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TOWN Of CARY North Carolina FISCAL YEAR 2011

BUDGET IN BRIEF ADOPTED

BENJAMIN SHIVAR TOWN MANAGER

SCOTT FOGLEMAN BUDGET DIRECTOR KATHY LLERAS BUDGET ANALYST

MICHAEL BAJOREK ASSISTANT TOWN MANAGER

STACEY TEACHEY SENIOR BUDGET ANALYST

JOSH EDWARDS BUDGET ANALYST

www.townofcary.org

ELAINE HUNTLEY BUDGET TECHNICIAN


TOWN OF CARY VISION STATEMENT Cary is a place where good neighbors form healthy neighborhoods in a green and vibrant community of friendly, caring people. TOWN OF CARY MISSION STATEMENT At the Town of Cary we focus every day on enriching the lives of our citizens by creating an exceptional environment and providing exemplary services that enable our community to thrive and prosper. TOWN OF CARY STATEMENT OF VALUES To achieve our mission we will uphold the following values: 1.

Our organization exists to serve our citizens. We will be open, ensure access, encourage involvement and be accountable to our citizens.

2.

Employees are our most important resource. We will attract and retain the best employees and invest in their personal and professional growth.

3.

We will be honest, ethical and diligent. Our actions will comply with local, state and federal laws.

4.

We will treat everyone with dignity, respect and fairness.

5.

We will achieve the best results through effective teamwork, strategic partnerships and community participation.

6.

We will provide outstanding customer service that is polite, friendly and responsive.

7.

We value creative thinking and innovation. We will continue to be nationally recognized for excellence in local government.

8.

We value growth that balances desired service levels, economic benefits and continued stability for our community.

9.

We are cost conscious. We spend public funds responsibly and effectively to ensure the Town’s short and long term financial strength.

10.

We are committed to proactive, comprehensive planning to guide the future of our community.

11.

We will preserve and protect our environment. We will be good stewards of our finite natural resources. Adopted by Town Council August 22, 2006


TOWN OF CARY QUALITY OF LIFE GUIDING PRINCIPLES 1. The Town of Cary is an exceptionally safe community • Citizens feel secure in their homes, in the community, and on the streets and sidewalks 2. The Town of Cary maintains a small town feel • The Town possesses a distinctively small town character with a vibrant downtown • Pedestrians, drivers, and bicyclists move efficiently • Public facilities are clean and inviting 3. The Town of Cary is defined by its distinctive sense of place • Citizens and users take pride in the attractive appearance of parks, streets, and buildings • Citizens value the community’s cultural, recreational and economic opportunities • Citizens feel encouraged to lead healthy lifestyles 4. The Town of Cary actively builds community for all of its people • Citizens take pride in their quality of life • Community gathering places are valued and utilized • Town infrastructure is built to last • Citizens get excellent value for their investment in the Town of Cary • The public respects the way the Town is governed • The Town provides extraordinary customer service TOWN OF CARY GOALS AND INITIATIVES

FOCUS AREA I: COMMUNITY PLANNING - PLANNING FOR QUALITY OF LIFE GOAL: ACHIEVE A WELL-PLANNED COMMUNITY USING INNOVATIVE AND PROACTIVE PLANNING APPROACHES AND TECHNIQUES. INITIATIVE: Administer existing development ordinances and related development guidelines as adopted. INITIATIVE: Create connections between development interests and affected citizens to eliminate problems and concerns. INITIATIVE: Be responsive and inclusive to those involved in and affected by the development process. INITIATIVE: Identify planning, land use and growth related trends that affect the community and identify related policy changes that need to be made. INITIATIVE: Recognize points of conflict between approved development ordinances and community vision/community response, and work with Council and the community to realign policy and reality. INITIATIVE: Understand the forces that affect the built community and how they relate to the built environment: market trends, economic trends, building materials and techniques, etc.


FOCUS AREA II: INFRASTRUCTURE - MAKING SURE WE’RE READY WHEN YOU ARE GOAL: ENSURE THAT ROADS, WATER AND WASTEWATER FACILITIES, PARKS, AND OTHER INFRASTRUCTURE EXISTS FOR THE EXISTING CITIZENS AND FOR THE FUTURE NEEDS IDENTIFIED IN THE COMPREHENSIVE PLAN. INITIATIVE: Develop, maintain and update infrastructure master plans that coincide with community vision – water, wastewater, roads, parks, greenways, public facilities. INITIATIVE: Establish priorities for the timing of capital project construction based on citizen input, development trends, existing plans and community need. INITIATIVE: Develop alternate financing plans to fund approved plans, including seeking alternate sources of funding. INITIATIVE: Manage implementation of infrastructure plans to the approved schedule and budget. INITIATIVE: Build public facilities that meet community expectations for quality, environmental sensitivity, aesthetics and future needs.

FOCUS AREA III: FINANCIAL CONDITION - MAKING SENSE WITH THE DOLLARS GOAL: ACHIEVE A STABLE AND STRONG FINANCIAL POSITION BY ACCURATELY ESTIMATING, PRUDENTLY ALLOCATING, AND MANAGING FINANCIAL RESOURCES. INITIATIVE: Clearly identify budget and financial strategies and goals in the area of budgeting, financial planning, acquisition and use of short-term and long-term debt, capital facilities planning and budget management and execution. INITIATIVE: Maintain a AAA Bond Rating. INITIATIVE: Maintain the credibility of the organization with the public, State of North Carolina and private financial markets. INITIATIVE: Ensure funding is allocated to execute priorities and service levels defined through the mission statement, statement of values and Council goals and initiatives. INITIATIVE: Promote efficient and effective use of resources through vigorous budget preparation, approval and execution. INITIATIVE: Provide credibility and accountability through internal controls, performance measures and attention to details. INITIATIVE: Estimate revenues in an aggressively conservative manner. INITIATIVE: Identify future issues and forecast operational and fiscal impacts. INITIATIVE: Utilize fund balance for mid-year funding flexibility, bond rating, stability, interest income, help manage cash flow, provide flexibility in debt management and contribute to overall healthy financial position. INITIATIVE: Maximize our financial position through prudent debt, cash and investment management. INITIATIVE: Include revenue billing and collection processes that are accurate and timely. INITIATIVE: Protect assets through proactive risk management system. INITIATIVE: Comply with all applicable federal and state laws, as well as grant and contract commitments.


FOCUS AREA IV: MUNICIPAL SERVICES – PROVIDING EXCELLENCE IN SERVICE TO THE CITIZENS GOAL: ACHIEVE A HIGH LEVEL OF SERVICE TO THE CITIZENS IN A PROMPT, RELIABLE, RESPONSIVE, AND COST-EFFECTIVE MANNER INITIATIVE: Through citizen engagement identify public services desired by the public and the level of service. INITIATIVE: Develop operations plans that clearly define service and service level so we can accurately measure performance. INITIATIVE: Provide all services in a prompt, consistent and dependable manner. INITIATIVE: Provide all services with the citizen in mind; service delivery must be understandable and convenient for citizens to access. INITIATIVE: Operations plans should be cost effective and efficient; plans will continually be benchmarked against like services across the country for quality and cost. INITIATIVE: The Town will meet or exceed all regulatory requirements. INITIATIVE: Offer services that improve the overall environment and quality of life in the community and are not readily available from the private sector.


HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF CARY

The Town of Cary, located in Wake and Chatham Counties, is in North Carolina’s Piedmont region. The Town is located just southwest of the City of Raleigh, which serves as both the state capital and Wake County seat. Cary is a major hub of residential development for employees of the State of North Carolina, North Carolina State University and the Research Triangle Park—an industrial, governmental and scientific research area adjacent to the northwest Town limits. Cary is also home to a substantial mix of non-residential development including several major office parks and retail centers. Cary began as a settlement called Bradford's Ordinary in 1750. In 1854, a farmer and lumber man named Frank Page bought three hundred acres of land and established several enterprises, including a sawmill, general store, inn and Post Office. Page named his development Cary after Mr. Samuel Fenton Cary, a prohibition leader from Ohio whom he admired. The extension of the railroad through Cary enabled the Town to flourish, and on April 6, 1871, the Town of Cary was incorporated. In 1963, the State Legislature amended the Town’s charter to provide for a CouncilManager form of Government. One council member is elected from each of four voting districts, and two council members and the mayor are elected at-large. A prestigious, private boarding school developed in Cary during the late 1800's. This school later became famous as the first public high school in North Carolina. The school was located on the site currently occupied by Cary Elementary School. In 2002, the Wake County School System began building a new elementary school on the same site. The Town reached an agreement with the school system to purchase the former Cary Elementary School building. The Town is renovating this building to become the new Cary Community Arts Center with completion expected in May 2011. The 1990 Decennial Census reported the Town's population to be 44,276. The 2000 Decennial Census reported a population of 94,536, indicating a growth rate of 114% since 1990, which was an average of 11.3% per year. The Town of Cary's Planning Department estimates Cary’s July 1, 2010 population at 141,271, representing a 3.9% increase since July 1, 2009.

North Carolina


TOWN OF CARY ORGANIZATION CHART

CITIZENS OF CARY

Mayor and Council 7 Members

Town Boards and Commissions 95 Volunteers

*Finance 25 General Fund 29.125 Utility Fund Employees

Parks, Recreation & Cultural Resources 69.25 Employees

*Town Clerk's Office

*Town Manager's Office

*Town Attorney's Office

3.75 Employees

15.625 Employees

3 Employees

Technology Services

Human Resources

23 Employees

12.25 Employees

Police

Fire

211.5 Employees

206 Employees

Engineering

Planning

62 Employees

Inspections & Permits

27 Employees

45.625 Employees

Public Works/Utilities 306 General Fund 84.25 Utility Fund 10 Fleet Management Fund

* The Town Clerk, Town Manager, and Town Attorney are appointed by Town Council. The function of Treasurer is a responsibility assigned by Town Council to the Finance Director. While the function of Treasurer is an appointment, the position of Finance Director is not. NOTE: Employee counts include permanent employees only, expressed as full time equivalents (FTEs). All employees are included in the general fund unless otherwise noted. The total number of approved budgeted regular employee positions for FY 2011 excluding Town Council, is 1,133.375. This total does not include the 7 non-budgeted overhire positions (3 in Fire and 4 in Police).

MEMBERS OF CARY TOWN COUNCIL Harold Weinbrecht 105 Windspring Court Mayor Jennifer Robinson 106 Chertsey Court District A

Don Frantz 706 East Cornwall Road District B

Jack Smith 104 Cricket Lane District C

Gale Adcock 300 Legault Drive District D

Julie Robison 112 Brant Point Place At-Large Mayor Pro Tem

Ervin Portman 101 Fern Bluff Way At-Large


RESPONSIBILITIES OF TOWN GOVERNMENT BY DEPARTMENT

LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT The Legislative Department includes the Town Council, the Town Clerk Division, and the Legal Division. 1.

The Town Council is comprised of the Mayor and six Council Members, and is selected by the registered voters of Cary. Council establishes policies and programs for effective delivery of Town services, approves the annual financial plan and sets the property tax rate and all user fees, and provides all ordinances, rules and regulations for the welfare of the Town.

2.

Town Clerk Division is responsible for giving notice of Town Council meetings, preparing the Council agenda, recording Council proceedings, serving as custodian of all permanent Town records, keeping the Town Seal, attesting all Town documents, updating the Town Code, keeping records of appointments and terms of the various Boards and Commissions, administrative support responsibilities for the Council and Boards and Commissions, and handling the sale of lots at Hillcrest Cemetery. The Town Clerk is appointed by and reports directly to the Town Council. The Town Clerk Division also includes one full-time Deputy Town Clerk, one full-time Administrative Secretary II, and one part-time Administrative Secretary II.

3.

Legal Division - The Office of the Town Attorney provides legal advice and representation to the Town, including the Mayor, Council, and other Town officials and employees on a broad range of issues. The Town Attorney represents the Town in litigation filed by or against it, and provides legal opinions to the Town Council. Ordinances are drafted or reviewed by the Legal Division. The Legal Division drafts and reviews as to form most contracts, leases, deeds, franchises, bonds, and other legal documents to which the Town is a party. The Town Attorney is also involved in the selection and management of outside counsel who represent the Town, its officials, and employees on Town-related matters. The Town Attorney is appointed by and reports to the Town Council. The Legal Division also includes one full-time Assistant Town Attorney and one full-time Legal Assistant. The Legal Division only represents the Town of Cary, and its agencies, officials and employees, on matters of public business. The Legal Division cannot provide legal advice or representation to citizens on any matter. Citizens seeking legal advice or representation must consult an attorney in private practice. ADMINISTRATION DEPARTMENT

The Administration Department includes the Town Manager’s Office, the Public Information Office, and the Budget Office. 1.

The Town Manager’s Office includes the Town Manager, Assistant Town Manager, Assistant to the Town Manager, Administrative Assistant, Sustainability Manager, and Downtown Development Manager, and is responsible for implementing the Council’s policy decisions. The Town Manager is appointed by the Town Council and is responsible for all operations and projects, the performance of all Town departments, and responding to citizen requests and concerns.

2.

The Public Information Office develops and executes a comprehensive communication program consistent with the organization’s mission and goals and is designed to increase citizen awareness and involvement in their local government. Responsibilities include overseeing communications planning, the Town’s government access channel (CARY TV), the utility bill insert (BUD), web site content (www.townofcary.org), media relations, advertising, and research. The office also oversees cable television service regulation.


3.

The Budget Office is responsible for the planning, development, execution, and evaluation of the Operating and Capital Improvements Budgets and the Capital Improvements Plan. Other responsibilities include long-term financial planning, preparing material for the Council/Staff Retreat, publishing budget documents, and handling special projects. Special projects include the statewide Performance Measurement Project, internal performance measurement/benchmarking projects, operational analyses, and policy research and recommendations. FINANCE DEPARTMENT

The Finance Department is composed of three divisions: Accounting, Procurement and Risk Services, and Utility Customer Accounting. 1.

The purpose of the Accounting Division is to administer the financial affairs of the Town. This encompasses cash management, debt management, grants management, maintaining accounting and financial records, invoicing all non-utility billed revenues, managing delinquent collections, bi-weekly payroll management, accounts payable, preparing the Comprehensive Annual Financial Report, assessment of internal control systems and performing special projects in financial analysis such as monthly statistical reporting, cash flow projections, etc.

2.

The Procurement & Risk Services Division provides centralized purchasing services for all the departments of Town government. It is located at the Town's Operations Center and is also responsible for the Town's mail, copy and courier services, risk management services including administration of the Town’s property and casualty insurance program, management of surplus property, central warehouse operations, and capital assets inventory management.

3.

The Utility Customer Accounting Division is responsible for reading water meters, providing customer service by assisting customers with daily requests such as turning water meters on and off, billing over 50,000 customers per month for water, sewer, solid waste and other miscellaneous Town services, receiving and posting payments for utility bills, Wake County taxes and other miscellaneous revenues, and managing delinquent accounts by sending notices and disconnecting service as a result of non payment. . This function is accounted for in the Utility Fund. TECHNOLOGY SERVICES DEPARTMENT

The Technology Services Department (TS) provides support for a variety of technology applications. TS provides installation and support for two AS/400 minicomputers, a microcomputer network of workstations and servers, geographic information services, emergency radio system, phone system, paging system, voice mail, electronic mail and the Town’s site on the World Wide Web (www.townofcary.org). In addition, TS provides training for all technologyrelated areas and develops strategic plans to ensure that current technology is provided to Town Council, staff and citizens. HUMAN RESOURCES DEPARTMENT The Human Resources Department ensures that the Town is staffed with capable and motivated employees who can provide the highest level of service to the citizens of Cary. This is accomplished through diligent recruitment and selection efforts, performance-based compensation and competitive benefits, effective employee relations, innovative and cutting-edge training and development programs, and aggressive safety initiatives. POLICE DEPARTMENT The mission of the Police Department is to protect life and property through community partnerships and the provision of the highest level of quality professional services. The police department exists to ensure the safety and well being of the community, its citizens, and visitors. The department accomplishes its mission by focusing on education, prevention, investigation, and enforcement. Major components of the department include Field Operations, Investigations, Support Services, and Professional Standards. The department also provides animal control, school resource, and emergency communications service for the town and its citizens. The police department’s Geographical Policing philosophy is enhanced by innovative methods, processes, and personnel dedicated to making Cary a safe place to live and work. The Cary Police Department has been internationally accredited since 1992 and has been deemed a Flagship Agency by the Commission on Accreditation for Law Enforcement Agencies (CALEA). The Cary Police Department and its personnel contribute greatly to Cary’s high quality of life.


FIRE DEPARTMENT The primary mission of the Fire Department is to protect and enhance the high quality of life for the citizens and visitors of the Town of Cary from the adverse effects of natural and man-made emergencies. Our goal is to provide a model customer-oriented, fire protection program through an innovative, proactive, and cost effective approach to emergency response, fire code application, and public fire education. ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT The Engineering Department provides or coordinates design, project management and construction administration services for a majority of the Town’s capital improvements projects, including streets, sidewalks, traffic signals, water distribution system projects, sanitary sewer collection system projects, treatment plants, parking lots, buildings and parks. Engineering also conducts studies to address community issues related to public infrastructure problems such as flooding, sight distance, traffic signal studies, and roadway safety, as well as managing the new fiber optic traffic system. Engineering is also involved in development activities including planning for water, sanitary sewer, transportation, and stormwater systems. PLANNING DEPARTMENT The Planning Department handles a wide variety of long-range and day-to-day land use planning and development functions. Examples of long-range policy activities include preparation and maintenance of the comprehensive plan related to land use, transportation, affordable housing, and historic preservation issues; managing affordable housing and transit programs; maintaining statistics and maps; and coordinating with other departments, agencies, and units of government. Current planning responsibilities include processing of rezoning and planned development district (PDD) applications; coordination of variance, appeal, and interpretation cases; reviewing subdivision plans and site plans for conformance with Town regulations; and maintaining, administering, and enforcing the zoning code. The Planning department also provides staff support to the Board of Adjustment, the Planning and Zoning Board, the Town Center Review Commission, and special citizen committees. INSPECTIONS AND PERMITS DEPARTMENT The Inspections and Permits Department is responsible for the enforcement of state and local laws related to the construction of buildings and other structures; the installation of such facilities as plumbing systems, electrical systems, heating systems, refrigeration systems, and air conditioning systems; the maintenance of buildings and other structures in a safe, sanitary, and healthy condition; street addressing, and other related matters specified by the Town Council. Duties of the department include processing applications for permits, collecting development related fees, conducting inspections, issuing certificates of occupancy, issuing orders to correct violations, and any other actions required to adequately enforce state and local laws. PARKS, RECREATION AND CULTURAL RESOURCES DEPARTMENT The Parks, Recreation and Cultural Resources Department (PRCR) consists of four divisions. The primary mission of the department is to serve, educate and enhance the quality of life for Cary citizens. 1.

The Administration Division is responsible for the acquisition of land and the design and development of a system of parks, greenways, recreation facilities, and open space areas. In addition, the division is responsible for public information and marketing, national accreditation, customer service and staff training, grant writing, volunteer development and recognition, coordination of citizen boards and committees, program evaluation and analysis, and other support functions.

2.

The Recreation Programs Division provides a wide range of recreational programs for adults, children, and senior adults including dance, exercise, adventure, trips, confidence building, social interaction, camps, as well as programs in ecology, environmental stewardship, preservation, and nature appreciation for adults and youth. In addition, the division provides Town citizens with the opportunity to rent facilities for group functions, such as picnics, meetings, and other social occasions. Programs and rentals are offered at Bond Park, Hemlock Bluffs Nature Preserve, Herb Young Community Center, Bond Park Community Center, Middle Creek Community Center, Cary Senior Center and other various parks throughout the Town. This division also supervises the management of Sk8-Cary and the Cary Dog Park.


3.

The Cultural Arts and Resources Division offers a wide-ranging schedule of classes in dance, visual arts, music, theatre, history, architecture, film and videography and international cuisine to enrich the lives of Town citizens. Division staff also provide communication, coordination, and support for Town cultural groups. In addition, special events such as Lazy Daze and Spring Daze, the Holiday Tree Lighting, Fourth of July Celebration, and events at the Sertoma Amphitheatre are managed by this division to provide an opportunity for Town citizens to come together as a community to experience artistic excellence. Applause! Cary Youth Theatre provides opportunities for area youth to participate in two theatrical productions each year. The Town public art program is administered through the division as well as coordination of Town exhibitions. The division also has responsibilities in administering the Town’s Public Art Master Plan. The division oversees the operation of the Page-Walker Arts and History Center and the Jordan Hall Arts Center, and provides general oversight for SMG, the facilities management company that administers the Koka Booth Amphitheatre at Regency Park.

4.

The Athletics Division is responsible for planning, implementing and supervising diverse youth and adult programs and special events. Programs and camps are offered in basketball, softball, baseball, volleyball, tennis, soccer, cross country and golf. The division is also host to various special events such as the Cary Road Race as well as local, state and national level soccer, tennis, baseball and softball tournaments. The Town manages several signature parks including the Cary Tennis Park (a 30-court full service tennis facility providing instruction, camps, clinics, tournaments and league play), WakeMed Soccer Park (a 150 acre facility which includes a nationally recognized cross country course, 7 multi-purpose soccer fields and a 7,000 seat stadium home to the Carolina Railhawks, a United States Soccer League team). The USA Baseball National Training Complex at Thomas Brook includes 4 full size baseball fields including a stadium field to complement the current 4 field softball/baseball complex at the park. PUBLIC WORKS AND UTILITIES DEPARTMENT

The Public Works and Utilities Department is divided into two major components that are funded through the General and Utility funds. The General Fund portion of the Public Works and Utilities Department is composed of six divisions, and the Utility Fund portion is composed of 7 divisions. The responsibilities within each fund are listed below. General Fund - Public Works The Administration Division coordinates water resource management, long range utility infrastructure needs, budget preparation, expenditure system control, operations analysis, data collection and analysis, parts and supplies procurement, report and study preparation, record-keeping, and personnel activities. An additional key function is providing telephone customer service information for all departmental functions that directly impact Cary citizens. This includes preparing work orders for customer needs that will be executed by operational staff. The Facilities Management Division is tasked with the planning and implementation of a comprehensive maintenance and repair program for all Town buildings, landscapes, parks, trails, rights-of-way, and cemetery. Other responsibilities include; the Town’s leaf collection program, street sweeping program, code enforcement pertaining to overgrown properties, roadway and sidewalk obstructions, hazard trees and related safety issues. The Division also provides emergency response during weather events and logistical support for all Town events. The Operations Division is responsible for providing utility, street maintenance, and traffic operation services for citizens, businesses and visitors to Cary. These services include maintenance and repair of the water and reclaimed water distribution systems, sanitary sewer systems, storm water conveyance systems, streets, sidewalks, curb and gutter, traffic signals, traffic signs and traffic markings, water meter services, and utility line locates. Other division responsibilities include inclement weather response operations such as snow and ice control, storm recovery and debris removal, and chipping services. In addition, the division provides program support to other divisions and departments. The Operations Division participates in engineering studies, provides direct support to facility maintenance teams, park and greenway trail repairs and other recreational facilities as needed and traffic sign/signal services and support for special events. The division maintains around-the-clock response capabilities through after hours/weekend response teams in four key areas - water, sewer, traffic signals, and construction.


The Solid Waste Management and Recycling Division provides curbside household garbage collection services on a weekly basis to households and small businesses. The division is also responsible for the collection of recyclables, yard waste, used large appliances and dead animals/ code enforcement for debris and health and safety related issues, emptying downtown litter containers; the processing and disposal of debris resulting from inclement weather; and, the operation of the Dixon Avenue Citizen Convenience Center/Transfer Station. In addition, the division coordinates a solid waste education program to increase citizen understanding of waste reduction/diversion opportunities, and the development of long range disposal operations. The Fleet Management Division is responsible for the repair and maintenance of all Town vehicles and equipment. Additionally, the division coordinates planned preventive maintenance of all vehicles, provides vehicle and equipment replacement planning for Town departments, and provides fuel for Town vehicles and equipment. Also, the division provides operation and maintenance cost data for all departments utilizing vehicle and equipment assets. The division is accounted for in a separate internal service fund and services, parts, and fuel are charged back to user departments. Utility Fund - Utilities The Water Conservation Division is responsible for implementing, monitoring, and evaluating water conservation programs focused on peak and per capita reduction through education, financial incentives and regulation. Staff also provides educational outreach for solid waste and recycling efforts. The Pretreatment Division is responsible for implementing the Town’s industrial pretreatment program, user fee program for industrial and commercial users of the sewer system, and the Fats, Oils, and Grease (FOG) program that help prevent blockages and overflows in the sanitary collection system. The Pretreatment Division is the primary contact for the regulatory agencies that assess the Town’s overall regulation and control of what is discharged into the sanitary sewer collection system.. The Utility Systems Management Division provides maintenance for the water and wastewater pumping facilities, and is also responsible for elevated water storage, odor control, instrumentation assistance, industrial wastewater flow data, wate system flow data, and inflow/infiltration functions. This division participates in engineering studies and related system review functions. The North and South Cary Water Reclamation Facilities’ mission is to treat wastewater generated by Cary’s utility customers. Ongoing efforts include the provision of preventive and corrective maintenance for the main plant sites, a biosolids processing facility, a regional pump station, a biosolids gravity belt thickener system and related facilities and grounds.. Both facilities also focus on biosolids removal and disposal. The Cary/Apex Water Treatment Plant’s mission is to provide adequate clean water to the Towns of Apex and Cary and those entities the Town contracts with to provide service. The Town of Apex pays a portion of the operating costs of the water plant (23% of capital costs and actual usage of other costs) as 23% owner of the facility. The plant also manages the disposal of water treatment residuals and develops and manages alternative residual disposal methods. The plant capacity is 40 million gallons per day. The Western Wake Water Reclamation Facility’s mission is to treat wastewater generated by Cary, Morrisville, Apex, and Holly Springs utility customers. The plant is expected to be operational in 2013.


TOWN OF CARY EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Introduction The Budget in Brief presents an overview of the annual budget for the 2011 fiscal year for the Town of Cary, North Carolina. This summary provides highlights of the Town’s major funds including the general fund, utility fund, and capital improvements funds. The various budget documents, including this Budget in Brief, present data in tables and graphs with some accompanying text providing explanatory or supplemental information. Information typically covers a five-year period, including actual figures for fiscal years 2007, 2008, 2009, estimated figures for FY 2010, and the adopted budget figures for FY 2011. In addition, this document includes the Town Council's goals and initiatives and a brief summary of each department’s responsibilities. Budget Development Budget development began in December 2009 with the Town Manager’s official kick-off of the budget season. Departments began submitting prioritized budget requests to the Budget Office for the capital budget year, the ten year capital improvement planning period, and the annual operating budget in late January 2010. After reviewing the initial budget requests, the Town Manager’s Office and budget staff met with departments to allow them to more fully explain and justify their requests. Emphasis was placed on maintaining a strong financial position, maintaining service levels in operations, identifying opportunities for further efficiencies in the organization, reducing costs, and future planning. In addition, departments submitted streamlined budget narratives, which focused on program objectives and performance measures. Both quantitative and qualitative performance indicators were included to help measure progress toward program objectives. February 2010 was the month designated to formally solicit and gather public input on priorities for the upcoming fiscal year during which interested parties could communicate their budget priorities for the coming year in person at one of two public hearings, by phone, or by email. Once the recommended budget was submitted to Council in May, there were two public hearings to gather feedback from the public. The budget development process this year also included two full Council work sessions prior to Town Council adopting the FY 2011 Budget on June 24, 2010. Review of Revenues General Fund: Revenue assumptions driving estimated FY 2010 and budgeted FY 2011 figures were based on an economy that has slowed down significantly, impacting the growth rate of population, assessed value, and the volume of new building permits. Population growth affects several of the large revenue sources in the general fund including ad valorem taxes, sales taxes, utilities franchise taxes, wine and beer taxes, building permit fees, building inspection fees, environmental permits, sanitation fees, and cable television franchise fees. The Town of Cary's population growth rate has varied over the years as seen in the chart below. Variables that have impacted these rates include the health of the national and local economies and in the early 2000s additional growth management efforts that were instituted. The growth management element of the Town’s Comprehensive Plan has included measures such as an adequate public facilities ordinance, and water, sewer, and transportation development fees to help ensure that additional growth does not occur before the required infrastructure is in place.

4.0%

135,955

130,716 6.6%

4.3%

122,643 5.9%

115,854

111,039 2.7%

108,152 1.3%

106,715 3.3%

99,798 4.0% 103,260 3.5%

88,354 1.8%

86,783 4.9%

82,700 7.7%

13.1%

69,500

61,439 7.4%

57,187 9.1%

52,403 8.9%

3.7%

48,130 8.7%

20,000

44,276

40,000

42,681 4.6%

60,000

40,810 3.6%

80,000 37,455 5.0% 39,387 5.2%

Population

100,000

76,800 10.5%

120,000

95,949 8.6%

140,000

141,271 3.9%

Town of Cary Population and % Change 160,000

0 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 00 01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10 11

Estimates as of July 1 of Each Fiscal Year


During 2002, only 466 new single family permits were issued compared to an average of about 1,500 per year in the mid 1990s. The assessed value on which tax receipts are calculated is based on what has been built by the prior January 1, meaning that FY 2011 revenues are based on values as of January 1, 2010. A historical perspective of the Town’s assessed value (tax base) growth since FY 1995 is provided in the graph below. The extremely high growth rate in 2001 and 2009 reflects property revaluation which is done every eight years in Wake County to adjust tax values to better approximate market value at the time. Typically, municipalities adjust the tax rate downward in a revaluation year to collect the same amount of revenue it would have achieved without the revaluation. The tax rate was reduced from 54 cents to 43 cents in FY 2001 as a result of property revaluation in Wake County. The tax rate was further reduced to 42 cents in FY 2002 and remained steady until it was reduced to 33 cents in FY 2009, again as a result of property revaluation. Assessed value levels are very important in Cary as property tax revenue represents 58% of total general fund revenues in FY2011. Town of Cary Assessed Value (Tax Base) and Growth Rate (% Change) 50% 41.5%

43.0%

$25,000,000,000

45% 40%

$15,000,000,000

30%

6.8%

25% 20% Est @ 5.3%

15% 3.7%

10% 0.8%

6.6%

4.8%

1.5%

8.0%

9.5%

11.1%

12.1%

13.1%

12.4%

$5,000,000,000

3.1%

5.1%

$10,000,000,000

% Change

35%

3.5%

Assessed Value

$20,000,000,000

Assessed Value

% Change

FY 2011 Bud.

FY 2010 Est.

*FY 2009

FY 2008

FY 2007

FY 2006

FY 2005

FY 2004

FY 2003

FY 2002

*FY 2001

FY 2000

FY 1999

FY 1998

FY 1997

FY 1996

0% FY 1995

$0

5%

Fiscal Year (*FY2001 and *FY2009 Wake County Property Revaluation)

Expected sales tax revenues totaling $21.3 million in FY 2011 make up 18% of all general fund revenues. The historical growth rate of this major revenue source was greatly impacted by the economic slowdown of the early 2000s as well as the most recent economic recession. The graph below depicts the historical growth of sales tax revenues and includes the one cent (Article 39) which is distributed based on sales delivered in Wake County, the two half cents (Articles 40 and 42) which are distributed state-wide based on the population of each county, and the one half cent (Article 44) which is distributed based on a combination of both approaches mentioned. Article 44 was approved in December 2002 to replace the expiring inventory tax reimbursement and intangibles tax reimbursement revenue sources. Town of Cary Sales Tax Revenues Actuals Through FY 2009, Estimates for FY 2010 and FY 2011

$12,000,000

One Cent (Art 39)

$10,000,000

Two Half Cents (Art 40 & 42) New in '03 Half Cent (Art 44)

$8,000,000 $6,000,000 $4,000,000 $2,000,000

Fiscal Year

FY 2011

FY 2010

FY 2009

FY 2008

FY 2007

FY 2006

FY 2005

FY 2004

FY 2003

FY 2002

FY 2001

FY 2000

FY 1999

FY 1998

FY 1997

FY 1996

FY 1995

FY 1994

FY 1993

FY 1992

FY 1991

FY 1990

FY 1989

$0


In FY 2001 the monthly solid waste fee, which covers the Town’s primarily residential solid waste and recycling collection programs, was reduced from $11.50 per month to $7.67 per month. In FY 2006, the fee was increased to $11.75 per month. This change was the result of a comprehensive review of the Town’s solid waste program, which produced two main recommendations: 1) increase the fee so those directly benefiting from the service pay an increasing portion of the direct costs; and 2) convert from backyard collection to automated curbside collection to provide safer, more efficient solid waste collection. The solid waste and recycling monthly fee history since 1987 is included below. Town of Cary Solid Waste and Recycling Fee History $16 $14.00 $14

$13.00 $11.50

Monthly Rate

$12

$11.75

$11.00

$10 $8.00

$7.67

$8 $6 $4 $2

2011

2010

2009

2008

2007

2006

2005

2004

2003

2002

2001

2000

1999

1998

1997

1996

1995

1994

1993

1992

1991

1990

1989

1988

1987

$0

In 1994, service was changed from twice a week back yard collection to once a week. In 2006, the process of converting to curbside automation and dual stream recycling began with full implementation in effect beginning in FY 2008. In FY 2009, the Town further expanded the list of recycling materials accepted and distributed roll-out carts to streamline collection.

Fiscal Year

The percentage of program cost recovery has varied over the years and was 50% in FY 2005. At the FY 2005 rate of $7.67 per month, 50% of the program costs were being subsidized by other general fund revenue sources, including the entire tax base (both residential and commercial). The $11.75 rate implemented in FY 2006 recovered about 77% of the total program costs from the customers receiving direct services and included the costs of actually collecting and disposing of the garbage, recycling materials (net of revenue received from selling recyclable materials), and yard waste. The FY 2011 fee of $14.00 remains the same as FY 2010 and is anticipated to recover approximately 90% of the program costs. Other significant general fund revenues include recreation-related revenues of $4.7 million, $2.7 million from building permits and related fees, $4.5 million from the utility franchise taxes, and $0.8 million in net interest from investments. Total general fund revenues for FY 2011 are budgeted at $116.6 million which is about the same as estimated FY 2009 revenues, and down about $1 million or 0.9% from FY 2008 actual revenues of $117.7 million. Utility Fund: FY 2011 utility fund revenues are budgeted at $55.9 million. The Town of Cary utilizes a tiered rate structure that includes a monthly base charge for all users to help address the equity of cost recovery from different customer classes, and uses a financial model that provides a flexible planning tool for calculating utility rates. The tiered rate structure shifts more of the burden to the higher volume users that have substantial effects on the peak demands of the system. The combined water and sewer utility bill for a 7,000 gallon per month residential customer is expected to rise 7.4% in FY 2011 over FY 2010 rates, or about $5.60 per month. The primary driver of these rate increases are costs of capital infrastructure improvements. The major sources of revenue for the utility fund are water retail fees of $22.5 million and sewer retail fees of $30.8 million. Until August of 1993, the Town of Cary purchased all of its water from the City of Raleigh. Since its opening in 1993, the Cary/Apex Water Treatment Plant has provided water for both Cary and the neighboring town of Apex which owns 23% of the plant and bears 23% of the capital cost, as well as a portion of the plant’s operating costs based on Apex’s actual water usage. In addition, Cary began selling water to the Town of Morrisville and the Raleigh/Durham Airport in FY 1994 and entered into an agreement to sell raw water to Chatham County during FY 1996. The Town also provides water for Wake County’s portion of the Research Triangle Park. In order to meet high peak demands, Cary also entered into agreements to purchase water from the cities of Raleigh and Durham to supplement the supply from the Cary/Apex Water Treatment Plant. Since the water treatment plant expansion was completed in the spring of 2002, the Town of Cary is no longer reliant upon other municipalities for its water supply. In April of 2006, the Town of Morrisville utility system merged with the Town of Cary system and the two are now operated as one with Town of Cary staff assuming responsibility for the combined system. Costs directly related to the merger are recovered through a rate differential being charged to utility customers in Morrisville’s jurisdiction until the merger costs are fully recovered, which is expected to take approximately fifteen years.


