas festivity. We have assembled a collection of our best fairs and festivals to celebrate the unique personality of this welcoming place.

MAY ‘16

Old Hallowell Day

Dead River Releases May 7, 14, and 29 The Forks

July 16 Hallowell

Pittston Fair July 21–24 Pittston

JUNE Whatever Family Festival

June 15–July 4 Augusta, Hallowell, Gardiner

Maine Fiber Frolic

The Kneading Conference July 28–29 Skowhegan

Maine Artisan Bread Fair

The Great Windsor Fair August 28–September 5 Windsor

SEPTEMBER Harmony Free Fair September 2–5 Harmony

Maine Outdoor Film Festival

December 2–3 Skowhegan

AUGUST Skowhegan River Fest

Litchfield Fair

August 2–6 Skowhegan

September 4–6 Litchfield

Gardiner Parade of Lights

Taste of Waterville

Clinton Lions Fair

June 18 Gardiner

August 3 Downtown Waterville

September 8–11 Clinton

Whatever Kids Day in Capital Park

Monmouth Fair

Common Ground Fair

August 4–7 Monmouth

September 23–25 Unity

Loon Calling Contest

Monmouth Apple Festival

Skowhegan State Fair

Manchester Apple Festival

June 27 to July 24, 2016 Waterville

August 11–20 Skowhegan

JULY 4th of July Parade and Fireworks

Winslow Blueberry Festival August 13 Winslow

July 4 Augusta

4th of July Family Fun Day July 4 Jackman

Maine International Film Festival July 8–17 Waterville

Central Maine Egg Festival July 11–13 Pittsfield

August 6 Belgrade Lakes

Country Fest August 15 Litchfield

Blistered Fingers Family Bluegrass Festival August 24–28 Litchfield

Anson-Madison Days August 25–28 Madison

November 25–December 22 Downtown Waterville

Holiday Stroll

Blistered Fingers Family Bluegrass Festival

Atlantic Music Festival

Kringleville

Skowhegan Craft Brew Fest September 3 Skowhegan

June 25 Augusta

November 25 Downtown Waterville

DECEMBER

July 30 Skowhegan

Greater Gardiner River Festival

Waterville Parade of Lights

September 3 The Forks

June 4–5 Windsor

June 15–19 Litchfield

NOVEMBER

September 24 Monmouth September 24 Manchester

OCTOBER Maine Craft Weekend October 1 & 2 Regionwide

Harvest Festival

Columbus Day Weekend Belgrade Lakes

Swine & Stein Oktoberfest October 8 Gardiner

December 3 Gardiner

Christmas in Old Hallowell Hallowell

Belgrade Holiday Stroll December 3 Belgrade

FEBRUARY ‘17 Winter Carnival and Ice Fishing Derby

Lake George Regional Park Canaan

Maine Pond Hockey Classic February 10-12 Snow Pond, Sidney

MARCH ‘17 Jackman Winter Festival First Weekend Jackman

Annual Maple Festival March 24–26 Skowhegan

Maine Maple Sunday

Haunted Hayride & Zombie 5K Obstacle Course

Fourth Sunday Annually Regionwide

October 28–29 Skowhegan

This list is far from complete and exact dates of events cannot always be determined by time of publication. Please visit KennebecValley.org or search the internet for more information on events.

Learn more at KennebecValley.org

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EXPLORE Maine’s Kennebec Valley Each rolling twist along the way could lead to a chance encounter with your next great adventure. Read on to learn more about the cities and towns in Maine’s Kennebec Valley.

Jackman

Rockwood The Forks

Bingham Madison Belgrade Lakes Winthrop Monmouth

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Skowhegan Canaan Pittsfield Waterville Augusta Hallowell Gardiner


SCENIC DRIVES A great way to cover the Kennebec Valley’s nearly 5,000 square miles is by car. Whether you’ve come for world-class outdoor adventure or just a quick weekend getaway, you’re bound to see some of our best sites from behind the wheel.

Old Canada Road National Scenic Byway Maine’s historical, industrial, and economic past travels along Route 201, weaving its story through our cities and towns. Officially, the byway begins in the hills above Skowhegan, where ME-43 meets US-201, and heads north to the international border with Canada. Unofficially, it began 400 years ago and continued through Maine’s industrial boom years of the 20th century, providing the connective tissue between the U.S. and Canada for generations of French-Canadians living in Maine to this day. Length: 78 Miles Travel Time: 3 Hours Learn more at OldCanadaRoad.org.

Scenic Lower Somerset Proceed on Route 150 from Skowhegan to Athens; join Route 151 and at Mayfield Corner turn left onto Route 16 to Bingham, then travel south on Route 201 all the way back to Skowhegan. Length: 60 Miles Travel Time: 1 Hour, 15 Minutes

It Takes Moxie Take Route 201N from Bingham to The Forks and turn right onto Lake Moxie Road. Two miles down on the right will be a parking area for the trail to Moxie Falls. The easy hike is 1.2 miles total. Back on Route 201, head north to Jackman, with a right onto Route 6/15 to Rockwood and on to Greenville Center, then south to Route 16 at Abbot and back to Bingham. Length: 144 Miles Travel Time: 3 Hours, 18 Minutes

Voyage International Follow Route 201N from Skowhegan to the Canadian border (passport required). Once in Canada, take Route 173, turning left at Route 269 and left again at Route 204 in St. Gideon. Follow Route 161 to Woburn, cross into the U.S. to Coburn Gore, follow Route 27 into Kingfield, turn onto Route 16 through Madison, and then head south on Route 201A back into Skowhegan. Length: 245 Miles Travel Time: 5 Hours, 25 Minutes

Photo by: Daniel J. Marquis Photography

Learn more at KennebecValley.org

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Holeb Pond

Wood Pond

12

Flagstaff Lake

Spencer Rips

Canada Falls Lake

6/15

Bingham

Moscow

Pleasant Pond

9

10

Austin Pond

Bald Mountain Pond

Moosehead Lake

Rockwood

Mayfield Corner

Moxie Pond

Indian Pond

Seboomook Lake

Brassua Lake

Moxie Falls

Wyman Lake

Kennebec River

Caratunk

The Forks

Houston Brook Falls

Pierce Pond

Dead River

West Forks

201

Lake Parlin

Long Pond

Somerset County

11

Jackman

Grand Falls

Attean Pond

Little Big Wood Pond

Moose River

201

Canada

To Saddleback

28

16

To Katahdin

6/15

Greenville

Wa t e r f a l l

Abbot

C a m p g ro u n d

No r t h e r n Fo re s t C a n o e Tra i l

Ap p a l a c h i a n Tra i l

Voy a g e In t e r n a t i o n a l

It Ta ke s Mox i e

S c e n i c L ow e r S o m e r s e t

Ol d C a n a d a Ro a d

(See page 27.)

