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STUDIO

Ken Farris UC Berkeley B.A Architecture Undergraduate kenhfarris@berkeley.edu (805) 280-1202


PERSONAL


STUDIO WORK The design project revolved around filling the space under an Oakland highway underpass but retaining the motif of the barren landscape. We created three buildings with the design strategies of horizontal, hypotenuse, and vertical. The horizontal started with the creation of seven paper models using situations like frame, interstice, surface, oblique, crease, cross, and void. I narrowed it down to the three most interesting situation space: void, surface, and frame. These three models were integrated into a final shop built model. The hypontenuse park served as a movement sequence from the horizontal to vertical. It was required to include a forty foot slope, a regulation size basketball court, a movie theater, and a sandbox. It had to contribute, not control the environment of space. The vertical acts as a 120 foot tower for a client with a specific set of needs. The client is a biologist studying urban grasslands who enjoys astronomy and solitude. The tower had to include her dwelling as well as a local archival space, a public park, multiple bathrooms, and a circulation system.


Abstracted Plan using Site Photos


Diagrammatic Plan Study using Module


After the production of the three models, we had the task of integrating them into one. Instead of fusing the models physically, I created them to have the same material and spatial language. Using strips of plexiglass and ridged MDF, I aimed to make an interesting experience by dividing the models into sections.


Different views of the final three paper models


Spatial Studies of Section and Plan


I placed the hypotenuse park against the underpass columns so the building would look like a continuation of its concrete geometry. The basketball court was placed on top of the building and the movie theater underground. There is a shared entrance so basketball players, children, and movie attendees will have an unusual but interesting spatial experience.


I started the tower with a basic building module in the form of an attaching square to define the public and private space in the building. Also, I decided to use the top floors for private space and bottom floors for public space. The materiality of glass and concrete was vital to seperate light and dark in the tower.


module


section

light study

module study


PERSONAL WORK

Involves the work from multiple design, art, and construction classes as well as personal work. The design class utilized as many artistic mediums to create a range of products like teapots, lighting devices, and chairs. Personal work includes renderings, photography, and graphic design.


POST OCCUPANCY LAB 2 RESULTS

NARRATIVE DESCRIPTION

HYPOTHESIS AND TEST METHODOLOGY

= low to high temperature

= tree or hedge

Our hypothesis is that occupants’ thermal comfort levels will vary significantly at different points within Caffé Strada even when air temperatures do not.

Caffe Strada is located at the intersection of College and Bancroft Ave. This café is a popular meeting and study location, as the environmental and atmospheric qualities provide a welcoming invitation to take a seat-provided that one is available. The greenery in the outdoors provides shade and buffers against the easterly wind. There is ample seating outside, and multiple heat lamps generate the warmth needed during the evening. Upon entering the cafe, which consists mainly of glass that directs daylight into the room, there is more seating within. Both the indoor and outdoor seats allow connectivity to the activities on the street. We chose to study the occupant thermal comfort of Caffe Strada to determine if there is a relationship between individual thermal comfort and real thermal conditions. We observe that the thermal comfort of occupants depends largely on the weather, since the majority of the seating and therefore activity at Caffe Strada occurs outdoors. The thermal qualities of the space include heat lamps, wind-buffering trees, and body heat from nearby cafe-goers.

= HOBO reading = Survey Participant

Our methodology is to use a temperature and relative humidity (RH) sensor to measure and record these thermal properties at various points both inside the cafe and in the outdoor seating area. We will divide our group of four students into two teams: two students will log data, and two students will conduct occupant surveys measuring their thermal comfort . Of the two students collecting data, one will record temperature and RH data inside the cafe, and the other student will record data in the outdoor seating area. The surveying students will be similarly split. We will survey multiple occupants in each of these spaces using a simple survey which we developed to gather information on the occupant’s thermal comfort. Our measurements will correspond to the survey questions because although our measurements indicate the actual temperature and RH levels, they do not address each person’s thermal comfort level. Although we can assume the thermal comfort based on the data, we believe that everyone has various thermal perceptions and preferences and thus their choices such as seating location differ. Thus, we should ask the customers where and why they chose to sit to determine if there is a correlation between thermal comfort and seating location.

These qualities can be seen more closely in the analytical section which highlights the heat generated by the heat lamps, lights, and cashier machines in comparison to the cold air entering the room. The analytical plan indicates how the arrangements of the seatings and trees affects the thermal heat gains.