Review of Expenditures Operating expenditures and transfers of $117.8 million are budgeted in the general fund for FY 2011, including $13.7 million for debt service. Debt service has grown substantially over the past few years as the Town has ramped up its capital spending. In FY 2000, debt service of $1.6 million made up 2.4% of all general fund expenditures and transfers. In FY 2011, debt service of $13.7 million makes up 11.6% of all general fund expenditures and transfers. This increase has allowed the Town to advance a large number of capital investments and to take advantage of the historically low interest rates that have been available in recent years. To help ensure debt service levels remain manageable, the Town Council set an informal ceiling level for general fund debt service of 15%. Public safety expenses comprised of personnel, operating, and capital expenses for the fire and police departments make up 32% of general fund spending in FY 2011 totaling $38 million. Budgeted utility fund expenses and transfers total $51.8 million for FY 2011. Of this amount, $12.9 million, or 25% is budgeted to cover utility-related debt service requirements. Operating funding covers operations at the North Cary Water Reclamation Facility, the South Cary Water Reclamation Facility, and the Cary/Apex Water Treatment Plant as well as the necessary maintenance associated with all transmission lines and equipment. Transfers from the utility fund include $424 thousand to help fund the purchase of open space as identified in the Open Space and Historic Resources Plan. Regarding staffing needs, the demand for services continues to grow and it has become increasingly difficult to maintain quality service with current staffing levels. However, with the recession’s impact of tightening revenue growth and somewhat reduced new development related workloads, 31.25 positions that were vacated at various times during FY 2009 and FY 2010 were held open and officially eliminated from the authorized staffing document as part of the FY 2011 budget adoption. To support other areas of growth and needed programs, 12 new positions were added in FY 2011 including 4 to support the opening late in the fiscal year of the new Cary Community Arts Center. The staffing ratio, an indicator of staff efficiency, is 8.1 employees per 1,000 citizens in FY 2011. This is 0.4 less than it was in FY 1999, and lower than many local government agencies in North Carolina. Capital Budget Considerations Every budget cycle the Town of Cary develops a ten year capital improvements plan to help identify future year priorities and what the related capital funding needs and related operating costs are going to be for the near future. As part of the same capital budget process, the upcoming budget year identifies specific capital projects for funding and the Council appropriates various funding sources to accomplish those initiatives. Once funds are set aside for capital projects, they are available for expenditure until the project is complete. The FY 2011 Capital Improvements Budget (CIB) totals $174.8 million and includes $165.6 million for water and sewer projects, and $9.2 million for the general capital category including transportation, parks, fire and general government projects. Water Capital Projects The water capital improvements budget and plan (FYs 2011-2021) includes $184 million in projects. Projects identified throughout this period range in scope from upgrading water lines each year to constructing an expansion of the Cary/Apex Water Treatment Plant (C/A WTP) in FY 2012. The FY 2011 appropriation to the water capital improvements budget totals $20.7 million, a 24% increase from the adopted FY 2010 CIB. This increase is largely attributed to an $8.1 million appropriation for design associated with the expansion of the Cary/Apex Water Treatment Plant, a $1.5 million appropriation for the development of a supplemental water supply at the Cary/Apex Water Treatment Plant and a $5.5 million appropriation toward construction of an elevated water storage tank in western Cary. Combined, these three projects represent 73% of the total FY 2011 water capital improvements budget. The FY 2011 water capital improvements budget also focuses on water line extension, reinforcement and upgrades. A total of $5 million, or 24%, of the FY 2011 water CIB is directed toward water line infrastructure and maintenance projects. Sewer Capital Projects The sewer capital improvements budget and plan (FYs 2011-2021) includes $271 million in projects. Projects scheduled during this period range in scope from sewer line replacements/upgrades to remaining design and construction of the statemandated Western Wake Regional Wastewater Management Facility (WWRWMF). The FY 2011 appropriation to the sewer capital improvements budget totals $145 million, a 463% increase from project funding included in the adopted FY 2010 CIB. $127.7 million, or 88%, of FY 2011 sewer appropriations are directed toward construction of the Western Wake Regional Wastewater Management Facility (WWRWMF). The WWRWMF will allow the Town of Cary to meet a mandate issued by the State of North Carolina to return water to the Cape Fear River Basin and address wastewater treatment capacity needs of the Town and its municipal partners (the towns of Apex, Holly Springs and Morrisville). After examining many alternatives for addressing the Town of Cary’s need for additional


capacity and the state’s mandate, Town officials concluded that the most efficient and cost-effective option was to partner with other local communities in need of wastewater treatment capacity. A municipal partnership between the towns of Cary, Apex, Morrisville and Holly Springs was formed to develop, design and construct a regional wastewater treatment facility in western Wake County. As the Town of Morrisville’s utility system merged with Cary’s in April 2006, their wastewater treatment needs will be met via Cary’s participation in the agreement. Development of the WWRWMF will occur in two phases. Upon completion of Phase I, the facilities will have a maximum treatment capacity of 18 million gallons per day (MGD) and a treated discharge capacity of 24 MGD (to accommodate Holly Springs' treated effluent as well) which is expected to meet the project partners’ needs through 2020. At startup, the facilities are projected to treat 9.9 million gallons per day (MGD) of raw wastewater and discharge 13.2 MGD of treated wastewater. The Town of Cary's share (including Research Triangle Park - South) is projected to be 5.8 MGD in 2011 and 10.5 MGD by 2020. Phase II of the project, which is currently planned to be completed by 2020, will allow the facilities to treat up to 30 MGD and discharge up to 38 MGD. In 2030, the Town of Cary’s share (including Research Triangle Park – South) is expected to be 16.3 MGD. The Town of Cary has been named lead agency for the project by the municipal partners. As such, Cary is responsible for managing all aspects of the project, including budgeting for the entire project with partners paying their share through Cary. Total cost for the WWRWMF initiative is estimated to be $330.4 million. The Town of Cary’s portion of the total cost (including Morrisville) is anticipated to equal $222.6 million. The Town includes all aspects of the WWRWMF in its CIB/CIP with each municipal partner’s project share noted independently. Municipal partners are responsible for annually funding their portions of the project undertaken in a given fiscal year. The Town of Cary’s FY 2011 share of the WWRWMF initiative (including Morrisville’s portion) totals $89.6 million with the FY 2011 municipal partners’ shares totaling $38.1 million. Apart from the WWRWMF initiative, the FY 2011 CIB includes $17.1 million in funding to address other sewer-related needs including: $7.9 million for wastewater collection projects such as construction of wastewater pump station parallel force mains and pump station improvements; $6.8 million for investments in reclaimed water, wastewater treatment, repair and rehabilitation and system management projects; $1.9 million provides peak flow management improvements throughout the wastewater system; $1.8 million funds repair and rehabilitation and flow monitoring and sampling improvement projects; $525,000 supports upgrades to the headworks at the South Cary Water Reclamation (SCWRF) facility; and $375,000 provides additional reclaimed water storage capacity at the SCWRF. The FY 2011 sewer capital improvements budget and plan continues to focus on efficiently and effectively providing safe and adequate wastewater treatment. Although the WWRWMF is a prominent aspect of the FY 2011 CIB/CIP, both the budget and the plan emphasize overall wastewater system management and infrastructure maintenance. Transportation Capital Projects The transportation capital improvements budget and plan (FYs 2011-2021) includes $70 million in projects. Projects identified during this period range in scope from sidewalk installation to major interchange modifications and road improvements. The FY 2011 transportation capital improvements appropriation totals $2.7 million which is 30% higher than the adopted FY 2010 transportation capital improvements budget. This increase is due to the fact that more infrastructure maintenance projects are funded in FY 2011 than were included in the FY 2010 adopted CIB. The FY 2011 transportation CIB continues to focus on infrastructure maintenance and road capacity. Funding for major road maintenance comprises $1.7 million, or 63%, of total FY 2011 transportation appropriations. $1 million of this amount is directed to the Town’s annual street improvement project. The street improvement project serves as the primary means of accomplishing overall repair and resurfacing for Town-maintained streets. Most major roadways within Cary are maintained by the state while the Town maintains most residential streets. The remaining $700,000 budgeted for major maintenance resumes appropriations to three transportation infrastructure maintenance initiatives that were not funded in FY 2010. Traditionally, the Town annually funds bridge/culvert repairs, railroad grade crossing repairs and street storm drainage system rehabilitation work. In response to economic pressures, it was determined that FY 2010 funding for these particular maintenance projects could be delayed for a fiscal year with minimal impact to the Town’s transportation infrastructure. Resuming appropriations to these projects in FY 2011 demonstrates the Town’s commitment to maintenance of existing infrastructure. Just over $1 million is included in the FY 2011 transportation CIB for alternate mode and control system projects. $500,000 of the $540,000 appropriation to alternate mode projects supports the Town’s sidewalk improvement project. $40,000 has been included for the purchase and installation of four additional bus shelters throughout the Town’s fixed route bus system. The remaining $500,000 is appropriated to the traffic calming ($100,000) and traffic signalization ($400,000) control system projects. Each of the alternate mode and control system projects funded in FY 2011 are typically funded on an annual basis but received no funds in FY 2010.


The FYs 2012 – 2021 transportation capital improvements plan continues to focus on infrastructure maintenance and the promotion of alternate modes of transportation. The most significant road capacity project during the planning period is the TCAP – Walker Street Extension project with an identified funding need of $19,500,000 in FY 2012. Total project cost is estimated at $25.2 million. $5.7 million has been appropriated through FY 2010 with $4.5 million of this figure comprised of federal funds. The TCAP – Walker Street Extension project would extend Walker Street from Cedar Street to Chapel Hill Road and alleviate traffic congestion in Cary’s downtown during peak hours. As with all other capital project categories, funding availability will continue to set the tone for the size and scope of future year transportation capital improvements budgets. Fire Capital Projects The fire capital improvements budget and plan (FYs 2011-2021) includes $30 million in projects. Projects scheduled during this period range in scope from constructing a training facility to building new fire stations and purchasing fire apparatus. The FY 2011 Fire capital budget includes a $3,034,000 appropriation to fire capital projects. This represents a 218% increase from FY 2010 appropriations to the fire category. $1.9 million or 63% of the FY 2011 fire capital appropriation is for the purchase of replacement fire vehicles. $1.1 million of this figure supports replacement of an aerial ladder truck, while $840,000 funds the replacement of a rescue truck. Aerial ladder trucks have an effective useful life of twelve years. FY 2011 funding supports replacement of a 1996 service ladder truck that has been in service for its fifteen year life. The retired truck will become a reserve aerial ladder apparatus and the new apparatus will be placed into service in one of the Fire Department's existing aerial ladder locations. The rescue truck replacement in FY 2011 replaces the existing truck with a larger apparatus and completes the Fire Department’s multi-year conversion of light rescue special response unit vehicles to vehicles appropriate for heavy rescue duties. The FY 2011 CIB also includes $748,000 to address necessary infrastructure improvements such as water and reclaimed water line installation and road improvements on the site of future Fire Station #8. $4 million has been appropriated through FY 2010 for the fire station, but further review of the selected site’s infrastructure led to the determination that improvements will be necessary in order to remain in compliance with the Town’s development standards. $105,000 has also been included in the Fire Station #8 FY 2011 funding for costs related to designing and building the station to Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) standards. In addition, $221,000 is provided in the FY 2011 fire CIB for the purchase and installation of hardware to complete the third phase of installation of traffic signal preemption devices at thirty intersections. Phases I and II of this project are complete. Parks, Recreation and Cultural Resources Capital Projects The PRCR capital improvements budget and plan (FYs 2011-2021) includes $15.8 million in projects. Projects identified during this period focus specifically on maintenance and improvements to the Town’s existing PRCR infrastructure. The FY 2011 PRCR capital improvements budget totals $700,000. This is a 22% increase from the adopted FY 2010 funding level. $680,000, or 97% of the FY 2011 PRCR capital appropriations, is directed toward park and greenway renovations. Specifically, $495,000 is for design and construction associated with the reconstruction of the Annie Jones Greenway. The project will improve trail drainage, remove trees and tree roots that are buckling the trail surface, repair the greenway’s bridge and boardwalk structures and pave the entire trail. $185,000 has also been included for the renovation of MacDonald Woods Park to address stream improvements that will ease flooding at this facility. The remaining $20,000 of total FY 2011 PRCR capital appropriations continues renovation work at the Hemlock Bluffs Nature Preserve. FY 2011 funding supports erosion control work on one section of the Swift Creek that flows through the Preserve. The FY 2011 PRCR capital improvements budget and plan, like the FY 2010 capital improvements budget, is greatly reduced from appropriation levels of recent years. With minimal dedicated funding sources for PRCR projects, continued pressure on the Town’s general fund, and limited debt capacity, there are fewer funding resources available. However, the Town maintains its commitment to infrastructure maintenance and will direct resources to these PRCR needs as available. The Town will also continue to adjust the capital improvements plan as the economic climate changes so that citizen needs, care for existing facilities and planning for future parks, greenways and special facilities are achieved as efficiently, and effectively as possible within the funding options available each year. General Government Capital Projects The general government capital improvements budget and plan (FYs 2011-2021) includes $43 million in maintenance, community and facility projects. The FY 2011 general government capital improvements budget totals $2.8 million, an 87% increase from the adopted FY 2010 CIB funding. $1 million is directed to the sanitation and recycling truck replacement project in FY 2011. This project supports the scheduled replacement and anticipated new route additions of sanitation and recycling truck vehicles. $576,417 in utility fund transfer and $76,417 in utility fund dollars totaling $652,834 supports the Town’s open space and parkland acquisition project. This project makes funding readily accessible for land acquisition purchases that may arise during the course of a fiscal year.


The remaining $1.2 million appropriated in FY 2011 within this category supports storm drainage assistance on public and private properties. As with other projects typically funded annually, these initiatives did not receive funding in FY 2010. The FY 2011 CIB resumes a $600,000 annual appropriation for the improvement of the Town’s storm drainage system in street rights of way and on Town properties (Town Policy #146) and $500,000 for the Town’s private assistance storm drainage program (Town Policy #35). Conclusion The actions taken over the last couple of years to help manage through the recession’s impacts on the Town of Cary’s operations and financial situation have provided a strong foundation to build the FY 2011 budget. Operating and capital service levels funded in this budget combine to continue providing the high service levels our citizens expect while protecting and maintaining the core infrastructure that is so vital to sustaining our quality of life. The budget is fiscally sound, addresses needs on a priority basis, and is balanced in accordance with state statutes.


TOWN OF CARY GOVERNMENTAL FUNCTIONS EXPRESSED AS CENTS OF A TAX DOLLAR

Function General Government Parks, Recreation and Cultural Resources Public Safety Solid Waste/Recycling Public Works Debt Total Cents

Cents of Tax Dollar 0.260 0.068 0.363 0.010 0.169 0.130 1.000

General Fund Did you know that for every tax dollar paid...?

Debt General Government

0.130

0.260 0.169 Public Works

0.068 Parks, Recreation & Cultural Resources

0.010 Solid Waste/Recycling

0.363 Public Safety

26 cents go to administrative and internal functions such as human resources, purchasing, technology services, engineering, planning, and inspections. 7 cents help fund parks, recreation, cultural, and athletic programs. 36 cents provide fire and police protection. 1 cent helps provide solid waste and recycling services. 17 cents are used for public works activities. 13 cents help retire debt for streets, parks, government facilities, and other miscellaneous costs/ functions.

NOTE: These numbers show cents of Cary's tax revenue dollar after factoring out revenue attributable to each function.


TOWN OF CARY SUMMARY OF OPERATING AND CAPITAL BUDGETS

OPERATING BUDGET GENERAL FUND Operating Expenditures Net Operating Transfers * Subtotal

$114,507,603 $1,068,067 $115,575,670

* This figure does NOT include transfers to Capital Project Funds totaling $2,226,756 as this amount is reflected in CIB expenditures.

UTILITY FUND Operating Expenses Net Operating Transfers**

$50,100,984 $1,113,830

Subtotal

$51,214,814

** This figure does NOT include transfers to Capital Project Funds totaling is reflected in CIB expenditures.

$576,417 as this amount

OTHER FUNDS Operating Expenditures***

$5,990,920

*** Includes the following funds; Fleet Management, CDGB, Transit, E911, Health and Dental, and Police Separation. These figures are net expenditures and transfers between funds are only counted as expenditures in the major fund, typically being the General Fund.

TOTAL OPERATING BUDGET

$172,781,404

CAPITAL IMPROVEMENTS BUDGET (CIB) UTILITY CIB Water Sewer Subtotal

$20,678,360 $144,887,507 $165,565,867

Transportation Fire Parks, Recreation and Cultural Resouces General Government Subtotal

$2,709,178 $3,034,000 $700,000 $2,803,173 $9,246,351

GENERAL CIB

TOTAL CIB PROJECTS

$174,812,218

TOTAL OPERATING PLUS CIB

$347,593,622


TOWN OF CARY GENERAL FUND SUMMARY

Actual FY 2007

Actual FY 2008

Actual FY 2009

Estimated FY 2010

Adopted Budget FY2011

Assessed Value 13,031,452,560 13,915,372,155 19,696,045,832 20,418,733,465 20,586,098,663 REVENUES Current Year Ad Valorem Taxes Prior Year Ad Valorem Taxes Penalties and Interest Subtotal Ad Valorem Taxes

REVENUES 53,868,051 324,660 100,864 54,293,575

57,718,968 380,864 109,067 58,208,899

64,275,901 433,763 142,145 64,851,809

66,468,968 300,000 100,000 66,868,968

67,043,875 300,000 100,000 67,443,875

Current Year Ad Valorem Taxes Prior Year Ad Valorem Taxes Penalties and Interest Subtotal Ad Valorem Taxes

320,896 10,911,210 7,885,652 4,260,171 1,199,663 661,086 10,760 72,131 25,321,569

513,455 11,415,942 8,302,458 4,449,799 1,722,785 712,375 9,525 68,814 27,195,153

473,961 10,582,503 7,958,959 4,015,718 1,794,198 655,705 9,630 74,140 25,564,814

472,725 9,788,815 7,362,037 3,714,539 1,434,673 605,356 8,003 70,819 23,456,967

482,179 9,993,427 7,509,278 3,788,830 1,420,326 570,000 7,203 68,000 23,839,243

ABC Revenue 1 Cent Sales Tax-Article 39 1/2 Cent Sales Tax-Articles 40 & 42 1/2 Cent Sales Tax-Article 44 Privilege Licenses Occupancy Tax Pet Licenses Rental Vehicle Tax Subtotal Other Taxes & Licenses

3,292,735 525,287 15,300 1,536,112 134,693 98,723 151,352 170,062 5,924,264

3,536,858 563,515 --1,729,206 91,313 --151,352 63,543 6,135,787

3,994,051 595,521 --1,896,284 54,059 --151,352 167,019 6,858,286

4,830,915 195,427 --1,812,894 8,703 300,000 151,352 17,922 7,317,213

4,582,306 195,427 --1,794,765 ----151,352 70,540 6,794,390

Utility Franchise Taxes Wine and Beer Tax Wireless E911 Wireless Communications Sales Tax Gov's Hwy Program Grant COPS Grant High School Resource Officer Reimb. Other Restricted/Grants Subtotal Intergovernmental

3,492,419 11,449 50,150 151,270 1,290,501 24,871 26,551 477,076 352,523 328,625 6,205,435

3,622,697 20,874 59,475 112,375 861,715 28,060 33,650 458,151 556,372 258,564 6,011,933

2,198,304 11,658 30,700 91,460 360,995 22,625 31,063 321,584 173,687 112,918 3,354,994

2,135,340 10,332 20,619 61,840 222,904 21,711 32,613 188,648 186,300 27,408 2,907,715

1,964,000 9,700 18,000 52,000 206,500 20,700 33,000 125,000 270,000 15,000 2,713,900

Building Permits Pavement/Curb Cuts Rezoning/Var. Request Fees Site/Final Plan Review Fees Inspection Fees Sign Permits Fire Permits Watershed Maint. Fees Traffic Impact Analysis Reimb. Grading Permits Subtotal Permits & Fees

4,873,406 30,539 724,762 40,535 42,765 131,056 27,244 574,062 ---

5,171,995 32,923 766,085 42,393 41,065 167,258 25,326 590,633 266,714

6,445,186 28,542 922,308 41,293 37,030 147,709 34,230 606,564 395,683

6,654,725 24,313 937,941 39,600 39,674 150,000 34,975 667,590 404,342

6,754,546 21,881 969,240 40,000 40,000 178,000 33,489 697,390 411,500

Solid Waste and Recycling Used Appliance Disposal Recreation Program Fees Recreation Retail Sales Dog Park Skate Park Ticket Sales Athletic Fees USA Baseball

Other Taxes & Licenses ABC Revenue 1 Cent Sales Tax-Article 39 1/2 Cent Sales Tax-Articles 40 & 42 1/2 Cent Sales Tax-Article 44 Privilege Licenses Occupancy Tax Pet Licenses Rental Vehicle Tax Subtotal Other Taxes & Licenses

Other Taxes & Licenses

Intergovernmental Utility Franchise Taxes Wine and Beer Tax Wireless E911 Wireless Communications Sales Tax Gov's Hwy Program Grant COPS Grant High School Resource Officer Reimb. Other Restricted/Grants Subtotal Intergovernmental

Intergovernmental

Permits and Fees Building Permits Pavement/Curb Cuts Rezoning/Var. Request Fees Site/Final Plan Review Fees Inspection Fees Sign Permits Fire Permits Watershed Maint. Fees Traffic Impact Analysis Reimb. Grading Permits Subtotal Permits & Fees

Permits and Fees

Sales and Service Solid Waste and Recycling Used Appliance Disposal Recreation Program Fees Recreation Retail Sales Dog Park Skate Park Ticket Sales Athletic Fees USA Baseball

Assessed Value

Sales and Service


Actual FY 2007

Actual FY 2008

Actual FY 2009

Estimated FY 2010

Adopted Budget FY2011

Tennis Arts & Crafts Wake Med Soccer Park Festivals Recreational Facility Rentals Cultural Arts Rentals Rents-Fire Hazardous Waste Reimb. Subtotal Sales & Service

716,387 260,924 773,594 104,555 222,794 41,910 213,337 7,775 8,785,645

804,098 261,867 614,166 125,211 256,144 25,921 247,567 37,090 9,476,456

931,164 261,109 629,323 114,238 255,051 39,483 271,553 24,032 11,184,498

990,000 274,650 525,000 119,065 283,000 39,500 120,669 --11,305,044

1,040,615 246,260 550,000 130,890 285,000 41,500 70,000 20,000 11,530,311

Investment Earnings Unrealized Gains/Losses Net Investment Earnings

4,617,077 403,732 5,020,809

3,830,449 931,032 4,761,481

2,439,848 121,262 2,561,110

1,331,873 --1,331,873

843,084 --843,084

Miscellaneous Revenues CATV Franchise Fees Video Programming Sales Tax PEG Channel Distribution Court Costs Donations / Contributions Soil Erosion Fines Recycled Goods Disposable Rebate Police Reports/Fines Red Light Ticket Cellular Tower Lease Proceeds Morrisville Reimbursement NCDOT Traffic Signal Reimbursement DMV Rental Revenue Subtotal Miscellaneous

540,444 471,611 353,935 12,270 15,157 33,660 150 293,902 ----15,166 522,389 --698,557 47,850 3,005,091

379,043 114,938 853,736 14,604 25,511 23,619 --131,663 --25 11,039 698,370 7,089 332,446 30,357 2,622,440

355,903 114,574 1,022,366 20,618 31,453 29,676 --126,728 317,315 --7,879 694,091 4,563 562,256 13,206 3,300,628

300,000 --963,284 18,692 30,328 44,200 --121,155 418,522 --7,900 892,768 --568,000 --3,364,849

300,000 --972,917 18,878 29,873 127,750 --125,000 412,309 --7,900 893,000 --568,000 --3,455,627

TOTAL REVENUES

108,556,388

114,412,149

117,676,139

116,552,629

116,620,430

Miscellaneous

Tennis Arts & Crafts Wake Med Soccer Park Festivals Recreational Facility Rentals Cultural Arts Rentals Rents-Fire Hazardous Waste Reimb. Subtotal Sales & Service Investment Earnings Unrealized Gains/Losses Net Investment Earnings

Miscellaneous

EXPENDITURES

Miscellaneous Revenues CATV Franchise Fees Video Programming Sales Tax PEG Channel Distribution Court Costs Donations / Contributions Soil Erosion Fines Recycled Goods Disposable Rebate Police Reports/Fines Red Light Ticket Cellular Tower Lease Proceeds Morrisville Reimbursement NCDOT Traffic Signal Reimbursement DMV Rental Revenue Subtotal Miscellaneous

TOTAL REVENUES EXPENDITURES

Legislative Legislative-Town Council Legislative-Boards & Comm. Legislative-Town Clerk Legislative-Legal Subtotal Legislative

591,283 117,067 236,555 506,194 1,451,099

674,488 133,406 306,556 658,278 1,772,728

606,494 135,132 263,584 1,213,279 2,218,489

710,582 141,132 622,165 1,718,358 3,192,237

709,754 146,974 320,113 1,096,312 2,273,153

Legislative Legislative-Town Council Legislative-Boards & Comm. Legislative-Town Clerk Legislative-Legal Subtotal Legislative

Administration Town Manager's Office Budget Office Public Information Office Subtotal Administration

578,030 451,331 441,475 1,470,836

722,077 583,655 502,062 1,807,794

487,566 498,407 525,404 1,511,377

660,762 679,782 591,100 1,931,644

836,639 567,277 521,856 1,925,772

Administration Town Manager's Office Budget Office Public Information Office Subtotal Administration

General Government Finance-Accounting Finance-Purchasing Self Insurance (Small Claims) Technology Services Capital Leases Capital Lease Proceeds (contra exp) Technology Services Less Reimb. from Soccer Park Human Resources Self Insurance (Workman's Comp) Engineering WWRWMF Costs Reimb. from Utility Fund

1,668,921 662,082 228,511 1,046,076 -1,046,076 4,016,595 -6,940 1,216,452 849,210 4,884,750 -93,311 ---

1,819,954 736,516 311,565 1,095,961 -1,095,961 4,818,526 -6,940 1,226,022 828,443 5,880,551 -99,192 ---

1,858,139 802,758 528,776 2,129,500 -2,129,500 5,993,492 -7,218 1,358,701 718,523 5,515,868 -107,868 ---

2,417,935 880,369 396,370 1,300,000 -1,300,000 7,331,457 -7,218 1,559,221 1,000,000 6,047,351 -180,000 -1,917,850

2,315,840 911,397 325,000 1,300,000 -1,300,000 6,824,429 -7,218 1,567,186 1,000,000 6,371,702 -190,000 -2,004,561

General Government Finance-Accounting Finance-Purchasing Self Insurance (Small Claims) Technology Services Capital Leases Capital Lease Proceeds Technology Services Less Reimb. from Soccer Park Human Resources Self Insurance (Workman's Comp) Engineering WWRWMF Costs Reimb. from Utility Fund


Actual FY 2007

Actual FY 2008

Actual FY 2009

Estimated FY 2010

Adopted Budget FY2011

Planning Affordable/Empl Housing Fund Inspections & Permits

2,295,160 283,606 2,996,537

2,362,424 257,051 3,837,960

2,694,092 307,501 3,673,991

3,035,752 906,065 3,964,155

2,552,965 183,667 3,902,808

Subtotal General Government

21,923,508

25,553,402

27,066,621

30,557,488

27,952,140

Subtotal General Government

Public Safety Police Police Separation Fund Fire Subtotal Public Safety

14,959,643 199,375 14,753,712 29,912,730

16,866,331 151,547 15,728,692 32,746,570

17,227,114 242,853 16,544,822 34,014,789

19,592,973 263,742 16,931,450 36,788,165

19,957,495 236,975 17,852,717 38,047,187

Public Safety Police Police Separation Fund Fire Subtotal Public Safety

PRCR Administration Recreation Programs Cultural Arts Festival Amphitheatre Tennis Center Soccer Park Skate Park USA Baseball Athletics Subtotal PRCR

992,471 2,413,240 1,269,891 106,650 407,195 1,026,068 787,843 147,154 223,019 1,179,575 8,553,106

1,141,657 2,607,870 1,411,887 111,233 453,527 1,031,141 1,032,147 163,591 800,664 1,328,672 10,082,389

1,201,334 2,823,845 1,477,911 106,107 725,462 1,214,745 1,013,725 189,923 808,066 1,338,680 10,899,798

1,743,277 2,789,807 1,621,071 121,677 455,000 1,216,345 1,204,364 219,744 1,126,862 1,455,122 11,953,269

1,611,373 2,885,946 1,727,876 130,890 455,000 1,414,337 1,171,574 233,869 859,836 1,423,168 11,913,869

PRCR Administration Recreation Programs Cultural Arts Festivals Amphitheatre Tennis Center Soccer Park Skate Park USA Baseball Athletics Subtotal PRCR

Public Works/Utilities Administration Less Reimb. from Utility Fund Facilities Management Less Reimb. from Amphitheatre Less Reimb. from Tennis Less Reimb. from Skate Park Less Reimb. from Soccer Park Less Reimb. from USA Baseball Operations Less Reimb. from Utility Fund Solid Waste Management Recycling Subtotal Public Works/Utilities Subtotal Departmental Expenditures

1,355,607 -882,776 10,315,360 -241,499 -186,303 -11,986 -497,774 -113,273 8,255,557 -5,577,817 5,908,000 1,996,703 20,319,799 80,709,143

1,498,043 -984,262 12,604,202 -261,155 -187,286 -5,944 -705,157 -582,362 10,611,107 -6,511,525 5,194,908 1,241,176 21,911,745 90,294,106

1,701,726 -1,081,295 13,352,771 -214,354 -225,609 -8,263 -694,166 -529,948 11,579,937 -7,439,181 5,480,534 1,257,573 23,179,725 95,160,933

2,318,864 -1,232,536 14,285,232 -230,000 -198,120 -11,537 -844,810 -756,014 12,636,622 -8,189,233 6,383,357 1,123,172 25,284,997 104,583,919

2,021,888 -1,367,666 14,194,121 -230,000 -193,107 -13,495 -778,933 -500,585 12,854,757 -8,394,108 5,708,380 1,338,914 24,640,166 102,553,362

Department Allocation Accounts Class & Pay Study Market Adjustment on Pay Schedule Reimb. Util. Fund for Ind. Cost Reimb. from ISF for Ind. Cost Subtotal Non Departmental Expenses Installment Purchase / Related Fees Long Term Debt / Related Fees

-------1,758,778 -80,410 -1,839,188 126,707 11,803,653

-------2,424,342 -80,879 -2,505,221 76,077 11,417,899

-------2,453,267 -205,542 -2,658,809 335,293 12,284,681

682,467 5,000 25,000 -2,027,331 -199,835 -1,514,699 -----

682,467 5,000 25,000 -2,253,067 -215,589 -1,756,189 -----

Planning Affordable/Empl Housing Fund Inspections & Permits

Public Works/Utilities Administration Less Reimb. from Utility Fund Facilities Management Less Reimb. from Amphitheatre Less Reimb. from Tennis Less Reimb. from Skate Park Less Reimb. from Soccer Park Less Reimb. from USA Baseball Operations Less Reimb. from Utility Fund Solid Waste Management Recycling Subtotal Public Works/Utilities Subtotal Departmental Expenditures

Department Allocation Accounts Class & Pay Study Market Adjustment on Pay Schedule Reimb. Util. Fund for Ind. Cost Reimb. from ISF for Ind. Cost Subtotal Non Departmental Expenses Installment Purchase / Related Fees Long Term Debt / Related Fees


Actual FY 2007

Actual FY 2008

Actual FY 2009

Estimated FY 2010

Adopted Budget FY2011

------11,930,360 10,091,172 90,800,315

------11,493,976 8,988,755 99,282,861

------12,619,974 9,961,165 105,122,098

7,969,735 5,083,119 --13,052,854 11,538,155 116,122,074

8,102,588 5,507,842 100,000 13,710,430 11,954,241 114,507,603

Beginning Fund Balance

68,585,398

65,800,074

66,676,018

74,249,014

71,319,676

Total Revenues

108,556,388

114,412,149

117,676,139

116,552,629

116,620,430

Total Revenues

Beginning Fund Balance Plus Operating Revenues

177,141,786

180,212,223

184,352,157

190,801,643

187,940,106

Beginning Fund Balance Plus Operating Revenues

Total Expenditures

90,800,315

99,282,861

105,122,098

116,122,074

114,507,603

Total Expenditures

39,440 2,190 --260,000 10,590,000 834,000 588,000 1,587,903 -248,189 --600,000 ---

-225,649 -10,200 -13,474,200 601,524 2,700,000 454,438 13,787,540 1,481,803 -203,772 -130,439 -----

-278,299 -11,474 ----1,123,700 ----1,804,524 -125,000 598,102 248,340 ---

-249,172 -11,554 ----2,226,756 ----1,642,376 -125,000 -423,583 235,000 ---

Trans. from UF for Self-Insur/W/C/Sm Claims

Trans. to General Cap. Res. Trans. to Streets Cap. Proj. Fund Trans. to Gen Govt Cap Proj Fund Trans. to Fire Capital Proj Fund Trans. to Parks Cap Proj Fund Trans. to Transit Fund Sale of Assets Other Trans. Out (In) Transfer to Economic Develop Fund Bond Proceeds

----1,374,400 3,084,525 4,300,000 750,000 10,096,458 935,596 -534,872 --775,000 -239,710

Total Transfers (Net)

20,541,397

14,253,344

4,981,045

3,359,893

3,294,823

Total Transfers (Net)

Total Expenditures and Inter-Fund Transfers

111,341,712

113,536,205

110,103,143

119,481,967

117,802,426

Ending Fund Balance

65,800,074

66,676,018

74,249,014

71,319,676

70,137,680

Ending Fund Balance

Appropriation to (from) Fund Balance

-2,785,324

875,944

7,572,996

(2,929,338)

(1,181,996)

Appropriation to (from) Fund Balance

Debt Principal Debt Interest Debt Miscellaneous Expense Subtotal Debt Expenses Subtotal Non Departmental Expenses TOTAL EXPENDITURES BALANCES

Trans. from ISF for Self-Insur/W/C/Sm Claims

TOTAL EXPENDITURES BALANCES

Transfers Out (In) / Other Adjustments Trans. from UF for Self-Insur/W/C/Sm Claims

Debt Principal Debt Interest Debt Miscellaneous Expense Subtotal Debt Expense Subtotal Non Departmental Expenses

Beginning Fund Balance

Transfers Out (In) / Other Adjustments Trans. from ISF for Self-Insur/W/C/Sm Claims

Trans. to General Cap. Res. Trans. to Streets Cap. Proj. Fund Trans. to Gen Govt Cap Proj Fund Trans. to Fire Capital Proj Fund Trans. to Parks Cap Proj Fund Trans. to Transit Fund Sale of Assets Other Trans. Out (In) Transfer to Economic Develop Fund Bond Proceeds

Total Expenditures and Inter-Fund Transfers


GENERAL FUND REVENUES BY SOURCE

Actual FY 2007

REVENUE

Actual FY 2008

Actual FY 2009

Budget FY 2011

% Change 2010 / 2011

Ad Valorem Taxes

$54,293,575

$58,208,899

$64,851,809

$67,443,875

0.9%

Sales Tax Other Taxes & Licenses Intergovernmental Permits and Fees Sales and Services Interest Miscellaneous

$23,057,033 $2,264,536 $5,924,264 $6,205,435 $8,785,645 $5,020,809 $3,005,091

$24,168,199 $3,026,954 $6,135,787 $6,011,933 $9,476,456 $4,761,481 $2,622,440

$22,557,180 $3,007,634 $6,858,286 $3,354,994 $11,184,498 $2,561,110 $3,300,628

$21,291,535 $2,547,708 $6,794,390 $2,713,900 $11,530,311 $843,084 $3,455,627

2.0% -1.7% -7.1% -6.7% 2.0% -36.7% 2.7%

$108,556,388

$114,412,149

$117,676,139

$116,620,430

0.1%

TOTAL

FY 2011 General Fund Revenue Sources

Sales and Services 9.9% Permits and Fees 2.3%

Interest 1.1%

Miscellaneous 3.0%

Intergovernmental 5.8% Other Taxes & Licenses 2.2%

Sales Tax 18.3%

Ad Valorem Taxes 57.8%


GENERAL FUND EXPENDITURES AND TRANSFERS BY FUNCTION

Actual FY 2007

Actual FY 2008

Actual FY 2009

Budget FY 2011

% Change 2010 / 2011

$21,923,508 $29,912,730 $12,415,096 $7,904,703 $8,553,106 $11,930,360 $19,605,383 ($903,174)

$25,553,402 $32,746,570 $15,475,661 $6,436,084 $10,082,389 $11,493,976 $12,272,000 ($523,877)

$27,066,621 $34,014,789 $16,441,618 $6,738,107 $10,899,798 $12,619,974 $4,069,302 ($1,747,066)

$27,952,140 $38,047,187 $17,592,872 $7,047,294 $11,913,869 $13,710,430 $2,226,756 ($688,122)

-9% 3% -1% -6% 0% 5% 98% -195%

$111,341,712

$113,536,205

$110,103,143

$117,802,426

-1%

EXPENDITURE TYPE General Government Public Safety Public Works Environmental Protection Cultural/Recreation Debt Service Transfer to Capital Projects Transfers/Other* TOTAL

* "Transfers/Other" represents reimbursements from the Utility Fund, police separation allowance, self-insurance, class and pay study impacts, water and sewer payments, insurance and bonds, reimbursement from the internal service fund, and because of its relatively small (negative) size is not represented in the pie chart below.