DR I V I NG LOOP S

Co u n t y L i n e

Map Key


Learn more at KennebecValley.org 29

Auburn

Visit CampMaine.com or call 1-888-274-9030 for a FREE 2016 Maine Camping Guide.

12. The Last Resort, Jackman

Jackman

11. Jackman Landing Campground

Indian Stream Township

10. Indian Pond Campground

9. Northern Outdoors Adventure Resort, The Forks

8. The Evergreens Campground & Restaurant, Solon

7. Yogi Bear’s Jellystone Park–Yonderhill, Skowhegan

Skowhegan

Lewiston

6. Skowhegan/Kennebec Valley KOA

Skowhegan

5. Two Rivers Campground

Vassalboro

4. Green Valley Campground

Winthrop

3. More to Life Family Campground

2. Augusta West Resort, Winthrop

North Monmouth

1. Beaver Brook Campground

With over 200 Campgrounds and RV Parks to pick from and access to diverse planning resources, the Maine Campground Owners Association welcomes you to Vacationland.

Your Maine Camp Connection

CampMaine.com om

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1

95

201

Litchfield

Cobbosseecontee Lake

2

3

Manchester

Maranacook Lake

Winthrop

Monmouth

Androscoggin Lake

Wayne

Great Pond

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2

Kennebec River

Messalonskee Pond

Oakland

Pittston Gardiner

Hallowell

Augusta

Kennebec River

5

Athens

201

Winslow

Waterville

Fairfield

China Lake

Windsor

4

Vassalboro

Sydney

201

Canaan

6

China

Clinton

Sebasticook River

95

2

Hartland

Great Moose Lake

Harmony

Hinckley

Skowhegan

Norridgewock

7

Wesserunsett Lake

Start of Old Canada Highway

Belgrade

201A

Madison

Kennebec County

Long Pond

201

Solon

Lakewood

8

Rome

Anson

Embden Pond

Mount Vernon Echo Lake

Readfield

Farmington

16

202

Pittsfield


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GARDINER: Maine’s Riverside Original

Photo by: Benjamin M. Williamson Photography

Shopping, dining, entertainment. A visit to Gardiner—a shortlist contender for “Best Main Street” in Maine—can be turned into a full-day adventure with the right motivation. Day or night, there is always something happening—with cute shops and popular and well-rated places to eat flanking both sides of Water Street. Further along you’ll find the “Maine Adventure” Renys, spread over several storefronts; give yourself time for a browse. Looking around town, you’ll notice how well-cared-for the facades of the buildings are; it is a testament to the town’s efforts to keep the spirit of this riverside city alive. That and many of the familyfriendly events that grace downtown and the waterfront park each year—from the spring and summer Artwalks and June’s Greater Gardiner River Festival to October’s Swine & Stein— mean there is no going wrong if you plan on visiting Gardiner any time of year. For those looking to be entertained, cast your eye no further than Johnson Hall, celebrating over 150 years of raucous and moving performances. It is a venue beyond measure that now boasts year-round shows in a theater whose ongoing restoration is already highlighting its magnificence.

For the truly hungry, downtown Gardiner hosts some great eateries with a nice selection to offer. Favorites include Lisa’s Legit Burritos; the nationally-recognized A-1 Diner; The Depot, a friendly pub; and Pastaz, with heaping servings of freshly-prepared Italian favorites. The Gardiner Food Co-op can help with lunch. For the best donuts in Maine, head to Frosty’s. Visitors are welcome to take advantage of the expansive waterfront park, with a boat launch and a cool kinetic sculpture. The town also boasts many picturesque historic homes and the beautiful Gardiner Public Library.

Not to Be Missed Do yourself the favor of stopping in at the Center for Maine Craft retail store and gallery—whether you are on your way into Gardiner or just passing through. Located in the West Gardiner Travel Plaza at the intersection of I-95 and I-295 south of Augusta, the location is a little on the unconventional side, but the works of the highly-talented craft artists on display—with items from the simply useful to the outright outlandish—are all worthy of your attention.

Learn more at KennebecValley.org

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Summertime on the lakes of WINTHROP Cobbosseecontee, or Cobbossee as it is often called, is one of the best bass lakes in all of the Northeast, with plenty of Maine’s biggest bass waiting to take you on. It also sports the state’s only working inland lighthouse, The Ladies Delight Light. The lake is just one of the area’s many gorgeous stretches of clean, clear, wonderful water, such as Androscoggin, Annabessacook, and Maranacook. Each is a haven for boating, kayaking, canoeing, fishing, and swimming. C’mon, jump in.

Summer Fun for All Ages All summer long, concerts held at the head of Maranacook Lake’s Norcross Point will entertain and delight. Or spend Independence Day on its shores and the night enjoying Winthrop’s Annual Fourth of July Fireworks. Small, and proud of it, Monmouth packs a punch in a number of ways. Located south of Augusta off Route 202, you’ll immediately be taken with the iconic structure of Cumston Hall, the cultural center of the area with its 250-seat opera house and home to both Maine’s Official Shakespearean Theatre and the town library.

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Up the street you’ll find The Monmouth Museum; which documents 19th-century farm living. Come summer, the annual Monmouth Fair has all the makings of an honest-to-goodness down-home fair. But if you go, be careful, or you might find yourself getting pulled into the skillet toss.

A Quick Climb to Survey the Entire Area Hikers should take the opportunity to make the short hike up the Mt. Pisgah trail, where they can climb the 60-foot historic fire tower and be rewarded with breathtaking views of the region. You will also appreciate the good work of the Kennebec Land Trust, which has, through years of work, put together access to the area’s most beautiful, unspoiled nature hikes and programs. Check them all out.

A Summer Home for Generations of Kids These shores also serve as the backdrop for many sleepaway camps, filling summers with smiles, activity, and laughter. Our region offers some of the finest camp experiences in the country, maybe even the world, right here!


Hallowell — Relaxin’ by Day. Rockin’ at Night.

Voted ‘One of the Best Places to Live in Maine’ – Downeast Magazine

Learn more at Hallowell.org

Learn more at KennebecValley.org

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Photo courtesy: Slates

Photo courtesy: Harlow Gallery

HALLOWELL: Experience Something New Hallowell may rest on a pretty and slowly moving stretch of the Kennebec River below Augusta, but along Water Street things are always moving. A center of art and culture for the entire capital area, Hallowell should be on everyone’s list of places to visit when in Maine’s Kennebec Valley. The eclectic variety of restaurants and shops set into Hallowell’s tidy and welcoming package—Maine’s tiniest city and a National Historic District to boot—give it the feeling of being simultaneously quaint and urbane. With an abundance of Federalist and Victorian structures, the city well deserves more than a drive-through.