Survey Question 1

feet

Oudoor 1

Number of People

Number of People

Indoor

3

Limited Variation in Thermal Conditions Outside and Inside Cafe

2

We recorded data both inside Caffe Strada and at the outdoor patio, and the difference between maximum temperature (75.3 degrees Fahrenheit, back corner inside) and minimum temperature (72 degrees F, corner of College and Bancroft) was only 2.5 degrees Fahrenheit. The difference between maximum relative humidity (RH) and minimum RH occurred at the locations was: 45.5 - 41.4 = 4.1%. This shows that there was little variation in thermal condition between outdoor and indoor seating, which may explain the results to our Survey Question #1 (Did you choose your seating location based on its thermal comfort?); although thermal comfort was considered by some when choosing their seating location, a large number of occupants did not have a choice in where they sat due to overcrowding, while some didn’t consider thermal comfort at all. As for our third survey question (Are you taking advantage of the heat lamps?), the question was not very relevant since the heat lamps were not turned on as we expected. Nevertheless, although some occupants were some who were not aware that the lamps existed or responded that they had no choice in their seating due to overcrowding, the majority were either avoiding the heat lamps or stated that they would have preferred it if the lamps were on. Clearly, there is no consensus on whether heating lamps are desirable or not which proves our hypothesis that occupants have significantly varied personal thermal comfort levels.

1

Indoor Oudoor No, Too Warm

0 Enjoy Feeling Cool

No All Other Seats Consideration Taken

Location Based on Thermal Comfort

Lamps Unaware No Choice Lamps of Heat Off, Off, Preferred Preferred Lamps Seating Avoiding It Near It

Taking Advantage of the Heat Lamps

feet

2

3.5

7

4

4

3

3

2

Indoor Outdoor

1

Number of People

ANALYTICAL SECTION

1

Number of People

Survey Question 2

inches

Survey Question 4

Snapshot in Time

2

Indoor Outdoor

1 0

0

Breezy

Cool Neutral Warm Rank of Thermal Comfort

Neutral Rank of Airflow

Still

DATA 2/22/13

%RH Temp

ARCH 140 GSI: BEN GOLZE

3/1/13 Main Entrance Central Aisle

In Front of ATM

In Front of Espresso Machine

Corner College/ Bancroft

Corner College/ Durant

In Front of Drinking Fountain

College Entrance Center Aisle

Back Tables, Indoors

35.1 71

35.6 70.8

35.8 71.2

34.6 69.7

34.9 70.5

36.3 71.2

34.4 70

37 71

7

The results of our investigation of thermal comfort at Caffe Strada show that occupants are overall pleased with the thermal conditions offered by this space. Our hypothesis that the thermal comfort of individuals would vary was supported by the results of the survey: some occupants felt warm while others felt cool or neutral (satisfied). The responses to our survey were varied but limited in range: for example, when asked to rank their thermal comfort on a scale of -3 (very cold) to 3 (very hot), some occupants who were seated within a few feet of each other ranked the space differently, however all of the occupants ranked the space (both indoors and outdoors) within the -1 (cool) to 1 (warm) range.

0 Enjoy Feeling Warm

2

Overall Satisfaction with Thermal Environment

Survey Question 3

2

1

3.5

CONCLUSION

4

3

3.5

inches

OCCUPANT SURVEY RESULTS

4

1

FT

temperature rating: high to low

Finally, we will compare the thermal data collected from the indoor and outdoor environment alongside the survey results to determine if occupant thermal comfort levels are independent of or directly correlate with actual thermal conditions.

ANALYTICAL PLAN

IN

%RH Temp

Main Entrance Central Aisle

In Front of ATM

In Front of Espresso Machine

Corner College/ Bancroft

Corner College/ Durant

In Front of Drinking Fountain

College Entrance Center Aisle

Back Tables, Indoors

45.1 74.9

44.4 74.7

44.6

41.4 72

42

42.9 74.3

44 74.7

45.5

74.5

74.5

Our investigation covered a snapshot in time, and therefore our results would be very different during other times of the year. We collected our data on an unseasonably warm day in March, so there was little difference between outdoor and indoor thermal conditions. On a cooler day, or even on the same day but once the sun has set, we would predict that occupants’ differing thermal comfort levels would be more obvious: some occupants would prefer sitting near the heating lamps, and others would enjoy sitting in the cool evening air. Since the temperature and RH levels were relatively constant throughout our data set, it was difficult to show the wide range of individual thermal comfort levels, since we performed our survey on a mild day. We predict that on colder winter days, occupants would be more aware of the heating lamps, prefer less air flow, and flock to the indoor seating. However, even on a cold day as described we predict that some occupants would prefer to sit outside since thermal comfort levels vary significantly, and some individuals prefer thermal conditions which others deem unbearably cold. Overall, our investigation confirmed that occupant thermal comfort levels are not static, and that the main determinant for seating location at Caffe Strada is not thermal comfort, but the availability of vacant seats. We now know that the warmest and most humid area of Caffe Strada is the back corner indoors to the west of the cashier, and the coldest and driest area is the outdoor table area near the corner of College and Bancroft.

75.3

CAROLINE WALLIS KEN FARRIS

DIANA CHUNG CLAIRE PORTER



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