FY 2011 General Fund Expenditures and Transfers Transfer to Capital Projects 0.8% Debt Service 12.2%

General Government 23.9%

Cultural/Recreation 9.9%

Environmental Protection 6.8%

Public Works 15.1%

Public Safety 31.9%


TOWN OF CARY UTILITY FUND SUMMARY Actual FY 2007 REVENUES Water Fees - Retail Water Wholesale Service Bulk Water/Hydrants

Actual FY 2008

Actual FY 2009

Estimated FY 2010

Budget FY 2011

20,618,645 96,823 200,733

21,257,880 1,103,864 174,648

20,148,396 106,504 125,615

22,274,578 143,361 58,606

REVENUES 22,522,572 Water Fees - Retail 138,442 Water Wholesale Service 58,606 Bulk Water/Hydrants

301,477 101,769 (6,523) (235,245) 21,319,448

289,100 102,129 (15,839) (149,258) 22,762,524

282,146 118,582 12,711 (133,331) 20,660,623

278,379 143,095 ----22,898,019

269,642 Water Capacity-RDU/Morris./Chatham 152,218 Raw Water Sales --- Reclaimed Water --- Irrigation 23,141,480 Subtotal Charges for Services-Water

Sewer Fees - Retail Sewer Wholesale Service Morrisville WW Capacity Charges Subtotal Charges for Services-Sewer

21,310,253 ----21,310,253

22,901,217 ----22,901,217

24,642,401 ----24,642,401

28,633,364 ----28,633,364

30,853,390 ----30,853,390

Sewer Fees - Retail Sewer Wholesale Service Morrisville WW Capacity Charges Subtotal Charges for Services-Sewer

Connection Fees New Account Service Charge Utility Inspection Fees Reconnection Fees Pretreatment Program Fees Fats, Oils, Grease Fees Sewer Extension Permits Late Payment Charge Returned Check Charge Re-installment Fees Cross Connection Program Fees Total Other Operating Revenues Subtotal Operating Revenues

399,498 210,199 891,928 47,103 85,484 52,280 15,000 169,062 7,348 25,983 --1,903,884 44,533,585

531,940 194,965 460,479 57,887 91,632 59,960 14,750 206,786 6,425 86,523 --1,711,347 47,375,088

301,783 195,484 92,474 72,235 116,971 60,360 5,200 237,519 7,530 129,598 --1,219,154 46,522,178

235,696 189,913 24,355 81,704 56,827 62,323 1,600 236,986 6,983 8,484 189,250 1,094,121 52,625,504

476,269 182,316 23,381 84,156 54,554 59,830 1,536 230,000 6,494 8,145 189,250 1,315,931 55,310,801

Connection Fees New Account Service Charge Utility Inspection Fees Reconnection Fees Pretreatment Program Fees Fats, Oils, Grease Fees Sewer Extension Permits Late Payment Charge Returned Check Charge Re-installment Fees Cross Connection Program Fees Subtotal Other Operating Revenues Subtotal Operating Revenues

Interest Earnings Gain on Investments Proceeds from Sale of Assets Miscellaneous Revenues Subtotal Non-Operating Revenues

1,948,527 296,027 52,949 27,147 2,324,650

2,289,913 543,060 33,214 139,459 3,005,646

1,801,845 71,148 64,942 107,540 2,045,475

943,033 --10,000 22,257 975,290

593,292 --10,000 21,367 624,659

TOTAL REVENUES

46,858,235

50,380,734

48,567,653

53,600,794

Water Capacity-RDU/Morris./Chatham Raw Water Sales Reclaimed Water Irrigation Subtotal Charges for Services-Water

Interest Earnings Gain on Investments Proceeds from Sale of Assets Miscellaneous Revenues Subtotal Non-Operating Revenues

55,935,460 TOTAL REVENUES


Actual FY 2007

Actual FY 2008

Actual FY 2009

Estimated FY 2010

EXPENDITURES Finance - Customer Accounting Public Works & Utilities Administration Admin. Costs Paid to General Fund (GF) Engineering Costs Paid to General Fund Water Conservation Pretreatment

1,689,399 899,936 1,758,778 --312,051 335,277

1,794,282 988,644 2,353,681 --435,100 345,338

2,007,948 1,698,917 2,354,556 --476,638 325,225

2,261,449 1,232,536 2,027,331 1,917,850 664,804 274,169

2,546,017 1,367,666 2,253,067 2,004,561 493,066 295,511

Field Operations Utility Systems Management North Cary WRF South Cary WRF Cary/Apex Water Treatment Plant Western Wake WRF Reimbursement from Apex Subtotal Departmental Expenditures

5,577,817 2,088,004 4,910,783 3,015,843 4,839,519 --(909,524) 24,517,883

6,526,864 2,711,113 5,380,058 3,245,984 5,318,193 --(852,731) 28,246,526

7,439,182 2,621,157 5,789,984 3,431,756 5,801,225 --(1,062,033) 30,884,555

8,189,233 2,671,498 7,004,776 3,765,476 6,142,573 --(1,148,827) 35,002,868

8,394,108 2,842,597 7,945,037 3,757,799 6,566,260 --(1,266,546) 37,199,143

Field Operations Utility Systems Management North Cary WRF South Cary WRF Cary/Apex Water Treatment Plant Western Wake WRF Reimbursement from Apex Subtotal Departmental Expenditures

NON-DEPARTMENTAL Department Allocation Accounts Long-term Debt Principal Payment Interest Expense Bond Issuance Costs & Expenses Bond Proceeds Subtotal Non-Departmental Expenditures

--6,647,064 4,732,116 525,820 (258,903) 11,646,097

--6,919,698 5,275,528 7,219 --12,202,445

--6,862,583 5,000,132 319,292 (30,320,980) (18,138,973)

--6,898,860 5,571,965 700,000 --13,170,825

--6,914,100 5,307,741 680,000 --12,901,841

NON-DEPARTMENTAL Department Allocation Accounts Long-term Debt Principal Payment Interest Expense Bond Issuance Costs & Expenses Bond Proceeds Subtotal Non-Departmental Expenditures

TOTAL EXPENDITURES

36,163,980

40,448,971

12,745,582

48,173,693

50,100,984 TOTAL EXPENDITURES

Transfer to GF (Open Space Debt Svc) Transfer to Sewer Projects Transfer to Water Projects Transfer to Open Space Transfer to Utility Capital Reserve Fund Other Payments Transfer to Ins., Sm Claims, & Work Comp Total Other Revenues (Expenditures)

------1,000,000 ------1,370,950

(39,440) 3,031,794 281,360 6,000,000 1,091,499 ----10,597,529

------1,000,000 1,973,555 30,006,378 --33,322,358

500,000 ----500,000 ----278,299 1,607,474

TOTAL EXPENDITURES & TRANSFERS

37,534,930

51,046,500

46,067,940

49,781,167

51,791,231 TOTAL EXPENDITURES & TRANSFERS

BALANCES Beginning Fund Balance

35,970,367

45,293,673

44,627,907

47,127,620

BALANCES 50,947,247 Beginning Fund Balance

Total Revenues

46,858,235

50,380,734

48,567,653

53,600,794

55,935,460 Total Revenues

Beg. Fund Balance plus Revenues

82,828,603

95,674,407

93,195,560

100,728,414

106,882,707 Beg. Fund Balance plus Revenues

51,791,231 Total Expenditures & Transfers

Total Expenditures & Transfers

37,534,930

51,046,500

46,067,940

49,781,167

Morrisville Fund Balance Addition Related to Merger

---

---

---

---

ENDING FUND BALANCE

45,293,673

44,627,907

47,127,620

50,947,247

Appropriation to (from) Fund Balance

9,323,305

2,499,713

3,819,627

(665,766)

Budget FY 2011

423,583 ----576,417 ----249,172 1,690,247

---

EXPENDITURES Finance - Customer Accounting Public Works & Utilities Administration Admin. Costs Paid to General Fund (GF) Engineering Costs Paid to General Fund Water Conservation Pretreatment

Transfer to GF (Open Space Debt Svc) Transfer to Sewer Projects Transfer to Water Projects Transfer to Open Space Transfer to Utility Capital Reserve Fund Other Payments Transfer to Ins., Sm Claims, & Work Comp Total Other Revenues (Expenditures)

Morrisville Fund Balance Addition Related to Merger

55,091,476 ENDING FUND BALANCE 4,144,229 Appropriation to (from ) Fund Balance


TOWN OF CARY UTILITY FUND REVENUES BY SOURCE Actual FY 2007 $21,319,448 $21,310,253 $1,903,884 $2,324,650

Actual FY 2008 $22,762,524 $22,901,217 $1,711,347 $3,005,646

Actual

Estimated

Budget

REVENUE TYPE Charges for Services - Water Charges for Services - Sewer Other Operating Revenue Non-Operating Revenue

FY 2009 $20,660,623 $24,642,401 $1,219,154 $2,045,475

FY 2010 $22,898,019 $28,633,364 $1,094,121 $975,290

FY 2011 $23,141,480 $30,853,390 $1,315,931 $624,659

TOTAL

$46,858,235

$50,380,734

$48,567,653

$53,600,794

$55,935,460

% Change 2010 / 2011 1.1% 7.8% 20.3% -36.0% 4.4%

FY 2011 Utility Fund Revenue Sources

Charges for Services Water 41.5%

Charges for Services Sewer 53.6%

Non-Operating Revenue 2.2%

Other Operating Revenue 2.4%


TOWN OF CARY UTILITY FUND EXPENDITURES BY FUNCTION Actual FY 2007 $1,689,399 $899,936 $4,839,519 $7,926,626 $312,051 $5,577,817 $2,423,281 $0 $0 $12,017,047 $1,000,000 $849,254

Actual FY 2008 $1,794,282 $988,644 $5,318,193 $8,626,042 $435,100 $6,526,864 $3,056,451 $3,031,794 $281,360 $12,434,761 $7,091,499 $1,461,510

Actual

Estimated

Budget

EXPENDITURE TYPE Customer Accounting PWUT - Administration Cary/Apex Water Treatment Plant Water Reclamation Facilities Water Conservation PWUT - Field Operations Systems Maint. & Pretreatment Transfer to Sewer Capital Projects Transfer to Water Capital Projects Debt Service Transfers to Capital Projects Other Indirect & Other Costs

FY 2009 $2,007,948 $1,698,917 $5,801,225 $9,221,740 $476,638 $7,439,182 $2,946,382 $0 $0 $12,209,830 $2,973,555 $1,292,523

FY 2010 $2,261,449 $1,232,536 $6,142,573 $10,770,252 $664,804 $8,189,233 $2,945,667 $0 $0 $13,500,000 $500,000 $3,574,653

FY 2011 $2,546,017 $1,367,666 $6,566,260 $11,702,836 $493,066 $8,394,108 $3,138,108 $0 $0 $13,342,916 $576,417 $3,663,837

TOTAL

$37,534,930

$51,046,500

$46,067,940

$49,781,167

$51,791,231

% Change 2010 / 2011 12.6% 11.0% 6.9% 8.7% -25.8% 2.5% 6.5% N/A N/A -1.2% 15.3% 2.5% 4.0%

FY FY 20112011 Utility Fund Expenditures Utility Fund Expenditures

Wa ter Reclama tion Water Recla mation Fa cilities Fa cilities 21.7%

21.7%

Ca pita l Projects Tra nsfer Capital Projects Transfer 1.1%

1.1%

PWUT - Field Operations PWUT 16.2% - Field Opera tions

16.2%

All Other Functions 34.3%

All Other Functions 34.3%

Debt Service 25.8%

Debt Service 25.8%


TOWN OF CARY CAPITAL IMPROVEMENTS BUDGET OVERVIEW The following summary presents projects funded by the Adopted Capital Improvements Budget for the Town of Cary, North Carolina for Fiscal Year 2011 which begins July 1, 2010 and ends June 30, 2011. The Capital Improvements Budget (CIB) represents the financial plan for the acquisition and construction of capital assets. A capital asset is defined as having a value exceeding $25,000 and a useful life of greater than three years. Exceptions to this rule exist for practical reasons. The CIB contains descriptions and cost estimates for each capital project and appropriates money for Fiscal Year 2011. These funds remain available for expenditure until project completion which may extend beyond the end of Fiscal Year 2011. The projects and their respective budgets funded in Fiscal Year 2011 are as follows: Water Capital Improvements Fund A. B. C. D. E. F. G. H. I. J. K. L. M. N. O. P.

$175,000 8,090,080 1,500,000 436,000 100,000 740,000 850,000 1,090,000 641,000 481,300 230,000 118,900 100,000 131,080 5,460,000 535,000 $20,678,360

Cary/Apex Water Treatment Plant - Laboratory Equipment - Atomic Adsorption Unit Replacement Cary/Apex Water Treatment Plant - Phase III Expansion and Improvements From 40 to 56 MGD Cary/Apex Water Treatment Plant - Supplemental Water Supply MM - Upgrade Water Lines - FY 2011 MM - Water Line Oversizings - FY 2011 NC-540 Western Wake Parkway Water Conflicts Penny Road and Birklands Drive Water Line Connector Roberts Road Water Line Southern Pressure Zone US 1 Water Line and Control Valve Upgrade Water Lines - FY 2011 Water Infrastructure Security Water Line Oversizings - FY 2011 Water Main Condition Assessment Program Water Resource Planning and Management West Cary Water Storage Tank West High Street Water Line Reinforcement Water Subtotal

Sewer Capital Improvements Fund A. B. C. D. E. F. G H. I. J. K. L. M. N. O. P. Q. R. S. T. U. V. W.

$400,000 800,000 100,000 900,000 18,000 98,310 52,432 80,000 118,900 1,500,000 900,000 131,080 1,233,540 525,000 375,000 480,000 350,000 135,000 200,000 6,686,000 115,000 1,950,000 5,416,256

Cleaning and Video Survey of Sewer Interceptors Dutchman's Branch Regional Pump Station, Force Main and Interceptor Extend Reclaimed Water Mains Green Level Interceptor MM - Ownership/Operation and Upgrades to the Wastewater Pump Station at the Groves - Morrisville MM - Reclaimed Water Line Oversizing - FY 2011 MM - Sanitary Sewer Oversizings - FY 2011 North Cary Water Reclamation Facility Sampling and Process Control System Reclaimed Water Line Oversizing - FY 2011 Reclaimed Water System Elevated Storage Reedy Creek Regional Pump Station, Force Main Interceptor and Pump Station Eliminations Sanitary Sewer Oversizings - FY 2011 Sewer System Repair/Rehabilitation South Cary Water Reclamation Facility Headworks Upgrades Storage Capacity for Reclaimed Water System - South Cary Water Reclamation Facility Swift Creek Pump Station Parallel Force Main Update Reclaimed Water System Master Plan Walnut Creek Pump Station Electrical and Pump Improvements Wastewater Pump Station Improvements Wastewater Pump Station Parallel Force Mains Wastewater System Flow Monitoring Study Water Reclamation Facility Peak Flow Management Improvements WWRWMF - Beaver Creek Force Main - APEX


TOWN OF CARY CAPITAL IMPROVEMENTS BUDGET OVERVIEW

X. Y. Z. AA. AB. AC. AD. AE. AF. AG. AH. AI. AJ. AK. AL. AM. AN. AO. AP. AQ. AR. AS. AT. AU. AV. AW. AX. AY. AZ. BA. BB. BC. BD. BE. BF. BG. BH. BI. BJ. BK. BL. BM. BN. BO. BP.

17,622,647 2,343,267 1,895,000 2,304,750 2,012,521 292,229 3,871,830 12,878,663 1,651,780 98,185 161,695 82,125 22,995 7,837 27,023 59,732 10,409 10,625,500 17,498,500 8,887,500 2,488,499 1,180,208 2,007,410 1,187,286 46,836 97,000 50,730 113,240 10,070 15,960 720,005 1,162,216 602,235 192,144 7,223,969 1,189,858 9,302,310 1,292,576 1,022,835 8,464,622 1,464,191 34,458 58,417 33,381 8,345 $144,887,507

$165,565,867

WWRWMF - Beaver Creek Force Main - CARY WWRWMF - Beaver Creek Force Main - MORRISVILLE WWRWMF - Beaver Creek Gravity Sewer - APEX WWRWMF - Beaver Creek Trunk Sewer and Tunnel - APEX WWRWMF - Beaver Creek Trunk Sewer and Tunnel - CARY WWRWMF - Beaver Creek Trunk Sewer and Tunnel - MORRISVILLE WWRWMF - Beaver Creek Pump Station - APEX WWRWMF - Beaver Creek Pump Station - CARY WWRWMF - Beaver Creek Pump Station - MORRISVILLE WWRWMF - Design and Phase IV Planning/Permitting - APEX WWRWMF - Design and Phase IV Planning/Permitting - CARY WWRWMF - Design and Phase IV Planning/Permitting - HOLLY SPRINGS WWRWMF - Design and Phase IV Planning/Permitting - MORRISVILLE WWRWMF - Effluent Pipeline - Phase I - APEX WWRWMF - Effluent Pipeline - Phase I - CARY WWRWMF - Effluent Pipeline - Phase I - HOLLY SPRINGS WWRWMF - Effluent Pipeline - Phase I - MORRISVILLE WWRWMF - Effluent Pipeline - Phase II - APEX WWRWMF - Effluent Pipeline - Phase II - CARY WWRWMF - Effluent Pipeline - Phase II - HOLLY SPRINGS WWRWMF - Effluent Pipeline - Phase II - MORRISVILLE WWRWMF - Effluent Pump Station - APEX WWRWMF - Effluent Pump Station - CARY WWRWMF - Effluent Pump Station - HOLLY SPRINGS WWRWMF - Effluent Pump Station - MORRISVILLE WWRWMF - Holly Springs Effluent Force Main - HOLLY SPRINGS WWRWMF - Project Management - APEX WWRWMF - Project Management - CARY WWRWMF - Project Management - HOLLY SPRINGS WWRWMF - Project Management - MORRISVILLE WWRWMF - Site 14 Water & Sewer Mitigation Project - APEX WWRWMF - Site 14 Water & Sewer Mitigation Project - CARY WWRWMF - Site 14 Water & Sewer Mitigation Project - HOLLY SPRINGS WWRWMF - Site 14 Water & Sewer Mitigation Project - MORRISVILLE WWRWMF - West Cary Force Main South - CARY WWRWMF - West Cary Force Main South - MORRISVILLE WWRWMF - West Cary Pump Station Upgrades - CARY WWRWMF - West Cary Pump Station Upgrades - MORRISVILLE WWRWMF - West Reedy Branch Interceptor - APEX WWRWMF - West Reedy Branch Interceptor - CARY WWRWMF - West Reedy Branch Interceptor - MORRISVILLE WWRWMF - Western Wake SCADA Project - APEX WWRWMF - Western Wake SCADA Project - CARY WWRWMF - Western Wake SCADA Project - HOLLY SPRINGS WWRWMF - Western Wake SCADA Project - MORRISVILLE Sewer Subtotal Total Utility CIB


TOWN OF CARY CAPITAL IMPROVEMENTS BUDGET OVERVIEW

Transportation Capital Improvements Fund A. B. C. D. E. F. G. H.

$500,000 49,178 40,000 120,000 1,000,000 500,000 100,000 400,000 $2,709,178

Annual Sidewalk Improvements - FY 2011 Bridge/Culvert Repairs - FY 2011 Cary Transit - FY 2011 Railroad Grade Crossing Repairs - FY 2011 Street Improvement Project - FY 2011 Street Storm Drainage System Rehabilitation - FY 2011 Traffic Calming Traffic Signalization Projects - FY 2011 Transportation Subtotal

Fire Capital Improvements Fund A. B. C. D.

$1,120,000 853,000 840,000 221,000

Aerial Ladder Replacement - #1446 Fire Station #8 - Mills Park Rescue Truck Replacement - #1770 Traffic Signal Preemption

$3,034,000

Fire Subtotal

Parks, Recreation & Cultural Resources Capital Improvements Fund A. B. C.

$495,000 20,000 185,000

Annie Jones Greenway Renovation Hemlock Bluffs Renovation Project MacDonald Woods Park Renovation

$700,000

PRCR Subtotal

General Government Capital Improvements Fund A. B. C. D.

$652,834 1,050,339 500,000 600,000

Open Space & Parkland Acquisition Sanitation and Recycling Truck Replacement Storm Drainage Project - Private Assistance Storm Drainage Project - Town Properties

$2,803,173

General Government Subtotal

$9,246,351

$174,812,218

Total General CIB

Total General and Utility CIB


TOWN OF CARY GENERAL CAPITAL RESERVE SUMMARY

Actual 2007

Actual 2008

Actual 2009

Estimated 2010

Budget 2011

REVENUES Investment Earnings

3,642,776

4,459,722

3,846,626

1,841,563

Unrealized Gains (Losses) on Investment Earnings

356,773

1,329,596

170,226

170,226

1,265,929 ---

Net Investment Earnings Transportation Development Fees Vehicle License Fees Powell Bill Special Recreation Payment In Lieu Payment in Lieu of Streets Payment in Lieu - Street Lighting Cable TV Franchise Fees (2%) Developer Reimbursement Utility Franchise Fee NCDOT Municipal Reimbursement Developer Payments Miscellaneous TOTAL REVENUES

3,999,549 1,799,956 889,868 3,272,482 3,430,110 817,251 --314,407 --235,957 246,973 20,000 34,441 15,060,994

5,789,318 1,812,624 943,980 3,830,426 695,076 512,266 15,779 76,625 --569,157 ----35,284 14,280,535

4,016,852 1,077,931 976,151 3,682,569 283,513 963,900 8,989 76,383 12,950 634,986 ----1,000 11,735,224

2,011,789 441,639 909,854 3,430,240 71,827 271,302 ------701,133 ----9,835 7,847,619

1,265,929 406,308 918,953 3,300,191 ----------694,122 ------6,585,503

OTHER FINANCING SOURCES (USES) Transfer to Transportation Capital Improv. Fund Transfer to Fire Capital Improv. Fund Transfer to Parks & Rec. Capital Improv. Fund Transfer to General Capital Improv. Fund NCDOT Loan Payment Sale of Assets Transfers From General Fund

(27,079,325) (1,156,763) (2,819,500) (981,181) 17,567,256 -----

(6,166,117) (81,451) 10,792,491 (961,271) --715,516 ---

(9,705,633) (123,851) (5,841,779) 1,600,640 ----(13,474,200)

(15,938,149) (4,953,781) (1,209,500) (7,847,158) -------

(2,709,178) (3,034,000) (700,000) ---------

TOTAL OTHER FINANCING SOURCES

(14,469,513)

4,299,168

(27,544,823)

(29,948,588)

(6,443,178)

18,579,703

(15,809,599)

(22,100,969)

Revenues and Other Sources Over (Under) Expenditures and Other Uses

591,481

Fund Balance - Start of Year Equity Transfers In (Out) Budget Adjustments

14,238,626 1,374,400 ---

16,204,507 -----

34,784,210 -----

18,974,611 (2,775,038) 22,852,408

16,951,012 -----

Fund Balance - End of Year

16,204,507

34,784,210

18,974,611

16,951,012

17,093,337

Undesignated Fund Balance - End of Year

15,847,734

33,454,614

18,804,385

16,780,786

16,923,111

142,325


TOWN OF CARY GENERAL CAPITAL IMPROVEMENTS FUNDING SOURCES = $9,246,351

Utility Fund Transfer $576,417 6% General Fund Transfer $2,226,756 24%

Powell Bill $2,000,000 22%

Interest/Other $4,443,178 48%

TOWN OF CARY GENERAL CAPITAL IMPROVEMENTS EXPENDITURES = $9,246,351

Transportation $2,709,178 29%

General Government $2,803,173 30%

Fire $3,034,000 33%

Parks, Recreation and Cultural Resources $700,000 8%


TOWN OF CARY UTILITY CAPITAL RESERVE SUMMARY

Actual 2007 REVENUES Investment Earnings Unrealized Gains (Losses) on Investment Earnings Net Investment Earnings Water Development Fee Sewer Development Fee Restricted Intergovernmental Revenue Misc. Developer Payments TOTAL REVENUES

4,420,154 636,662 5,056,816 7,559,520 8,362,886 --6,110 20,985,332

Actual 2008 5,019,165 1,407,709 6,426,874 8,617,159 8,847,746 --125,595 24,017,374

Actual 2009

Estimated 2010

Budget 2011

4,365,564 201,612 4,567,176 4,978,007 5,653,691 350,000 --15,548,874

2,108,897 201,612 2,310,509 3,794,404 5,060,566 ----11,165,479

1,453,069 --1,453,069 3,490,852 4,655,721 ----9,599,642

OTHER FINANCING SOURCES (USES) Water Projects Fund (4,525,983) (14,036,981) Sewer Projects Fund (14,104,386) (10,004,140)

(11,520,589) (18,587,363)

(10,512,554) (2,677,591)

(18,432,392) (7,843,742)

TOTAL OTHER FINANCING SOURCES (USES) (18,630,369) (24,041,121)

(30,107,952)

(13,190,145)

(26,276,134)

(14,559,078) ----(14,559,078)

(2,024,666) ----(2,024,666)

(16,676,492) ----(16,676,492)

Net Income (Loss) Adjustment to Accrual Gain on Sale of Assets Net Income (Loss) Adjusted

2,354,963 ----2,354,963

(23,747) ----(23,747)

Net Assets-Start of Year Transfer From Utility Fund - Morrisville Transfer From Utility Fund Adjustment to Accrual

46,475,619 ----911,365

49,741,947 1,091,499 --710,085

51,519,784 --1,973,555 724,224

39,658,485 -------

37,633,819 -------

* Net Assets-End of Year

49,741,947

51,519,784

39,658,485

37,633,819

20,957,327

* Fund Equity-End of Year

47,630,433

48,698,185

36,112,662

34,087,995

17,411,503

** Undesignated Fund Equity-End of Year

46,993,771

47,290,476

35,911,050

33,886,383

17,209,891

* "Net Assets-End of Year" includes non-expendable accounting adjustments, while "Fund Equity-End of Year" represents available cash reserves. ** "Undesignated Fund Equity - End of Year" represents fund equity available for future appropriation.


TOWN OF CARY UTILITY CAPITAL IMPROVEMENTS FUNDING SOURCES = $165,565,867

Restricted Revenue $1,504,860 1%

Debt Funding $98,856,842 60%

Restricted Fund Balance $20,886,971 13% Unrestricted Fund Balance $3,884,303 2%

Reimbursement Revenue $40,432,891 24%

TOWN OF CARY UTILITY CAPITAL IMPROVEMENTS EXPENDITURES = $165,565,867

Water Storage Tanks Pump Stations and $5,460,000 Water System Force Mains 3% Management $2,315,000 $461,080 Water Treatment 1% Water Lines 0% $9,765,080 $4,992,200 6% 3% Reclaimed Water $2,167,210 1% Sewer System Repair/Rehab $1,233,540 1% Western Wake Regional Wastewater Management Facility $127,739,245 77%

Wastewater Collection $7,969,512 5% Wastewater Treatment $900,000 1%

Wastewater System Management $2,563,000 2%


TOWN OF CARY EXPLANATION OF ACRONYMS ACRONYM EXPLANATION ABC ADA AOB APF ARRA ATM AWWA BANs BARs BBP BOD CAEF CAFR CALEA CAMPO CAPFR CATA CATV CAWTP CDBG CDL CFAI CIB CIP CIRC CMAQ CO COD COPs COPS CSX C-Tran dba DARE DEIS DENR DHIC DMV DOT EDC EDU EECBG EEO EHAP E EIS EMS EPA ESAB ETB ETJ

Alcoholic Beverage Commission Americans with Disabilities Act Annual Operating Budget Adequate Public Facilities American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Automated Teller Machine American Water Works Association Bond Anticipation Notes Budget Adjustment Requests Blood-borne Pathogen Biochemical Oxygen Demand Certificate of Adequate Educational Facilities Comprehensive Annual Financial Report Commission on Accreditation for Law Enforcement Agencies Capital Metropolitan Planning Organization Certificate of Adequate Public Facilities for Roads Certificate of Approved Traffic Analysis Cable Access Television Cary/Apex Water Treatment Plant Community Development Block Grant funding Commercial Drivers License Commission on Fire Accreditation International Capital Improvements Budget Capital Improvements Plan Citizen Issue Review Commission Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality Certificate of Occupancy Chemical Oxygen Demand Certificates of Participation Community Oriented Policing Services program of Federal Grants for Name of railway company Cary Transit Doing Business As Drug Awareness Resistance Program Draft Environmental Impact Statement Department of Environment and Natural Resources Downtown Housing Improvement Corporation Department of Motor Vehicles Department of Transportation Economic Development Commission Equivalent Dwelling Unit Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Equal Employment Opportunity Employee Housing Assistance Program Exempt Environmental Impact Statement Emergency Management Services Environmental Protection Agency Environmental Services Advisory Board Extra Territorial Boundary Extra Territorial Jurisdiction


ACRONYM EXPLANATION FCC FEMA FMD FM FSE FOG FT FTE FY FYS GA GAAP GAC GASB GF GFOA GIS GO GPD GPS GS HR HRSS HVAC I&I IBT IBNR ISAB ISF ISO ITE LDO LEED LGC LOS MAPPS MGD MM MPO N/A NE NCDOT NCDWQ NCLM NCWRF NFPA NPDES O&M OS OSHA P&D P&Z PD PIL PIO PM

Federal Communications Commission Federal Emergency Management Administration Facilities Management Division Force Main Food Service Establishment Fats, Oils, and Grease program Full-time Full-time Equivalent Fiscal Year Fiscal Years General Assembly Generally Accepted Accounting Principles Granular Activated Carbon Governmental Accounting Standards Board General Fund Government Finance Officers Association Geographic Information Systems General Obligation bonds Gallons Per Day Geographic Positioning System General Statutes Human Resources department High Risk, Safety Sensitive Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning Inflow & Infiltration Inter-Basin Transfer Incurred But Not Reported Information Services Advisory Board Internal Service Fund Insurance Services Organization Institute of Transportation Land Development Ordinance Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design Local Government Commission Level of Service Managing And Planning Performance System Million Gallons per Day Morrisville Merger Master Police Officer Not Applicable Non-Exempt North Carolina Department of Transportation North Carolina Department of Water Quality North Carolina League of Municipalities North Cary Water Reclamation Facility National Fire Protection Association National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System Operating and Maintenance Oversizings Occupational Safety and Health Act Occupational Safety and Health Administration Planning and Development Planning and Zoning Police Department Payment in Lieu Public Information Office Preventive Maintenance


ACRONYM EXPLANATION

PO PRCR PS PSA PT PUD PW/UT RDU RFP RIL SCADA SCWRF SF SS SPO SPOT SR SRO SRU SS SSO STM T-Bill TAZ TCAP TDF TDM TIA TIP TND TOC TS TS-1 TS-2 TTA UCR UDO UF USA VLF WAS WCPSS W&S WCWRF WRF WT WTP WWMP WWRWM WWWRF WWTP

Purchase Order or Police Officer Parks, Recreation and Cultural Resources department Pump Station Public Service Announcement Part-time Planned Unit Development Public Works/Utilities Raleigh-Durham Request for Proposals Recreation in Lieu Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition South Cary Water Reclamation Facility Square Foot Sanitary Sewer or Suspended Solids Senior Police Officer Small Projects One-hour Turn-around State Road School Resource Officer Special Response Unit Sanitary Sewer Sanitary Sewer Oversizing Storm Drainage Management Treasury Bill Traffic Analysis Zone Town Center Area Plan Transportation Development Fee Traffic Demand Traffic Impact Analysis Transportation Improvement Program Traditional Neighborhood Development Town of Cary Technology Services department Traffic Signal - 1 (refers to a type of traffic signal cabinet) Traffic Signal - 2 (refers to a type of traffic signal cabinet) Triangle Transit Authority Unified Crime Reporting Unified Development Ordinance Utility Fund Urban Service Area Vehicle License Fees Waste Activated Sludge Wake County Public School System Water and Sewer West Cary Water Reclamation Facility Water Reclamation Facility Water Treatment Water Treatment Plant Waste Water Master Plan Western Wake Regional Wastewater Management Facility Western Wake Water Reclamation Facility Waste Water Treatment Plant


TOWN OF CARY GLOSSARY OF TERMS

ACCRUAL ACCOUNTING: A basis of accounting in which revenues and expenses are recorded at the time they are incurred, instead of when cash is actually received or disbursed (see funds). For example, in accrual accounting, a revenue earned between June 1 and June 30, but for which payment was not received until July 12, is recorded as earned on June 30 rather than on July 12. ACCOUNTS: Accounts are used to enter the formally adopted annual operating budget into the general ledger, as well as to organize expenditures and revenues by fund, program, department, activities, etc. ACREAGE FEES: Fees charged by the gross acre against all property to be developed. Fees start at $750 per acre for water and sewer for residential development, and increase as density increases. These fees are restricted to Utility Fund projects. These fees were replaced with the Water and Sewer Development Fees in FY 2000. ACTIVITY: A specific service or unit of work performed. AD VALOREM TAX (PROPERTY TAX): A tax levied on the assessed value of real and personal property located within the Town. APPROPRIATION (BUDGETING): A legal authorization granted by the Town Council to make budgeted expenditures and to incur obligations for purposes specified in the budget ordinances. ASSESSED VALUATION: A value established for real property for use as a basis for levying property taxes. BALANCED BUDGET: Occurs when planned expenditures equal anticipated revenues. In North Carolina, it is a requirement that the budget submitted to the Town Council be balanced. BASE BUDGET ALLOWANCE: Ongoing expense for personnel and replacement of existing equipment to maintain service levels previously authorized by the City Council. A base budget reduction reflects discontinuation of a service or program previously approved or a cost decrease to provide the same service level. BASIS OF ACCOUNTING and BASIS OF BUDGETING: The system under which revenues, expenditures, expenses, and transfers – and the related assets and liabilities – are recognized in accounts and reported in financial statements. Basis of Accounting and Basis of Budgeting specifically relates to the timing of the measurements made. Full Accrual and Modified Accrual are each an accepted Basis of Accounting and Basis of Budgeting. The Town of Cary does not distinguish between Basis of Accounting and Basis of Budgeting. All Town of Cary funds are maintained on a modified Accrual basis. BIOSOLIDS: Defined as stabilized wastewater organisms, this by-product of wastewater treatment is sold as fertilizer by the Town. Commonly referred to as "sludge." BOND: A written promise to pay a designated sum of money (the principal) at a specific date in the future, along with periodic interest at a specified rate. The payment on bonds is identified as Debt Service. Bonds are generally used to obtain long-term financing for capital improvements. BOND ANTICIPATION NOTES (BANS): Short-term interest-bearing notes issued by the Town in anticipation of bonds to be issued at a later date. The notes are retired from the proceeds of the bond issue to which they are related. BOND FUNDS: Resources derived from issuance of bonds for specific purposes and related Federal project grants used to finance capital expenditures.


BOND RATING: A rating (made by an established bond rating company) from a schedule of grades indicating the probability of timely repayment of principal and interest on bonds issued. Cary has a AAA bond rating from all three major bond rating companies. BOND REFERENDUM: An election in which registered voters vote on whether the Town will be allowed to issue debt in the form of interest-bearing bonds. BUDGET: A plan of financial operation embodying an estimate of proposed expenditures for a given period and the proposed means of financing them. Upon approval by the Town Council, the budget appropriation ordinance becomes the legal basis for expenditures in the budget year. BUDGET DOCUMENT (PROGRAM AND FINANCIAL PLAN): The official written statement prepared by the Town staff reflecting the decisions made by the Council in their budget deliberations. BUDGET MESSAGE: A general discussion of the budget that provides the Town Council and public with a summary of the most important aspects of the budget, changes from previous fiscal years, and the views and recommendations of the Town Manager. BUDGET ORDINANCE: A formal legislative enactment by the Town Council. If it is not in conflict with any higher form of law, such as a statute or constitutional provision, it has full force and effect of law within the boundaries of the municipality to which it applies. BUDGET SCHEDULE: The schedule of key dates or milestones that the Town follows in preparation and adoption of the budget. CAPITAL IMPROVEMENTS: Major construction, repair of, or addition to buildings, parks, streets, bridges and other Town facilities. Capital Improvements projects cost $25,000 or more, and have a useful life of more than three years. CAPITAL IMPROVEMENTS BUDGET: The schedule of project expenditures for the acquisition and construction of capital assets for the current fiscal year. CAPITAL IMPROVEMENTS PLAN: The annually updated plan or schedule of project expenditures for public facilities and infrastructure (buildings, roads, etc.), with estimated project costs, sources of funding, and timing of work over a ten-year period. CAPITAL OUTLAY: Vehicles, equipment, improvements, software, and furniture purchased by the Town which individually amount to an expenditure of $5,000 or more, but less than $25,000, and which have an expected life of more than one year. CAPITAL RESERVE FUND: A special fund used as a clearing house for monies being transferred from other funds into capital project accounts. CO-Certificate of Occupancy – is a document issued by the governing agency, signifying that a newly completed building or dwelling conforms to building code regulations and all pertinent ordinances, by meeting the required health and safety standards, and can thereby be inhabited. CONTINGENCY ACCOUNT: Account in which funds are set aside for emergency and exceptional expenditures that may become necessary during the year and which have not otherwise been provided for in the context of the annual operating budget. COUNCIL-MANAGER FORM OF GOVERNMENT: Under this form of government, the Mayor and Council establish policy, while a professional manager and his/her appointees are responsible for governmental operations. DEBT LIMIT: The maximum amount of outstanding gross or net debt legally permitted. The State of North Carolina forbids cities from incurring debt in excess of 8% of the total assessed valuation of taxable property within the city.


DEBT SERVICE: Payment of long term debt principal, interest, and related costs on borrowed funds such as bonds. Debt service is budgeted and accounted for in the fund in which it is incurred. DEFERRED COMPENSATION: The Town participates in a supplementary retirement income plan (401-K). In addition to Town contributions, each employee has the option of making additional pre-tax contributions. DEPARTMENT: A major administrative division of the Town that indicates overall management responsibility for an operation or a group of related operations within a functional area. A department usually has more than one program and may include activities or divisions that are accounted for in different funds. DEVELOPMENT FEES: These fees were developed in FY 1999 to replace the majority of the Town's utility capital impact fees. There is a separate fee for water and sewer. The development fees replace acreage fees, and connection charges. The fees are due entirely at building permit issuance and are used to help offset the cost of infrastructure for projects needed to serve growth. DEVELOPER REIMBURSEMENT: A special case in which the Town reimburses the developer's contribution for a particular construction project, such as waterline oversizings. In the reverse of this situation, the developer may have to reimburse the Town. DIVISION: A program or function that falls within the specific functional area assigned to a particular Department. Several Divisions may comprise a single Department. ENCUMBRANCE: A financial commitment for a contract not yet performed. An encumbrance is charged against an appropriation, and a portion of the appropriation is reserved for the purpose of satisfying the encumbrance. It represents the expenditure the Town will make after performance under the contact is completed and an invoice is served. ENTERPRISE FUND: A grouping of activities whose expenditures are wholly or partially offset by revenues collected from consumers in the form of fees or charges. EXPENDITURE: The outlay of or obligation to pay cash; a decrease in net financial resources. EXTRATERRITORIAL ZONING JURISDICTION (ETJ): A geographic area extending from one to three miles beyond a municipality's corporate limits within which the municipality exercises zoning and subdivision control, and enforces the State Building Code. A municipality assumes this authority only if the county is not enforcing these three types of development regulations. FINAL BUDGET: Term used to describe revenues and expenditures for the upcoming year beginning July 1 as adopted by the Town Council. FIXED ASSETS: Assets of a long-term character which are intended to be held or used, such as land, buildings, machinery, furniture, and other equipment. FISCAL YEAR: Any consecutive twelve-month period to which the annual operating budget applies and at the end of which a government determines its financial position and the results of its operations. The Town of Cary’s fiscal year runs from July 1 to June 30. FLEXIBLE SPENDING ACCOUNTS: Town employees have the option of having pre-tax dollars deducted from their paychecks and held in a special account, designated for either medical or child care expenses. Throughout the year, employees can submit claims to their flex accounts, and be reimbursed with their own, pre-tax dollars. FRANCHISE FEE: A fee paid by public service businesses for use of Town streets, alleys, and property in providing their services to the citizens of a community. Example: The Town charges a Cable Television Franchise Fee to cable television companies serving Cary citizens. FULL-TIME POSITION: Any employee who receives full benefits and works at least 40 hours per week.


FULL-TIME EQUIVALENT POSITION (FTE): A part-time position converted to the decimal equivalent of a fulltime position based on 2,080 hours per year. For example, a seasonal employee working for four months, or 690 hours, would be equivalent to .3 of a full-time position. FUNCTION: A group of related programs crossing organization (departmental) boundaries and aimed at accomplishing a broad goal or major service. FUND: An accounting entity with self-balancing accounts. A fund records all financial transactions for specific activities or government functions. FUND BALANCE: Amounts shown as fund balance represent monies which remain unspent after all budgeted expenditures have been made. North Carolina statutes dictate that a portion of fund balance is not available for appropriation in the following fiscal year. This term is used in relation to governmental funds. FUND EQUITY: Amounts shows as fund equity represent monies which remain unspent after all budgeted expenditures have been made. This term is used in relation to proprietary funds. GAAP (Generally Accepted Accounting Principles): Accounting principles that are commonly used in preparing financial statements and generally accepted by the readers of those statements. The authoritative source of GAAP for state and local governments is the Governmental Accounting Standards Board (GASB). GENERAL FUND: The general operating fund of the Town used to account for all financial resources except those required to be accounted for in another fund. GENERAL LEDGER: A record containing the accounts needed to reflect the financial position and the results of operations of a government. GENERAL OBLIGATION BONDS: Debt issued by the Town, repayment of which is backed by full taxing power. GOAL: A statement of broad direction, purpose or intent based on the needs of the community. A goal is general and timeless; that is, it is not concerned with a specific achievement in a given time period. GRANTS: Contributions or gifts of cash or other assets from another government to be used or expended for a specified purpose, activity, or facility. INTERCEPTOR: A large sanitary sewer collection line. INTERNAL SERVICE FUNDS: Those funds used to account for the financing of goods or services provided by one Town department to others on a cost reimbursement basis. INVESTMENT REVENUE: Revenue earned on investments with a third party. The Town uses a pooled cash system, pooling the cash of all funds and investing it in total. The interest earned is then allocated back to the individual funds by the average cash balance in that fund. LDO (Land Development Ordinance): A compilation of rules and regulations adopted by the Town Council, pursuant to the authority granted to the Town of Cary by the NC General Assembly. This ordinance protects the health, safety, and general welfare of the general public, and it implements the policies of the Cary Comprehensive Plan, which guides development of the physical environment of the Town and its planning jurisdiction.

LGC (Local Government Commission): An agency in the NC State Treasurer's Office which oversees local government bonded debt and assists cities and counties in all areas of fiscal management. The LGC conducts all bond sales, and ensures that local units have sufficient fiscal capacity to repay debt. LIABILITIES: Debts or other legal obligations arising out of transactions in the past which must be liquidated, renewed, or refunded at some future date. This term does not include encumbrances.


MDC (Mobile Data Computer): A computer placed in emergency vehicles (specifically designed to perform in vehicles), which provides improved dispatch / response time, communication with station, mapping applications, hazardous material information, field reporting, and location of necessary contact information. MGD (Million Gallons Per Day): A measure used to express the amount of water or wastewater that is treated at the water and wastewater treatment plants. MODIFIED ACCRUAL: The basis of budgeting and accounting where revenues are recorded when collectable within the current period or soon thereafter to be used to pay liabilities of the current period. Expenditures are recognized when the related liability is incurred. NET BONDED DEBT: The amount calculated as gross bonded debt less debt service monies available at year-end less debt payable from Enterprise Revenues, which ultimately equates to amounts to be repaid through property taxes. OBJECTIVE: A statement of specific direction, purpose or intent to be accomplished by staff within a program. OCCUPANCY TAX: A locally administered tax levied on the occupancy of hotel and motel rooms in addition to sales tax. The Wake County Occupancy Tax is 6%. The Chatham County occupancy tax is 3%. OPERATING BUDGET: The Town's financial plan that outlines proposed expenditures for the coming fiscal year and estimates the revenues that will be used to finance them. OPERATING FUNDS: Resources derived from recurring revenue sources used to finance ongoing operating expenditures and pay-as-you-go capital projects. OPERATIONS AND MAINTENANCE EXPENDITURES: Costs other than those for salaries, benefits, and capital outlay that are necessary for the provision of services offered by the Town. PAYMENT-IN-LIEU: Payments made typically by developers in lieu of donation of recreation land, construction of streets, greenways, etc. This payment is based on appraised values. These funds are restricted to specific types of parks and recreation and transportation projects. PERSONNEL SERVICES: The expenditure category that includes total costs of all wages, salaries, retirement, and other fringe benefits. PERFORMANCE MEASUREMENT: Any systematic attempt to learn how responsive a government's services are to the needs of constituents through the use of standards, workload indicators, etc. POLICE SEPARATION ALLOWANCE: A separate trust fund required by state law, to provide a separation allowance for police officers if they retire after age 55 and have served at least 5 years. POWELL BILL FUNDS: An intergovernmental transfer from the State of North Carolina. These revenues are based on gasoline sales in the state and the number of miles of streets within the Town. These funds must be used for transportation projects. PRETREATMENT PROGRAM: Industries must obtain a permit and renew it annually in order to discharge into the Town's wastewater system. The program includes sampling charges for monitoring the industry's discharge and surcharges for any discharges exceeding desired limits. PRIOR YEAR AD VALOREM (PROPERTY) TAXES: Ad Valorem (Property) Taxes that remain unpaid on or after the date they are due. A penalty is included for non-payment. PRODUCTIVITY: A measure of the output of Town programs per unit of resource input invested. PROGRAM: An organized set of related work activities, which are directed toward accomplishing a common goal. Each Town department is usually responsible for a number of related service programs.