Window Shopping is a Must Using a spot along Water Street as your home base; simply walk up one side then down the other, stopping along the way at any of the many wonderful and welcoming shops. Take your pick from a wide selection of antique and vintage stores. You’re sure to find a must have item. Hallowell offers an excellent selection of boutiques, book shops, and gift stores—as well as quirky departures from the everyday like Scrummy Afters, a curious confectioners shop.

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While most of the action is on Water Street, the downtown doesn’t have a monopoly on “cool.” During the warmer months, secret and special parks and places nearby beckon you to take time out to beat the heat. Just ask a local.

Forks Up! When you’re ready to eat, it’s time to make some decisions. There are so many favorites here, it’s hard not to be partial. Savor some freshly-baked deliciousness at Slate’s. Celebrate over some of Maine’s top pints at The Maine House or try the Quarry Tap House. From Hattie’s Chowder House for classic Maine fare to something light and healthy at Juiced, the cuisine on offer in Hallowell deserves your attention.

Out On the Town When night falls and other communities are rolling up the sidewalks, Hallowell is rolling out the welcome mat. Maine’s antique river port seems anything but old when the moon rises. Catch a stage performance at Gaslight Theater, chat with a local artist at Harlow Gallery, catch an acoustic set around town or a rock show on the waterfront stage. We hope we’ll see you out and about.


THE AUGUSTA REGION – MUCH MORE THAN YOU EXPECT! More cultural attractions. More of the arts. More shopping. More dining and nightlife. Our cities and towns along the Kennebec River even offer more outdoor recreation than you ever imagined. Come spend a little more time here…it’s more than you expect. Request our Map and Activities Guide by calling 207-623-4559 or visiting KennebecValleyChamber.com

Learn more at KennebecValley.org

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AUGUSTA: Much More Than Expected

The city of Augusta is outgrowing its reputation for being simply the state’s capital. Visitors from far and near now come to take advantage of its beautiful location on the Kennebec River for so much more. Boating, fishing, or swimming right here in town or in any of the nearby lakes, it’s a perfect place for a day on the water. Spend time in the museums or see history come to life at Old Fort Western. Shop the day away at the Marketplace at Augusta, downtown on Water Street, and in our quaint neighboring towns. When the day is done, Augusta serves up something different and delightful: dining and entertainment for all. Augusta truly has much more to offer than you might have expected.

Enjoy Our City by Day There is no getting around in our city without spotting the recently replaced copper dome of our state Capitol. Spend a little time getting the grand tour, or skip it and simply relax and enjoy downtime in Augusta’s Capitol Park, the public garden directly across the street from the Capitol complex. The broad, grassy park, flanked by some of the best shade trees in the city, is also home to the Maine Vietnam Veterans Memorial.

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The Maine State Museum is another of Augusta’s delightful and surprising attractions. Inside you will spot the Lion (one of the nation’s oldest steam engines), explore 12,000 years of Maine’s history, or tour the museum’s prize exhibit—a spectacular three-story water-powered woodworking mill that was taken apart and re-assembled inside the museum.

Looking for More? Head downtown to shop and dine or visit the Farmers’ Market at Mill Park on Water Street (Tuesdays from May to October) to pick up a fresh local treat or takeaway lunch. Crossing the Kennebec takes you to the Viles Arboretum, a vibrant showcase offering a refreshing collection of walking trails on 225 acres. The arboretum is home to a well-curated American Chestnut collection and the renowned hosta garden. Look up the regularly scheduled artist programs, like the annual Sculpture Symposium, or take a hike along any of the trails that crisscross the arboretum. The location is also one of Maine’s top in-town birding locales, with over 150 documented species.


Photo by: Kevin Shields

Old Fort Western—Over 250 Years in “Cushnoc”

Visit Downtown Augusta

In 1754, a blockhouse was erected here to provide for regional protection. It still stands today at Old Fort Western on the river’s eastern bank at Cushnoc—now modern-day Augusta. True to Maine form, the fort has been used for many different purposes during its long life, including a civilian store, a private residence, and a rooming house. The fort also housed Benedict Arnold’s troops before his ill-fated march up the Kennebec to Québec. 

Across the Kennebec from Old Fort Western is a part of the city that’s hitting its stride. Downtown Augusta along Water Street is emerging as a revitalized area, with shops, restaurants, galleries, and boutiques. Downtown has many great spots for a quick lunch. Or enjoy dinner at the end of a fun day in Maine’s capital city.

Get Active in Augusta The entire region is crisscrossed with some of the most beautiful, green, and exciting trails in the state, and Augusta is not to be outdone. One quick visit to AugustaTrails.org shows the wide variety offered here. One of these, Bond Brook Park, is Augusta’s must-visit spot. Amazingly, many area residents are unaware that this park exists. But Bond Brook has a growing reputation and the potential to become a world-class trail-sports venue that supports skiing, mountain-biking, trail-running, and hiking. The park itself is a little off the beaten path, but worth the trip.

Whatever You Do… The Whatever Festival, held annually at the end of June and into July, offers citizens lots of whatever to do, especially on the event’s Family Fun Day. There really is nothing like this event anywhere else in Maine. In addition to being Maine’s capital, Augusta features quite a bit more than expected. When you visit, take the time to stroll through our museums and parks, shop, dine, or just play. Visit a downtown gallery or walk through history. Most of all, meet our residents. Once you do, you’ll learn why Augusta is a great place to return.

Learn more at KennebecValley.org

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BELGRADE LAKES: A Classic Maine Lakeside Village Everyone has something different to say about the Belgrade Lakes and all of it is good. For some, it’s fond memories of sleep-away camp. For others, it’s the doleful sound of loons following a spectacular golden sunset. What will you say? In the Belgrade Lakes, it’s pretty common to see summertime experiences passed from generation to generation of families that return each year. With that comes an unspoken emphasis on the importance of time spent together in pursuit of relaxation and recreation. The wholesome, free-and-easy attitude of this popular lakes region seems to melt away the tensions of everyday life. Easing into this carefree Maine way of life is simpler than you might think. Set out on foot with a pole and a can of worms (don’t forget your license) and you’ll soon find a new favorite fishing spot. Enjoy a round on the 18-hole championship Belgrade Lakes Golf Course, recognized in 2015 as Maine’s No. 1 public course by Golf Digest. Find your way to Blueberry Hill for a sweeping view of our seven lakes. Take a scenic drive in any direction and you’ll be rewarded with inspiring views. All summer long there are myriad reasons to visit, many of which focus on the beauty and importance of

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the lakes that surround the community. One favorite is the annual Antique Boat Parade, held each 4th of July. When it’s time to eat, head into the Village and grab something quick and tasty to go from Day’s, or sit down to the views and atmosphere at the Sunset Grill. The Village Inn has classic ambiance and a seasonal menu featuring one of the best duck entrées in the state. Try Wing’s Hill Inn for a delightful chef-prepared meal served in the dining room. Don’t think of Belgrade as just a summer place though. Nature’s colorful fireworks truly showcase the beauty of the region in autumn. In the colder months, the region becomes a winter wonderland, offering activities ranging from cross-country skiing and snowshoe-trekking to ice-fishing or snowmobiling on the area’s well-cared-for trails. Having shed its “summer only” moniker years ago, Belgrade Lakes offers a wide selection of lodging available in all four seasons. Paddling around Great Pond, hiking French’s Mountain in Rome, strolling around the Village, or even playing golf every day, this is what vacation memories are made of, so do whatever you want. The Belgrade Lakes region is, without question, one of the most iconic American summer vacation destinations you can find.


ARTS ENTERTAINMENT COMMUNITY Find it all here:

MidMaineFun.com

Visitor Center 50 Elm Street Waterville

Call 207.873.3315

BELGRADE LAKES

Belgrade Lakes Marine & Storage, Inc. Winter Storage for Summer Vehicles Secure newer storage facilities accommodate boats on trailers, autos, and the largest RVs in 3 buildings totaling over 21,000 sq. ft. Electrical charging outlets are available. Reasonable rates for real protection from extreme winter storms and sun damage.

generated at BeQRious.com

July 4th: Events and Parade Columbus Day Weekend: Harvest Festival 1st Saturday in December: Holiday Stroll

207-495-2378 • WWW.BelgradeLakesMarine.com 366 Augusta Road, Route 27, Belgrade, ME

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Scan for Info

BelgradeLakesMaine.com

Learn more at KennebecValley.org

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Photo courtesy of: Taste of Waterville

Photo courtesy of: MIFF

WATERVILLE: Maine’s Cultural Crossroads The Arts Are Alive! Waterville Creates!

WatervilleCreates.org

Maine International Film Festival July 8–17, 2016 MIFF.org

Atlantic Music Festival

June 27–July 24, 2016 AtlanticMusicFestival.org

Taste of Waterville

August 3, 2016 TasteofWaterville.com

Waterville has so much to offer visitors. Art. Theater. Dining. Film and festivals. Colleges. A burgeoning downtown. Arguably, Waterville is becoming mid-Maine’s cultural epicenter. Any visit to this part of the state would be incomplete without a trip to the Colby Museum of Art, featuring a vast collection of American artwork spanning three centuries and the celebrated Bernard Langlais Collection. The collegiate spirit spills into the downtown, with a great food scene and many diversions. Lovers of the performing arts should check out the Waterville Opera House, where local and national traveling acts of all kinds entertain audiences year-round in the beautifully restored theater. Visitors should also stop by Common Street Arts. Each summer, the Maine International Film Festival (MIFF)—entering its 19th year—presents nearly 100 films over 10 days, with works representing the best of American and international independent cinema. Visitors with a love of classical music should keep an ear open for the Atlantic Music Festival. This highly-respected organization fosters innovation in American musical performance. Each summer, hundreds of aspiring artists gather to celebrate the musical masters. The hungry will not be turned away either. With a wide array of food styles to choose from, diners can enjoy something new every night of the week. Or enjoy the annual Taste of Waterville, which brings together all things tasty from the region for one yummy day and night. From food carts to fancy finger foods, it’s this city’s perfect taste of summer. Outdoor enthusiasts have nothing to worry about either. Waterville is a popular center of outdoor activity, with miles of hiking trails spread throughout the city and superior fishing only minutes away. Check out the Quarry Road Trails and the Kennebec Messalonskee Trails, which double in the colder months as in-town cross-country ski and snowshoe trails.

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Learn more at KennebecValley.org

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THE BANKERY AND SKOWHEGAN FLEURISTE

87 Water St., Downtown Skowhegan 207-474-BAKE(2253) TheBankery.com Our shops are nestled in the Flat Iron District offering artistically designed cakes, fine pastries, and fresh flowers.

BIGELOW BREWING COMPANY

473 Bigelow Hill Rd., Skowhegan 207-399-6262 BigelowBrewing.com Bigelow Brewing Company opened its doors in May of 2014 and has quickly grown into a must-see destination craft brewery. Owners Jeff and Pam strive to use as many locally sourced ingredients as possible in their products, from the fresh brewed craft beer to the delicious wood fired pizza. Open Fridays 3–8pm and Saturdays 12–5 pm.

GINNY’S NATURAL CORNER

78 Water St., Downtown Skowhegan 207-474-3000 Facebook.com/GinnysNaturalCorner We are a family-friendly natural food store carrying a wide variety of products including many local items. If you are looking for something to help maintain or improve your healthy lifestyle, come see what we can do for you.

CAYFORD ORCHARDS

99 Hilton Hill Rd., Skowhegan 207-474-5200 CayfordOrchards.com Explore the farm, pick your own apples, have a picnic, and take a hayride in the orchard. Open 9–5 daily Sept. 1 to Thanksgiving. Try our new hard cider!

THE CHILDREN’S COTTAGE

66 Water St., Downtown Skowhegan 207-660-5495 Packed with new, and like-new, name-brand children’s clothing, toys, baby gear and furnishings.

HERITAGE HOUSE

182 Madison Ave., Skowhegan 207-474-5100 HHRestaurant.com An unforgettable dining experience that is a favorite among visitors and locals alike.

THE KNEADING CONFERENCE

Skowhegan State Fairgrounds Thursday, July 28–Friday, July 29, Artisan Bread Fair, Saturday, July 30 KneadingConference.com A two-day intensive educational experience about bread-baking, grain-growing, woodfired oven construction and use and milling.

MAJA’S BODY ART

75 Water St., Downtown Skowhegan 207-474-9330 Facebook.com/MajasBodyArt A unique shop offering glass pipes, hookahs, and body jewelry. Check us out! Open Monday–Saturday 11–7, Sunday 11–4.

THE MILL CAFE

Somerset Grist Mill, 42 Court St., Downtown Skowhegan 207-474-8001 MaineGrains.com

A farm-to-table cafe featuring wood-fired pizza and seasonal local food. The cafe, which will be open for lunch and dinner starting in the summer of 2016, will showcase freshly milled grains from Maine Grains and an on-site Farmers’ Market on Saturdays.

OLD MILL PUB

39 Water St., Downtown Skowhegan 207-474-6627 OldMillPub.net Enjoy casual riverside dining along the Kennebec River in a historic building with great character and charm.