PROPERTY TAX (AD VALOREM TAX): A tax levied on the assessed value of real and personal property located within the Town. PUD (Planned Unit Development): A tract of land under single ownership, or under common control evidenced by duly recorded contracts or agreements approved by the Town Council, that is planned and developed as an integral unit in a single development operation or in a programmed series of development operations in accordance with a master land use plan and detailed engineering and architectural plans as approved by Town Council. REFUNDING: The issuance of long term debt in exchange for, or to provide funds for, the retirement of long-term debt already outstanding. Refunding is essentially the "refinancing" of long-term debt. RESERVE: A portion of fund balance earmarked to indicate that it 1) is not available for expenditure, or 2) is legally segregated for a specific future use. RESOURCES: Assets that can be used to fund expenditures. These can be such things as property taxes, charges for service, beginning fund balance, or working capital. RETAINED EARNINGS: An equity account reflecting the accumulated earning of an enterprise or internal service fund. REVENUE: Income received from various sources used to finance government services (ex. sales tax revenue). REVENUE BONDS: Bonds whose principal and interest are payable exclusively from earnings of an Enterprise Fund. Such bonds sometimes contain a mortgage on the fund's property. REVERSION: The amount of approved budget authority for operating expenditures remaining at the end of a given fiscal year. For example, if the current adopted budget includes $3 million for expenditures, and only $2.9 million is spent during the fiscal year, there would be $100,000 in reversion. Typically, the amount of reversion serves to increase the previously estimated amount of fund balance remaining at the end of the fiscal year because not all of the approved funding was actually expended. RISK MANAGEMENT: The identification and control of risk and liabilities incurred by a local government to conserve resources from accidental loss. SERVICE LEVEL TREND: The tracking, over a specified time period, of an output measure showing a workload change or the degree of achievement for stated program objectives. SEWER DEVELOPMENT FEES: See Development Fees. SPECIAL REVENUE FUNDS: Special Revenue Funds are used to account for resources that are subject to legal spending restrictions. They are created when a resolution, statute or ordinance requires that specific taxes or special revenue sources are used to finance a particular activity. STIMULUS ACT: The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA), also known as “Stimulus Act” was approved by the United States Government on February 17, 2009 to create or save three to four million jobs, in addition to providing short-term stimulus. The act also benefits new infrastructure, provides capital over three years to eventually double domestic renewable energy capacity, undertakes weatherization of federal buildings and more than 1 million homes; increases college affordability through grants and providing higher education tax cuts, assists in computerizing American’s health records, and providing an $800 tax credit to 129 million working households. The Town of Cary is applying for all applicable funding available, through the Stimulus Act, to support respective Council goals and initiatives. SUPPLEMENTAL BUDGET ALLOWANCE: A supplemental budget allowance reflects additional personnel, equipment, and related expenses that increase the size of the work force or the inventory of equipment.


TAX BASE: The total assessed valuation of real property within the Town. TAX RATE: See Ad Valorem Tax or Property Tax. TIPPING FEES: The cost incurred by the Town to deposit garbage in the Wake County Landfill. In FY 2009 the Town has budgeted $30.00/ton to cover these charges. Effective January 2009, the Town has also budgeted an additional $2 per ton excise tax that will be due for each ton received at the landfill. TRANSFER: An appropriation to or from another fund. A transfer is the movement of money from one fund to another to wholly or partially support the functions of the receiving fund. TRANSPORTATION DEVELOPMENT FEE: Impact fees charged by the Town to developers which are to be used to construct and improve thoroughfares in and around subdivisions. This fee was added during FY 1990 with permission of the State Legislature. TRANSPORTATION IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM (TIP): A document containing funding information and schedules for State Transportation Projects, including highways, aviation, enhancements, public transportation, rail, bicycle and pedestrians, and the Governor's Highway Safety Program. TIP is the statewide program run by the North Carolina Department of Transportation. TRUST AND AGENCY FUNDS: These funds are custodial (used to account for assets held by a government in a trustee capacity) and do not involve measurement of results of operations. They are generally limited to instances where legally mandated, or where a formal legal trustee relationship exist. Principal and interest in the funds may be expended in the course of their designated operations. USER CHARGES: The payment of a fee for direct receipt of a public service by the party benefiting from the service. UTILITY FRANCHISE TAX: Tax levied by the state on electric, gas, telephone, and street transportation companies. The proceeds are shared with municipalities. WATER DEVELOPMENT FEES: See Development Fees. WORKLOAD INDICATORS: An indication of the output of a department. It may consist of transactions, products, events, services, or persons served.


TOWN Of CARY North Carolina

FISCAL YEAR 2011

ANNUAL OPERATING BUDGET ADOPTED

BENJAMIN SHIVAR TOWN MANAGER

SCOTT FOGLEMAN BUDGET DIRECTOR KATHY LLERAS BUDGET ANALYST

MICHAEL BAJOREK ASSISTANT TOWN MANAGER

STACEY TEACHEY SENIOR BUDGET ANALYST

JOSH EDWARDS BUDGET ANALYST

www.townofcary.org

ELAINE HUNTLEY BUDGET TECHNICIAN


GFOA AWARD FOR DISTINGUISHED BUDGET PRESENTATION

The Government Finance Officers Association of the United States and Canada (GFOA) presented an award of Distinguished Budget Presentation, to the Town of Cary, for its annual budget for Fiscal Year 2010 which began July 1, 2009. In order to receive this award, a governmental unit must publish a budget document that meets specific program criteria as a policy document, an operations guide, a financial plan, and a communications device. The Fiscal Year 2011 budget will be submitted to GFOA for award consideration as well.


Town of Cary, North Carolina ANNUAL OPERATING BUDGET

TABLE OF CONTENTS INTRODUCTION Vision Statement / Mission Statement / Statement of Values....................................................... 1 Goals and Initiatives .................................................................................................................. 2-4 Town of Cary Organization Chart ................................................................................................ 5 Council / Boards & Commissions / Appointed & Administrative Positions ................................ 6 Responsibilities of Town Government By Department ........................................................... 7-11 Governmental Functions Expressed as Cents of a Tax Dollar.................................................... 12 Budget Message..................................................................................................................... 13-49 Changes to Recommended Operating Budget ............................................................................ 50 Budget Ordinance .................................................................................................................. 51-57 Attachment A: Fee Schedule...................................................................................... 58-84 Attachment B: Authorized Positions.......................................................................... 85-94 Attachment C: Pay Ranges.............................................................................................. 95 Budget Process and Schedule ................................................................................................ 96-97 FINANCIAL SUMMARIES Summary of Operating and Capital Budgets .............................................................................. 99 Revenue and Expenditure Graphs - All Funds .................................................................. 100-102 Budget Overview – All Funds .................................................................................................. 103 Changes in Fund Balance – All Funds...................................................................................... 104 Assessed Value and Tax Rates ................................................................................................. 105 Adopted Rates and Graph .................................................................................................. 106-107 Debt Service Requirements Overview................................................................................................................. 108-111 Outstanding Bonded Debt / Legal Debt Margin ............................................................ 112 Annual Debt Service Requirements ............................................................................... 113 General Fund and Utility Fund Debt Ratios ........................................................... 114-115 KEY FACTS / STATISTICS History and Map of Cary .......................................................................................................... 117 Miscellaneous Statistics ..................................................................................................... 118-122 DEPARTMENTAL BUDGET DETAIL GENERAL FUND Revenue and Expenditures Per Capita................................................................................... 123 Revenue and Expenditure Graphs................................................................................... 124-125 General Fund Revenue Sources and Trends ................................................................... 126-136 General Fund Summary .................................................................................................. 137-140 Narrative & Expenditures by Department/Division Legislative............................................................................................................... 141-152 Administration ........................................................................................................ 153-158 Finance.................................................................................................................... 159-168 Technology Services ............................................................................................... 169-173 Human Resources ................................................................................................... 174-178 Police....................................................................................................................... 179-183 Fire .......................................................................................................................... 184-188 Engineering ............................................................................................................. 189-194 Planning .................................................................................................................. 195-200 Affordable Housing ................................................................................................ 201-203 Inspections & Permits ............................................................................................. 204-208 Parks, Recreation and Cultural Resources .............................................................. 209-242 Public Works and Utilities ...................................................................................... 243-259


Table of Contents -- continued UTILITY FUND Revenue and Expenses Per Capita.............................................................................................261 Revenue and Expenses Graphs.......................................................................................... 262-263 Utility Fund Revenue Sources and Trends ........................................................................ 264-266 Utility Fund Summary ....................................................................................................... 267-268 Narratives & Expenditures by Department and Division: Finance Department Customer Accounting ............................................................ 269-273 PWUT - Water Conservation.................................................................................. 276-279 PWUT - Pretreatment ............................................................................................. 280-282 PWUT - Utility Systems Management ................................................................... 283-285 PWUT - North Cary Water Reclamation Facility................................................... 286-288 PWUT - South Cary Water Reclamation Facility................................................... 289-291 PWUT - Western Wake Water Reclamation Facility .....................................................292 PWUT - Water Treatment Plant ............................................................................. 293-295 OTHER FUNDS Fleet Management Fund Revenues.........................................................................................................................298 Schedule of Revenues and Expenses ..............................................................................299 Narrative ................................................................................................................. 300-302 Transit Revenues.........................................................................................................................304 Fund Summary................................................................................................................305 Narrative ................................................................................................................. 306-308 Community Development Block Grant Fund Summary............................................................309 Economic Development Strategic Fund ....................................................................................310 911 Fund....................................................................................................................................311 Police Separation Allowance Fund............................................................................................312 Health and Dental Fund.............................................................................................................313 Self-Insurance Funds .................................................................................................................314 CAPITAL IMPROVEMENTS BUDGET AND PLAN Overview ........................................................................................................................... 315-343 Utility Capital Reserve Summary ..............................................................................................344 Utility Capital Funding Sources/Expenditure Graphs ...............................................................345 General Capital Reserve Summary............................................................................................346 General Capital Funding Sources/Expenditure Graphs .............................................................347 Cumulative Impacts of FY 2011 - FY 2021 Capital Improvements Budget/Plan Projects On the Operating Budget ........................................................................................ 348-353 Capital Project Status Update - Active Projects ................................................................ 354-359 Closed or Pending Closure Projects................................................................................... 360-362 Ten-Year Plan.................................................................................................................... 363-368 APPENDIX Town of Cary Budget Policies........................................................................................... 369-374 Fund Structure / Basis of Budgeting.................................................................................. 375-377 Sample of Departmental Line Accounts....................................................................................378 Account Structure ......................................................................................................................379 Staffing History ................................................................................................................. 380-381 Definitions of Expenditure Accounts ................................................................................ 382-385 Explanation of Acronyms .................................................................................................. 386-388 Glossary............................................................................................................................. 389-395


GUIDE TO USING THE OPERATING BUDGET

One objective of the budget document is to describe the Town of Cary’s budget in a manner that is easy for the lay reader to use, yet comprehensive for the experienced reader. Brief descriptions of the major sections of the document follow. • Introduction (pages 1 -97) The most notable information in this section is the Manager’s Budget Message, which discusses the major revenue and expenditure issues for Fiscal Year 2011. Other helpful information in this section includes the mission statement, goals and initiatives, Town-wide organization chart, adopted budget ordinance, fee schedule, pay ranges and authorized position listing, and a description of the budget process. • Financial Summaries (pages 99 - 115) This section provides summary financial information on all funds that are included in the budget document. Further details may be found in other sections of the document or in the Capital Improvements Budget and Plan. Information on the Town’s financial condition, assessed value, tax rates, approved water and sewer rates, and debt service is also included. • Key Facts / Statistics (pages 117 - 122) This segment of the budget describes the history of the Town and presents facts and statistics about Cary, including population comparisons and demographic information. • General Fund (pages 123 - 259) The General Fund is the Town’s major operating fund. Graphs and charts provide historical summaries of revenues and expenditures. Detailed discussions of budgeted revenue sources are also included here. The General Fund Summary provides five fiscal years of revenue and expenditure data – actuals for FY 2007-2009, estimates for FY 2010, and the adopted budget for FY 2011. In addition to revenue and expenditure data, this report shows the estimated ending fund balance for the General Fund. The General Fund section of the budget also contains a narrative for each General Fund department. The narratives present each department’s mission statement, program descriptions, activity history, FY 2010 accomplishments, key performance objectives, workload indicators and performance measures, and explanations of significant budget and service level changes for FY 2011. • Utility Fund (pages 261 - 295) The Utility Fund section is formatted in the same manner as the General Fund section but provides information related specifically to the Utility Fund. The Utility Fund accounts for Town of Cary water and sewer operations. • Other Funds (pages 298 - 314) This portion of the budget contains information related to Town activities that are either partially or fully funded by transfers from the General, Utility, and Fleet Management funds. The Transit Fund, Police Separation Fund, SelfInsurance Funds (Workers’ Compensation & Small Claims), Health and Dental Internal Service Fund, 911 Fund, Community Development, Economic Development and Fleet Management Fund are all addressed in the Other Funds section. • CIB/CIP (pages 315 - 368) This section contains information about the Capital Improvements Budget and Ten-Year Capital Improvements Plan. Included is an overview of each funded project, a utility capital and general capital reserve summary, utility capital and general capital funding sources and expenditure graphs, lists of current projects and projects scheduled for closure as of June 30, 2011, and Ten-Year Plan. • Appendix (pages 369 - 395) The Appendix includes information on the North Carolina Local Government Budget and Fiscal Control Act, the Town’s budgeting and financial policies, a description of the Town’s fund structure and basis of budgeting, and definitions of individual expenditure accounts. This section also includes historical staffing levels, an explanation of acronyms used in this document, and a glossary of terms.


TOWN OF CARY VISION STATEMENT Cary is a place where good neighbors form healthy neighborhoods in a green and vibrant community of friendly, caring people. TOWN OF CARY MISSION STATEMENT At the Town of Cary we focus every day on enriching the lives of our citizens by creating an exceptional environment and providing exemplary services that enable our community to thrive and prosper. TOWN OF CARY STATEMENT OF VALUES To achieve our mission we will uphold the following values: 1.

Our organization exists to serve our citizens. We will be open, ensure access, encourage involvement and be accountable to our citizens.

2.

Employees are our most important resource. We will attract and retain the best employees and invest in their personal and professional growth.

3.

We will be honest, ethical and diligent. Our actions will comply with local, state and federal laws.

4.

We will treat everyone with dignity, respect and fairness.

5.

We will achieve the best results through effective teamwork, strategic partnerships and community participation.

6.

We will provide outstanding customer service that is polite, friendly and responsive.

7.

We value creative thinking and innovation. We will continue to be nationally recognized for excellence in local government.

8.

We value growth that balances desired service levels, economic benefits and continued stability for our community.

9.

We are cost conscious. We spend public funds responsibly and effectively to ensure the Town’s short and long term financial strength.

10.

We are committed to proactive, comprehensive planning to guide the future of our community.

11.

We will preserve and protect our environment. We will be good stewards of our finite natural resources. Adopted by Town Council August 22, 2006


TOWN OF CARY QUALITY OF LIFE GUIDING PRINCIPLES 1. The Town of Cary is an exceptionally safe community • Citizens feel secure in their homes, in the community, and on the streets and sidewalks 2. The Town of Cary maintains a small town feel • The Town possesses a distinctively small town character with a vibrant downtown • Pedestrians, drivers, and bicyclists move efficiently • Public facilities are clean and inviting 3. The Town of Cary is defined by its distinctive sense of place • Citizens and users take pride in the attractive appearance of parks, streets, and buildings • Citizens value the community’s cultural, recreational and economic opportunities • Citizens feel encouraged to lead healthy lifestyles 4. The Town of Cary actively builds community for all of its people • Citizens take pride in their quality of life • Community gathering places are valued and utilized • Town infrastructure is built to last • Citizens get excellent value for their investment in the Town of Cary • The public respects the way the Town is governed • The Town provides extraordinary customer service TOWN OF CARY GOALS AND INITIATIVES

FOCUS AREA I: COMMUNITY PLANNING - PLANNING FOR QUALITY OF LIFE GOAL: ACHIEVE A WELL-PLANNED COMMUNITY USING INNOVATIVE AND PROACTIVE PLANNING APPROACHES AND TECHNIQUES. INITIATIVE: Administer existing development ordinances and related development guidelines as adopted. INITIATIVE: Create connections between development interests and affected citizens to eliminate problems and concerns. INITIATIVE: Be responsive and inclusive to those involved in and affected by the development process. INITIATIVE: Identify planning, land use and growth related trends that affect the community and identify related policy changes that need to be made. INITIATIVE: Recognize points of conflict between approved development ordinances and community vision/community response, and work with Council and the community to realign policy and reality. INITIATIVE: Understand the forces that affect the built community and how they relate to the built environment: market trends, economic trends, building materials and techniques, etc.


FOCUS AREA II: INFRASTRUCTURE - MAKING SURE WE’RE READY WHEN YOU ARE GOAL: ENSURE THAT ROADS, WATER AND WASTEWATER FACILITIES, PARKS, AND OTHER INFRASTRUCTURE EXISTS FOR THE EXISTING CITIZENS AND FOR THE FUTURE NEEDS IDENTIFIED IN THE COMPREHENSIVE PLAN. INITIATIVE: Develop, maintain and update infrastructure master plans that coincide with community vision – water, wastewater, roads, parks, greenways, public facilities. INITIATIVE: Establish priorities for the timing of capital project construction based on citizen input, development trends, existing plans and community need. INITIATIVE: Develop alternate financing plans to fund approved plans, including seeking alternate sources of funding. INITIATIVE: Manage implementation of infrastructure plans to the approved schedule and budget. INITIATIVE: Build public facilities that meet community expectations for quality, environmental sensitivity, aesthetics and future needs.

FOCUS AREA III: FINANCIAL CONDITION - MAKING SENSE WITH THE DOLLARS GOAL: ACHIEVE A STABLE AND STRONG FINANCIAL POSITION BY ACCURATELY ESTIMATING, PRUDENTLY ALLOCATING, AND MANAGING FINANCIAL RESOURCES. INITIATIVE: Clearly identify budget and financial strategies and goals in the area of budgeting, financial planning, acquisition and use of short-term and long-term debt, capital facilities planning and budget management and execution. INITIATIVE: Maintain a AAA Bond Rating. INITIATIVE: Maintain the credibility of the organization with the public, State of North Carolina and private financial markets. INITIATIVE: Ensure funding is allocated to execute priorities and service levels defined through the mission statement, statement of values and Council goals and initiatives. INITIATIVE: Promote efficient and effective use of resources through vigorous budget preparation, approval and execution. INITIATIVE: Provide credibility and accountability through internal controls, performance measures and attention to details. INITIATIVE: Estimate revenues in an aggressively conservative manner. INITIATIVE: Identify future issues and forecast operational and fiscal impacts. INITIATIVE: Utilize fund balance for mid-year funding flexibility, bond rating, stability, interest income, help manage cash flow, provide flexibility in debt management and contribute to overall healthy financial position. INITIATIVE: Maximize our financial position through prudent debt, cash and investment management. INITIATIVE: Include revenue billing and collection processes that are accurate and timely. INITIATIVE: Protect assets through proactive risk management system. INITIATIVE: Comply with all applicable federal and state laws, as well as grant and contract commitments.


FOCUS AREA IV: MUNICIPAL SERVICES – PROVIDING EXCELLENCE IN SERVICE TO THE CITIZENS GOAL: ACHIEVE A HIGH LEVEL OF SERVICE TO THE CITIZENS IN A PROMPT, RELIABLE, RESPONSIVE, AND COST-EFFECTIVE MANNER INITIATIVE: Through citizen engagement identify public services desired by the public and the level of service. INITIATIVE: Develop operations plans that clearly define service and service level so we can accurately measure performance. INITIATIVE: Provide all services in a prompt, consistent and dependable manner. INITIATIVE: Provide all services with the citizen in mind; service delivery must be understandable and convenient for citizens to access. INITIATIVE: Operations plans should be cost effective and efficient; plans will continually be benchmarked against like services across the country for quality and cost. INITIATIVE: The Town will meet or exceed all regulatory requirements. INITIATIVE: Offer services that improve the overall environment and quality of life in the community and are not readily available from the private sector.


TOWN OF CARY ORGANIZATION CHART

CITIZENS OF CARY

Mayor and Council 7 Members

Town Boards and Commissions 95 Volunteers

*Finance 25 General Fund 29.125 Utility Fund Employees

*Town Clerk's Office

*Town Manager's Office

*Town Attorney's Office

3.75 Employees

15.625 Employees

3 Employees

Technology Services

Human Resources

23 Employees

12.25 Employees

Police

Fire

211.5 Employees

206 Employees

Parks, Recreation & Cultural Resources

Engineering

Planning

Inspections & Permits

69.25 Employees

62 Employees

27 Employees

45.625 Employees

Public Works/Utilities 306 General Fund 84.25 Utility Fund 10 Fleet Management Fund Employees

* The Town Clerk, Town Manager, and Town Attorney are appointed by Town Council. The function of Treasurer is a responsibility assigned by Town Council to the Finance Director. While the function of Treasurer is an appointment, the position of Finance Director is not. NOTE: Employee counts include permanent employees only, expressed as full time equivalents (FTEs). All employees are included in the general fund unless otherwise noted. The total number of approved budgeted regular employee positions for FY 2011 excluding Town Council, is 1,133.375 . This total does not include the 7 non-budgeted overhire positions (3 in Fire and 4 in Police).


MEMBERS OF CARY TOWN COUNCIL

Harold Weinbrecht 105 Windspring Court Mayor Jennifer Robinson 106 Chertsey Court District A

Don Frantz 706 East Cornwall Road District B

Jack Smith 104 Cricket Lane District C

Gale Adcock 300 Legault Drive District D

Julie Robison 112 Brant Point Place At-Large Mayor Pro Tem

Ervin Portman 101 Fern Bluff Way At-Large

TOWN BOARDS AND COMMISSIONS

Citizens Issue Review Commission Pearl McAdaragh, Chair

Information Services Advisory Board Helen Hutchings, Chair

Economic Development Commission Nellie Shipley, Chair

Parks, Recreation and Cultural Resources Advisory Board Dennis Hoadley, Chair

Environmental Advisory Board Oliver Pau, Chair

Planning and Zoning Board Kelly Commiskey, Chair

Public Art Advisory Board Carol Aupperle, Chair Sister Cities Commission Jennifer Jones, Chair Town Center Review Commission Julia Rudy, Chair Zoning Board of Adjustment Charles McDarris, Chair

APPOINTED AND ADMINISTRATIVE POSITIONS

______________________________________________________________________ Benjamin Shivar Town Manager *

Michael Bajorek Assistant Town Manager

Christine Simpson Town Attorney *

Sue Rowland Town Clerk *

Karen Mills Finance Director / Treasurer *

Susan Moran Public Information Officer

Scott Fogleman Budget Director

Patricia Bazemore Police Chief

Valiria Willis Human Resources Director

Bill Stice Technology Services Director

Allan Cain Fire Chief

VACANT Parks, Recreation and Cultural Resources Director

Tim Bailey Engineering Director

Jeff Ulma Planning Director

Russ Overton Inspections and Permits Director

Steve Brown Public Works and Utilities Director

Scott Hecht Public Works Director

Jamie Revels Utilities Director

*Appointed By Town Council


RESPONSIBILITIES OF TOWN GOVERNMENT BY DEPARTMENT

LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT The Legislative Department includes the Town Council, the Town Clerk Division, and the Legal Division. 1.

The Town Council is comprised of the Mayor and six Council Members, and is selected by the registered voters of Cary. Council establishes policies and programs for effective delivery of Town services, approves the annual financial plan and sets the property tax rate and all user fees, and provides all ordinances, rules and regulations for the welfare of the Town.

2.

Town Clerk Division is responsible for giving notice of Town Council meetings, preparing the Council agenda, recording Council proceedings, serving as custodian of all permanent Town records, keeping the Town Seal, attesting all Town documents, updating the Town Code, keeping records of appointments and terms of the various Boards and Commissions, administrative support responsibilities for the Council and Boards and Commissions, and handling the sale of lots at Hillcrest Cemetery. The Town Clerk is appointed by and reports directly to the Town Council. The Town Clerk Division also includes one full-time Deputy Town Clerk, one full-time Administrative Secretary II, and one part-time Administrative Secretary II.

3.

Legal Division - The Office of the Town Attorney provides legal advice and representation to the Town, including the Mayor, Council, and other Town officials and employees on a broad range of issues. The Town Attorney represents the Town in litigation filed by or against it, and provides legal opinions to the Town Council. Ordinances are drafted or reviewed by the Legal Division. The Legal Division drafts and reviews as to form most contracts, leases, deeds, franchises, bonds, and other legal documents to which the Town is a party. The Town Attorney is also involved in the selection and management of outside counsel who represent the Town, its officials, and employees on Town-related matters. The Town Attorney is appointed by and reports to the Town Council. The Legal Division also includes one full-time Assistant Town Attorney and one full-time Legal Assistant. The Legal Division only represents the Town of Cary, and its agencies, officials and employees, on matters of public business. The Legal Division cannot provide legal advice or representation to citizens on any matter. Citizens seeking legal advice or representation must consult an attorney in private practice. ADMINISTRATION DEPARTMENT

The Administration Department includes the Town Manager’s Office, the Public Information Office, and the Budget Office. 1.

The Town Manager’s Office includes the Town Manager, Assistant Town Manager, Assistant to the Town Manager, Administrative Assistant, Sustainability Manager, and Downtown Development Manager, and is responsible for implementing the Council’s policy decisions. The Town Manager is appointed by the Town Council and is responsible for all operations and projects, the performance of all Town departments, and responding to citizen requests and concerns.

2.

The Public Information Office develops and executes a comprehensive communication program consistent with the organization’s mission and goals and is designed to increase citizen awareness and involvement in their local government. Responsibilities include overseeing communications planning, the Town’s government access channel (CARY TV), the utility bill insert (BUD), web site content (www.townofcary.org), media relations, advertising, and research. The office also oversees cable television service regulation.


3.

The Budget Office is responsible for the planning, development, execution, and evaluation of the Operating and Capital Improvements Budgets and the Capital Improvements Plan. Other responsibilities include long-term financial planning, preparing material for the Council/Staff Retreat, publishing budget documents, and handling special projects. Special projects include the statewide Performance Measurement Project, internal performance measurement/benchmarking projects, operational analyses, and policy research and recommendations. FINANCE DEPARTMENT

The Finance Department is composed of three divisions: Accounting, Procurement and Risk Services, and Utility Customer Accounting. 1.

The purpose of the Accounting Division is to administer the financial affairs of the Town. This encompasses cash management, debt management, grants management, maintaining accounting and financial records, invoicing all non-utility billed revenues, managing delinquent collections, bi-weekly payroll management, accounts payable, preparing the Comprehensive Annual Financial Report, assessment of internal control systems and performing special projects in financial analysis such as monthly statistical reporting, cash flow projections, etc.

2.

The Procurement & Risk Services Division provides centralized purchasing services for all the departments of Town government. It is located at the Town's Operations Center and is also responsible for the Town's mail, copy and courier services, risk management services including administration of the Town’s property and casualty insurance program, management of surplus property, central warehouse operations, and capital assets inventory management.

3.

The Utility Customer Accounting Division is responsible for reading water meters, providing customer service by assisting customers with daily requests such as turning water meters on and off, billing over 50,000 customers per month for water, sewer, solid waste and other miscellaneous Town services, receiving and posting payments for utility bills, Wake County taxes and other miscellaneous revenues, and managing delinquent accounts by sending notices and disconnecting service as a result of non payment. . This function is accounted for in the Utility Fund. TECHNOLOGY SERVICES DEPARTMENT

The Technology Services Department (TS) provides support for a variety of technology applications. TS provides installation and support for two AS/400 minicomputers, a microcomputer network of workstations and servers, geographic information services, emergency radio system, phone system, paging system, voice mail, electronic mail and the Town’s site on the World Wide Web (www.townofcary.org). In addition, TS provides training for all technologyrelated areas and develops strategic plans to ensure that current technology is provided to Town Council, staff and citizens. HUMAN RESOURCES DEPARTMENT The Human Resources Department ensures that the Town is staffed with capable and motivated employees who can provide the highest level of service to the citizens of Cary. This is accomplished through diligent recruitment and selection efforts, performance-based compensation and competitive benefits, effective employee relations, innovative and cutting-edge training and development programs, and aggressive safety initiatives. POLICE DEPARTMENT The mission of the Police Department is to protect life and property through community partnerships and the provision of the highest level of quality professional services. The police department exists to ensure the safety and well being of the community, its citizens, and visitors. The department accomplishes its mission by focusing on education, prevention, investigation, and enforcement. Major components of the department include Field Operations, Investigations, Support Services, and Professional Standards. The department also provides animal control, school resource, and emergency communications service for the town and its citizens. The police department’s Geographical Policing philosophy is enhanced by innovative methods, processes, and personnel dedicated to making Cary a safe place to live and work. The Cary Police Department has been internationally accredited since 1992 and has been deemed a Flagship Agency by the Commission on Accreditation for Law Enforcement Agencies (CALEA). The Cary Police Department and its personnel contribute greatly to Cary’s high quality of life.


FIRE DEPARTMENT The primary mission of the Fire Department is to protect and enhance the high quality of life for the citizens and visitors of the Town of Cary from the adverse effects of natural and man-made emergencies. Our goal is to provide a model customer-oriented, fire protection program through an innovative, proactive, and cost effective approach to emergency response, fire code application, and public fire education. ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT The Engineering Department provides or coordinates design, project management and construction administration services for a majority of the Town’s capital improvements projects, including streets, sidewalks, traffic signals, water distribution system projects, sanitary sewer collection system projects, treatment plants, parking lots, buildings and parks. Engineering also conducts studies to address community issues related to public infrastructure problems such as flooding, sight distance, traffic signal studies, and roadway safety, as well as managing the new fiber optic traffic system. Engineering is also involved in development activities including planning for water, sanitary sewer, transportation, and stormwater systems. PLANNING DEPARTMENT The Planning Department handles a wide variety of long-range and day-to-day land use planning and development functions. Examples of long-range policy activities include preparation and maintenance of the comprehensive plan related to land use, transportation, affordable housing, and historic preservation issues; managing affordable housing and transit programs; maintaining statistics and maps; and coordinating with other departments, agencies, and units of government. Current planning responsibilities include processing of rezoning and planned development district (PDD) applications; coordination of variance, appeal, and interpretation cases; reviewing subdivision plans and site plans for conformance with Town regulations; and maintaining, administering, and enforcing the zoning code. The Planning department also provides staff support to the Board of Adjustment, the Planning and Zoning Board, the Town Center Review Commission, and special citizen committees. INSPECTIONS AND PERMITS DEPARTMENT The Inspections and Permits Department is responsible for the enforcement of state and local laws related to the construction of buildings and other structures; the installation of such facilities as plumbing systems, electrical systems, heating systems, refrigeration systems, and air conditioning systems; the maintenance of buildings and other structures in a safe, sanitary, and healthy condition; street addressing, and other related matters specified by the Town Council. Duties of the department include processing applications for permits, collecting development related fees, conducting inspections, issuing certificates of occupancy, issuing orders to correct violations, and any other actions required to adequately enforce state and local laws. PARKS, RECREATION AND CULTURAL RESOURCES DEPARTMENT The Parks, Recreation and Cultural Resources Department (PRCR) consists of four divisions. The primary mission of the department is to serve, educate and enhance the quality of life for Cary citizens. 1.

The Administration Division is responsible for the acquisition of land and the design and development of a system of parks, greenways, recreation facilities, and open space areas. In addition, the division is responsible for public information and marketing, national accreditation, customer service and staff training, grant writing, volunteer development and recognition, coordination of citizen boards and committees, program evaluation and analysis, and other support functions.

2.

The Recreation Programs Division provides a wide range of recreational programs for adults, children, and senior adults including dance, exercise, adventure, trips, confidence building, social interaction, camps, as well as programs in ecology, environmental stewardship, preservation, and nature appreciation for adults and youth. In addition, the division provides Town citizens with the opportunity to rent facilities for group functions, such as picnics, meetings, and other social occasions. Programs and rentals are offered at Bond Park, Hemlock Bluffs Nature Preserve, Herb Young Community Center, Bond Park Community Center, Middle Creek Community Center, Cary Senior Center and other various parks throughout the Town. This division also supervises the management of Sk8-Cary and the Cary Dog Park.


3.

The Cultural Arts and Resources Division offers a wide-ranging schedule of classes in dance, visual arts, music, theatre, history, architecture, film and videography and international cuisine to enrich the lives of Town citizens. Division staff also provide communication, coordination, and support for Town cultural groups. In addition, special events such as Lazy Daze and Spring Daze, the Holiday Tree Lighting, Fourth of July Celebration, and events at the Sertoma Amphitheatre are managed by this division to provide an opportunity for Town citizens to come together as a community to experience artistic excellence. Applause! Cary Youth Theatre provides opportunities for area youth to participate in two theatrical productions each year. The Town public art program is administered through the division as well as coordination of Town exhibitions. The division also has responsibilities in administering the Town’s Public Art Master Plan. The division oversees the operation of the Page-Walker Arts and History Center and the Jordan Hall Arts Center, and provides general oversight for SMG, the facilities management company that administers the Koka Booth Amphitheatre at Regency Park.

4.

The Athletics Division is responsible for planning, implementing and supervising diverse youth and adult programs and special events. Programs and camps are offered in basketball, softball, baseball, volleyball, tennis, soccer, cross country and golf. The division is also host to various special events such as the Cary Road Race as well as local, state and national level soccer, tennis, baseball and softball tournaments. The Town manages several signature parks including the Cary Tennis Park (a 30-court full service tennis facility providing instruction, camps, clinics, tournaments and league play), WakeMed Soccer Park (a 150 acre facility which includes a nationally recognized cross country course, 7 multi-purpose soccer fields and a 7,000 seat stadium home to the Carolina Railhawks, a United States Soccer League team). The USA Baseball National Training Complex at Thomas Brook includes 4 full size baseball fields including a stadium field to complement the current 4 field softball/baseball complex at the park. PUBLIC WORKS AND UTILITIES DEPARTMENT

The Public Works and Utilities Department is divided into two major components that are funded through the General and Utility funds. The General Fund portion of the Public Works and Utilities Department is composed of six divisions, and the Utility Fund portion is composed of 7 divisions. The responsibilities within each fund are listed below. General Fund - Public Works The Administration Division coordinates water resource management, long range utility infrastructure needs, budget preparation, expenditure system control, operations analysis, data collection and analysis, parts and supplies procurement, report and study preparation, record-keeping, and personnel activities. An additional key function is providing telephone customer service information for all departmental functions that directly impact Cary citizens. This includes preparing work orders for customer needs that will be executed by operational staff. The Facilities Management Division is tasked with the planning and implementation of a comprehensive maintenance and repair program for all Town buildings, landscapes, parks, trails, rights-of-way, and cemetery. Other responsibilities include; the Town’s leaf collection program, street sweeping program, code enforcement pertaining to overgrown properties, roadway and sidewalk obstructions, hazard trees and related safety issues. The Division also provides emergency response during weather events and logistical support for all Town events. The Operations Division is responsible for providing utility, street maintenance, and traffic operation services for citizens, businesses and visitors to Cary. These services include maintenance and repair of the water and reclaimed water distribution systems, sanitary sewer systems, storm water conveyance systems, streets, sidewalks, curb and gutter, traffic signals, traffic signs and traffic markings, water meter services, and utility line locates. Other division responsibilities include inclement weather response operations such as snow and ice control, storm recovery and debris removal, and chipping services. In addition, the division provides program support to other divisions and departments. The Operations Division participates in engineering studies, provides direct support to facility maintenance teams, park and greenway trail repairs and other recreational facilities as needed and traffic sign/signal services and support for special events. The division maintains around-the-clock response capabilities through after hours/weekend response teams in four key areas - water, sewer, traffic signals, and construction.


The Solid Waste Management and Recycling Division provides curbside household garbage collection services on a weekly basis to households and small businesses. The division is also responsible for the collection of recyclables, yard waste, used large appliances and dead animals/ code enforcement for debris and health and safety related issues, emptying downtown litter containers; the processing and disposal of debris resulting from inclement weather; and, the operation of the Dixon Avenue Citizen Convenience Center/Transfer Station. In addition, the division coordinates a solid waste education program to increase citizen understanding of waste reduction/diversion opportunities, and the development of long range disposal operations. The Fleet Management Division is responsible for the repair and maintenance of all Town vehicles and equipment. Additionally, the division coordinates planned preventive maintenance of all vehicles, provides vehicle and equipment replacement planning for Town departments, and provides fuel for Town vehicles and equipment. Also, the division provides operation and maintenance cost data for all departments utilizing vehicle and equipment assets. The division is accounted for in a separate internal service fund and services, parts, and fuel are charged back to user departments. Utility Fund - Utilities The Water Conservation Division is responsible for implementing, monitoring, and evaluating water conservation programs focused on peak and per capita reduction through education, financial incentives and regulation. Staff also provides educational outreach for solid waste and recycling efforts. The Pretreatment Division is responsible for implementing the Town’s industrial pretreatment program, user fee program for industrial and commercial users of the sewer system, and the Fats, Oils, and Grease (FOG) program that help prevent blockages and overflows in the sanitary collection system. The Pretreatment Division is the primary contact for the regulatory agencies that assess the Town’s overall regulation and control of what is discharged into the sanitary sewer collection system.. The Utility Systems Management Division provides maintenance for the water and wastewater pumping facilities, and is also responsible for elevated water storage, odor control, instrumentation assistance, industrial wastewater flow data, wate system flow data, and inflow/infiltration functions. This division participates in engineering studies and related system review functions. The North and South Cary Water Reclamation Facilities’ mission is to treat wastewater generated by Cary’s utility customers. Ongoing efforts include the provision of preventive and corrective maintenance for the main plant sites, a biosolids processing facility, a regional pump station, a biosolids gravity belt thickener system and related facilities and grounds.. Both facilities also focus on biosolids removal and disposal. The Cary/Apex Water Treatment Plant’s mission is to provide adequate clean water to the Towns of Apex and Cary and those entities the Town contracts with to provide service. The Town of Apex pays a portion of the operating costs of the water plant (23% of capital costs and actual usage of other costs) as 23% owner of the facility. The plant also manages the disposal of water treatment residuals and develops and manages alternative residual disposal methods. The plant capacity is 40 million gallons per day. The Western Wake Water Reclamation Facility’s mission is to treat wastewater generated by Cary, Morrisville, Apex, and Holly Springs utility customers. The plant is expected to be operational in 2013.