REJUVENATE SALON

14 Madison Ave., Downtown Skowhegan 207-614-4324 Facebook.com/RejuvenateSalon2015 Dedicated to providing the best professional hair care services and products tailored to meet our clients’ needs.

WHITTEMORE’S REAL ESTATE

108 Water St., Downtown Skowhegan 207-474-3303 WhittemoresRealEstate.com Whittemore’s Real Estate has been in business since 1969 selling land, waterfront property, camps, cottages, residential and commercial properties.

For more information visit MainStreetSkowhegan.org. 42


SKOWHEGAN: A Whole Lot of Energy and a Ton of Fun Skowhegan possesses an indescribable vibe. Maybe it's the thundering waters of the Kennebec River that roll into town and cascade into the river’s gorge. Maybe it is the deep sense of community. We can’t quite put a finger on it, but regardless of the time of year, there always seems to be something fun happening here.

So Many Great Things to Do Options are the modern traveler’s conundrum. But don’t worry, the many annual events held in Skowhegan offer an antidote to whatever ails you. Whether you come to town for the one-of-a-kind Kneading Conference, or to paddle in the River Fest during the first part of August, make sure to stick around for the Skowhegan State Fair, which is still going strong as it approaches its 2018 bicentennial. Then come back in September for the inaugural Skowhegan Craft Brew Fest.

Down on Water Street As one of the four Main Street Maine communities in the Kennebec Valley, Skowhegan has been recognized for having a uniquely walkable downtown area filled with small cafés, shops, and businesses set among a collection of beautiful historic structures, a blend that truly showcases the diversity of this place. Just a short walk from downtown, you’ll find another local gem,

Coburn Park, a stunning example of modern community gardening that welcomes visitors from far and near. If you come in the summer, make time for the gazebo concert series.

Visit with Our Very Tall Friend Be certain to take a little time to see the lovingly restored Skowhegan Indian. He was a gift bestowed upon the town by renowned artist Bernard Langlais in 1969 to celebrate Maine’s 150th anniversary. Look for him at High Street between Madison Avenue (Rt. 201) and Court Street. The Skowhegan Indian is the tallest Native American sculpture in America. Also find numerous other Langlais works throughout town— all adding to Skowhegan’s whimsy.

Foodies Welcome Eons of farming on the rich banks of the winding Kennebec may have predestined Skowhegan’s current role as a foodie destination. Or maybe it’s just that vibe thing again. As home to a year-round farmers’ market on the rise, Skowhegan upped the ante with a stroke of genius by repurposing an abandoned jail into Maine’s premier modern grist mill. Check out The Heritage House Restaurant, The Old Mill Pub, and then the Bankery for a little something sweet. Or grab and go from Kel-Mat or the 201 Market. Check back again in a year as this list continues to grow.

Learn more at KennebecValley.org

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EXPLORE THE SKOWHEGAN AREA Eat. Shop. Play. Enjoy! Here you will savor the time spent reconnecting with nature’s tranquility along the road, river, or trail less traveled—a place still overflowing with the excitement of new discoveries. Sample the flavors and aromas of handcrafted brews and a perfectly-prepared Farm-to-Table meal. Experience real Maine shopping in a place filled with independently-owned shops, award-winning products, and service that is second-to-none.

Top it all off with community events that attract families from everywhere. • MEMORIAL DAY PARADE May 30, 2016 • 10TH ANNIVERSARY KNEADING CONFERENCE July 28–29, 2016 • SKOWHEGAN RIVER FEST August 2–6, 2016 • SKOWHEGAN STATE FAIR August 11–20, 2016 • SKOWHEGAN CRAFT BREW FEST September 3, 2016 • HAUNTED HAYRIDE & ZOMBIE 5K OBSTACLE COURSE October 28–29, 2016 Plan your next adventure in the Skowhegan area. Visit SkowheganAreaChamber.com or call 207-474-3621.

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Whatcha doin’ this Summer?

Reservations Required VacationlandSkydiving.com • 207-487-5638 Pittsfield Municipal Airport, Pittsfield, ME Just 30 minutes from Bangor and Augusta.

Learn more at KennebecValley.org

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CANAAN & PITTSFIELD: Great Neighbors

Photo by: Mark Schumpert

Lake George Regional Park Nestled along Route 2 between Canaan and Skowhegan, and a short, beautiful drive from the region’s Route 201 artery, sits Lake George Regional Park, a delightful outdoor wonderland well-suited for nearly any kind of day use.

Great Moose Pond

The residents here know that the sunsets on Great Moose Pond in Hartland are dazzling. Now it’s your turn. Come for a day of fishing in the well-stocked 3,500-acre lake, and stick around for the haunting calls of the loons.

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From Canaan’s peaceful tranquility found in places like Lake George, to the warm, welcoming village of Pittsfield. These neighboring towns make an excellent pair and the perfect basecamp for sportsmen and vacationers. Looking for a quiet day of fishing? Want to spend the afternoon shopping without having to drive all the way to Augusta or Bangor? These two locales have all you need to make a vacation in Maine live up to every expectation. They’ve even got loons and moose. If guided hunting or sport-shooting is your style, try pheasant-hunting on a local preserve in Canaan. Summer or winter visitors can access an excellent trail system, on the north side of town, that connects to the many other regional and statewide trails. That includes the Interconnected Trail System (ITS), which provides an entry point to limitless destinations throughout Maine. Pittsfield offers a different appeal. This is a place where everyone, from the waitress at a little diner called Vittles to the cashier at Renys department store, does everything they can to make you feel at home. It’s the kind of place you’ll want to spend a little more time. With numerous events like the farmers’ market in Hathorn Park and the Central Maine Egg Festival each summer, sticking around is easy.


RIVERSIDE TOWNS: Life Along the Kennebec Norridgewock—Home to Maine’s Abenaki Indians

Bingham—Halfway There

The Norridgewock Indians, or the “people of the still water between the rapids,” as their name means in their own language, were an advanced people who cultivated the land and fished the waters of the ancient Kennebec River Valley.

Known as the “Gateway to Adventure” in Maine, Bingham is an outdoor sporting paradise and home to the geographic halfway point between the North Pole and the Equator.

Crossing the river today is a rainbow-arched bridge built to replace an older bridge of similar design. It is known as the “Covered Bridge” by locals. The town has a long and proud manufacturing history tied to the flow of the river. It is here that the Norridgewock Falls drop 90 feet, along the course of a mile, a geological feature that attracted manufacturers to the area.

Sportsmen and those who love the outdoors and are lucky enough to include a stop in Bingham in their plans are in for a treat in any season. The area’s many guides and outfitters will help them make the most of their trip. Anglers are especially fond of the Kennebec River in this area, affectionately calling sections of this wonderful stretch Rainbow Alley. This place is close enough, but still provides that faraway feeling.

Solon—Old Canada Road—South Solon Meeting House

Moscow—Beautiful Spots for Nature Lovers

Solon is the point of origin for the Old Canada Road Scenic Byway. This majestic 78-mile road runs from here to the Canadian border and offers soaring views in any season. Many favor autumn for the unforgettable—and nationally-listed—leaf-peeping opportunities a trip on the Old Canada Road can offer.

2016 marks the bicentennial of Moscow, a small town of whiteclapboard homes further up Route 201. As things tend to go, it is not surprising that tiny Moscow is home to some stunningly beautiful places that, with a little effort, can be enjoyed by all. Lake Wyman—a 15-mile widening of the Kennebec River created by the nearby dam—offers an ideal setting for recreational paddling and swimming.

On the outside, The South Solon Meeting House looks like many other buildings of its kind, but it hides a secret inside. Built in 1842, it is a traditional Colonial church with Classical Revival details. What makes it so special, though, is the interior— elaborately painted with buon fresco technique in the 1950s by artists from the nearby Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture. In 1980 it was added to the National Register of Historic Places.

Houston Brook Falls is a masterpiece of nature accessible by a trail about 3.5 miles up the road from the bridge crossing the Kennebec River in Bingham. Baker Mountain is an old-school tow-rope ski mountain for locals with a great view. The Old Canada Road traveling along Wyman Lake offers pretty panoramas marked with pull-offs looking over the lake.

Learn more at KennebecValley.org

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MADISON, a great place to live, work & play! COLONY HOUSE INN

68 Beach Rd. – 207.474.6599 ColonyHouseInn.com Built in 1929, the Colony House Inn is situated in scenic and historic Lakewood, offering both the elegance of the Inn and more rustic cottages.

FIRESIDE CAFÉ

208 Main St. Facebook.com/mmicecreamfiresidecafe Relax inside our quaint Victorian home or on our outdoor porch. We serve an assortment of home-made soups, salads, Paninis and wraps.

FOSHAY’S INFORMATION BOOTH

144 Main St. One-stop shopping for all your tourism and business information in and around the Madison area. Also the home of Santaville during the holiday season.

KENNEBEC ICE KREAMERY

469 Main St. – 207.399.4392 Facebook.com/Kennebec-Ice-Kreamery Delicious homemade ice cream served in generous portions.

LAKEWOOD GOLF COURSE

803 Lakewood Rd. – 207.474.5955 LakewoodGolfMaine.com Originally built in the 1920s, our beautiful course includes Maine’s only Par 6, with amazing scenery to give you a great golfing experience.

LAKEWOOD INN RESTAURANT

R&B’S HOME SOURCE

LAKEWOOD THEATER

SOMERSET ABBEY

76 Theater Rd. – 207.858.4403 LakewoodTheater.org Enjoy simple Maine elegance with lakeside views. Next to the Theater, enjoy dinner, dessert or a libation before the show or at intermission.

76 Theater Rd. – 207.474.7176 LakewoodTheater.org The longest-running summer theater in the nation, located lakeside, this historical setting provides nine performances each summer.

M&M ICE CREAM & CAFÉ

208 Main St. Facebook.com/mmicecreamfiresidecafe Delicious soft-serve flavors, Annabelle’s Super Premium hard-serve ice cream, super sundaes and a classic root beer float.

MAINE MAPLE PRODUCTS, INC.

449 Lakewood Rd. – 207.474.3387 MaineMaple.com Our maple syrup has been selected as the BEST for quality, purity and taste 12 of the last 14 years. Judge for yourself.

NORTH STAR ORCHARDS

97 Orchard Rd. – 207.696.5109 NorthStarOrchards.me A family farm for family fun! Visit our farm store for fresh apples, cider and much more. Find us on Facebook— we’re open all year round.

517 Lakewood Rd. – 207 474 2400 RandBsHomeSource.com Looking to furnish your camp? R&B’s is a family-owned discount appliances, lawn and garden, furniture, mattresses, and electronics store. 98 Main St. – 207.696.5800 SomersetAbbey.com A music, wedding and events hall in a historic setting. See our website for a calendar of musical and comedy events or call for a tour .

TREASURES: A PRIMITIVE SHOP 270 Main St. – 207.696.8440 A shop of old and new Primitives, including home décor and accents of times gone by. Like us on Facebook.

YOGI BEAR’S JELLYSTONE PARK

221 Lakewood Rd. – 207.474.7353 Yonderhill.com A family-friendly campground that also has cabin and RV rental units. Gem mining, bounce area, pedal cart rentals, fishing, pool, birthday party packages and much more!

XANA-DO SALON & DAY SPA

411 Lakewood Rd. – 207.474.1234 Xana-DoSalonandDaySpa.com Relax with our exceptional, effective beauty treatments and allow yourself and your body to get the rest you need in a rejuvenating environment.

For more information, visit MadisonME.org or Facebook.com/VisitMadisonMaine.

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MADISON: Hometown Maine Appeal The pretty, tree-lined drive along Route 201 shows some of what you will experience in Madison—a classic Maine small-town community located a few miles up the road from Skowhegan. To really get a sense of what this homey town feels like, you need to take the left onto White Schoolhouse Road just up from the Maine Maple Products store. Minutes later, you’ll be at the center of a town filled with brick and clapboard turn-of-thecentury homes set back from wide, tree-lined streets.

Those looking for a little more paddling action should investigate the Madison Wave. It offers the kind of ride tricksters thrive on— big air and slick tricks that are fun to do and more fun to watch. Anglers need to know that fine trout fishing can be found just below the Madison Dam along the Historic Pines Trail. If you go, look for granite monuments telling the story of Jesuit missionary Sebastian Rasle (pronounced “rall”) and the Abenaki people.

Raising Spirits in Madison

Back on Route 201, in East Madison, is Lakewood Theater, Maine’s State Theater since 1967. The curtain first rose in 1901. Today, the venue continues as one of the nation’s longest-running summer theater programs. Each year its magnificent stage offers adoring fans a range of entertaining productions including comedies, dramas, musicals, and special engagements for children. Lakewood is also home to one of the area’s finer dining establishments, the Lakewood Inn Restaurant—an excellent complement to the theater, offering a seasonally changing menu. Can’t come for a show? Then stop in for brunch.