TOWN OF CARY GOVERNMENTAL FUNCTIONS EXPRESSED AS CENTS OF A TAX DOLLAR

Function General Government Parks, Recreation and Cultural Resources Public Safety Solid Waste/Recycling Public Works Debt Total Cents

Cents of Tax Dollar 0.260 0.068 0.363 0.010 0.169 0.130 1.000

General Fund Did you know that for every tax dollar paid...?

Debt General Government

0.130

0.260 0.169 Public Works

0.068 Parks, Recreation & Cultural Resources

0.010 Solid Waste/Recycling

0.363 Public Safety

26 cents go to administrative and internal functions such as human resources, purchasing, technology services, engineering, planning, and inspections. 7 cents help fund parks, recreation, cultural, and athletic programs. 36 cents provide fire and police protection. 1 cent helps provide solid waste and recycling services. 17 cents are used for public works activities. 13 cents help retire debt for streets, parks, government facilities, and other miscellaneous costs/ functions.

NOTE: These numbers show cents of Cary's tax revenue dollar after factoring out revenue attributable to each function.


BUDGET MESSAGE FOR FISCAL YEAR 2011 Mayor Weinbrecht and Members of Council: Submitted herein, in accordance with the Local Government Budget and Fiscal Control Act, is the recommended annual budget for fiscal year 2011 for the Town of Cary. The budget is balanced without a tax increase and identifies methods of raising and spending funds for specific programs during the coming fiscal year. The budget is a plan that presents financial information summarized by major category of expense for each departmental budget and outlines the operations of the Town of Cary government and its component operating and capital programs. The approach of the FY 2011 Recommended Budget is to continue with a conservative budget structure and philosophy using basic business principals to guide decisions now and in the future for the provision of our core municipal services. Our organization is guided by the statement of values and mission statement to help improve and clarify how we can most efficiently and effectively work toward accomplishing our comprehensive goals and initiatives. We have worked through our budget development process with a focus on continuing to provide high quality services while working within limits of our existing revenue sources which have continued to be impacted by the recession. The pace of the economic recovery will largely determine our flexibility to adjust the service levels we provide every day given our general fund related capital debt financing and operating margin fund balance levels. It is extremely important that we do everything we can to maintain our strong financial position which was confirmed most recently in April, 2010 with Fitch Ratings’ confirmation of a ‘AAA’ rating for the Town’s combined system revenue bonds issued in 2001, 2004 and 2007. Highlights of the recommended budget are included in the table below: Description Tax Rate Solid Waste Fee Utility Rates

Changes? No No Yes

New Debt Supported by the General Fund (taxes)

No

Elimination of Existing Vacant Positions

- 31.25

New Positions

+ 12

Notes The tax rate is recommended to remain 33 cents per $100 of assessed value. The solid waste and recycling fee is recommended to remain $14 per month. The Town’s average residential customer uses about 4,918 gallons per month, and for them the increase is expected to be $4.03 per month, which is also about 7.4%. For a residential customer averaging 7,000 gallons per month, the increase is expected to be $5.60 per month, still about 7.4%. These rate increases are needed to pay increasing utility costs for capital infrastructure including the state mandated Western Wake Regional Wastewater Reclamation Facility. For the second straight year, no new general fund supported debt is being recommended. Limiting new general capital project appropriations to only those available with cash forces us to make difficult choices. As the economy continues to slowly recover, revenue growth will help create capacity for the possibility of additional debt service in the future. Since the beginning of FY 2008, vacancies in certain development related positions have been held open as signs of the slowing economy began to hit Cary. Since that time, we have held other positions vacant and remaining personnel have had to manage priorities to absorb the most critical duties. By officially eliminating the authority and funding for 31.25 vacant positions, approximately $1.5 million in budgetary savings will be realized. 12 new positions are being recommended: 4 to support the Cary Community Arts Center planned to open late in the fiscal year, 3 police to start a Crime Free Neighborhood program, 1 school resource police officer for the new Mills Park Middle School, 1 to support the 911 center computer applications, 1 engineer to focus on new stormwater quality regulations, and 1 tennis program coordinator, and 1 new Downtown Development Manager to help focus on bringing private redevelopment interests to fruition.


Despite the impacts of the recession on the Town’s finances and operations that are discussed in detail later, the recommended budget for FY 2011 continues to provide a high quality level of service for our citizens while protecting and maintaining the core infrastructure that is so vital to sustaining our quality of life. The general fund is where we account and pay for the majority of non-utility related services. Identified in the chart below is a breakdown of where our $116 million general fund budget is broken down to carry out service provision in fiscal year 2011. This year’s overall general fund operating budget represents a net increase of about $3.8 million or 3.4%. Town of Cary General Fund Expenses and Transfers of $116M Dollars in Millions

Public Works, $17.6 , 14.9%

Solid Waste & Recycling, $7.0 , Debt Service, $13.7 , 11.6% 6.0%

Transit, $1.6 , 1.4% Legislative, $2.3 , 1.9%

PRCR, $11.9 , 10.1%

Administration, $1.9 , 1.6% Finance, $3.6 , 3.0%

Fire, $17.9 , 15.1%

Technology Services, $6.8 , 5.8% Human Resources, $2.6 , 2.2%

Police, $20.2 , 17.1% Inspections & Permits, $3.9 , 3.3%

Planning, $2.7 , 2.3%

Engineering, $4.2 , 3.5%

In addition to the public safety and other operational duties covered by the general fund, the FY 2011 recommended budget provides funding for several very important capital preservation oriented projects as well as final funding needed for the state mandated Western Wake Regional Wastewater Management Facility. Some highlights of the capital plan for the coming year are shown in the table below. Project Title Fire Station #8

Fire Truck Replacements

Park and Greenway Renovation

Brief Description A station at the Mills Park site on Green Level Church Road is necessary to ensure that response time goals continue to be met in the western portion of Town. The station is expected to start construction in FY 2011 and be operational in FY 2012. Funding to date is $4.1M with $833K needed this year to support related infrastructure requirements. Fully functioning and dependable equipment is critical to ensure prompt and reliable fire and rescue protection service delivery for citizens. This year an aerial ladder truck ($1.12M) and a rescue truck ($840K) are both nearing the end of their anticipated useful life and in need of replacement. Annie Jones Greenway, with portions constructed in 1979, is in need of reconstruction ($495K). MacDonald Woods Park has some specific drainage areas that need to be improved to allow full utilization of areas within the park ($185K).

Funding $833K

$1.96 million

$680K


Project Title Western Wake Regional Wastewater Management Facility

Brief Description This project is necessary for the Town of Cary to meet a mandate issued by the State of North Carolina to return water to the Cape Fear River Basin and address wastewater treatment capacity needs of the Town and its municipal partners (the towns of Apex, Holly Springs and Morrisville). All appropriations, including the $128M needed in FY 2011, total $330.4M. The partner shares generally break down as follows: Cary $198M or 60%, Morrisville $27M or 8%, Apex $89M or 27% and Holly Springs $17M or 5%.

Funding $127.7 million

Water Treatment Plant Expansion Design

This funding supports design efforts for the Phase III expansion of the Cary/Apex water treatment plant from 40 million gallons per day (MGD) to 56 MGD. Approximately $46M has been identified in the FY 2012 capital improvements plan for construction of this facility.

$8.1 million

MAJOR ISSUES IMPACTING THE FY 2011 BUDGET Recession and the Impact on Our Revenue Structure The recession began to impact Town of Cary sales tax revenues and building permits in early fiscal year 2009 (fall of calendar 2008). These two major revenue categories combined are expected to be about $6.2 million or 20% lower in FY 2011 than they were in FY 2008, just three years ago. The graph below compares the major revenue changes since FY 2008 compared to those projected as part of the FY 2011 recommended budget. FY 2008 has been chosen for comparison in this table because it is the last full fiscal year before the Town began seeing impacts in revenue growth due to the recession. Town of Cary General Fund Revenue Change Summary Showing Changes from Actual FY 2008 to Budget FY2011 In Whole Dollars

$130,000,000 Black bars = revenue growth since FY 2008

$1,045,448

$348,469

Red bars = revenue decline since FY 2008

$2,876,664

$1,582,551 $125,000,000

$3,298,033

$9,324,907

$122,500,000

$3,918,397

$120,000,000 $117,500,000 $115,000,000

$116,620,430 $114,412,149

$112,500,000

FY2011 Budgeted Revenues

Investment Earnings

Building Permits & Fees

Sales Tax

Miscellaneous

Utility Franchise Tax

Solid Waste & Recycling

Ad Valorem Tax

$110,000,000

FY2008 Actual Revenues

Revenue Impact

$127,500,000


From FY 2008 to FY 2011, general fund revenues are expected to increase by $2.2 million or 1.9%. This small growth rate over three years averages out to about $736K or 0.6% growth per year (during the recession). This is dramatically lower than the average growth amount of $9M or 10% per year for fiscal years 2006 through 2008 (before the recession).

Tax Base Growth Taxable property in the Town of Cary is comprised of real property (land and buildings), personal property (campers, boats, etc.), public service property (public utilities), and vehicles. In FY 2011, the taxable property is expected to equal $20.6 billion which reflects tax base growth of $167.3 million or about 0.8% over estimated FY 2010 levels. This total includes $299 million for property located within Cary’s corporate limits of Chatham County. Chatham County revalues its property every four years instead of every eight years like Wake County. While Wake County revalued its property effective in FY 2009, Chatham County revalued its property effective in FY 2010. The goal of each property revaluation process is to adjust the taxable values of real property so that they approximate market value. This four or eight year process is not necessary for the other types of taxable property as those are automatically revalued every year according to predetermined depreciation schedules. Since a municipality can only have one tax rate and 98.5% of Cary’s tax base is in Wake County, the tax rate is adjusted due to revaluation consistent with the Wake County schedule of every 8 years. The tax rate was most recently adjusted effective in FY 2009 from 42 cents down to 33 cents per $100 of taxable value, and the tax rate is recommended not to change in FY 2011, remaining at 33 cents for the third straight year. During the early 2000s, the impacts of the poor economy, coupled with the Town’s successful growth control measures, combined to slow the rate of revenue growth compared to that of the mid to late 1990s. Since the mid 1990s, the Town’s tax base has generally been comprised of about 70% residential and 30% nonresidential. While commercial and office developments have continued locating in Cary, residential tax base has been added a little more steadily. Today, approximately 74% of the Town’s tax base is residential, so fluctuations in development patterns that impact the population growth rate typically have a significant effect on the growth rate of ad valorem tax base in Cary. This is the largest single revenue source for the Town and, at $67 million, comprises 57% of all general fund revenues. The Town of Cary gradually bounced back from its recent low in annual tax base growth of 1.53% in FY 2005 to an estimated growth in tax base of 7% in FY 2009 before dropping again due to the early impacts of the recession to an expected growth level of only 3.7% for FY 2010. Due to the current recession’s impact on the development community and the resulting drop in building permits being requested currently, the level of tax base growth for FY 2011 is projected to be only 0.8%. A historical perspective of the Town’s assessed value (tax base) growth since FY 1995 is provided in the graph below. The extremely high growth rate in 2001 reflects a property revaluation conducted by Wake County that year. In FY 2001, the tax rate was reduced from 54 cents to 43 cents to maintain a revenue neutral tax rate. The tax rate was reduced by an additional penny to 42 cents in FY 2002. In FY 2009 another Wake County property revaluation took place and the tax rate was again reduced due to the revaluation, this time from 42 cents to 33 cents.


Town of Cary Assessed Value (Tax Base) and Growth Rate $25,000,000,000

41.5%

43.0%

50% 45% 40%

$15,000,000,000

30%

20%

3.7%

Est @ 5.3%

15% 10%

0.8%

6.6%

4.8%

1.5%

3.5%

3.1%

5.1%

8.0%

9.5%

11.1%

12.1%

13.1%

12.4%

$5,000,000,000

6.8%

25% $10,000,000,000

% Change

35%

Est @ 6.6%

Assessed Value

$20,000,000,000

$0

5%

Assessed Value

% Change

FY 2011 Bud.

FY 2010 Est.

*FY 2009

FY 2008

FY 2007

FY 2006

FY 2005

FY 2004

FY 2003

FY 2002

*FY 2001

FY 2000

FY 1999

FY 1998

FY 1997

FY 1996

FY 1995

0%

Fiscal Year (*FY2001 and *FY2009 Wake County Property Revaluation)

The assessed value on which tax receipts are calculated is based on what has been built by the prior January 1 meaning that FY 2011 revenues are based on tax values “on the ground” as of January 1, 2010. Since Cary’s tax base is much higher than it was in the mid 1990s, it takes more growth each year to have the same percentage increase. The graph below represents the average monthly number of new single family residential permits issued each year since 1990. The dramatic reduction in the monthly average number of permits being issued for single family development during the recession of the early 2000s as well as the current recession is demonstrated in the graph below. Town of Cary Single Family Permit Average Per Month

250

% Change

63 93 130 168 167 128 125 127 121 88 70 51 39 43 65 121 164 193 109 98

47% 39% 30% -1% -23% -2% 1% -5% -28% -20% -27% -24% 12% 51% 86% 36% 17% -43% -10%

2010 Apr CYTD

101

3%

193

200 168

150 100 50

130 93 63

167

164

125 127 121 128 88 70

121 109

101 98

65

51 39

43

1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 Apr CYTD

1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009

Average Per Month

Calendar Year

Average Number of New Permits Per Month

Calendar Year


The Town of Cary is not without declines in single family permit activity in 2009. The graph below of all jurisdictions in Wake County is based on calendar year 2008 compared to 2009 single family permit levels. Commercial activity has similarly seen dramatic declines which are further indications that tax base growth for at least the next couple of years will be sluggish at best. % Change in NewSingle Family Permit Totals for Wake County Comparing Calendar Year 2008 to 2009 (numerical change in parentheses) Angier (4)

-67%

Apex (107)

-56%

-14% Cary (164) Fuquay-Varina (130)

-36%

Garner (25)

-32%

Holly Springs (140)

-42%

-21%

Knightdale (36) Morrisville +30

-42%

12%

Raleigh (708) Rolesville (70)

-74%

Wake County (286)

-56%

-13% Wake Forest (35) -27%

-70%

-50%

Wendell (11) Zebulon (8)

-50%

-90%

The average change across all Wake County jurisdictions from calendar 2008 to 2009 as shown in this chart was a drop of 37% versus the average drop of 48% from 2007 to 2008.

-30%

-10%

10%

Sales Taxes Projected sales tax revenues totaling $21.3 million in FY 2011 make up 18.3% of all general fund revenues. The historical growth rate of this major revenue source was greatly impacted by the economic slowdown of the early 2000s, but the economic recovery of the mid 2000s helped this revenue source recover as evidenced by an average annual growth rate of 11.5% for FY 2003 through FY 2007. With the global and domestic economies slowing under the pressure of the recent recession, the health of Cary’s regional economy has shown signs as well. The recessionary impacts are expected to continue through FY 2010 with slight improvement expected in FY 2011 as the economy begins to slowly recover. Historical revenue levels are depicted in the graph below indicating a total decline across all three sales tax sources of $1.6 million or 6.6% in FY 2009 and another drop of $1.7 million or 7.5% estimated in FY 2010. Moderate growth of $426K or 2% is anticipated in FY 2011 generating approximately $21.3 million, which is still $2.9 million or 12% less than the peak year of FY 2008. If sales tax revenues in FY 2009, FY 2010, and FY 2011 had continued at the average annual growth rate of 11.5% which occurred over the previous four years, sales tax revenues in FY 2011 would be expected to total about $33.5 million, which would be $12 million or 36% higher than the $21.3 million being budgeted for FY 2011. In the FY 2011 budget, one penny on the tax rate is equal to $2M, so the property tax equivalent loss in sales tax revenue with typical growth is equal to 6 cents on the tax rate. The graph below depicts the historical amount of sales tax revenues and includes the one cent (Article 39) which is distributed based on sales delivered in Wake County, the two half cents (Articles 40 and 42) which are distributed state-wide based on the population of each county, and the one half cent (Article 44) which is distributed based on a combination of both approaches mentioned. Article 44 was approved in December 2002 to replace the expiring Inventory Tax Reimbursement and Intangibles Tax Reimbursement revenue sources. Sales taxes are distributed within Wake and Chatham Counties on a per capita basis.


Town of Cary Sales Tax Revenues Actuals Through FY 2009, Estimates for FY 2010 and FY 2011

$12,000,000 One Cent (Art 39)

$10,000,000

Two Half Cents (Art 40 & 42) New in '03 Half Cent (Art 44)

$8,000,000 $6,000,000 $4,000,000 $2,000,000

FY 2011

FY 2010

FY 2009

FY 2008

FY 2007

FY 2006

FY 2005

FY 2004

FY 2003

FY 2002

FY 2001

FY 2000

FY 1999

FY 1998

FY 1997

FY 1996

FY 1995

FY 1994

FY 1993

FY 1992

FY 1991

FY 1990

FY 1989

$0

Fiscal Year

Investment Earnings Existing cash balances on hand due to current receipts, fund balances, and project funding are often invested temporarily to earn the Town income in the form of investment earnings to help augment the funding needed for Town services. While the sagging economy of the early 2000s drove debt service rates lower in the bond market, it also reduced the amount of return available for the Town’s investments. Interest earnings in FY 2001 were $8.7 million across all governmental funds, while net investment earnings in FY 2004 for these same funds were only $1.3 million, which was a drop of $7.4 million or 85%. As these market changes have affected the Town’s income over the past few years, the Town has had to adapt its expense and pay-as-you-go capital planning accordingly. With the economic recovery of the mid 2000s, investment earning levels improved, but as the economy slumped again, total investment earnings for FY 2011 are expected to be about $4.2 million which is $15.7 million or 79% less than those recorded in FY 2008. For the general fund specifically, investment earnings are expected to decrease from $4.7 million in FY 2008 to only $843K in FY 2011. For comparison purposes, each penny on the tax rate in FY 2011 is expected to generate $2 million in revenue, so the Town’s much weaker investment earnings in the general fund are expected to generate less than half of one penny’s worth of tax revenue. This is in stark contrast to general fund investment earning levels in FY 2005 when investment earnings of $5M equaled the value of just over 4 cents on the tax rate at the time.

Debt Service Historical financing decisions and the rate of capital investments have been shaped by a variety of funding philosophies and the health of the economy in general. Beginning in fiscal year 1999, the Town leveraged its debt capacity in the general fund to increase its rate of investment in Town infrastructure including streets and parks. The flexibility to afford additional capital improvements with existing resources has changed dramatically over the past several years. By managing operating cost increases and adjusting programs and their related cost recovery rates, the Town has been able to maximize the level of general fund operating margin (the difference between revenues and operating expenditures that is available to pay debt service). From fiscal year 2002 through 2008, the Town’s operating margin before debt service averaged 22% per year. With the economy driving revenue growth lower, the operating margin before debt service anticipated for FY 2011 is only expected to be 13.7%. Over this same time period, the level of debt service being paid by the general fund has risen from $1.7 million in FY 2002 to $13.7 million in FY 2011.


Heading into development of the FY 2010 budget last year, it was clear that the recession was impacting the Town’s revenue growth and that a variety of course changes had to be made right away regarding the previously planned capital projects that required substantial debt borrowings in the spring of 2010, thus increasing debt service payments in FY 2011. In the fall of 2009, the Council held a series of worksessions focused on reducing the immediate debt burden of the general fund to address this very issue. With 194 active general capital (transportation, fire, parks, general government) related projects, the task required a great deal of staff time and resources to bring Council a comprehensive prioritized strategy to reduce or eliminate debt. Ultimately, Council approved staff’s recommendations resulting in the delay of 19 capital projects including $63.8 million of debt funding sources. Exactly when these projects are determined to move forward within existing revenue sources, will be determined by the pace of the economic recovery. None of the debt funded capital projects delayed by Council are being recommended to resume with the FY 2011 budget. These changes resulted in lowering debt service in the general fund for FY 2011 by $2.6 million, or 19%, compared to what would have been required if the projects had proceeded as planned when the economy was stronger. In addition to the 19 projects delayed, another 39 active capital projects were postponed indefinitely. To allow other projects to continue without adding debt burden, the postponed projects were closed and available cash balances along with capital reserves totaling about $24 million were reallocated to replace previously planned debt. Those projects selected for closure may return for future consideration along with other new capital project priorities. Challenges certainly exist in balancing demands for operating service levels in the near future as the economy slowly recovers. However, a greater challenge will be reconciling community expectations for continued general capital investment without raising the level of operating margin to afford additional debt service. Given the assumption that the current mix of high service levels will continue to be expected by our citizenry, it may not be possible to cut existing operating costs low enough to provide the same services and provide substantial incremental operating margin to afford measureable amounts of additional debt service. Without significant renewed levels of growth in the economy and the Town’s tax base, we will continue to struggle providing significant additional capital investment without commensurate tax increases to pay for the debt service that may be necessary.

Maximizing Existing Resources to Protect the Quality of Life Operating Margin Operating margin is defined as the amount of revenues remaining after paying for operating expenses. Operating margins in the general fund from FY 1992 through FY 2002 averaged nearly $15 million annually. As the graph below illustrates, the rate of debt service growth (in red) and steadily climbing expense growth (in blue) has put increasing pressure on the rate of margin growth (in black). Operating margin after debt service is demonstrated in the graph by the area where the revenues, shown in black, are still visible since they exceed debt service and expenses. The recommended budget reflects an operating margin after debt service of zero, with all anticipated resources being utilized for operating costs and debt service. With conservative budgeting practices such as assuming a variable interest rate of 3.25% for the year, we anticipate to accumulate operating margin through the year which is monitored very closely. For example, in FY 2010, we currently expect operating margin in the general fund to be approximately $4 million versus the adopted FY 2010 budget that reflected operating margin of $252K.


General Fund Operating Margin $125 Revenues Debt Service

$100

$ in Millions

Operating Expenses $75 $50 $25

2011 Bud

2009

2008

2007

2006

2005

2004

2003

2002

2001

2000

2010 Bud

Fiscal Year

1999

1998

1997

1996

1995

1994

1993

1992

1991

1990

1989

1988

1987

$0

Debt Capacity Fiscal Year 2003 marked two significant milestones in Cary’s debt history. At the beginning of FY 2003, the Town appropriated the last of its bond authority for streets and park facilities that was approved by the voters in 1999 ($63 million for streets and $10 million for parks). Realizing that the Town intended to continue improving street capacity and park facilities, the Town held the largest combined municipal bond referendum in North Carolina in 15 years: $130 million for streets and $30 million for park facilities. In 2005, Cary continued its tradition of ensuring infrastructure is in place when needed by beginning to execute plans for a major water reclamation facility necessary for future capacity and to meet a state mandated inter-basin transfer certificate agreement to return water to the Cape Fear River basin. This project is being undertaken regionally and includes as project partners the towns of Morrisville, Apex, and Holly Springs. To help finance the Western Wake Regional Wastewater Management Facility (WWRWMF) in the most affordable manner, Cary held a $110 million general obligation bond referendum which was approved by Cary voters. Included on the same ballot was an additional question for voters regarding $10 million in general obligation bond authority for the purchase of open space which was also approved. The general obligation bond referendum authority being recommended for appropriation in FY 2011 includes the last $5.4 million for the Western Wake Regional Wastewater Management Facility. No other general obligation debt is recommended for appropriation in FY 2011. The current appropriation authority remaining from each of the Town’s general obligation bond referendums after subtracting the authority being allotted to projects in FY 2011 is as follows: • • •

2003 $130 million transportation bond: $46.9 million remaining 2003 $30 million park bond: $7.6 million remaining 2005 $110 million WWRWMF bond: None remaining; the final $5.4 million is being recommended in FY 2011


Debt Affordability With $160 million in approved debt authority for streets and parks, there is an increased focus on long term capital priorities and affordability of the respective debt service payments. The cost of borrowed money remains relatively low compared to historical levels; however, the interest rates charged in bond markets can change rapidly. While lower interest rates are a great incentive to leverage the Town’s remaining debt capacity, being able to repay the related debt service each and every year is a major factor when deciding which projects to undertake and how much to borrow. Debt service related to the 1999 bond authority for streets and parks, costs related to the widening of North Carolina Highway 55, an expansion of Town Hall and the debt issued from the 2003 street and park bonds have combined to increase debt related costs in the general fund to $13.7 million in FY 2011. If all of the projects with debt funding sources being delayed were to move forward, debt service could grow another $6 million. Following the FY 2006 budget development process, Council focused a great deal of attention on all previously funded capital projects including the liquidity of their various funding sources. Several work sessions were held to determine options related to minimizing the impact of pending debt service on the general fund without altering or delaying any projects already approved. The first approach involved using the Town’s cash balances within existing projects that were not spending right away to prevent borrowing funding for debt funded projects that were ready to spend. This approach was used until the time that the variable interest rate market provided an opportunity for the Town to use its borrowing power and AAA credit rating in the spring of 2006. The Town borrowed $47 million with only interest payments due the first two years (fiscal years 2007 and 2008) and principal being due for the first time in FY 2009. Increased investment earnings on the bond proceeds during these two years helped pay the interest costs the first two years, while general fund debt service increased as the related principal payments came due in FY 2009. The economic resurgence from late 2005 to early 2008 materialized in Cary in the form of increased levels of new residential construction, tax base growth, and sales tax growth for fiscal years 2006, 2007, and 2008. However, the recent economic slowdown that began impacting Cary in early FY 2009 and its impacts on Cary’s tax base and sales tax revenues were key factors in Council’s previously mentioned decisions to reallocate cash resources in some projects and to delay others (see “Debt Service” section above).

Fund Balance The Town of Cary’s fast growth during the 1990s helped develop one of the highest levels of general fund fund balance in the state of North Carolina. This major cash reserve created by historically healthy annual operating margins helped facilitate a large number of cash funded projects and mid-year funding flexibility regarding special opportunities and emergencies. The Town Council decided during FY 2003 to reserve six months worth of operating expenditures and debt service for future needs, while designating the remainder for pay-as-you-go capital projects or for special opportunities versus the funding of on-going expenditures. Since FY 2003, the size of a six month reserve has grown by $22 million from $36 million to an expected $58 million with the FY 2011 recommended budget. In the spring of 2008, the Council held a financial planning worksession in which the concept of adjusting the Town’s definition of fund balance reservations and amounts was considered. Rather than total general fund fund balance, the decision was made to adjust the definition of fund balance set aside for emergencies to four months of unreserved fund balance (after the amount reserved by state statute). As it turns out, two months worth of operating expenditures and debt service are currently roughly equal to the amount that is reserved by state statute, so the amount available for capital in either approach is about the same currently. However, the current definition of the amount set aside for emergencies is known to be more consistent with evaluation criteria utilized by bond rating agencies and is expected to leave approximately $14 million available for capital by the end of FY 2011. The graph below shows the distinction between the reserved by state statute (red), the four month Council directed designation (yellow), and the remainder each year (green) since fiscal year 1989.


Changes in General Fund Fund Balance With Four Month's Worth of Operating Expenditures and Debt Service After the Amount Reserved by State Statute

14 39

11 38

34

31

17

17

17

17

2008

2009

2010 Bud

2011 Bud

12 2006

16

11 2005

2007

9 2004

29

9 2003

27

11 2002

25

8 2001

19

35

16

19

28

27

32 24

22

32 25

24 8 2000

1996

13

1995

5

1994

1999

1993

1998

1992

$0

4 12

4 10

1991

$10

1997 4 11

7 9

9

6

6 4

8

5 1990

$20

15

19

$30

19

23

$40

24

32

$50

14

$ in Millions

$60

21

$70

22

$80

Available for Pay-As-You-Go Capital 4 Months of Annual Operating Expenditures & Debt Service Reserved by Council Reserved by State Statute

While fund balance levels are a key consideration when bond rating agencies (Moody’s, Fitch, Standard & Poor’s) evaluate the risks associated with future borrowings of the Town, there are many other factors considered as well. Items considered heavily when awarding Cary’s AAA bond ratings, which were confirmed again for the bond refinancing sale going to market in May, 2010, include evidence of a strong and proactive administration, effective debt management with moderate to low debt levels, a vibrant or diverse economy, and strong finances. As future capital opportunities arise and various financing options are considered, fund balance targets and appropriations should be considered very carefully and only as a onetime funding source. Fund balance is extremely difficult to replenish, especially during tough economic times and periods of slow tax base and population growth like that we expect to experience for at least the next two years due to the current recession.

Options for Creating Additional Operating Margin The conversion to curbside solid waste collection and a fee increase implemented in FY 2006 have helped improve that service’s cost recovery percentage and boost general fund operating margin available for debt service. The solid waste fee had been reduced from $11.50 to $7.67 in FY 2001, which equated to about $1.5 million less in annual revenue until FY 2006 when the fee was raised to $11.75. FY 2008 was the first full fiscal year that all routes had been converted and provided a good foundation to analyze the economies of scale achieved with the new program. In FY 2009 the fee was increased to $14.00 per month and it is recommended that the solid waste fee remain unchanged in FY 2011 at $14 per month. With the conversion to curbside recycling now complete, the cost recovery percentage for solid waste and recycling collection is expected to reach 90% in FY 2011. This represents a dramatic departure from the program’s cost recovery low point of 47% in FY 2004. The cost recovery level associated with the automated curbside solid waste and recycling programs will continue to be monitored for improvement and possible fee adjustments in the future (each $1 of the $14 monthly fee is expected to generate about $482,000 in FY 2011). The largest cause for decreased levels of operating margin over the past decade is the growing amount of debt service that has been absorbed within the general fund with no tax increases. Over this same time period, a one cent decrease was approved in FY 2002 changing the rate from 43 cents to 42 cents. In the FY 2011 budget, each one cent on the tax rate is expected to yield about $2 million in revenue. Since FY 1994, four bond referendums have been approved by the voters authorizing $242 million of general obligation debt for streets and parks with the understanding that the potential tax increase resulting from all of that debt could be


as much as 11 cents on the tax rate once all the debt is issued (all tax rate impacts here have been adjusted for property revaluation impacts in 2000). For comparison purposes only, eleven cents on the tax rate today generates approximately $22 million in revenue. Due to the decisions made by Council last fall to reallocate cash sources from capital projects and to delay others (see “Debt Service” section above), general fund debt service is expected to remain about the same as last year at $13.7 million. To the degree that new debt sales are not required in the future, operating margin will be created as debt is paid down over time. The current rate of paydown generates lower debt service payments in a normal debt amortization year of about $600K when compared to the prior year. Other initiatives to help create and/or reduce the impact on operating margin totaling about $8 million in savings in the FY 2011 budget over the past few years include: • raising the business license fees effective in FY 2007 for the first time since 1990 (generated an additional $650,000 in FY 2008) • increasing the monthly solid waste and recycling fee from $7.67 to $11.75 in FY 2006 (having this fee increase still in place in FY 2011 will generate about $2 million in additional revenue) • increasing the monthly solid waste fee from $11.75 to $14.00 in FY 2009 (having this fee increase still in place in FY 2011 will generate another $1.1 million in additional revenue). With the fee remaining at $14 per month, cost recovery on the program is expected to be 90% • delayed $47 million debt sale for already appropriated street and park projects beyond FY 2006; approved a variable rate financing mechanism delaying principal payments until FY 2009 • leveraging the buying power of Blue Cross and Blue Shield as the Town’s third party administrator for the health and dental self-insurance fund in FY 2006 (created savings versus budgeted funds of $1.3 million in just the first year) • updating the parks and recreation fee system in FY 2006 (expected to generate about $150,000 annually) • continuing the conversion to voice over internet protocol (VOIP) phone system begun in FY 2008; will save at least $171,000 annually upon full and complete implementation in FY 2011, or 17% of the Town’s previously existing $1 million in phone related costs. • Council’s decision in the fall of 2009 to reallocate cash funding sources within some capital projects and delay other debt funded projects reduced debt service payments in FY 2011 by about $2.6 million compared to what it have been had the debt been sold as planned during a stronger economic environment.

The Balance Between Revenue Growth and Expenditure Growth Historically, the North Carolina General Assembly has given local governments a limited range of responsibilities for services and capital facilities and a limited set of revenue sources to meet those responsibilities. Over an extended period of time, local governments need to develop and maintain a focus on community priorities within the limits of their responsibilities. Having this prioritization structure and focus assists local governments in the struggle to balance revenues and expenditures while maintaining a strong and stable financial position. During the decade of the 1990s, the Town of Cary benefited financially from the booming economy and an exceptionally high growth rate in both population and assessed value. Many of the Town’s major revenue sources are largely driven by population such as ad valorem taxes, building permits, solid waste fees, recreation fees, cable television franchise fees and vehicle license fees. Other major revenue sources driven by population and distributed through the state or county on a per capita basis include sales taxes, wine and beer taxes, and Powell Bill funding for local street improvements. Due to growth management efforts and a slowing economy, both the Town’s population and revenue growth rates declined in the early 2000s. One of


the benefits of the high growth levels was large amounts of operating margin (revenues less expenses) that enabled the Town to self-fund many large projects and new priorities. For example, from FY 1998 through FY 2002, the Town was able to fund $130 million, or about 52% of its entire general capital program with cash generated either from operating margin, grants, or capital reserve revenue sources. The revenue reductions discussed have been coupled with significant service level increases in the form of new appropriations to roads, parks, specialized facilities, strong financial support of Wake County school related responsibilities, affordable housing, and the initiation of a transit program. In addition to the initial capital costs to build many of these facilities, some of them require additional staffing and/or contracting expenditures to maintain and program their use. General fund operating margin before debt service has averaged about $20 million per year since FY 2003 and is expected to be $13.7 million in FY 2011. However, over that same time period, debt service has grown from $5 million to $13.7 million. In order to continue supporting the level of services enjoyed by our community today and maintain the excellent financial condition of the Town, we will need some combination of an economic recovery, increased revenues through fees or taxes, or decreased expenditures in the future. Town staff has a history of being very frugal in its application of new resources to accomplish both existing and new tasks by not adding people or new funding until absolutely necessary in order to achieve the Town’s goals. In addition, there is recognition within the organization that most often, people are the most expensive solution to any problem. In response to the dynamics of the past several years, the staff has taken an even harder look at operations to help reduce and control costs. Examples of some of these initiatives are identified below: • •

• • • • • • • • • •

Began conversion to automated curbside solid waste collection and dual stream recycling in FY 2006 with full conversion in FY 2007 Reduced eight positions in Inspections and Permits (5 inspectors, 3 permit staff) when the number of new permits being issued dropped in 2003 – added three inspectors and one permit staff position back in FY 2007 and increased another three in FY 2008 given the resurgence in the number of new permits and resulting inspections – still below the related staffing levels in 2003 Discontinued residential plan review program Did not fill Recycling Coordinator vacant position (reassigned majority of duties and increased a 30 hour position to 40 hours to handle the remaining workload) Began contracting janitorial services, landscaping, right of way and town facility mowing Reduced the minimum staffing on aerial ladder units in the Fire Department from 4 to 3 Changed approach to rising health and dental insurance costs by encouraging more consumerism and development of a fitness promotion and health awareness program Initiated consultant studies on operations and staffing efficiencies at all utility plants and fleet operations Reallocated four sworn officer positions from elementary school resource officer positions to higher priority objectives (two to new ninth grade centers, one to patrol and one to investigations) Adjusted classification and pay study approach so as not to have associated automatic increases with grade changes Required a 10% reduction across the board in training and travel expenses for FY 2006 after holding amounts flat for the previous two years Required a 3% reduction across the board in non utility operating and maintenance expenses for FY 2006


In addition to these activities, the current economic recession has required some additional measures to help the Town brace for anticipated drops in economy driven revenues. • • • •

Late in the FY 2009 budget development process, Council directed that a reduction to the general fund of $3.5 million be incorporated to hedge against the signs that the economy was beginning to slow As the economy began to decline in the fall of 2008, contracted services of $1.6 million and training and travel expenditures of $226,000 were identified for delay through a prioritization process Several of the new positions approved as part of the FY 2009 budget were delayed until later in the fiscal year and some of them, in addition to selected vacancies that occurred during the year, were held open. Council held worksessions in the fall of 2009 focused on reducing general fund debt service. Through this reprioritization effort, 194 active general capital (transportation, fire, parks, general government) were studied, the task required a great deal of staff time and resources to bring Council a comprehensive prioritized strategy to reduce or eliminate debt. Ultimately, Council approved staff’s recommendations resulting in the delay of 19 general capital projects including $63.8 million of debt funding sources. Exactly when these projects are determined to move forward within existing revenue sources, will be determined by the pace of the economic recovery. None of the capital projects delayed by Council are being recommended to resume with the FY 2011 budget. These changes resulted in lowering debt service in the general fund for FY 2011 by $2.6 million, or 19%, compared to what would have been required if the projects had proceeded as planned when the economy was stronger. Positions that were vacant and held open in FY 2009 were available for reconsideration through our budget development process. As a result, only one of those positions has been recommended to be filled. The net result in the FY 2011 budget is that 31.25 positions are being recommended for elimination from the staffing document, saving approximately $1.5 million town-wide, with $1.3 million of that being realized in the general fund.

GENERAL FINANCIAL CONDITION OF THE TOWN FY 2011 budget recommendations have been made relative to the current overall financial condition of the Town and to meet the goals set by Council for the future of the Town. The Town’s financial condition continues to be above average, providing adequate liquidity even in a struggling economy. All three major national bond rating agencies have awarded the Town of Cary their highest possible rankings for both general and utility debt, a move that reaffirms Cary’s financial strength. These AAA ratings allow the Town to save tax dollars when borrowing by gaining lower interest rates on bond issuances. In fact, all three rating agencies confirmed AAA bond ratings for the recent bond refinancing that go to market in May, 2010. The Town has historically maintained a strong cash position driven predominantly by growth in population and property tax base during the 1990s, allowing the Town to avoid property tax rate increases since Fiscal Year 1990. Since then, any adjustments to the tax rate have been for revaluations, except in FY 2002, when the tax rate was dropped by one cent from 43 to 42 cents per $100 of property valuation. While overall revenue growth has continued, a slowdown in the growth rate has been experienced compared with that of the 1990s, with a slight resurgence from a recent low in tax base growth of 1.5% in FY 2005 to a projected 7% for FY 2009 back down to about 3.7% anticipated in FY 2010 and 0.8% in FY 2011. Past strong population and commercial development resulted in the need for a sizable and aggressive capital improvements program for both general and utility needs. Due to these growing infrastructure needs and a comparatively slower growth rate, the Town can no longer depend on its financial reserves to the extent it has in the past. Alternative financing options may be needed to enhance funding flexibility and continue to ensure cost effectiveness. While the Town has traditionally funded major capital needs with cash, plans during the early 2000s to leverage the Town’s borrowing power by increasing the use of debt financing are evident with the resulting increases in debt service. Financial reserves over and above Council’s four month goal for fund balance have been leveraged, but the ability to fund significant capital requirements in the future will be minimal. These changes will affect future operating budgets when considering additional debt service.


Acquiring additional debt without existing margin will require some combination of tax increases, additional revenue sources, and/or expenditure reductions to create the amount of margin necessary to service the debt load pending in the next few years (see “Debt Affordability” section above). The Town’s strong financial reserves have provided significant flexibility in the past allowing the Town to move quickly to take advantage of economic opportunities and/or begin new projects in the middle of the year. Plans for the Town’s additional capital investment in tax supported debt will continue to consider maintaining flexibility for periods of both economic growth and downturns such as those currently being experienced.