At the corner of Madison’s Main Street and Weston Avenue is the most attractive structure in Madison—Somerset Abbey—and if the records are right, it’s the oldest as well. This iconic structure at the heart of Madison is beautifully-built of brick and stone. Long a church, it was converted in 2015 into a community and performance venue welcoming acts ranging from folk and jazz ensembles such as Gunther Brown and the Ghost of Paul Revere to the ongoing Maine Comedy Series. The abbey is also home to the town’s Winter Farmers’ Market. Visitors will find the abbey looks as good on the inside as it does on the outside. Stainedglass windows let in a rainbow of light while bright woodwork adorns the walls. They even have the gorgeous 1928 E.M. Skinner pipe organ that looks and sounds as good as when it was first played nearly 90 years ago. The abbey’s transformation helped cement its place as a community hub. So while you shouldn’t call it a church, Somerset Abbey seems to have answered a lot of prayers around town.

Along the Kennebec River The Kennebec drops 90 feet over the course of a mile in Madison. This nice drop allows kayakers to float or paddle their way gently downriver from “The Pines” to Norridgewock’s Oosoola Park.

Maine’s State Theater at Lakewood

Fore! The Longest Hole in Maine Both challenging and beautiful, the stunning mountain views from the Lakewood Golf Course make this a uniquely enjoyable afternoon golf outing. The front nine offers a classic links course right out of the Roaring 20s while the modern park-like back nine seems to be carved from the forest. Scenic views and the rolling greenery make this a highly enjoyable course. Be sure to bring your big driver, though, because Lakewood’s No. 12 is a blisteringly-long 660-yard Par 6. When was the last time you played a Par 6?

Learn more at KennebecValley.org

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ATV Trails • Boating • Canoe & Kayaking • Conferences & Retreats Cross-country Skiing • Fall Foliage • Fishing • Hiking • Hunting Lake Cruises • Seaplane Tours • Snowmobiling • Snowshoeing Tubing • Weddings • Whitewater Rafting • Wildlife Watching

1041 US Route 201, Caratunk, ME 04925 • 207.672.3333 • MaineSterlingInn.com Learn more at KennebecValley.org

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THE FORKS: Year-round Adventure Over the last four decades The Forks has grown to become the home of whitewater rafting in Maine. With easy access to the great outdoors, the area is an ideal destination for all kinds of adventure. Whitewater rafting just scratches the surface of all there is to do. Each year, long before the rafts even hit the gorge, this place has seen its first and second seasons of adventurists. Wintertime brings snow and with it the thrill of long days spent riding wellgroomed trails through the deep woods, across lakes, and climbing peaks. Nordic skiers and snowshoe hikers also enjoy the growing number of trails that crisscross the area. Once the snow (and then mud) are gone, the shifting season brings anglers looking to stand waist-deep or float atop a kayak in the cold waters of the streams and tributaries of the Kennebec River for the age-old battle with wily (but hungry) spring trout. In The Forks, rafting season kicks off in May. Around this time of year, it’s green and cool, the trails firm up, and springtime starts to

feel a little more summery. That’s when the whole game changes around here. ATVs can be heard in the distance, moose safaris become more available, and every car and truck seems to be topped with a canoe, kayak, or mountain bike. Winter snowmobile trails are now an avenue to adventure for a new crop of hikers, climbers, bikers, and backpackers headed out on deep-wood escapades. Autumn brings leaf-peepers and other nature lovers, hunters, and anglers looking for a last taste of the outdoors before snow falls, starting the whole beautiful cycle again.

Don’t Miss the Moxie One place not to miss, no matter what you love to do when you visit, is the short and easy walk out to the spectacular Moxie Falls, Maine’s highest and some say most beautiful waterfall. If you are lucky enough to visit during the summer, bring a towel, because there is a rockin’ swimming hole a hundred feet or so down from the main drop.

Learn more at KennebecValley.org

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JACKMAN & THE MOOSE RIVER VALLEY: Escape to a Place Without Limits

A Remarkable Journey The stretch of the Old Canada Road above The Forks—along

one of Maine’s four National Scenic Byways—takes on a slightly different feel. The rolling green pitches of the hills urge you northward as you leave the Kennebec Valley and approach the Moose River Valley. The road takes you through prime moose-spotting marshes and ponds that line its edges.

In autumn those greens become the vibrant golds, yellows, and reds prized by leaf peepers. While there are remarkable views at virtually every turn in the road, we highly recommend taking time—especially around sunset—to enjoy the truly spectacular view from The Attean Overlook, located as you head north, just before arriving in Jackman.

Stay Awhile For visitors to this unspoiled destination, there is a wider selection of lodgings than one might expect, with accommodations to suit all tastes and budgets. Lodges and resorts include the modern and beautifully-built Lake Parlin Lodge and in-town

motels like Bishop’s or the Northland. Fans of sporting camps

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may wish to consider Cedar Ridge Outfitters, Bulldog Camps or the aptly named Last Resort. The more you look, the more options appear, be it a tidy, basics-only campsite or an off-thegrid, shoreside getaway like Attean Lake Lodge (accessible only by boat). So go ahead and boldly forge your plan to escape. We’ve got you covered.

Paddle Into the Region’s Wilderness During warmer weather, everyone in town with a few hours to kill seems to be on the prowl for open water. Who could blame them? It’s everywhere. Jackman itself sits on the shore of Wood Pond, the epicenter of 60 easily accessed lakes, ponds, and streams. Perfection lies at the end of a cast or a paddle. For paddling devotees, the list of trips is filled with great variation in length and tests of skill. Days could be spent exploring and paddling among the more than 40 islands that populate Attean Pond, spotting the wide variety of birds overhead and earthbound wildlife. This is the home of the Moose River Bow Trip. East of Jackman, paddlers can enjoy a trip from Moose River to Long Pond. Challenge yourself with light rapids on the Moosehead Lake to Indian Pond trip. Or look into the vast stores of information online if you seek something different.


Blissful Casting

Mt. Kineo

With so much water, it’s the area’s fishing that attracted many of its original fans. Excellent opportunities for outdoor sport still remain, with fish biting in all seasons. So come on by!

Mt. Kineo swings into view as you roll into the tiny village of Rockwood, after the beautiful and sometimes moose-filled drive from Jackman and the Old Canada Road. This has been a destination for longer than written history for good reason. It’s a mammoth beauty that you have to experience up close—by boat, on foot, or from the air.

Spend a guided day fly-fishing on a tributary that feeds the Moose River or trolling for salmon and brook trout along the drop-off in Moosehead. Head to Brassua’s inlet streams like Johnson Brook and Misery Stream for an excellent day of fishing. The great bass fishing on Moosehead might only be exceeded by the Indian Pond fishery. Those seeking native brook trout should explore the many miles of the Moose River above the path of the “Bow” trip. Head to the area of Attean Falls in the spring for a good chance at landlocked salmon and splake.