REVIEW OF REVENUES General Fund Most of Cary’s general fund revenue sources are dependent on Cary’s existing population, and growth from year to year is heavily dependent on the number of new residents (permit fees, assessed value, sales taxes, etc.). Cary's population is expected to reach about 140,857 people as of July 1, 2010, which reflects a growth rate of about 3.6%, significantly lower than the double-digit growth experienced during much of the 1990s (11.5% average annual growth rate from 1990 to 2000). While a slowing economy and growth management practices of the early 2000s combined to encourage a slower growth rate, the economic resurgence that began in 2005 resulted in a slight increase in the growth rate. Council’s target is to have a 3% to 4% rolling five year average population growth, and that reflected in the historical graph below is 4.9 % from July 1 of FY 2007 through projected population as of July 1 of FY 2011. With the significant decline in the number of new single family permits experienced over the past couple of years and the slow recovery from the recession, it is extremely likely that population growth rate over at least the next couple of years will be significantly lower.

4.0%

135,955

130,716 6.6%

4.3%

122,643 5.9%

115,854

111,039 2.7%

108,152 1.3%

106,715 3.3%

99,798 4.0% 103,260 3.5%

88,354 1.8%

86,783 4.9%

82,700 7.7%

13.1%

69,500

61,439 7.4%

57,187 9.1%

52,403 8.9%

3.7%

48,130 8.7%

20,000

44,276

40,000

42,681 4.6%

60,000

40,810 3.6%

80,000 37,455 5.0% 39,387 5.2%

Population

100,000

76,800 10.5%

120,000

95,949 8.6%

140,000

140,857 3.6%

Town of Cary Population and % Change 160,000

0 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 00 01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10 11

Estimates as of July 1 of Each Fiscal Year


From a historical perspective, most of the Town of Cary’s population growth has occurred in just the last thirty years having grown from a population of 21,763 in 1980 as seen in the table below reflecting historical decennial data and an estimate for 2010. This chart demonstrates just how much the average population growth rate has declined in the 2000s, especially compared to that of the previous two decades.

Town of Cary Decennial Census Average Increase Per Year Increase % Increase

Year

Population

1940

1,141

1950

1,496

355

31%

3.1%

1960

3,356

1,860

124%

12.4%

1970

7,640

4,284

128%

12.8%

1980

21,763

14,123

185%

18.5%

1990

43,858

22,095

102%

10.2%

2000

94,536

50,678

116%

11.6%

2010 Est.

140,857

46,321

49%

4.9%

Revenue assumptions have been developed according to the effects of the economy and estimated population growth levels as they directly impact many of the Town’s revenues such as ad valorem taxes, permit and inspection fees, solid waste fees, sales taxes, utility franchise tax, wine and beer tax, inventory reimbursement tax, cable TV franchise fees, and recycled goods. The general fund revenues for Fiscal Year 2011 are expected to total $116.6 million which is about the same as estimated revenue totals for Fiscal Year 2010. The chart below shows the level of general fund revenues (blue line) and the resulting rate of change (red line) in each year since FY 1987. It is clear from this data the dramatic impact that a recessionary period has on the Town’s revenues with the only two years of decline being FY 2002 and that seen in FYs 2009 and 2010. Most economists are expecting the economic climate to continue gradually improving. We expect that our revenue picture will continue to improve in the future, but at a slower growth rate than that seen in the 2005 to 2008 time frame.


Town of Cary General Fund Revenue and % Change 19%

$120 $100

15%

15%

20%

18%

15% 15% 15%

15%

13%

12% 10%

11% 9%

12%

$80

10% 9%

8%

10%

7% 5%

$60

4%

4%

5%

3%

$40

0%

0%

$20

-1%

-3%

2011 Bud

2009

2008

2007

2006

2005

2004

2003

2002

2001

2000

1998

1999

Fiscal Year

2010 Est.

% Change

1997

1996

1995

1994

1993

1992

1991

1990

1989

1988

1987

$0 Total Revenue

Annual % Change

Annual Revenue in Millions

$140

-5%

The Town's major source of revenue for FY 2011, the property tax, is based on January 1, 2010 assessments, which are projected to increase 0.8% over the estimate for FY 2010. This growth impacts revenue billings in FY 2011 and is based on new construction on the ground as of January 1, 2010 that is new since January 1, 2009. The Cary Town Council sets the tax rate, currently 33 cents per $100 of assessed value, each year as part of the budget process. The tax rate for the year becomes official when the new budget is adopted annually in June. The tax rate for Fiscal Year 2011 is recommended to remain unchanged at 33 cents per $100 of assessed value. The tax base in FY 2011 is estimated at $20.6 billion, which includes real property (land and buildings), personal property (campers, boats, etc.), public service property (public utilities), and vehicles. This total includes $299 million for property located within Cary’s corporate limits of Chatham County (about 1.5% of Cary’s total). The 33 cent rate is expected to provide $67 million in revenue. One penny on the tax rate is expected to generate approximately $2 million in revenue for the Town in FY 2011. The chart below provides a breakdown of the major revenue categories in the general fund, their amounts, and their respective percentages of the total $116 million in revenues expected in FY 2011. Town of Cary Estimated General Fund Revenues of $116M For FY 2011 with Dollars in Millions Intergovernmental, $6.8, 6%

Sales Taxes, $21.3, 18%

Permits & Fees, $2.7, 2%

Sales & Services, $11.5, 10%

Investment Earnings, $0.8, 1%

Ad Valorem, $67.4, 58%

Privilege Licenses, $1.4, 1% Other, $4.6, 4%


As is the case with most units of local government in North Carolina, the sources of revenue that are directly influenced by the Town of Cary are relatively restricted in terms of number, but are generally fairly stable in comparison to other areas of the country that rely heavily on income tax revenues instead of property taxes. Included below is a breakdown of both Town influenced revenue sources (property tax, solid waste fees, permits and fees, business licenses) and those that are heavily influenced by others (sales taxes, state shared revenues, investment earnings). Town of Cary Estimated General Fund Revenues of $116M For FY 2011 with Dollars in Millions

"Directly Influenced by the Town of Cary" Portion, $83.1, 71%

"Heavily Influenced by Others" Portion, $33.5, 29%

For the Town of Cary, the focus is also on the local issues and the effects of growth on our ability to maintain our revenue streams. Cary was able to get credit for its fast pace of growth during the 1990s by having a special census done in 1998 which increased its official population count relative to other municipalities in the county. The Town of Cary’s share of sales tax revenue is dependent on its population as a proportion of Wake County and Chatham County since sales taxes are distributed within each county on a per capita basis. Cary has a comparatively small population in Chatham County, so the annual sales tax revenues of about $100,000 distributed to Cary based on its Chatham population is not as substantial as the Wake related revenues. Cary’s population growth rate slowed compared to the rest of Wake County in the early 2000s and it received a smaller portion of the total distribution amount which fell to a low of 8.63% in FY 2006. With the population growth of the past few years, the Town of Cary’s share has grown to 9.11%. If Cary’s distribution percentage had remained constant at the 8.63% level of FY 2011, it would be receiving about $1.1 million or about 5.3% less, in FY 2011. Projected sales tax revenues totaling $21.3 million in FY 2011 make up 18% of all general fund revenues. The historical growth rate of this major revenue source was greatly impacted by the economic slowdown of the early 2000s, and after recovering in the mid 2000s, it took another hit with the most recent recession. With the global and domestic economies slowing once again however, the health of Cary’s regional economy has slowed as well. Sales tax revenues have been severely impacted and projections of this major general fund revenue source show that compared to FY 2008 a drop of $2.9 million or 11.9% is expected in FY 2011. If sales tax revenues in FY 2009 through FY 2011 had each continued at the average annual growth rate of 10% which occurred over the previous five years, sales tax revenues in FY 2011 would have been expected to total $32 million which would have been about $10.9 million or 51% higher than the $21.2 million being budgeted.


Utility Fund Utility fund revenues are budgeted at $55.9 million for FY 2011, an increase of $2.3 million or 4.4%, and include Morrisville customer generated revenues following the April 3, 2006 merger of the Morrisville water and sewer system with the Town of Cary system. Per the merger agreement, Morrisville customers will be paying slightly higher rates to fund costs of the merger over the anticipated cost recovery period of 15 years. Total revenue from water retail fees is expected to increase 1.1% compared to FY 2010 estimates, while total sewer retail revenues are expected to increase 7.8%. These increases reflect a blended rate increase of 7.4% or $5.60 per month for a residential customer using an average of 7,000 gallons per month. While 7,000 gallons is often used for comparative data across the years and from one utility to another, Cary’s average residential customer currently consumes an average of 4,918 gallons per year, and they can expect to see an increase of $4.03 or 7.4% per month in FY 2011. Projected capital investment needs related to the state mandated Western Wake Regional Wastewater Management Facility could require additional rate increases of 8–10% per year through FY 2014. Just how much of an increase is required will depend on a number of factors including construction bid levels which have been better than budget amounts recently, the number of new customers added to the system over the next few years, and the variability of weather patterns that affect irrigation needs of customers. In order to collect enough revenue to recover the mostly fixed costs of the utility system, these combined rate increases over the next few years are required to generate sufficient revenue levels to pay all of the related expenditures. It is recommended that Council continue the rate smoothing approach started in FY 2009 to help ease the burden of a comparatively large increase in utility rates that would otherwise be necessary in FY 2014 to accommodate the debt requirements of the WWRWMF. As was initiated in FY 2002, the utility rates generate $1 million annually for open space acquisition. The FY 2011 recommended budget appropriates $576,417 of the FY 2010 $1 million to the open space project for pay-as-you-go funding, while the remaining $423,583 is being transferred to the general fund to pay for debt service on the $10 million open space bond approved by Cary voters in 2005. The current tiered utility rate structure shifts a portion of the financial burden to the high-volume users who require additional capacity to support their peak demand. The rate structure also currently includes a monthly base charge for all users. With the Town’s continued emphasis on water conservation measures, the rates provide a financial incentive for the higher volume users to conserve in accordance with the Water Conservation and Demand Management Plan adopted by Council in April 2000. Other revenue sources in the utility fund include connection fees, pretreatment fees, sewer wholesale service, bulk water sales, and interest income. Fund balance levels are forecasted to increase with approximately $51.3 million anticipated at the end of FY 2011 which is in alignment with Council’s April 2008 target of 100% of annual operating expenditures and debt service. Utility fund balance ensures cash flow needs are met and that sufficient reserves exist to buffer any dramatic weather changes that may occur (i.e. a very rainy season). Available fund balance amounts in the past have been used to fund an $11.2 million transfer for open space acquisition in FY 2002 and another $13.5 million transfer to help offset utility capital costs related Town-initiated annexation areas in FY 2003. Growing debt service needs related to infrastructure investments are continuing to increase revenue requirements in the utility fund. The May 3, 2005 general obligation bond referendum of $110 million was approved by Cary voters to help finance the Town’s share of a new regional wastewater management facility and another $10 million general obligation bond referendum was approved on that date for the acquisition of open space. Including the FY 2011 budget, all of the $110 million wastewater bond and all $10 million of open space bond funding will have been appropriated. As the chart below illustrates, utility fund revenues have been increasing to help afford related debt service and operational cost increases. The rate of debt service growth (in red) and steadily climbing and heavily fixed operating expenses (in blue) have put increasing pressure on the rate of revenue growth (in black). Operating margin is demonstrated in the graph by the area where the revenues, shown in black, are still visible since they exceed debt service and operating expenses. The recommended budget reflects an operating margin of approximately $4.1 million or about 8% after transfers to capital. This contribution is


being generated mostly by continuing the rate smoothing approach and the marginally higher utility rates in Morrisville per the merger agreement, and achieves the fund balance targeted level of 100%.

Utility Fund $60 Revenues

$ in Millions

$50

Debt Service Operating Expenses

$40 $30 $20 $10

2011 Budget

2010 Budget

Fiscal Year

2009

2008

2007

2006

2005

2004

2003

2002

2001

2000

1999

1998

1997

$0

REVIEW OF EXPENDITURES General Fund and Utility Fund Total Expenditures Summary General fund expenditures and inter-fund transfers total $117.8 million for FY 2011. Included in this amount is $1,050,339 in the form of a transfer funding the annual contribution to the Town’s sanitation and recycling truck replacement program. General capital related debt service is budgeted at $13.7 million in FY 2011, in stark contrast to last year’s forecast of the need for debt service in FY 2011 which showed an increase to $16.4 million. In the fall of 2010, the Town Council directed staff to conduct a thorough review of all active capital projects. At the conclusion of the review, Council decided to delay 19 projects (with future debt needs of $63.8 million) and to postpone another 39 projects while reallocating the cash sources to eliminate the need for debt funding in those projects selected to continue. Compared to previous planned debt sales, these actions to help manage debt service expenditure growth reduced the debt service need in FY 2011 by $2.7 million. Utility fund expenses and transfers total $51.8 million including the $424K transfer to the general fund for open space debt service and the $576K directed to the open space project. This total also includes $12.9 million to cover utility-related debt service requirements.


General Fund Expenditures & Transfers Utility Fund Expenditures & Transfers

51.8

117.8

119.5 49.8

110.1 46.0

51.0

111.3 37.5

34.0

96.1

81.3 31.2

$20

29.5

$40

40.9

77.3

63.7

$60

88.8

$100 $80

113.5

$120

36.5

Dollars in Millions

$140

$0 FY02 FY03 FY04 FY05 FY06 FY07 FY08 FY09 FY10 FY11 Est. Bud.

Major Personnel Impacts Additional staff members have been needed through the years to help keep pace with the service demands of our growing population and the related infrastructure needs and to support additional parks, greenways, community centers, and key special facilities such as the WakeMed Soccer Park, USA Baseball, and the Tennis Park. The graph below shows the percentage change in population growth (in blue) compared to the change in Town full time equivalents (FTEs) or staff position growth (in red) since FY 1993. In the late 1990s staff members were added to help serve the population growth of the 1990s. However, the economic climate and funding flexibility in FY 2010 and FY 2011 has been much more constrained than that of a decade ago when larger operating margins existed and debt service was practically nonexistent.

Population Growth % Compared to

Staff Position Growth %

16%

12% 10% 8% 6% 4% 2% 0% -2% FY 11

FY 10

FY 09

FY 08

FY07

FY 06

FY 05

FY 04

FY 03

FY 02

FY 01

FY 00

FY 99

FY 98

FY 97

FY 96

FY 95

FY 94

-4% FY 93

% Increase of People

14%


Based on the trends we have seen over the last couple of years regarding the economy and the relatively slow pace which we expect recovery to occur, I am recommending elimination from the staffing document of a total of 31.25 positions representing various positions that are currently vacant. Over the past three years, as vacancies have occurred in various areas, we have been holding them open to help manage affordability knowing that the recession’s impacts were going to impact our workload, especially in new development related areas such as some groups within planning, engineering, and inspections and permits. In other areas, as vacancies have occurred, just as we always have, we conduct a thorough review of the position and its responsibilities to ensure it is absolutely necessary. Meanwhile, the needs of the community continue to evolve, and to help meet those needs, twelve new positions are being recommended with the FY 2011 budget. In addition, one of the previously positions held open is recommended to be filled. The following pages of this budget message have been prepared to provide a one page summary of each program area being addressed with each position, or group of positions, as well as what the current year funding needs are. The following list provides a summary of the supporting information for each program area that follows in the next few pages: 1 Downtown Development Manager to focus on bringing private development efforts to fruition 1 School Resource Officer for the new Mills Park Middle School 3 Police officers to help initiate a Crime Free Neighborhood Program (1 Lieutenant and 2 officers) 2 additional police officers will likely be needed as the program is implemented in FY2012 1 Emergency Communications Center Computer Aided Dispatch Specialist 1 Stormwater Quality Engineer 4 Various positions (3 in Cultural Resources, 1 in Facilities Management) late in the year as the new Cary Community Arts Center (Cary Elementary renovation) comes on line late in the year 1 Tennis Program Coordinator As referenced above, the position summaries that follow also include a Facilities Maintenance Worker II for which there is already existing and is recommended to be filled with Mills Park fields coming on line in the summer of 2010.


Downtown Development Manager Town of Cary Fiscal Year 2011 Manager’s Recommended Budget Recommendation: One Downtown Development Manager position and funding of $80,672 to focus on facilitating private redevelopment efforts that will leverage past, current, and future Town efforts to revitalize the Town Center Area.

Appropriation Summary: $80,672 will be needed for this position in FY2011. It will be funded by General Fund revenues and costs will be budgeted within the Town Manager’s Office.

FY2011

Ongoing Annual Estimate Description

Personnel

55,672

Base pay and benefits (Grade 30; exempt; normal hiring annual 101,073 salary range: $59,405 - $98,009)

Operating & Maintenance

25,000

-

-

-

Cost Summary

Capital Outlay Total

80,672

Office reconfiguration with Administration area

101,073

Background: The revitalization of the downtown Cary area has been a goal of various administrations and Councils through the years. The Town has invested, and continues to invest, a great deal of time, funding, and energy toward this ultimate goal that will likely take many years to evolve. Some of the more recent examples of tangible results include Council’s decision to move forward with three major initiatives in the downtown area: the renovation of Cary Elementary into the new Cary Community Arts Center, the continued land acquisition efforts aimed at developing a Town Center Park, and right of way purchases related to the Walker Street Extension. The revitalization effort is complex and will take quite some time to come to fruition. There needs to be a single point of contact now, while the economy is beginning to recover, who can focus on leveraging all the great work done by Town staff, Town Councils, and our community partners to bring private developers and partners together to create win-win projects specifically geared toward downtown revitalization through economic development. This position is recommended for hire mid-way through FY2011 to give staff and Council time to determine together precisely what roles and responsibilities this position will entail, what tools for redevelopment are right for Cary, and what objectives will help us measure success.


School Resource Officer for Mills Park Middle School Opening August, 2010 Town of Cary Fiscal Year 2011 Manager’s Recommended Budget Recommendation: One new “Police Officer I” position and funding of $99,964 to support the assignment of a new school resource officer to the Mills Park Middle School scheduled to open in August, 2010.

Appropriation Summary: $99,964 will be needed for this position in FY2011. It will be funded by General Fund revenues and costs will be budgeted within the Police Department account categories as shown below: Ongoing Annual Estimate Description Base pay and benefits (Grade 21; nonexempt; normal hiring 55,181 annual salary range: $38,292.80 - $59,342.40) Includes initial vehicle setup, gun, taser, camera, and ongoing 5,723 supplies and vehicle maintenance

Cost Summary

FY2011

Personnel

55,181

Operating & Maintenance

21,093

Capital Outlay

23,690

-

Total

99,964

60,904

Vehicle purchase

Background: The School Resource Team, a component of the Cary Police Department Operations Bureau, emphasizes early intervention in the lives of youth who are at risk. The team currently consists of nine uniformed officers assigned to the schools. The goal is to redirect negative behavior before it lands a student in the court system. Team members are active in the Wake County Teen Court program, which diverts minor offenders from the juvenile justice system. Programs are designed to empower youth to take charge of situations that could adversely affect them. School resource officers and juvenile crime detectives work together and are regularly in contact with the same youths. A full-time school resource officer (SRO) is assigned to each of the middle and high schools in Cary. The Town receives $151,352 from Wake County to help support the four high school SRO positions, and the Town funds 100% of the five existing middle school SROs. The officers work with school administrators on security and safety issues and investigate crimes in which students are victims or suspects. Although officers are not assigned to elementary schools, SROs are commonly called on to assist them when issues arise that require police attention. Programs initiated by school resource officers include Conflict Resolution & Peer Mediation, Law Enforcement Club, Students Against Destructive Decisions (S.A.D.D.), Students Against Violence Everywhere (S.A.V.E.), and community service projects. The officers give classroom presentations on law and crime prevention topics. They are also available for conferences with students, parents and faculty.


Emergency Communications CAD Specialist Town of Cary Fiscal Year 2011 Manager’s Recommended Budget

Recommendation: One Emergency Communications Computer Aided Dispatch (CAD) Specialist position and funding of $74,242 to implement the new CAD/Records Management system (RMS) and update and maintain the 911 Network Database and Master Street Addressing Guide (MSAG).

Appropriation Summary: $74,242 will be needed for this position in FY2011. It will be funded by General Fund revenues and costs will be budgeted within the Police Department and work in the Emergency Communications Center.

Cost Summary

FY2011

Personnel

70,503

Operating & Maintenance Capital Outlay Total

3,739

Ongoing Annual Estimate Description Base pay and benefits (Grade 22; nonexempt; normal hiring 70,503 annual salary range: $40,206.40 - $62,316.80) 1,020 Includes furniture, computer, phone, and software

-

-

74,242

71,523

Background: The Emergency Communications CAD Specialist will be instrumental in the implementation of the new CAD/RMS system that is projected to be up and running by January of 2011. CAD assists with the efficient handling of requests for emergency services. The system makes a recommendation of service units to dispatch taking into account the geographic location of the request and the availability of work units. The system recognizes different call types that require the dispatch of special equipment, provides information on hazards that may be present, and provides for special medical information and call history. Numerous statistical reports are provided to assist management in the proper allocation and scheduling of public safety personnel. The CAD Specialist will be responsible for updating and maintaining the 911 Network Database and Master Street Addressing Guide. The setup of the new system will require the creation of complex routing recommendations. This position will be the point person for CAD training, troubleshooting CAD/MSAG problems as they arise, making CAD corrections and updates, and pulling statistics from the system when needed. Currently, Technology Services Staff assist with most of this work, but their other workloads do not always allow them to address updates or projects from public safety agencies within the time frames desired. The CAD Specialist will manage all these tasks and allow public safety departments to more quickly meet internal operational and external interoperability goals. The CAD Specialist will provide better separation of duties as recommended by our accreditation and auditing agencies, as it is typically better Technology Services staff, who is responsible for ensuring the systems are up and running, do not also have data entry capabilities. This position allows the Town to be better prepared as the Next Generation 911 is expected to bring text messaging, video, and data from outside sources such as On Star into the CAD and 911 Systems.


Three New Police Officers for the Initiation of a Crime Free Neighborhood Program

Town of Cary Fiscal Year 2011 Manager’s Recommended Budget Recommendation: One “Lieutenant” and two “Police Officer I” positions to begin developing a crime free neighborhood program to help our community focus more specifically on improving the quality of life in non-owner occupied residential dwellings.

Appropriation Summary: $262,630 will be needed for these positions in FY2011. They will be funded by General Fund revenues and costs will be budgeted within the Police Department within the following categories:

Cost Summary Personnel

FY2011 106,471

Operating & Maintenance

85,089

Capital Outlay

71,070

Total

262,630

Ongoing Annual Estimate Description Base pay and benefits for one LT (start date 9/1/10) and two PO 163,687 I's (start date 1/1/11) Includes initial vehicle setup, gun, taser, camera, and ongoing 18,429 supplies and vehicle maintenance -

Three vehicles purchased.

182,116

Background: The Police Department will develop a program focused on working with property managers and tenants of multi-family housing properties to reduce crime and improve quality of life. A typical crime free neighborhood program is voluntary and addresses three aspects of what it takes to make multi-family housing properties safer for everyone: • The rights and concerns of property management for profitability and liability • Physical attributes of the structures and property environment • The rights and concerns of tenants in acquiring a nice crime-free place to live. The Lieutenant will be responsible for developing a program that works for the Town of Cary, forming relationships with property owners, and supervision of day to day operations. Police officers will be assigned multi-family neighborhoods to help build working relationships by interacting daily with property owners, managers, and tenants. Police staff will receive training and materials from the International Crime Free Association providing them the skills to: • Train property managers in crime prevention theory, lease agreements, and eviction issues • Conduct a thorough security survey of the properties looking for minimum lighting, lock, and landscape standards • Work with property managers to train tenants in community awareness and crime prevention The goal is to add two more officers to the program at the beginning of FY 2012 to address the program as currently envisioned with a total of five additional police staff (one Lieutenant and four officers). Bringing these resources on gradually through FY 2011 and the start of FY 2012 the program can be better tailored to meet Cary’s specific needs.


Facilities Maintenance Worker II Off Hold List for Mills Park Town of Cary Fiscal Year 2011 Manager’s Recommended Budget

Recommendation: One Facility Maintenance Worker II position will be taken off the hold list and funding of $45,447 will be used as Mills Park becomes fully operational.

Appropriation Summary: $45,447 will be needed for this position starting in August of FY2011 which will be funded by General Fund revenues and costs will be budgeted within Public Works/Utilities Facilities Management division.

Cost Summary

FY2011

Personnel

41,897

Operating & Maintenance Capital Outlay Total

3,550 45,447

Ongoing Annual Estimate Description Base pay and benefits (Grade 14; nonexempt; normal hiring annual salary range: $27,206.40 - $42,182.40) FY2011 based off of start date of August 1st while ongoing estimate includes 43,792 personnel costs for full a full fiscal year 400 Includes telephone, radio, and uniform 44,192

Background: On February 1, 2010 Facilities Management accepted responsibility for 1 football stadium field, 2 soccer fields, 1 softball field, and one multipurpose field at Mills Park. Later this year Facilities Management will accept the rest of the facility which includes maintenance of general turf/grounds, a basketball court, a comfort station, and stormwater ponds. All fields were constructed with warm season turf and will not be programmed until August 2010. The increased workload resulting from maintenance which began this spring is currently being accomplished with existing staff. However, with the programming of these fields planned to start in August of 2010, an additional Facilities Maintenance Worker II will be necessary at that time. The facility will be programmed meaning daily field prep and field painting on both football and soccer fields for scheduled games. Along with field use, an increase in required maintenance practices such as monthly aeration will occur. Moving of soccer goals and shifting of the field will be performed to extend the life of the turf. Increased trash and litter collection will also be required. A new Facilities Maintenance II position was initially requested during the FY 2010 budget process to be hired in the spring of 2010. The position and funding were not approved, however, due to budget constraints. Furthermore, during FY 2010 two existing Facilities Maintenance II positions became vacant: one allocated to landscaping and one to field maintenance. Existing staff is absorbing the work this spring by reducing landscape staff allocations in other areas. However, with the programming of the new Mills Park fields beginning in August 2010, it will be necessary to fill one of the existing vacant positions to adequately prepare and maintain these new fields.


Staffing for Cary Community Arts Center in Late FY 2011 Town of Cary Fiscal Year 2011 Manager’s Recommended Budget

Recommendation: Four new fulltime positions and the reclassification of two existing fulltime positions with funding of $100,237 to staff the new Cary Community Arts Center based on the estimated construction completion date of May 2011. The four new positions are: Box Office Manager, Customer Service Representative I, Technical Coordinator and a Facility Maintenance Mechanic I. The two positions for reclassification are the current Arts Center Supervisor to a Community Arts Center Supervisor and the current Performing Arts Coordinator to a Performing Arts/Operations Coordinator.

Appropriation Summary: $100,237 will be needed for these positions in FY2011. They will be funded by General Fund revenues and costs will be budgeted within the Cultural Resources and Facilities Management account categories as shown below:

Cost Summary in Cultural Resources Personnel Operating & Maintenance

FY2011 28,963 2,910

Ongoing Annual Estimate Description 148,141 Positions to be hired in May 2011 1,800 Includes computers and supplies for the additional staff

Facilities Management Personnel

17,964

46,352 Position to be hired in April 2011.

Operating & Maintenance

26,246

30,059 Includes supplies, radio, and vehicle fuel & maintenance

Capital

24,154

Total of both departments

100,237

-

3/4 Ton Van

226,352

Background: As detailed in Staff Report PR10-12 with the bid award for renovation of Cary Elementary in November 2009, the construction of the Cary Community Arts Center is estimated to be completed May 2011. While the new Cary Community Arts Center will provide the opportunity for expanded programming, several components of the existing cultural arts program will be transferred to CCAC. These areas include all of Jordan Hall operations, Applause! Cary Youth Theatre, Marvelous Music Series, Cary Performs, as well as the activities involved with the coordination and facilitation of community groups. The facility will be staffed by the transfer of existing staff and the addition of these four new staff members. Staff will be monitoring the progress of construction very closely and adapt the recruitment and hiring dates of these new staff members as necessary. The full annual operating revenue and cost summary for a full year of operation as shown in the staff report are included to the right.

Estimated Revenues Instructional Programs $412,313 Ticket sales $66,870 Rental $163,130 Concessions/Point of Sale $51,650 Sponsorship $11,000 Total Estimated Revenue $704,963 Estimated Expenses Instructional Program $241,450 Performances $90,890 General Administrative $90,000 Regular, Full time Staffing $462,500 Temporary Staffing $91,995 Building/Site Services $300,000 Total Estimated Expenses $1,276,835 Estimated Net Operating Costs ($571,872) Reduction in Current Net Operating Cost $507,335 Total Net Estimated Cost ($64,537)


Stormwater Quality Engineer Town of Cary Fiscal Year 2011 Manager’s Recommended Budget Recommendation: One Stormwater Quality Engineer position and funding of $84,475 to allow the Town to stay in compliance with the new State Laws and regulations.

Appropriation Summary: $84,475 will be needed for this position in FY2011 with an estimated start date of September 2010. It will be funded by general fund revenues and costs will be budgeted within the Engineering Department.

Cost Summary

Personnel Operating & Maintenance Total

FY2011

83,115 1,360 84,475

Ongoing Annual Estimate Description Base pay and benefits (Grade 28; exempt; normal hiring annual 98,251 salary range: $53,872 - $88,899) 1,360 Supplies and Dues 99,611

Background: The General Assembly of North Carolina through Session Law 2009-484 has enacted Senate Bill 838 which clarifies implementation of nutrient offsets under the Jordan Lake Rules and clarifies implementation of the Jordan Lake Rules related to Federal and State Entities. Part of the nutrient offsets section is the implantation of Jordan Lake Riparian Buffer Protection for lands within the Jordan Lake Watershed. The General Assembly through Session Law 2009-216 has enacted House Bill 239 that provides for the improvements in the management of the Jordan Watershed in order to restore water quality by implementation of the Stage 1 adaptive management program to control nutrient loading from existing development. New development in the Jordan Lake watershed will also be required to meet new nitrogen and phosphorus targets through the use of engineered stormwater best management practices (BMP) controls, much like the current Neuse River Rules which were enacted by the General assembly in 2001. The Stage 1 program will require increased requirements for dry weather monitoring and storm drain inspection and mapping, illegal discharge detection and elimination, public outreach and involvement in targeted areas and location and design for retrofit opportunities in the Jordan Lake watershed. Riparian buffers are also included in the senate bill and local governments will be required to adopt ordinances to protect and preserve existing riparian buffers throughout the Jordan Lake Watershed. This will include stream determinations, site and subdivision plan enforcement, permits procedures, requirements and approvals to the riparian buffer impacts. The Town will also be required to perform site inspections for compliance and enforcement which will include civil and criminal penalties under the riparian buffer requirements. This new position will allow the Town of Cary to stay in compliance with the new State Laws that did not carry with them any state supported funding mechanism. The Jordan Lake Water Supply Nutrient Strategy will have more requirements in the future. The Town of Cary has a NPDES Phase 2 permit that is currently under the renewal process. It will contain additional requirements for the implementation of a Water Quality Recovery Plan that will address the Swift Creek total maximum daily load (TMDL) which is defined as a calculation of the maximum amount of a pollutant that a waterbody can receive and still safely meet water quality standards. The Swift Creek TMDL will require the town to provide increased monitoring and public involvement within the Swift Creek Watershed to ensure requirements are met.


Tennis Program Coordinator Town of Cary Fiscal Year 2011 Manager’s Recommended Budget Recommendation: One new Tennis Program Coordinator and funding of $66,604 to meet the increase in lesson demand and program participation to provide the expected levels of service. This position will administer increased program areas, supervise current staff and provide needed additional instruction.

Appropriation Summary: $66,604 in new expenditure authority will be needed for this position in FY2011. It will be funded by General Fund revenues and costs will be budgeted within the Town of Cary Tennis Park under the following categories. It is expected that incremental revenues generated through program participants will recover the majority of the costs associated with this new staff member.

Cost Summary

FY2011

Personnel

66,604

Revenue

(65,615)

Net Total Cost

989

Ongoing Annual Estimate Description

Base pay and benefits (Grade 13; nonexempt; normal hiring annual salary range: $25,917 - $30,160), plus additional compensation for 66,604 lessons and commission of $26,788 (65,615) Additional teaching revenue (conservative estimate) 989

Background: The Tennis Park teaching programs are divided into two main teaching groups; the Academy, which is specifically for advanced/competitive juniors, and Tennis Programs, which includes all other junior programs, adult instructional programs and league coaching. Both of these program areas continue to grow, and with this growth in instructional programs the demand for private lessons has also increased. To deal with these increases, staff has implemented changes such as staggering time schedules of leagues and offering programming at selected satellite parks. Even with these changes in programming, the demand for instruction has continued to grow. At this point, the part time staff is teaching a combined eighty hours per week of group programs in addition to private lessons. These part time staff do great job of teaching, but are unable to provide the other services that come with this many additional hours of teaching in a week. Full time staff is handling many of the administrative duties associated with current increased teaching hours (monitoring waitlists, coordinating staff schedules, lesson plans, communication and feedback with participants, parents and league coordinators). This is causing the full time staff to be spread too thin and staff is concerned with maintaining the quality that is expected by the patrons. The present customer base of the Cary Tennis Park looks forward to the teaching staff maintaining constant feedback and making recommendations for player advancement to the next level of teaching. The financial commitment patrons are making to advance their level of play or those of their children through the programs offered requires that staff continually monitor the participant’s development and progress. A new position will provide this needed level of service. Full time tennis staff professional positions typically create positive cash flow positions, meaning the direct revenue earned exceeds the total cost of the hourly salary, teaching rate and benefits. In addition to the teaching revenue, the success of the major revenue streams (i.e. pro shop sales, annual pass sales, tournament revenues) is directly related to the quality and quantity of the teaching staff.


The anticipated annual savings associated with the 31.25 existing but currently vacant positions have been removed from the recommended budget and total $1.3 million in the general fund and $210K in the utility fund. The staffing ratio for FY 2011 is expected to again drop compared to the last few years to 8.1 employees per 1,000 population as portrayed in the graph below. Part of the reason for the decline in FY 2009 is the elimination of seven positions from the Recycling division due to the new automated curbside recycling program that is rolling out in the spring of 2009. Fortunately we were able to plan far enough ahead by holding vacant positions generated through normal turnover such that each person occupying one of the eliminated positions was able to remain employed with the Town by filling one of the positions being held open with them in mind. Population figures shown in the table below are as of the beginning of each fiscal year and the July 1, 2010 population estimate is 140,857. Employees Per Thousand Population

10.0

8.0

6.0

4.0

2.0

Population in Thousands

FY 11

FY 10

FY 09

FY 08

FY07

FY 06

FY 05

FY 04

FY 03

FY 02

FY 01

FY 00

FY 99

FY 98

FY 97

FY 96

FY 95

FY 94

0.0 FY 93

0

Employees Per Thousand

Employees Per Thousand

8.5

9.3

8.8

8.1 141

136

131

116

111

108

107

103

96

100

88

87

77

70

61

57

52

40

48

80

83

120

123

9.6

9.6

9.7

9.5

9.7

9.7

9.8

7.9 8.5

160

7.9

8.4

9.6

9.3

9.5

9.4

9.7

12.0

FY 92

Population in Thousands

200


CAPITAL IMPROVEMENTS BUDGET For the tenth consecutive year, the Town’s capital improvement planning process includes the development of a recommended budget for the coming year as well as a ten-year capital improvements plan. Prior to this, a five-year plan was used. The move to the ten-year period provides the Town of Cary with a longer planning horizon to better assess needs and help facilitate longer-term financial planning. The CIB funds water, sewer, transportation, fire, parks, recreation and cultural resources (PRCR) and general government (gen’l gov’t) projects. Total recommended appropriations for water and sewer projects in FY 2011 are $165.6 million. General capital project recommended appropriations are $9.2 million yielding a total FY 2011 CIB of $174.8 million.

UTILITY CAPITAL PROJECTS $165,565,867 Water, 20,678,360 12%

Sewer, 144,887,507 88%

GENERAL CAPITAL PROJECTS $9,226,351

General Government, 2,803,173 30%

PRCR, 700,000 8%

Transportation 2,709,178 29%

Fire, 3,014,000 33%


The $174,792,218 recommended Fiscal Year 2011 capital improvements project appropriation represents a 268% increase from the FY 2010 adopted CIB. This increase is primarily attributed to $127.7 million in recommended FY 2011 appropriations to the state mandated Western Wake Regional Wastewater Management Facility (WWRWMF). FY 2011 represents the last year of significant funding need for this project. With an estimated total cost of $330.4 million, the WWRWMF is funded by the towns of Cary, Apex, Holly Springs and Morrisville to meet state mandates and address capacity needs of these partner municipalities. The FY 2011 recommended CIB demonstrates the Town’s continued commitment to infrastructure maintenance and improvement despite the economic downturn. While $127.7 million or 73% of the $174.8 million FY 2011 recommended CIB supports the state-mandated WWRWMF, $23.1 million of the remaining $47.1 million supports infrastructure maintenance and improvement initiatives such as: • • • • • • • • •

pavement rehabilitation for existing roadways bridge and culvert repairs street storm drainage rehabilitation railroad grade crossing repairs aerial ladder truck and rescue truck replacement construction of Fire Station #8 maintenance of existing PRCR facilities contributions toward sanitation and recycling truck replacement program installation of new water lines to reinforce existing lines and better address system demand

• • • • • •

video surveying and cleaning of the Town’s sewer system inspection and rehabilitation of existing force mains construction of an elevated water storage tank in west Cary to provide necessary storage capacity replacement of equipment at the Cary/Apex Water Treatment Plant construction of new force mains parallel to existing critical mains water main condition assessments

A specific priority in FY 2011 is to resume funding for infrastructure maintenance projects that have traditionally been funded annually but were not funded in the FY 2010 CIB. Repeatedly delaying maintenance in order to respond to economic pressures is not a viable long-term solution. The Town’s infrastructure must receive frequent and comprehensive maintenance in order to help ensure services are provided continuously in an efficient and effective manner. The Town’s FYs 2011 – 2021 recommended capital improvements budget and plan focuses on core infrastructure maintenance, necessary infrastructure improvements and prior commitments and mandates. Projects selected for the FY 2011 CIB/CIP were chosen based on their alignment with Town goals, their relationship to other projects already funded, the existence of prior commitments or mandates, cost effectiveness, and overall benefit provided. Additionally, the following four principles guided its development: 1.

Guiding Principle: Utilize as little debt as possible to minimize additional debt service obligations Typically, the Town of Cary utilizes a combination of general obligation bond debt, installment purchase debt and revenue bond debt to fund major infrastructure needs. In order to help with affordability and remain in accordance with the 15% debt service ceiling, no general fund supported general obligation bond debt and no installment purchase (asset backed debt) is recommended for FY 2011. Specific information related to recommended FY 2011 debt appropriations follows.


General Obligation Bond Debt The FY 2011 recommended capital improvements budget includes a $5.4 million general obligation bond appropriation for the state-mandated Western Wake Regional Wastewater Management Facility. $104.6 million in general obligation debt has been appropriated to this project through FY 2010. Debt service associated with the FY 2011 debt appropriation is expected to come on-line in FY 2012 and will be paid for through the Town’s utility rates, not through property taxes. There are no transportation or PRCR general obligation bond appropriations in the FY 2011 recommended capital improvements budget. Limited general fund operating margin to support new debt service limits the Town’s ability to utilize 2003 GO referendum funds in FY 2011. The following charts provide brief summaries of general obligation bond appropriations to date and indicate funds available for future needs. General obligation bond authority is available for seven years after voter approval. If approved authority is not fully appropriated by that time, an application may be submitted to the North Carolina Local Government Commission (NCLGC) for a three year extension. The Town’s 2003 Transportation and PRCR GO bond authority was set to expire in April 2010. However, in February 2010, the NCLGC approved the Town’s request to extend this referendum’s appropriation deadline to April 2013. The 2005 open space and WWRWMF GO bond authority expires in May 2012.

2003 General Obligation Bond Debt Summary

Transportation PRCR TOTALS

Total Approved by Voters in Appropriated April 2003 Through FY 2010 130,000,000 83,138,674 30,000,000 22,389,200 160,000,000 105,527,874

FY 2011 Appropriation -

Remaining GO Debt Available for Appropriation 46,861,326 7,610,800 54,472,126

FY 2011 Appropriation 5,373,985 5,373,985

Remaining GO Debt Available for Appropriation -

2005 General Obligation Bond Debt Summary

W W RW MF* Open Space TOTALS

Total Approved by Voters in Appropriated April 2005 Through FY 2010 110,000,000 104,626,015 10,000,000 10,000,000 120,000,000 114,626,015

* W W RW MF = W est ern W ake Regional W ast ewat er Management Facilit y

Revenue Bonds The FY 2011 recommended CIB includes $93.5 million in revenue bonds for sewer infrastructure needs. Revenue bond debt is secured by dedicated, non-tax revenue sources. This form of debt is secured by the Town’s ability to adjust utility rates. Utility rate increases will be used if necessary to generate the additional revenue needed to afford the incremental debt service associated with these appropriations. $81 million of the recommended $93.5 million appropriation supports portions of Cary and Morrisville’s contributions to the WWRWMF project while the remaining $12.5 million is directed to sewer infrastructure maintenance and improvements.


2.

Guiding Principle: Maximize the use of existing capital reserve fund balances Utility Capital Reserve The FY 2011 recommended CIB contains a $24.7 million appropriation of cash from utility capital reserve fund balance. Unrestricted fund balance comprises $3.9 million of the total fund balance appropriation, while restricted fund balance provides the remaining $20.8 million. Total utility capital reserve fund balance at the close of FY 2011 is anticipated to be $17.5 million with the majority of these funds restricted to growth-related water and sewer projects. These cash resources will be utilized as the primary funding source for upcoming qualifying projects to minimize additional debt obligations. General Capital Reserve Appropriations of estimated restricted fund balances available at the end of FY 2010 have been maximized to continue leveraging currently available resources. The FY 2011 general capital improvements budget includes $5.3 million in appropriations from general capital reserve fund balance. $3.2 million of this figure is unrestricted, while the remaining $2.1 million is restricted. General capital reserve fund balance at the close of FY 2011 is expected to be $17.3 million with 42% of these funds restricted to certain types of transportation projects.

3.

Guiding Principle: Minimize reliance on FY 2011 capital reserve revenues Utility The FY 2011 recommended capital improvements budget appropriates a total of $41.9 million of FY 2011 revenue in support of utility capital reserve projects. $38.4 million of this figure represents reimbursements from the Town of Cary’s municipal partners for the Western Wake Regional Wastewater Management Facility. The Town of Cary reflects all needs for the WWRWMF in its CIB/CIP. The municipal partners provide their respective capital funding as revenue to the Town of Cary for their portions of the project. The Town will also receive $2.2 million from the Town of Apex during FY 2011 in support of budgeted Cary/Apex Water Treatment Plant (C/A WTP) projects. The C/A WTP is jointly owned by the towns of Cary and Apex with Cary being financially responsible for 77% of the plant’s operations and capital needs and Apex responsible for the remaining 23%. The FY 2011 CIB includes three C/A WTP related capital projects. Apex’s 23% share of the budgeted capital costs is $2.2 million. As with the WWRWMF, Cary budgets for the total capital needs of the C/A WTP within its capital budget. The Town of Apex’s share is paid by the Town of Apex to Cary and is accounted for as project revenue as the respective projects are executed. Lastly, the FY 2011 sewer capital improvements budget includes an appropriation of $1.5 million in anticipated restricted sewer development fee revenue. These funds help support growth-related infrastructure needs.

General $1.1 million of anticipated FY 2011 general capital reserve fund revenue is programmed for appropriation in the recommended capital improvements budget. $26,874 of this amount is from estimated utility franchise fee revenue. The remaining $1,107,448 is categorized as transportation-restricted Powell Bill funding (a state-collected local revenue).


4.

Guiding Principle: Limit transfers from the general and utility operating funds for capital purposes Utility Fund Transfers The FY 2011 capital improvements budget includes a $576,417 transfer from utility fund fund balance in support of the Town’s open space acquisition initiative. This funding is generated each year through water rates that were increased for this purpose by 3% in FY 2002, generating $1 million per year that is directed toward open space acquisition. As debt service associated with the issuance of $10,000,000 in 2005 open space general obligation bonds came on-line in FY 2010, only $576,417 of this $1,000,000 is available for open space land purchases in FY 2011. The remaining $423,583 is directed to the general fund where it addresses debt service associated with the issued 2005 open space general obligation bond debt. The debt service schedule associated with the $10,000,000 debt issuance is such that interest-only payments are required for the first two years (FYs 2010 and FY 2011) with full principal and interest payments beginning in FY 2012. Once full debt service payments begin, as little as $21,766 in utility fund transfer funding will be available annually for open space acquisition. The majority of the $1,000,000 generated annually for open space acquisition will support debt repayment. The table below notes the division of this funding between debt service and open space funding until debt repayment is complete. Debt Service Schedule for 2005 GO Debt - Open Space Utility rates generate $1 million annually for open space acquisition. This table identifies the portion of those funds utilized for debt service and the portion available each year for transfer to the open space acquisition capital project. Required for Debt Service FY2010 FY2011 FY2012 FY2013 FY2014 FY2015 FY2016 FY2017 FY2018 FY2019 FY2020 FY2021

423,583 423,583 978,234 961,595 945,898 918,119 890,339 862,559 834,779 807,000 779,220 756,996

Available for Open Space 576,417 576,417 21,766 38,405 54,102 81,881 109,661 137,441 165,221 193,000 220,780 243,004

General Fund Transfers $2.2 million in general fund transfers are included in the FY 2011 recommended capital improvements budget. $1,050,339 of this amount facilitates scheduled replacement of the Town’s sanitation and recycling trucks. This funding is being generated through the $14 monthly fee that customers pay for their solid waste and recycling services. $500,000 is directed to the Town’s public property storm drainage improvement project, and $600,000 supports the Town’s private-assistance storm drainage improvement initiative. The remaining $76,417 funds open space land purchases. FY 2010 debt service payments for issued open space debt were $76,417 less than originally estimated. These funds will fall to general fund fund balance at the close of FY 2010 and become available for transfer to the open space acquisition project in FY 2011. Planning for major capital projects and the increased operational costs that often accompany them will remain


critical. With so many potential projects, and recent revenue trends indicating limited growth in income, the Town of Cary will continue to be forced to make difficult choices in the near future. Future funding for road priorities must be addressed along with other infrastructure such as parks, fire stations, water tanks and water and sewer lines. The Town must continue to ensure that funding is in place to allow adequate infrastructure to maintain the quality of life for existing citizens, as well as for the future citizens of Cary. In looking to the Town’s future needs, all financing options must be thoroughly investigated to ensure that infrastructure requirements are met in a manner that maximizes resources, allows flexibility in funding decisions and maintains a strong financial position.

SUMMARY The FY 2011 Recommended Budget is balanced in accordance with state statutes and addresses the goals and priorities established by Town Council for the Town's future. The budget is fiscally sound, and although it does not fund all initial requests made by departments, it does address top priority needs. The long-term capital plan is indeed a plan, which will need to be adjusted according to changes in needs for projects and the availability of funding for capital investments. I wish to recognize and extend thanks to staff in all Town departments for their invaluable assistance during the budget process and express my appreciation to the Town staff who helped in preparing this budget. Respectfully submitted,

Benjamin T. Shivar Town Manager


TOWN OF CARY CHANGES TO FISCAL YEAR 2011 RECOMMENDED BUDGET

The FY 2011 recommended operating and capital budgets, as modified by the changes identified below, were adopted by the Cary Town Council at its regularly scheduled meeting on June 24, 2010.

General Capital - Fire 1. Council directed at its meeting on May 13, 2010 that capital funding be provided for Fire Station 8 to be designed and constructed as a “Green Build� pilot project built to LEED standards to provide the operational and environmental benefits of green building. The incremental cost for that option, as described in staff report AD10-013, is $105,000. The FY 2011 recommended capital budget already included an estimate of $85,000 for the pursuit of this type of initiative, so only $20,000 above the amount included in the recommended budget is necessary. Staff recommends this increase of $20,000 be funded with an appropriation from general capital reserve unrestricted fund balance.

General Fund 2. Additional annual funding of $3,017 to fund salary and travel allowance increases for the appointed positions of Town Clerk, Town Attorney, and Town Manager and additional annual funding of $2,562 to fund increases related to travel allowances for the Town Council members.


TOWN OF CARY OPERATING BUDGET BE IT ORDAINED by the Town Council of the Town of Cary, North Carolina, that the following anticipated fund revenues and expenditures by function, together with a financial plan for Internal Service Funds, certain Fee and Charge Schedules, and with certain restrictions and authorizations, are hereby appropriated and approved for the operation of Town Government and its activities for the Fiscal Year beginning July 1, 2010, and ending June 30, 2011.

SECTION 1. GENERAL FUND ANTICIPATED REVENUES Current Year Ad Valorem Taxes Prior Year Taxes Penalties & Interest on Taxes ABC Revenue Wake County Sales Tax - 1 Cent (Article 39) Wake County Sales Tax - 1/2 Cent (Articles 40 & 42) Wake County Sales Tax - 1/2 Cent (Article 44) Privilege Licenses Occupancy Tax Pet Licenses Utility Franchise Taxes Wine and Beer Tax Wireless Communications Sales Tax Rental Vehicle Tax High School Resource Officer Reimbursement Building Permits Pavement/Curb Cuts Rezoning/Variance Request Fees Site/Final Plan Review Fees Bldg./Elect./Mech./Plumbing Inspections Fees Sign Permits Fire Permits Watershed Maint. Fees Traffic Impact Analysis Reimbursement Grading Permits Sanitation Fees Used Appliance Disposal Recreation Program Fees Recreation Retail Sales Dog Park Skate Park Ticket Sales Athletic Fees USA Baseball Tennis Arts & Crafts Fees Wake Med Soccer Park Festivals Recreation Facility Rentals Cultural Arts Rentals Rents-Fire Hazardous Waste Reimbursement Interest Earned Miscellaneous Revenues Video Programming Sales Tax PEG Channel Distribution Court Costs Donations Recycled Goods

$67,043,875 $300,000 $100,000 $482,179 $9,993,427 $7,509,278 $3,788,830 $1,420,326 $570,000 $7,203 $4,582,306 $195,427 $1,794,765 $68,000 $151,352 $1,964,000 $9,700 $18,000 $52,000 $206,500 $20,700 $33,000 $125,000 $270,000 $15,000 $6,754,546 $21,881 $969,240 $40,000 $40,000 $178,000 $33,489 $697,390 $411,500 $1,040,615 $246,260 $550,000 $130,890 $285,000 $41,500 $70,000 $20,000 $843,084 $300,000 $972,917 $18,878 $29,873 $127,750 $125,000


Disposable Rebate Red Light Ticket Cellular Tower Lease Proceeds NCDOT Traffic Signal Reimbursement Appropriation From Fund Balance Total Anticipated Revenues AUTHORIZED EXPENDITURES/TRANSFERS OUT General Government Public Safety Parks, Recreation and Cultural Resources Public Works Departmental Allocation Accounts Class & Pay Study Market Adjustment on Pay Schedule Debt Expense Reimbursement from Utility Fund - Indirect Costs Reimbursement from Internal Service Fund Subtotal - Expenditures Inter-Fund Transfers: Capital Project Funds Transit Fund Economic Development Strategic Fund Self-Insurance Fund Sale of Assets Other Transfers Out (In) Subtotal - Transfers (net) Total Authorized Expenditures/Transfers

$412,309 $7,900 $893,000 $568,000 $1,181,996 $117,731,886

$27,881,600 $38,047,187 $11,913,869 $24,640,166 $682,467 $5,000 $25,000 $13,710,430 ($2,253,067) ($215,589) $114,437,063 $2,226,756 $1,642,376 $235,000 ($260,726) ($125,000) ($423,583) $3,294,823 $117,731,886

SECTION 2. UTILITY FUND ANTICIPATED REVENUES/TRANSFERS IN Interest Earned Miscellaneous Revenues Proceeds from Sale of Assets Utility Inspection Fees Water Service Fees Sewer Service Fees Connection Fees Reconnection Fees Water Capacity Charges-RDU/Chatham Co. Cross Connection Program Fees Reinstallment Fees New Account Service Charge Bulk Water/Hydrants Water Wholesale Sales Raw Water Sales Sewer Extension Permits Pretreatment Program Fat, Oil, and Grease Fees Returned Check Charge Late Payment Charge Total Anticipated Revenues

$593,292 $21,367 $10,000 $23,381 $22,522,572 $30,853,390 $476,269 $84,156 $269,642 $189,250 $8,145 $182,316 $58,606 $138,442 $152,218 $1,536 $54,554 $59,830 $6,494 $230,000 $55,935,460

AUTHORIZED EXPENSES/TRANSFERS OUT (TRANSFERS IN) BY DEPARTMENT Administration Utility Systems Management Reimbursement to General Fund - Field Operations Wastewater Plants Cary/Apex Water Plant Self-Insurance Long Term Debt

$8,959,888 $2,842,597 $8,394,108 $11,702,836 $5,299,714 $249,172 $12,662,916


Bond Proceeds Transfer to General Fund (Open Space Debt Svc) Capital Projects - Open Space and Parkland Acquisition Appropriation To Fund Balance Total Authorized Expenditures/Transfers

$680,000 $423,583 $576,417 $4,144,229 $55,935,460

SECTION 3. TRANSIT FUND ANTICIPATED REVENUES Transfer from General Fund Fees/Vehicle License Fee Federal Transit Grant State Grant Transportation / C - Tran Tickets Total Anticipated Revenues

$1,642,376 $499,000 $1,239,632 $185,000 $204,750 $3,770,758

AUTHORIZED EXPENDITURES Operating Expenses Total Anticipated Expenditures

$3,770,758 $3,770,758

SECTION 4. COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT BLOCK GRANT FUND The Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) is a multi-year award from the US Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD). Under HUD regulations, CDBG funds must be expended within five years of award. The CDBG budgets will remain effective and will not expire for the entire five year period. ANTICIPATED REVENUES Federal Grant Total Anticipated Revenues

$474,417 $474,417

AUTHORIZED EXPENDITURES Unallocated Expenses Total Anticipated Expenditures

$474,417 $474,417

SECTION 5. ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT STRATEGIC FUND ANTICIPATED REVENUES Transfer from General Fund Contributions from outside agencies Appropriation from Fund Balance Total Anticipated Revenues

$235,000 $50,000 $75,000 $360,000

AUTHORIZED EXPENDITURES Operating Expenses Total Anticipated Expenditures

$360,000 $360,000

SECTION 6. POLICE SEPARATION ALLOWANCE FUND ANTICIPATED REVENUES Transfer from General Fund Investment Earnings Total Anticipated Revenues

$236,975 $900 $237,875

AUTHORIZED EXPENDITURES Police Separation Allowance Appropriation to Fund Balance Total Anticipated Expenditures

$236,975 $900 $237,875


SECTION 7. SELF INSURANCE (WORKMAN'S COMP & SMALL CLAIMS) FUND ANTICIPATED REVENUES Transfer from General Fund Transfer from Utility Fund Transfer from Fleet Management Fund Total Anticipated Revenues AUTHORIZED EXPENDITURES Expenditures Total Anticipated Expenditures

$1,064,275 $249,172 $11,554 $1,325,000

$1,325,000 $1,325,000

SECTION 8. SELF INSURANCE (HEALTH & DENTAL) FUND ANTICIPATED REVENUES Transfer from General Fund Transfer from Utility Fund Transfer from Fleet Management Fund Dependent Premium Revenue Appropriation From Fund Balance Total Anticipated Revenues AUTHORIZED EXPENDITURES Expenditures Total Anticipated Expenditures

$8,392,006 $1,964,770 $91,099 $2,745,834 $65,835 $13,259,545

$13,259,545 $13,259,545

SECTION 9. 911 FUND ANTICIPATED REVENUES E911 Combined System Appropriation From Fund Balance Total Anticipated Revenues

$434,032 $208,255 $642,287

AUTHORIZED EXPENDITURES Expenditures Total Anticipated Expenditures

$642,287 $642,287

SECTION 10 FLEET MANAGEMENT FUND ANTICIPATED REVENUES Parts Fuel Labor Outsourcing Fee Interest Appropriation From Fund Balance Total Anticipated Revenues

$115,272 $368,365 $580,020 $27,324 $15,895 $76,330 $1,183,206

AUTHORIZED EXPENSES Operating Expenses Transfer to Self Insurance Total Authorized Expenses

$956,063 $227,143 $1,183,206


SECTION 11. UTILITY FEES AND CHARGES A. There is hereby established, for the Fiscal Year 2011, Utility Fees as scheduled herewith: WATER RATES: Base Charges: (for water and irrigation services)

Meter Size 5/8" & 3/4" 1" 1 1/2" 2" 3" 4" 6"

Residential Charge (per 1,000 gallons) Tier 1 (usage 0 - 5,000 gallons) Tier 2 (usage 5,001 - 8,000 gallons) Tier 3 (usage 8,001 - 23,000 gallons) or up to water budget amount

Tier 4 (usage > 23,000 gallons) or over water budget amount Non-Residential & Multifamily Charge (per 1,000 gallons) Tier 1 (usage 0 - Water Budget Amount) Tier 2 (usage > than Water Budget Amount)

Cary*

Morrisville*

$3.07 $6.61 $21.71 $26.41 $71.08 $107.70 $132.94 Cary* $3.60 $4.08 $5.79 $11.29

$5.00 $6.61 $21.71 $26.41 $71.08 $107.70 $132.94 Morrisville* $4.31 $4.31 $6.09 $11.88

$4.08 $11.88

$4.31 $12.50

Single-Family Potable Irrigation (per 1,000 gallons) Tier 1 (usage 0 - 15,000 gallons) or up to water budget amount Tier 2 (usage > 15,000 gallons) or over water budget amount

$5.79 $11.29

$6.09 $11.88

Non-Residential & Multifamily Irrigation (per 1,000 gallons) Tier 1 (usage 0 - Water Budget Amount) Tier 2 (usage > than Water Budget Amount)

$6.38 $11.88

$6.73 $12.50

$3.60

$4.31

Reclaimed Water Rate (Non-potable Irrigation) (per 1,000 gallons) SEWER RATES: Base Charges:

Meter Size 5/8" & 3/4" 1" 1 1/2" 2" 3" 4" 6" Volume Charge - All Users (per 1,000 gallons)

Cary* $3.07 $6.61 $21.71 $26.41 $71.08 $107.70 $132.94

Morrisville* $5.00 $6.61 $21.71 $26.41 $71.08 $107.70 $132.94

$7.04

$9.12

*For retail utility customers outside the corporate limits of the Town of Cary or the Town of Morrisville, the respective charges for water and/or sewer shall be triple the charges herein established. SECTION 12. SANITATION FEES There is hereby established, for Fiscal Year 2011, a Sanitation Fee of $14.00 per month. SECTION 13. UTILITY CONNECTION FEES SCHEDULE There are hereby established, for Fiscal Year 2011, Utility Connection Fees as contained in Attachment A.


SECTION 14. FEES SCHEDULE There is hereby established, for Fiscal Year 2011, various fees as contained in Attachment A. SECTION 15. LEVY OF TAXES There is hereby levied, for Fiscal Year 2011, an Ad Valorem Tax Rate of $0.33 per One Hundred Dollars ($100.00) valuation of taxable property as listed for taxes as of January 1, 2010, for the purpose of raising the revenue from current taxes as set forth in the foregoing estimates of revenues, and in order to finance the foregoing applicable appropriations. This rate of tax is based on an estimated assessed valuation of $20,586,098,663. SECTION 16. LEVY OF TAXES There is hereby levied, for Fiscal Year 2011, a Tax on Gross Receipts derived from retail short-term motor vehicle leases or rentals of one and one-half percent (1 1/2%) of the gross receipts from the short-term lease or rental of vehicles at retail to the general public as defined in Section 105.871.1 of the North Carolina General Statutes. SECTION 17. AUTHORIZED POSITIONS A. B. C. D. E. F.

There is hereby established, for Fiscal Year 2011, a schedule of authorized positions, as contained in Attachment B. Position authorizations (new positions) are initially established by the annual budget ordinance. Any new positions needed during the fiscal year outside of the annual budget process must be approved by the Town Council. Any changes to non-exempt positions may occur during the fiscal year as authorized by the Town Manager. Any changes to exempt positions (other than grade increases) may occur during the fiscal year as authorized by the Town Manager. Any grade increases to exempt positions must be approved by the Town Council.

SECTION 18. MARKET ADJUSTMENT There is hereby authorized for Fiscal Year 2011, a 2% market adjustment increase to the Town's pay table, as included and reflected in Attachment C. SECTION 19. SPECIAL AUTHORIZATION - BUDGET OFFICER A. The Budget Officer shall be authorized to reallocate appropriations within functions, and amounts of various line accounts not organized by departments, as deemed necessary. B. The Budget Officer shall be authorized to execute interfunctional and interdepartmental transfers within the same fund. C. Utilization of appropriations contained in contingencies may be accomplished by the Town Manager and notification of all such transfers shall be made to the Town Council at its next meeting following the date of transfer. D. The Budget Officer shall be authorized to make interfund loans as necessary to meet cash flow needs. The Budget Officer may make advances to the various Internal Service Funds, for working capital purposes, without additional approval from the Town Council. E. Interfund transfers, established in the Budget Ordinance, may be accomplished without additional approval from the Town Council. SECTION 20. SPECIAL AUTHORIZATION - BUDGET OFFICER Interfund and Interdepartmental transfer of monies, except as noted in Section 19, paragraphs C, and D, and Section 21, paragraphs A and B, shall be accomplished by Town Council authorizations only. SECTION 21. UTILIZATION OF BUDGET ORDINANCE A. This ordinance shall be the basis of the financial plan for the Cary Municipal Government during the 2010-2011 Fiscal Year. The Budget Officer shall administer the Budget and ensure that operating officials are provided guidance and sufficient details to implement their appropriate portion of the Budget. B. The Finance Department shall establish and maintain all records which are in consonance with this Budget Ordinance, and the appropriate Statutes of the State of North Carolina.


SECTION 22. SPECIAL AUTHORIZATION - TOWN MANAGER A. The Town Manager shall have the power to authorize the transfer of funds out of the employee pay plan accounts in the General Fund, Utility Fund and Fleet Management Fund, into departmental accounts to fund performance award and reclassification increases for individual employees. B. The Town Manager shall have the power to authorize the transfer of funds out of the departmental allocation accounts in the General Fund and Utility Fund into departmental accounts. SECTION 23. REAPPROPRIATION OF FUNDS ENCUMBERED IN FY 2010 Operating funds encumbered on the financial records as of June 30, 2010, are hereby reappropriated to this budget.


ATTACHMENT A

TOWN OF CARY FEES AND CHARGES FINANCE DEPARTMENT FEES: Late Payment Fees: Utility Bills ......................................................................................1% per month on unpaid balance ($5 minimum) Miscellaneous invoices..................................................................¾ % per month on unpaid balance ($5 minimum) Business licenses ................................................................................ 5% per month, 25% maximum ($5 minimum) Returned Check Fee ....................................... Maximum allowed by NC State Law as of July 1, 2009……..$25.00 Utility Service Charge for New Accounts, per metered service ....................................................................... $18.00 (may be added to the first month’s bill) Meter Test......................................................................................................................................... (per test) $86.00 Nonpayment Charges for Utility Bills: Fee for processing disconnection of service due to nonpayment of utility charges: For services reestablished Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. ........................................................... $33.00 Any other time .............................................................................................................................................. $48.00 Business Licenses: Tax Schedule A: Unless otherwise contained in Tax Schedule B, Tax Schedule C, or Tax Schedule E below, the tax on all trades, occupations, professions, businesses and franchises within the Town shall be based on gross sales/receipts as reported on the trades, occupations, professions, businesses or franchises North Carolina State Income Tax. Gross Receipts License Tax 0 - 20,000 .......................................................................................................................................................... $25.00 20,001 - 30,000 ................................................................................................................................................. $35.00 30,001 - 50,000 ................................................................................................................................................. $50.00 50,001 - 75,000 ................................................................................................................................................. $75.00 75,001 - 100,000 ............................................................................................................................................. $100.00 Over 100,000 ........................................................................................................................maximum of $5,000.00* *($100 for first $100,000 & $.60 per $1,000 or fraction thereafter) Tax Schedule B: All trades, occupations, professions, businesses and franchises for which city license taxes are restricted or limited pursuant to Schedule B of the Revenue Act (NC General Statute, Section 105-33 et seq.), as amended, shall be taxed at the maximum amount cities are permitted to tax such businesses under Schedule B. For this purpose, the definitions and maximum tax amounts permitted cities as set forth in Schedule B of the Revenue Act, are hereby adopted and incorporated herein by reference. Tax Schedule C: License Tax Business Christmas Trees ................................................................................................................................................ $50.00 Electric Light & Power Companies .................................................................................................................. $50.00 Natural Gas Companies .................................................................................................................................... $50.00


ATTACHMENT A Tax Schedule E: The tax on all trades, occupations, professions, businesses and franchises within the Town that do not generate gross sales/receipts shall be based on the number of people employed by the trade, occupation, profession, business, or franchise. Examples include, but are not limited to, customer service call centers and research laboratories. The tax shall be levied according to the following schedule:

Number of Employees: License Tax 1 – 5 ................................................................................................................................................................ $100.00 6 – 15 .............................................................................................................................................................. $500.00 16 – 25 ......................................................................................................................................................... $1,000.00 26 and above ................................................................................................................................................ $2,000.00

POLICE DEPARTMENT FEES: Special Events (Per Officer)............................................................................................................. (per hr) $10.00 Note: This per officer fee is charged when a police vehicle or other equipment is needed at the event in the opinion of the Police Chief. This per officer fee is in addition to the wage negotiated with the officer.

Precious Metals Fees: NCGS Chapter 66 Article 25 contains the specific statutes detailing with the permit process and various fees for the precious metal dealer permits. The statutes applying to this process are NCGS 66-163 through 66-179 and are broken down as follows: Criminal Background Check ........................................................................................................................... $38.00 The State Bureau of Investigation (SBI) will bill the Town of Cary their standard fee ($38.00) for running each criminal history. The Town of Cary will collect this fee from the applicant/co-applicant prior to the fingerprint cards being sent to the SBI. Precious Metals Dealer Permit ...................................................................................................................... $180.00 (Collected by the Town of Cary Finance Department after the criminal background check is completed and returned. The business license fee that is normally charged is included in the $180.) Precious Metals Business Employee Registration Form: Application Fee for Qualifying Employees of Precious Metal Businesses ..................................................... $10.00 Application Annual Renewal Fee for Qulaifying Employees of Precious Metal Businesses .......................... $3.00 Pet License Tax: Non-neutered dog or cat permanent pet tag.....................................................................................(one time) $50.00 Neutered dog or cat permanent pet tag ........................................................................................... (one-time) $10.00 Neutered dog or cat that has also been micro chipped permanent pet tag.........................................(one time) $5.00 Penalty for not displaying ............................................................................................................... (one-time) $20.00 Motor Vehicles and Traffic The owner or operator of any vehicle who has received a notice of violation under Article 111 of the Traffic Violations Bureau may answer such charge before the traffic violations bureau by voluntarily paying a civil penalty as specified in this section. Provided further, if the owner shall fail to pay said penalty within fifteen (15) days from issuance of the violation notice, the owner is subject to being charged under G.S. 20-37.6 For violation of the following traffic regulations, the penalties shall be as follows: Parking as to obstruct fire hydrants or in designated fire lanes .......................................................................... $5.00 Parking or leaving standing any vehicle: a. In space designated in conformance with G.S. 20-37.6(d) for handicapped or visually impaired person when the vehicle does not display the distinguishing license plate or placard as required by state statute; or b. So as to obstruct a curb ramp or curb cut for handicapped persons as provided for by the North Carolina Building Code or as designated in G.S. 136-14.14 Violation of either a. or b................................................................................................................................ $100.00 All other parking violations ................................................................................................................................ $5.00 Parking of Oversized Vehicles and Trailers Prohibited:


ATTACHMENT A 1) It shall be unlawful for any person to park any vehicle or trailer of eighty (80) inches or more in width or thirty (30) feet or more in length on the streets within the corporate limits of the Town at any time except for the duration of the following activities: a. When actively engaged in loading or unloading; b. Temporary parking for emergency services to a vehicle or trailer or repair a mechanical breakdown; c. Temporary parking at a construction site during the period of active construction.

2) Provided, that this section shall not apply to any mass transit buses or to school buses, when the school buses are parked in conformity with permits issued by the police department. Any violator who has received a notice of violation under this section may answer such charge before the traffic violation bureau by voluntarily paying a civil penalty of ten dollars ($10). Motor vehicle and traffic penalties are paid to the Wake County Public School System.

FIRE DEPARTMENT FEES: Fire Permits: Aerosol Products............................................................................................................................................... $75.00 Amusement Buildings....................................................................................................................................... $75.00 Aviation Facilities............................................................................................................................................. $75.00 Battery Systems ................................................................................................................................................ $75.00 Carnivals and Fairs ........................................................................................................................................... $75.00 Cellulose Nitrate Film....................................................................................................................................... $75.00 Combustible Dust Producing Operations ......................................................................................................... $75.00 Combustible Fibers ........................................................................................................................................... $75.00 Compressed Gases ............................................................................................................................................ $75.00 Covered Mall Buildings.................................................................................................................................... $75.00 Cryogenic Fluids............................................................................................................................................... $75.00 Cutting/Welding ............................................................................................................................................... $75.00 Dry Cleaning Plants.......................................................................................................................................... $75.00 Exhibits and Trade Shows ................................................................................................................................ $75.00 Explosives (Also See Blasting) ........................................................................................................................ $75.00 Flammable/Combustible Liquids Storage......................................................................................................... $75.00 Floor Finishing.................................................................................................................................................. $75.00 Fruit/Crop Ripening.......................................................................................................................................... $75.00 Fumigation and Thermal Insecticidal Fogging ................................................................................................. $75.00 Hazardous Materials ....................................................................................................................................... $250.00 HPM Facilities ................................................................................................................................................. $75.00 High Piled Storage............................................................................................................................................ $75.00 Hot Work Operations........................................................................................................................................ $75.00 Industrial Ovens................................................................................................................................................ $75.00 Lumber Yards/Woodworking Plants ................................................................................................................ $75.00 Liquid- or Gas- Fueled Vehicles or Equipment in Assembly Buildings .......................................................... $75.00 LP Gas .............................................................................................................................................................. $75.00 Magnesium ....................................................................................................................................................... $75.00 Miscellaneous Combustible Storage................................................................................................................. $75.00 Open Burning (Also See Burn Permits)............................................................................................................ $75.00 Open flames and torches................................................................................................................................... $75.00 Open flames and candles .................................................................................................................................. $75.00 Organic Coatings .............................................................................................................................................. $75.00 Places of Assembly........................................................................................................................................... $75.00 Private Fire Hydrants ........................................................................................................................................ $75.00 Pyrotechnic Special Effect Material ................................................................................................................. $75.00 Pyroxylin Plastics ............................................................................................................................................. $75.00

Refrigeration Equipment .................................................................................................................................. $75.00


ATTACHMENT A Repair Garages and Motor Fuel Dispensing Facilities ..................................................................................... $75.00 Rooftop Heliports ............................................................................................................................................. $75.00 Spraying or Dipping ........................................................................................................................................ $75.00 Storage of scrap tires and tire byproduct .......................................................................................................... $75.00 Temporary Membrane Structures, Tents, and Canopies................................................................................... $75.00 Tire Rebuilding Plants ...................................................................................................................................... $75.00 Waste Handling ................................................................................................................................................ $75.00 Wood Products.................................................................................................................................................. $75.00 Burn Permit (Air curtain burn only) 30 days .................................................................................................. $100.00 Blasting Permit 30 days .................................................................................................................................. $100.00 Tank Installation (per tank) ............................................................................................................................ $100.00 Tank Removal (per tank) ................................................................................................................................ $100.00

Hazardous Material Emergency Charges and Special Events: Hazardous material emergency charges, natural disasters, and special events costs are charged according to the specific service needed. Most of the respective charges are detailed in the “PUBLIC WORKS / UTILITES FEES Vehicle, Equipment and Labor Charges, Per Hour” section within this document. For all services provided that are not specifically listed in that section, the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA)’s schedule of equipment rates will be applied. Material and labor costs of personnel responding are not included in the FEMA equipment rates. The actual rates for personnel responding and materials utilized will be added accordingly. Detailed item and cost descriptions of those fees can be found at: http://www.fema.gov/government/grant/pa/eqrates.shtm Violation Fines: Imminent hazard violation .............................................................................................................................. $250.00 Non-compliance fee for outstanding violation ................................................................................................. $50.00 Inspection Fees (charged only for inspections conducted outside Cary Town Limits in the Town’s ETJ): Mercantile small ............................................................................................................................................... $13.00 Mercantile large ................................................................................................................................................ $67.00 Office small ...................................................................................................................................................... $13.00 Office large ....................................................................................................................................................... $36.00 Educational (Private) ........................................................................................................................................ $24.00 Industrial small ................................................................................................................................................. $60.00 Industrial medium ........................................................................................................................................... $132.00 Industrial large ................................................................................................................................................ $137.00 Hazardous small................................................................................................................................................ $36.00 Day care / rest home ......................................................................................................................................... $32.00 Multi-family...................................................................................................................................................... $36.00 Assembly .......................................................................................................................................................... $32.00 Malls ................................................................................................................................................................. $98.00 Reinspection ..................................................................................................................................................... $23.00 Other Fees: Hydrant Flow Test and Data........................................................................................................................... $250.00 Fire Hydrant Final Re-Inspection Fee ............................................................................................................ $200.00

E-911 TELEPHONE SERVICE SURCHARGE: Under the authority granted in North Carolina General Statute 62A-4; Secs. 12-2 through 12-20, the Town of Cary charges two separate fees to telephone subscribers that have access to the Town’s 911 Emergency Telephone Center. Wired Charge................................................................................................................... (per month / per line) $0.25 Wireless Charge............................................................................................................... (per month / per line) $0.80 INSPECTIONS & PERMITS FEES Building Permit Fees (B=Building, E=Electrical, P=Plumbing, M=Mechanical Permits)


ATTACHMENT A DESCRIPTION .....................................................................$/SQ. FT............................................... MINIMUM FEE ALL NEW STRUCTURES, ADDITIONS, FITUPS Non-Residential ** (B)................................................................... $0.10............................................................... $185.00 Non-Residential (E P M) – (each trade) .....................................$0.03 ea................................................................. $60.00 Residential * (B)............................................................................. $0.15............................................................... $185.00 Residential (E P M) – (each trade) .............................................$0.04 ea................................................................. $60.00 Residential Accessories & Alterations ........................................... $0.15................................................................. $60.00 MISCELLANEOUS Minimum Permit Fee (B E P M) - (each trade) .................................N/A................................................................. $60.00 Mobile Home (B E P M) ...................................................................N/A................................................................. $60.00 Construction Trailer (E) ....................................................................N/A................................................................. $60.00 Change of Occupancy (B) ................................................................N/A............................................................... $185.00 Demolition (B E P M) .......................................................................N/A................................................................. $60.00 Exact Change Out**** .....................................................................N/A................................................................. $60.00 Fire Alarm System...................................................< 15,000 square feet................................................................. $60.00 Fire Alarm System........................................ 15,101 –50,000 square feet............................................................... $120.00 Fire Alarm System....................................................>50,000 square feet............................................................... $240.00 Fixed Extinguishing Systems (Cooking/Spraying) ...........................N/A................................................................. $60.00 Sprinkler System/Standpipe (B) .................................. $0.01/square foot................................................................. $60.00 Sign (E)..............................................................................................N/A................................................................. $60.00 Curb Cut Fee (B) ...............................................................................N/A................................................................. $60.00 Re-inspection.....................................................................................N/A................................................................. $60.00 Post-Construction Inspections (each trade ).....................................N/A................................................................. $60.00 Special Request Inspection..................................... $60/hr. per Inspector................................................................. $60.00 PLAN REVIEW FEES Residential, New Single Family Dwellings/Townhomes (B E P M) . ..N/A............................................................... $160.00 Commercial/Non-Residential, New Construction & Fitups (B E P M)N/A............................................................... $265.00 Utility Pretreatment ...........................................................................N/A................................................................. $50.00 Express Review Fees For the first hour...................................................................................................................................................... $600.00 For each quarter hour thereafter ............................................................................................................................. $150.00 For the first hour of a re-review .............................................................................................................................. $300.00 For each quarter hour thereafter .............................................................................................................................. $150.00 Cancellations must be made at least 3 days prior to the scheduled review or the $600.00 fee is applied. ADMINISTRATIVE FEES Restamp plans (per permit)................................................................N/A................................................................. $60.00 Duplicate Building Permit Inspections Card .....................................N/A................................................................. $10.00 Project Modification Fee/Change Contractor Form ..........................N/A................................................................. $60.00 Homeowners Recovery Fund *** .....................................................N/A................................................................. $10.00 Refund Processing Fee (applied to refunds of $1,000 or greater) .....N/A................................................................. $50.00 NOTES: 1) Double permit fees shall be charged for work started without permit being issued. 2) A re-inspection fee shall be assessed when the project is not ready for inspection, recurring deficiencies exist, or inspection requests are not canceled on time. 3) No CO will be issued until extra charges are cleared in the office. Inspectors cannot accept any type of fees in the field.

4) Fees may be collected on behalf of Wake County Environmental Services for plan review by County staff in accordance with Wake County’s current budget and fee schedule. 5) Permit reinstatement fee is to be minimum fee per trade.

* Residential other than single family is additional $60/unit + $/SF or minimum. ** Except storage occupancy which is $0.07/SF if SF > 10,000. *** New single family home or an addition/alteration to existing single family home.


ATTACHMENT A **** Exact change-out of hot water heater or heating units.