Take Aim on Excellent Sport Hunting Camo and blaze orange are popular here for a good reason: something always seems to be in season. Common quarry like deer, moose, and bear; while once over-hunted, are again plentiful. Many smiling hunters are returning to the region. But don’t limit yourself to tradition; other types of hunts are increasingly popular, too. And during winter, numerous guides offer wintertime bobcat and snowshoe hare hunting.

The island mountain rises dramatically out of the cold blue depths of Moosehead Lake to an epic 1,789 feet. It boasts panoramic views of the indescribably beautiful lake below and is snaked with an excellent collection of trails. The prize for hikers will always be the lookout tower at the summit. The views here are of an unspoiled Maine woods. They include Big and Little Spencer Mountains to the northeast and, to the southeast, the Lily Bay Mountains. Cast your eye south to see Big Squaw. Southwest beyond Blue Ridge and Misery Ridge, you can spot Mt. Coburn—home of Maine’s highest snowmobile trail. Look west and see the three rolling bumps of Boundary Bald Mountain. And, of course there’s Little Kineo. The climb and the views are well worth the effort.

Learn more at KennebecValley.org

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GET OUT AND ENJOY

JACKMAN

Photo courtesy of Cozy Cove Cabins

ALLENS MOBILE HOME PARK & CAMPGROUND 37 Johns Street, Jackman | 207-668-7683 | cell 207-668-6300 AllensFourSeasonsAccommodations.com | johns4se@hotmail.com Mobile Home Park. Daily, weekly, and monthly rentals. Year-round campground. COZY COVE CABINS 3 Elm Street, P.O. Box 370, Jackman | 207-668-5931 CozyCovecabins.com | info@cozycovecabins.com Year-round cabins on Big Wood Lake with easy trail access. JACKMAN ATV RENTALS 56 River Road, Jackman | 207-668-9090 JackmanATVRentals.com | buzzell@JackmanATVRentals.com Experience 300+ miles of awesome local ATV trails with many more on the ITS. Bask in the seclusion of the mountains, combined with the thrill ride of your life. Call us today to schedule an outing—you won’t regret it! JACKMAN HARDWARE & SPORTING GOODS 598 Main Street, Jackman | 207-668-5151 Open 7 days a week. Offering a large assortment of sporting goods, including guns, ammo, ice traps, and canoe rentals. UPS Shipping Center and U-Haul Dealer. JACKMAN POWERSPORTS 549 Main Street, Jackman | 207-668-4442 JackmanPowersports.com | jackpowr@myfairpoint.net We carry a full line of Arctic Cat, Polaris, Ski-Doo, and Yamaha snowmobiles and ATV’s. Come visit our showroom of up-to-date apparel and accessories. We have a full-service department with mechanics available Monday–Saturday. MAMA BEAR’S DEN RESTAURANT 420 Main Street, Jackman | 207-668-4222 Enjoy home-cooked meals in a cozy atmosphere. Great prices and excellent service. Breakfast, lunch, and dinner. Meet us on Facebook.com/MamabearsRestaurant.

MOOSE RIVER CAMPGROUND & CABINS 107 Heald Stream Road, Moose River | 207-668-4400 MooseRiverCampground.org | littlebigwood@hotmail.com Located on Moose River, we offer 48 tent and RV sites along with 3 year-round cabins, canoe and paddleboat rentals, trout ponds for fishing, and a woodheated lodge. Snowmobile and ATV Trail access. MOUNTAINVIEW RESORT 263 Main Street, Jackman | 207-668-7700 MountainviewResort.net | vacation@mountainviewresort.net One-bedroom suites with full kitchens, 3-bedroom log cabins with full kitchens, whirlpool tubs, and gas fireplaces. Year-round indoor heated pool and hot tub, outdoor pool (seasonal). Snowmobile and ATV trail access from your door. WEYERHAEUSER Greenville, Jackman, Bingham, Fairfield Weyerhaeuser.com | mark.doty@weyerhaeuser.com We work to achieve sustainable outcomes, meeting the needs of the environment, society, and our company with a perpetual timber supply. We offer outdoor enthusiasts a vast resource for enjoying outdoor recreation. THE LAST RESORT CABINS & CAMPGROUND PO Box 777, Jackman | 207.668.5091 LastResortMaine.com | info@lastresortmaine.com Facebook.com/lastresortmoose Eight remote, yet accessible, rustic log cabins and four wilderness tent sites on the north shore of Long Pond. A nature lover’s paradise with fishing, hiking, kayaking, canoeing, relaxing, star gazing, and wildlife photography.

For more information, visit JackmanMaine.org or Facebook.com/JackmanMaine.

Jackman-Moose River Region Chamber of Commerce | P.O. Box 368 Jackman, Maine 04945 | 1-888-633-5225

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Capital City Riverfront Fourth of July A classic parade, a day of patriotic celebration, family fun, and food, then fireworks to fill the night sky over the Kennebec River at the Annual Capital City Riverfront Fourth of July. Monday, July 4 from 4:00 p.m. & Fireworks at 9:00 p.m. Downtown Augusta AugustaDowntownAlliance.org

First Annual Skowhegan Craft Brew Fest Join us for what will become a signature event in Skowhegan. A celebration in the streets of downtown, the Skowhegan Craft Brew Festival will feature Maine-crafted libations, farm-to-table fare, and live music. Saturday, September 3 from 2:00 to 7:00 p.m. Water Street, Downtown Skowhegan SkowheganCraftBrewFest.com

Photo: ©Jeff Wood Photography

! T EE R T S IN A M G N LO A S U H IT W E T A CELEBR downtown hubs where everyone is welcome.

vibrant Gardiner, Augusta, Waterville, and Skowhegan are how great it is down on Main Street. see to m— the of all r —o nts eve se the of one Join them at any nities visit: bit.ly/ MainStreetCommunities mu Com ine Ma eet Str in Ma ey Vall ec neb Ken se To learn more about the

Seventh Annual Swine & Stein Oktoberfest Oktoberfest tradition meets modern street party. Swine & Stein is Gardiner’s unique interpretation of an old-world Oktoberfest, featuring succulent pork dishes, the tastiest local brews and the best in established and emerging Maine musicians.

Parade of Lights & Kringleville

Saturday, October 8 from 11:30 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. Water Street, Downtown Gardiner GardinerMainStreet.org

Photo: ©MaineMediaPhotography.com

The dazzling floats of the spectacular Parade of Lights herald Santa and Mrs. Claus’ arrival at Kringleville for a month long visit to delight and thrill thousands of visitors and parade goers.

Learn

Parade: Friday, November 25 starting at 6:00 p.m. Main Street, Downtown Waterville Kringleville: Evenings & Weekends November 25 –December 22 The Center at 93 Main Street, Downtown Waterville Kringleville.org more at KennebecValley.org 57



2016 - The Kennebec Explorer Vacation Planner