ENGINEERING FEES: Assessment Charges: 4” Sidewalk (per linear ft. abutting frontage) ............................................................................................... * $20.00 Storm Drainage (per linear ft. abutting frontage) ............................................................................................ $26.70 6” Concrete Driveway (per sq.yd. installed per property – including radius) ................................................. $28.00 Concrete Residential Driveway .......................................................................................................... (each) $750.00 Concrete Commercial Driveway..................................................................................................... (each) $1,600.00 2' - 6" Concrete Curb & Gutter ...............................................................(per linear ft., abutting frontage) * $20.00 Flat Fee Assessment Rates: Water Assessment Water Main per linear foot (unpaved area or shoulder).................................................................................... $20.00 Per linear foot (paved area)............................................................................................................................... $34.00 Water Connection without Meter (bored under roadway).............................................................................. $800.00 Water Connection without Meter ................................................................................................................... $480.00 Sewer Assessment: Per linear foot (unpaved area or shoulder)........................................................................................................ $32.50 Per linear foot (unpaved area, easement required)............................................................................................ $42.50 Per linear foot (paved area)............................................................................................................................... $46.50 4" service lateral (bored under roadway)..................................................................................................... $1,000.00 4" service lateral ............................................................................................................................................. $600.00

PLANNING FEES: Site Plan/Subdivision Filing Fees: New site plan for building(s) with total of 40,000 square feet or more of gross floor area (excluding the Alston Mixed Use Sketch Plan): “Full Plan” option....................................................................................................................... (each) $1,500.00 “Sketch Plan” option ...................................................................................................................... (each) $750.00 New site plan for building(s) with less than 40,000 square feet of gross floor area (excluding the Alston Mixed Use Sketch Plan): “Full Plan” option.......................................................................................................................... (each) $700.00 “Sketch Plan” option ...................................................................................................................... (each) $350.00 New site plan within the Alston Mixed Use Sketch Plan for building(s) with total of 40,000 square feet or more of gross floor area............................................................. (each) $2,500.00 New site plan within the Alston Mixed Use Sketch Plan for building(s) with less than 40,000 square feet of gross floor area........................................................................ (each) $1,200.00 Revision to previously approved site plan for a 50% or greater increase in gross floor area ............ (each) $700.00 Revision to previously approved site plan for less than 50% increase in gross floor Area (Minor site plan) ................................................................................................................... (each) $250.00 New site plan located in Town Center Zoning District ......................................................................... (each) 250.00 Revision to site plan located in Town Center Zoning District (for less than 50% increase in gross floor area) ........................................................................................................................ (each) $100.00 New subdivision plan, less than 5 acres: “Full Plan” option.......................................................................................................................... (each) $500.00 “Sketch Plan” option ...................................................................................................................... (each) $250.00 New subdivision plan, 5 acres or greater:


ATTACHMENT A “Full Plan” option....................................................................................................................... (each) $1,000.00 “Sketch Plan” option ...................................................................................................................... (each) $500.00 New subdivision plan, less than 5 acres, within the Alston Mixed Use Sketch Plan .......................... (each) $700.00 New subdivision plan, 5 acres or greater, within the Alston Mixed Use Sketch Plan...................... (each) $1,200.00 New subdivision plan, located in Town Center District..................................................................... (each) $250.00 Revision to subdivision plan, 50% or less increase in existing number of lots (Minor Plan) ............ (each) $250.00 Revision to previously approved subdivision plan, for greater than 50% increase in existing number of lots ................................................................................................................... (each) $500.00 Revision to subdivision plan located in Town Center Zoning District................................................ (each) $100.00 Reuse/Redevelopment Plans................................................................................................................ (each) $250.00 4th Review, and each review after, for plans for above listed projects ................................................ (each) $100.00 Minor Alterations – Incidental revisions to site or subdivision plans (i.e.: revisions to lighting, façades, landscaping, dumpster/mechanical screening, fencing, and similar) ................... (each) $75.00 Director Modification to the Development and Zoning District Standards approval (LDO 3.19.1) and special exceptions requiring Director Approval ......... (per modification or exception) $75.00

Rezoning Application Fees: General rezoning, or initial zoning associated with citizen-initiated annexation petition, 5 acres or greater ........................................................................................................................... (each) $700.00 Initial zoning associated with citizen-initiated annexation petition, less than 5 acres ...................................................................................................................................... (each) $100.00 Conditional use rezoning (per change of zoning classification requested) ..................................... (each) $1,000.00 Mixed Use District (MXD) Rezoning Application Fees: Mixed Use District (MXD) Rezoning with 40,000 square feet or more gross floor area or 40 residential units............................................................................................................................ (each) $1,800.00 Mixed Use District (MXD) Rezoning with less than 40,000 square feet gross floor area or 40 residential units............................................................................................................................ (each) $1,000.00 Mixed Use District (MXD) Rezoning amendment to less than 50% of total size (gross floor area, number of units, etc.) ............................................................................................................. (each) $500.00 Planned Development Application Fee: New application or major amendments to approved Planned Developments (Major PDD) ............ (each) $1,500.00 Minor amendment to an approved Planned Development (change conditions, etc.) .......................... (each) $700.00 Minor Planned Developments (Minor PDD)....................................................................................... (each) $700.00 Additional Public Hearing and/or Mailed Notice Fee (for all planning-related applications).................. (each) $150.00 Final Plat Filing Fees (includes preliminary plat review): New Plat approval, more than 10 lots ................................................................................................ (each) $350.00 New Plat approval, up to 10 lots ......................................................................................................... (each) $250.00 Revision to previously approved plat (e.g., recombination, minor correction or easement plat)........ (each) $100.00 Other Land Development Ordinance Fees: Special Use application........................................................................................................................ (each) $250.00 Land Use Plan Amendment ................................................................................................................. (each) $700.00 Accessory Use Permit ...........................................................................................................(per application) $25.00 Temporary Use Permit........................................................................................................................... (each) $50.00 Citizen-initiated Annexation petition (total acreage less than 3 acres) ................................................ (each) $50.00 Citizen-initiated Annexation petition (total acreage 3 acres or greater).............................................. (each) $200.00 Variance application ................................................................................................................ (per variance) $300.00 Sign Variance application........................................................................................................ (per variance) $300.00 Civil Penalty Appeal application ................................................................................................ (per appeal) $300.00 Administrative Appeal (BOA - LDO) Application .................................................................... (per appeal) $300.00 Administrative Appeal (BOA-Minimum Housing) Application ........................................................ (each) $300.00


ATTACHMENT A Directorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Modification - Minor building encroachments in required setbacks (LDO 3.19.3) ........... (each) $150.00 Vested Rights Certificate..................................................................................................................... (each) $100.00 Zoning Verification Letter...........................................................................................................(per parcel) $100.00 Tree Clearing Certificate .................................................................................................................................. $50.00

Permanent and Temporary Signs: Sign Permit - Temporary sign................................................................................................................ (each) $25.00 Sign Permit - Wall sign (New or change greater than 25% to an existing sign) ..............................(per sign) $50.00 Sign Permit - Ground sign (New or change greater than 25% to an existing sign) ..........................(per sign) $75.00 Minor Modification (Change of 25% or less) to an existing sign ......................................................... (each) $25.00 New Master Sign Plans (Residential) (New or change greater than 25% to an existing sign plan) ........................................................... (each) $100.00 New Master Sign Plans (Non-Residential) (New or change greater than 25% to an existing sign plan) ........................................................... (each) $150.00 Minor Modification to Master Sign Plan (Change of 25% or less to an existing sign plan) ................. (each) $25.00 Utility Inspection Fees: In addition to other inspection fees, the owner of any land proposed for development as a subdivision or proposed for development requiring site plan approval pursuant to the zoning ordinance or development requiring submission of a plot plan shall, upon submission of the final subdivision plan or site plan or plot plan, pay the following utility inspection fees: Water lines ................................................................................................................................ (per linear foot) $0.85 Reclaimed water lines............................................................................................................... (per linear foot) $0.85 Sewer lines................................................................................................................................ (per linear foot) $0.85 Water and Sewer taps .........................................................................................................................(per tap) $50.00 Application fee for Drainage and Utility Easement Release Request ................................................. (each) $125.00 Pump Station Construction ...........................................................................................(per pump station) $1,400.00 Site Inspection Fees: In addition to other inspection fees, the owner of any land proposed for development as a subdivision or proposed for development requiring site plan approval pursuant to the zoning ordinance or development requiring submission of a plot plan shall, upon submission of the final subdivision plan or site plan or plot plan, pay the following site inspection fees: 1) Residential (single-family dwelling) Sites................................................................................... (per lot) $35.00 2) Non-Residential or Multi-family Development Sites ............................................... (per denuded acre) $515.00 3) Re-inspection of single-family residential sites ........................................................................... (per lot) $60.00 Street Inspection Fees: In addition to other inspection fees, the owner of any land proposed for development as a subdivision or proposed for development requiring site plan approval pursuant to the zoning ordinance or development requiring submission of a plot plan shall, upon submission of the final subdivision plan or site plan or plot plan, pay the following street inspection fees: Streets, including any combination of public/private street widening, fire lanes or sidewalks .......................................................................................................... (per linear lane ft) $1.60 Environmental Permits (Grading Permits): Sites and Subdivisions ..................................................................................................... (per denuded acre) $500.00

Water and Sewer Extensions: Permit for use of groundwater-application fee ...................................................................................... (each) $10.00 Sanitary Sewer Non Discharge Permit ................................................................................................ (each) $200.00 Water Extension Permit ....................................................................................................................... (each) $200.00


ATTACHMENT A

Street Signs: Street signs requested by individuals: Per sign blade........................................................................................................................................ (each) $45.00 Per Public Hearing ................................................................................................................................ (each) $30.00 Total Nitrogen (TN) for TN above 40 mg/l on a mass basis ......................................................(per 100 lbs) $58.11

PARKS, RECREATION AND CULTURAL RESOURCES FEES: Recreation Fees: Sports Leagues Youth Sports (Ages 5-18) Fees for Cary residents recover a minimum of 75% of direct costs. Non-resident participants must pay an additional $25 Adult Sports (Over Age 18) Fees are calculated at a 100% direct costs recovery rate with up to an additional $25/participant for non-residents. Sports Camps and Clinics Fees for Cary residents are set to recover up to 175% of instructor and 100% of supply costs or in-kind services. Nonresident participants must pay an additional 30% not to exceed $30 per camp or clinic. Instructional Programs Fees for Cary residents recover a minimum of 175% of instructor costs and 100% supply costs based upon minimum to average participation. Classes: Additional non-resident fee equal to 30% of resident’s fee not to exceed $30.00 with a minimum of $5.00 1-Day Workshops: Additional non-resident fee equal to 30% of resident fee not to exceed $30.00 with a minimum of $1.00. Senior Citizen Programs/Special Events/Trips/SeniorNet Classes: Classes & Workshops: Fees for classes shall be set to recover a minimum of 110% of instructor costs plus 100% of supplies based on minimum to average participation. Non-residents shall pay an additional 30% of resident fees not to exceed $30.00 with a minimum of $5.00. 1-Day Workshops: Additional non-resident fee equal to 30% of resident’s fee not to exceed $30.00 with a minimum of $1.00. Day and Overnight Trips: Fees for day trips are 110% of transportation cost plus 100% of admission fees (based on a minimum number of riders). Staff travel costs are to be divided among all travelers’ expenses. Non-residents shall pay an additional 30% of resident fees with a minimum of $5.00. Senior Special Events and Dances: Direct supply and/or meal costs will be divided among all participants (resident and non-resident will have same fee). SeniorNet Classes and Workshops: All participants in SeniorNet must join the national organization prior to registering for any classes. Cary residents and non-residents pay the same membership fee. Class fees will be based on recommendations from SeniorNet and the ability to provide sufficient funds to replace lab supplies and equipment. Non-residents shall pay an additional 30% of resident fees not to exceed $30.00 with a minimum of $5.00 for classes, workshops and labs. Garden Plots (for Cary Residents Only): Raised Planting beds (per season) ............................................................................................................................. $20.00 Small Planting bed (per season) ................................................................................................................................ $30.00 Large Planting bed (per season) ................................................................................................................................ $40.00 Senior Fitness Pass - Adult (55+)


ATTACHMENT A Resident (per visit) ..................................................................................................................................................... $5.00 Non-Resident (per visit) ............................................................................................................................................. $6.00 Resident (per 5 visit pass) ......................................................................................................................................... $25.00 Non-Resident (per 5 visit pass) ............................................................................................................................... $30.00 Senior Open Studio Membership Pass - Adult (55+) Resident (per visit) ..................................................................................................................................................... $4.00 Non-Resident (per visit) ............................................................................................................................................. $5.00 Resident (per 10 visit pass) ....................................................................................................................................... $25.00 Non-Resident (per 10 visit pass) ............................................................................................................................. $30.00 Gym, Fitness and Wellness Passes: Adult (18+) Resident (per visit) ..................................................................................................................................................... $4.00 Non-Resident (per visit) ............................................................................................................................................. $6.00 Resident (per 5 visit pass).......................................................................................................................................... $15.00 Non-Resident (per 5 visit pass) ............................................................................................................................... $25.00 Resident (per 10 visit pass) ....................................................................................................................................... $20.00 Non-Resident (per 10 visit pass) ............................................................................................................................. $40.00 Resident (per 25 visit pass)........................................................................................................................................ $37.50 Non-Resident (per 25 visit pass) ............................................................................................................................... $75.00 Youth and Teens (Ages 8-17) Resident (per visit) ...................................................................................................................................................... $4.00 Non-Resident (per visit) .............................................................................................................................................. $6.00 Resident (per 5 visit pass).......................................................................................................................................... $10.00 Non-Resident (per 5 visit pass) ................................................................................................................................. $20.00 Resident (per 15 visit pass)........................................................................................................................................ $15.00 Non-Resident (per 15 visit pass) ............................................................................................................................... $30.00 Seniors (55+) ............................................................................................................................................................FREE Fitness Pass Fitness Single Session Pass (Resident)........................................................................................................................ $4.00 Fitness Single Session Pass (Non-Resident) ............................................................................................................... $5.00 Fitness Pass 5 Sessions (Resident) ............................................................................................................................ $20.00 Fitness Pass 5 Sessions (Non-Resident) .................................................................................................................... $25.00 Fitness Pass 10 Sessions (Resident) .......................................................................................................................... $35.00 Fitness Pass 10 Sessions (Non-Resident) .................................................................................................................. $45.00 Wellness Pass Single Sessions Pass (Resident) .................................................................................................................................. $9.00 Single Sessions Pass (Non-Resident) ........................................................................................................................ $12.00 Wellness Pass 5 Sessions (Resident) ......................................................................................................................... $45.00 Wellness Pass 5 Sessions (Non-Resident)................................................................................................................. $60.00 Wellness Pass 10 Sessions (Resident) ....................................................................................................................... $80.00 Wellness Pass 10 Sessions (Non-Resident)............................................................................................................. $100.00 Corporate Pass (For Businesses Within Town of Cary) Open Gym Pass 100 Sessions.................................................................................................................................. $300.00 Fitness Pass 100 Sessions........................................................................................................................................ $400.00 Wellness Pass 100 Sessions..................................................................................................................................... $900.00 Teen Programs: Fees are calculated based on 110% of direct costs, including part-time staff salaries, instructors, transportation, and supplies based on minimum to actual participation. There is an additional fee of 30% of resident fee not to exceed $30.00 for non-residents. Summer Camp/Track-Out Programs


ATTACHMENT A Fees are calculated to recover a minimum of 110% of direct cost to operate the program based on a minimum to actual participation. Non-residents fees shall be an additional 30% of resident fee, not to exceed $30.00 Late pick-up fee (per hour)........................................................................................................................................ $13.00 Art Supplies – Jordan Hall Art Center & Senior Center: General art supply charges are calculated at cost. Clay charges are calculated at a minimum of 300% of costs to recover studio usage (wheels, firings, glazes, utility costs). Ticket Sales: Ticket sales for Applause! Cary Youth Theatre is calculated to recover 100% of production costs. Ticket sales for other productions are calculated to recover 125% of artist fees. Ropes Course Fees: Corporate Half day low course....................................................................................................................... (per participant) $36.00 Half day high course....................................................................................................................... (per participant) $49.00 Combination High/Low – Full Day ............................................................................................... (per participant) $65.00 Half day low with one high element............................................................................................... (per participant) $46.00 Noncorporate Half day low course........................................................................................................................ (per participant) $25.00 Half day high course....................................................................................................................... (per participant) $42.00 Combination High/Low.................................................................................................................. (per participant) $34.00 (Half day low with one high element) Combination High/Low (Full Day) ................................................................................................ (per participant) $58.00 Wake County Public School System Classes Half day low course........................................................................................................................ (per participant) $23.00 Half day high course....................................................................................................................... (per participant) $40.00 Combination High/Low.................................................................................................................. (per participant) $32.00 (Half day low with one high element) Combination High/Low (Full Day) ................................................................................................ (per participant) $56.00 Non-Resident Fee – There is an additional fee of 30% of resident fee not to exceed $30.00 for non-residents. Special Guided Programs at Hemlock Bluffs Non-Profit groups..................................................................................................................................... (per hour) $36.00 Group rate................................................................................................................................................. (per hour) $42.00 Wake County School Groups ................................................................................................................... (per hour) $27.00

Fees and Reservations: Town sponsored Parks, Recreation and Cultural Resource programs and programs co-sponsored by the Parks, Recreation and Cultural Resource Dept. .......................................................No Fee

Facility Reservations: Herbert C. Young Community Center Reservation Fees*: Facility: Large Meeting Room (A) .............................................................................................................. (per hr-2 hr min) $80.00 Small Meeting Room (B) .............................................................................................................. (per hr-2 hr min) $49.00 Kitchen (available w/ meeting room) ....................................................................................... (per hr- 2 hour min) $29.00 Gymnasium (when used as a meeting room)................................................................................. (per hr-2 hr min) $55.00 Entire Building ............................................................................................................................ (per hr-2 hr min) $200.00 *Herbert C. Young Community Center fees shown above are resident fees. Non-resident fees are 150% of the resident rate. Additional per hour charge beyond normal hours .................................................................................................... $25.00 Damage Deposit (25% of total reservation fee) ............................................................................................................. (minimum) $100.00 (with permitted beer and wine serving) .............................................................................................. (minimum) $150.00


ATTACHMENT A Cary based Non-Profit Groups ............................................................................... 50% discount & no charge for kitchen (weekdays, 8 am - 2 pm) Application fee for serving beer and wine......................................................................................(per application) $50.00 Activities: Volleyball ...................................................................................................... (per usage, per net, includes set-up) $25.00 Equipment: (Includes set-up and removal) Staging...................................................................................................................................................... (per use) $100.00 Portable Dance Floor................................................................................................................................ (per use) $525.00 40â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Pipe and Drape ................................................................................................................................... (per use) $300.00 Electric Piano.............................................................................................................................................. (per use) $25.00 Chairs for Gymnasium............................................................................................................................... (per 100) $20.00 Tables for Gymnasium ..................................................................................................................................... (each) $2.00 Gym Floor Cover Use .............................................................................................................................. (per use) $200.00 Gym Scoreboard........................................................................................... (per hr with 2 min includes operator) $15.00 Middle Creek Community Center Reservation Fees and Charges*: East/West Meeting Room......................................................................................................................... (per hour) $49.00 Gymnasium (for athletic activities only) ....................................................................................(per with 2 hr min) $55.00 *Middle Creek Community Center fees shown above are resident fees. Non-resident fees are 150% of the resident rate shown. Additional per hour charge beyond the normal hours ............................................................................................... $25.00 Damage Deposit (25% of total reservation fees).................................................................................. (minimum) $100.00 Volleyball Net ...................................................................................................................................... (per net use) $25.00 Gym Scoreboard.....................................................................(per hour with 2 hour minimum, includes operator) $15.00 Cary-based Non-Profit groups (weekdays, 8 am â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 2 pm) and YMCA After School Program....................... 50% discount Bond Park Community Center Reservation Fees and Charges*: Maple Room w/kitchenette.................................................................................................... (per hr with 2-hr min) $49.00 Oak Room w/kitchenette ....................................................................................................... (per hr with 2-hr min) $49.00 Dogwood Room .................................................................................................................... (per hr with 2-hr min) $29.00 Gymnasium (per gym-for athletic activities only)................................................................. (per hr with 2-hr min) $55.00 *Bond Park Community Center fees shown above are resident fees. Non-resident fees are 150% of the resident rate. Additional per hour charge beyond the normal hours .............................................................................................. $25.00 Damage Deposit (25% of total reservation fee) .................................................................................. (minimum) $100.00 Volleyball Net .................................................................................................................................. (per net usage) $25.00 Gym Scoreboard........................................................................................(per hr with 2-hr min includes operator) $15.00 Cary-based Non-Profit groups (weekdays, 8 a.m. - 2 p.m.) ........................................................................... 50% discount Senior Center Reservation Fees*: Ball Room (includes use of Courtyard/Gazebo).....................................................................(per hr with 2 hr min) $95.00 Ball Room 1 (1/3 Ball Room) ..................................................................................................(per hr with 2 hr min) $49.00 Ball Room 2 (2/3 Ball Room) ..................................................................................................(per hr with 2 hr min) $69.00 Classroom 302 ........................................................................................................................(per hr with 2 hr min) $39.00 Kitchen ...................................................................................................................................(per hr with 2 hr min) $29.00 (Reserved only w/ Ball Room(s); no cooking, catering only). Coffee Urn.................................................................................................................................................. (per use) $25.00 Courtyard-Gazebo ..................................................................................................................(per hr with 2 hr min) $15.00 Conference Room...................................................................................................................(per hr with 2 hr min) $20.00 *Senior Center fees shown above are resident fees. Non-resident fees are 150% of the resident rate shown. Cary-based Non-Profit groups (weekdays, 8am-2pm) ................................................................................... 50% discount Additional per hour charge beyond normal hours .................................................................................................... $25.00 Application fee for serving beer and wine......................................................................................(per application) $50.00 Damage Deposit (25% of total reservation fee) .................................................................................... minimum($100.00) Damage Deposit (with permitted beer and wine serving) .................................................................... (minimum) $150.00


ATTACHMENT A Stage Usage (includes set-up) .................................................................................................................. (per use) $100.00 40â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Pipe and Drape ................................................................................................................................... (per use) $300.00 Page-Walker Arts and History Center Reservation Fees*: First Floor - Main Gallery ......................................................................................................(per hr with 2 hr min) $70.00 (Monday -Thursday) First Floor - Main Gallery ....................................................................................................(per hr with 6 hr min) $100.00 (Friday, Saturday, & Sunday) First Floor/Second Floor Combination (Friday, Saturday, & Sunday).................................... (per hr w/6-hr min) $112.00 Second Floor - Conference and Education Center .................................................................(per hr with 2 hr min) $50.00 Third Floor - Archive Gallery ................................................................................................(per hr with 2 hr min) $68.00 Additional per hour charge (outside established hours) ............................................................................................ $25.00 *Page-Walker Arts and History Center fees shown above are resident fees. Non-resident fees are 150% of the resident rate shown. Cary based non-profit cultural groups ............................................................................................................ 50% discount (Sunday evening - Thursday evening) Other Charges/Equipment Application fee for serving beer and wine......................................................................................(per application) $50.00 Damage Deposit - First floor .................................................................................................................................. $250.00 - Second floor ......................................................................................................................................................... $100.00 -Third Floor ............................................................................................................................................................ $125.00 TV/VCR ..................................................................................................................................................... (per use) $10.00 Coffee Urn (100 cup) ................................................................................................................................. (per use) $25.00 Portable Dance Floor............................................................................................................................... (per use) $525.00 North Cary Park Shelter and Rotary Picnic Shelter-Ritter Park: Weekdays ...............................................................................................................................(per hr with 4 hr min) $16.00 Weekends & holidays.............................................................................................................(per hr with 4 hr min) $22.00 Non-resident rates are........................................................................................................150% of the resident rate shown Additional per hour charge beyond the normal hours ............................................................................................... $25.00 Kiwanis Shelter - Bond Park: Weekdays ...............................................................................................................................(per hr with 4 hr min) $18.00 Weekends & holidays.............................................................................................................(per hr with 4 hr min) $24.00 Non-resident rates are........................................................................................................150% of the resident rate shown Additional per hour charge beyond the normal hours ............................................................................................... $25.00 Davis Drive Park Shelter, Thomas Brooks Playground Shelter, Thomas Brooks Soccer Shelter, and White Oak Park Shelter, Ropes Course Shelter: Weekdays ...............................................................................................................................(per hr with 2 hr min) $12.00 Weekends & holidays.............................................................................................................(per hr with 2 hr min) $17.00 Non-resident rates are........................................................................................................150% of the resident rate shown additional per hour charge beyond the normal hours ............................................................................................... $25.00 Buehler Shelter, Kids Together Park Shelter and Bond Park Screened Porch: Weekdays ...............................................................................................................................(per hr with 2 hr min) $14.00 Weekends & holidays.............................................................................................................(per hr with 2 hr min) $20.00 Non-resident rates are..................................................................................................... 150% of the resident rate shown Additional per hour charge beyond the normal hours .............................................................................................. $25.00

Green Hope Elementary Park Shelter: Weekdays ...............................................................................................................................(per hr with 4 hr min) $14.00 Weekends & holidays.............................................................................................................(per hr with 4 hr min) $20.00 After-hours usage fee ............................................................................................................................... (per hour) $25.00


ATTACHMENT A Non-resident rates are........................................................................................................150% of the resident rate shown Sertoma Amphitheater: Mon-Fri (8am-2pm) - Non-Holiday ......................................................................................................... (per use) $125.00 Mon-Fri (3pm-Closing) - Non-Holiday.................................................................................................... (per use) $125.00 Mon-Fri (All Day) - Non-Holiday ............................................................................................................ (per use) $250.00 Sat-Sun & Holidays* (9am-2pm) ............................................................................................................. (per use) $200.00 Sat-Sun & Holidays* (3pm-Closing) ....................................................................................................... (per use) $200.00 Sat-Sun & Holidays* (9am-Closing)........................................................................................................ (per use) $400.00 Holidays are: Memorial Day, Fourth of July, & Labor Day Equipment Usage and Boat Launch Fees (subject to availability): Pedal Boats ............................................................................................................................................. (per ½ hour) $6.00 Sailboats ................................................................................................................................................... (per hour) $11.00 Kayaks ........................................................................................................................................................ (per hour) $5.00 Rowboat...................................................................................................................................................... (per hour) $5.00 Trolling Motors .......................................................................................................................................... (per use) $11.00 Boat Launch Ramp (non-motorized vessels maximum 16 ft.) ..................................................................... (per use) $4.00 Annual boat launch pass (Cary residents only unlimited use)...................................................................(per year) $30.00 Bond Park - Retail Store: Retail prices charge based on cost and inventory. Stevens Nature Center/Hemlock Bluffs Retail Fees: Retail prices charge based on cost and inventory. Hourly Sports Fields Reservations: (Excludes Thomas Brooks & Middle Creek baseball/softball complexes and WakeMed Soccer Park) Hourly Rate for baseball/softball field use – (Resident)............................................................................................ $20.00 Hourly Rate for baseball/softball field use – (Non-Resident) ................................................................................... $40.00 Hourly Rate for baseball/softball field use (Non-Profit Athletic Organizations, Wake County Schools) .............. $20.00 Hourly Rate for Soccer /Multi-Purpose field use (Resident) .................................................................................... $40.00 Hourly Rate for Soccer/Multi-Purpose field use (Non-Resident) ............................................................................. $60.00 Hourly Rate for Soccer/Multi-Purpose field use (Non-Profit Athletic Organizations, Wake County Schools)... .. $40.00 Other Fees for Field Reservation use: Light usage (where available)................................................................................................................... (per hour) $10.00 Field preparation: Baseball/Softball infield preparation ..............................................................................................(per application) $25.00 Football field lining/painting ........................................................................................................(per application) $100.00 Sand Volleyball Court Reservations Tournament or Special Events rate for Sand Volleyball Courts ...............................................(per court per hour) $10.00 (Each tournament reservation includes use of the court(s), lines, sand groomed, and lights) Middle Creek Softball Complex - Tournament and Rental Reservation Fees: 1 Field (hourly rate)(per hour) .................................................................................................................................. $40.00 1 Field ½ day (up to 6 hours) .................................................................................................................................. $150.00 1 Field all day (8:00am-11:00pm) ........................................................................................................................... $200.00 Full Wheel of Softball Complex (4 fields) all day .................................................................................................. $600.00 Full Wheel of Softball Complex (4 fields) 2 days................................................................................................ $1,100.00 Full Wheel of Softball Complex (4 fields) 2 ½ days............................................................................................ $1,500.00 Each tournament reservation fee includes basic maintenance service, water coolers in each dugout, batting cage use, and light use. (Basic maintainance service includes fields to be drug and marked prior to the first game of each day rented and drug after the 3rd game of the day.)


ATTACHMENT A Middle Creek Softball Complex - Additional Services for Tournament Reservations: Extra Field Preparation ..................................................................................................................(per application) $30.00 Tent usage ................................................................................................................................................. (per tent) $30.00 Table/chair usage (1 table/6 chairs)........................................................................................................................... $25.00 Thomas Brooks Park Softball Complex Tournament and Rental Reservation Fees: 1 Field (hourly rate)................................................................................................................................. (per hour) $40.00 1 Field ½ day (up to 6 hours) .................................................................................................................................. $150.00 1 Field all day (8:00am-11:00pm) ........................................................................................................................... $200.00 Full Wheel of Softball Complex (4 fields) all day .................................................................................................. $600.00 Full Wheel of Softball Complex (4 fields) 2 days................................................................................................ $1,100.00 Full Wheel of Softball Complex (4 fields) 2 ½ days............................................................................................ $1,500.00 Each tournament reservation fee includes basic maintenance service, water coolers in each dugout, batting cage use, and light use. (Basic maintainance service includes fields to be drug and marked prior to the first game of each day rented and drug after the 3rd game of the day.) Thomas Brooks Park Softball Complex - Additional Services for Tournament Reservations: Extra Field Preparation ..................................................................................................................(per application) $30.00 Tent usage ................................................................................................................................................. (per tent) $30.00 Table/chair usage (1 table/6 chairs)........................................................................................................................... $25.00 USA Baseball National Training Complex at Thomas Brooks Park: Stadium Event (usually a high attendance game (1,000 or more) ............................................ (per event/game) $1,500.00 Stadium Game (usually a low attendance game on the stadium, 999 or less) .......................................(per game) $900.00 Each stadium event or game includes batting practice prior to use, field prepped before BP and also prepped and lined before the game itself, use of lights, coolers and ice in dugouts, field recovery support in rain situations, and use of press box (including amenities), training room and ticket booths (when authorized by Town). Does not include tarp crew. Tarp crew per game ................................................................................................................................................. $800.00 Training Field Reservations (includes field 2, 3, 4) ...................................................................(per field per hour) $75.00 These hourly rentals include use of field, dugouts, scoreboards, PA system and ticket booths (when authorized by Town), ice and coolers in dugouts, field prep and lining, adjacent Batting Cage. USA Baseball Complex at Thomas Brooks Park: Additional Services for Hourly Training Field Reservations: Extra Field Preparation ..................................................................................................................(per application) $40.00 Batting Practice Setup/takedown ................................................................................................. (per occurrence) $100.00 Training Room Reservations ......................................................................................................................(per day) $40.00 Light usage ............................................................................................................................................... (per hour) $20.00 Scoreboard Operator/Official Scorer........................................................................................................ (per hour) $15.00 Press Box Usage for Tournament Headquaters ......................................................................................... (per day) $40.00 (location for Tournament Directors to use with their staff during weekend tournaments) Batting Cage Rental only (outside of field rental).................................................................................... (per hour) $25.00 Bullpen rental (Outside of field rental).................................................................................................... (per hour) $35.00 NOTE: Fees for special athletic events such as tournaments, co-sponsored events and multi-field events, rates will be determined based on number of games, tournament structure, economic impact or other related criteria. Thomas Brooks Park - Other Park Fees: Parking Lot Reservation (for use as remote parking for off-site events)...................................(per event) $400.00-900.00 (This may be adjusted based on number of spaces needed/used or the parking lots being used) Use of Park outside of field/complex reservations ...............................................................................(per day) $2,800.00 Use of Park outside of field/complex reservations ....................................................(per weekend –Sat/Sunday $4,600.00


ATTACHMENT A Cary Tennis Park Instructional Programs 1. Beginner classes /Intermediate classes/Camps â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Fees for Cary residents are established at an hourly rate computed as follows: (the average instructor rate + supply expenses + 25%) divided by the average between the minimum and maximum number of students per instructor. Single day/drop-in rate add additional 20%. Additional non-resident fee of 20% not to exceed $30. 2. Advanced Classes/Academy Instruction - Fees for Cary residents are established at an hourly rate computed as follows: (the average top two (2) instructorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s rate + supply expenses + 40%) divided by the average between the minimum and maximum number of students per instructor. Single day/drop-in rate add additional 20%. Additional non-resident fee of 20% not to exceed $30 with the exception of no additional non-resident rate for the highest level of the Academy Program. 3. League Team Instruction - Fees shall be computed by taking the beginner class hourly rate multiplied by the average roster size of the league and the number of instructional hours for the season. No additional nonresident rate. General Programs 1. Singles Challenge Ladder (Resident) (Per Player per season)............................................................................ $25.00 2. Singles Challenge Ladder (Non-Resident) (Per Player per season)..................................................................... $30.00 3. Doubles Challenge Ladder (Resident) (Per paired team per season).................................................................. $30.00 4. Doubles Challenge Ladder (Non-Resident) (Per paired team per season).......................................................... $36.00 5. Court Fees (Per hour/Per Player) (Resident)......................................................................................................... $2.00 6. Court Fees (Per Hour/Per Player) (Non-Resident) ................................................................................................ $3.00 7. Court Fees (Per hour/Per Player) QuickStart Courts (Resident)............................................................................ $1.00 8. Court Fees(Per hour/Per Player) QuickStart Courts (Non Resident)..................................................................... $2.00 9. USTA, Triangle, Capital League Facility Fee (Per player on roster plus applicable practice court fees) (Resident). ................................................................ $20.00 10. USTA/ Triangle/Capital League Facility Fee (Per player on roster plus applicable practice court fees) (Non-Resident)......................................................... $24.00 11. Individual Private Lessons (1 or 2 individuals) ................................................................................................. $40-55 (Private Lesson Hourly rates based on instructor certifications & experience) 12. Semi-Private Lessons (3 individuals/Fee applies per person/per hour) ............................................................... $20.00 13. Semi-Private Lessons (4 or more individuals/Fee applies per person/per hour).................................................. $15.00 14. Pro Shop Sales .............................................................................................Retail Prices Based on Cost and Inventory 15. Court Fee Pass (40 hours) (Resident) (change expiration from one year to four month) ................................... $72.00 16. Court Fees Pass (40 hours) (Non-Resident) (change expiration from one year to four month) ........................ $108.00 17. Court Fees Pass (60 hours) (Resident) (six month expiration) ............................................................................ $96.00 18. Court Fees Pass (60 hours) (Non-Resident) (six month expiration) .................................................................. $144.00 Tennis Park Annual Pass Adult Annual Pass (Resident) ................................................................................................................................. $300.00 Adult Annual Pass (Non-Resident) ......................................................................................................................... $400.00 Youth Annual Pass (Resident ) (18 and under) ....................................................................................................... $100.00 Youth Annual Pass (Non-Resident ) (18 and under)............................................................................................... $120.00 Senior Annual Pass (Resident) (Ages 55 and older) ............................................................................................... $200.00 Senior Annual Pass (Non-Resident) (Ages 55 and older) ....................................................................................... $250.00 Family of Two Senior Annual Pass (Resident) (Ages 55 and older)....................................................................... $300.00 Family of Two Senior Annual Pass (Non-Resident) (Ages 55 and older) .............................................................. $400.00 Family of Two Annual Pass (Resident)................................................................................................................... $400.00 Family of Two Annual Pass (Non-Resident)........................................................................................................... $500.00 Full Family Annual Pass (Resident) ........................................................................................................................ $500.00 Full Family Annual Pass (Non-Resident)................................................................................................................ $700.00


ATTACHMENT A Corporate/Organization Pass Businesses or Organizations can purchase an annual pass for their employees to use at a 40% discount with a minimum of 10 passes purchased. The passes can be any combination of individual or family passes. This special is only valid for current full time employees of the business/organization. Each passholder will have full Annual Passholder benefits. Cary Tennis Park Annual Passholder benefits include: All Cary Tennis Park court fees, Challenge Ladder registration fees, Cary Tennis Park facility fees for league play, Socials, Cary Towne Championships registration fee, Polar Doubles registration fee, Parent/Child Tournament registration fee, Pro Tournaments gate admission, ten (10) Guest Passes, eight (8) pass holder ball machine uses, Court Reservation up to one week in advance, ten percent (10%) discount on most inventory items and various special programs/clinics offered at reduced cost throughout the year. Pass holder benefits may be changed throughout the year at the discretion of the Department Director. Tennis Park Social Activities Fees for social activities shall be computed to recover total direct expenses including part-time staff costs and court fees divided by number of attendees. Tournament Reservations (Non-Profit and other tennis clubs/facilities) Fees for non-profit tournament reservations rates are based upon Cary resident court fee rates multiplied by the number of hours and courts divided by two plus direct expenses. Tournament Reservation (School Usage) Fees for school usage to include grades (K-12, high school and middle school conferences, and state athletic associations) shall be computed as follows for court usage: Up to 10 courts ..............................................................................(total for all courts) $10.00 per hour or $30.00 per day Eleven to Twenty (11 to 20) courts ...............................................(total for all courts) $15.00 per hour or $45.00 per day Twenty-one to Thirty (21 to 30) courts .........................................(total for all courts) $20.00 per hour or $60.00 per day Organized Play Organized play fees shall be set to recover the direct staff and supply costs of organizing and conducting the program plus 25% to recover a portion of the indirect costs. Additional court fees apply. NOTE: Fees for special athletic events such as tournaments, co-sponsored events and multi-court events, will be determined based on the number of matches, tournament structure, economic impact or other related criteria. WakeMed Soccer Park: Instructional Programs Fees for instructional programs shall be established to recover a minimum of 160% of the direct operational costs (instructors, supplies, equipment, etc.) Non-Resident participants shall pay an additional 30% of the resident rate not to exceed $30.00 per instruction program. Reservations Cross Country Course.............................................................................................................................. $350.00 per event (Includes use of the cross country course and parking lot E) Cross Country Course Reservation by Middle/High Schools .............................................................$100 per school year (Includes training and meet access for schools in Wake County per school year) General Field Reservations * (Fields 4, 5, 6, or 7) ......................................................................................$60.00 per hour General Fields Reservations * (Fields 4, 5, 6, or 7) Youth based non-profit organizations) ......................$45.00 per hour Field Reservation Training Field 8 .............................................................................................................$40.00 per hour Field Reservation Training Field 8 Youth based non-profit organizations .................................................$30.00 per hour Enhanced Field Reservations * (Fields 2 or 3) (Field lighting not included)............................................$100.00 per hour Enhanced Field Reservations * (Fields 2 or 3) (Youth based non-profit organizations) (Field lighting not included) .......................................................................................................................$75.00 per hour *General and Enhanced field reservations include field lining for standard soccer field size


ATTACHMENT A Stadium Reservation (Includes lighting if applicable, restrooms, ticket office on day of event, locker room(s), training room, officials locker room, TOC skyboxes, press box, audio/visual platform) (Event is defined as a single match) ......................................................................................................$3,000.00 per event Parking Event parking fees shall be set by the Town and if applicable, promoter. Proceeds received from parking may be retained by the Town, promoter or shared as per negotiated agreements. Other Charges/Equipment (When Not Included In Reservation Fee) Lighting Fee (Fields 2 or 3).........................................................................................................................$30.00 per hour Town of Cary Skybox Use (1 Hour Minimum)...........................................................................................$50.00 per hour Athletic Training Room................................................................................................................................ $25.00 per day Locker Room .................................................................................................................... $200.00 per locker room per day Portable Sound System...............................................................................................................................$50.00 per event Portable Scoreboard....................................................................................................................................$50.00 per event Portable Bleachers ................................................................................................................. $50.00 per bleacher per event Parking Lot E Reservation (For festivals, events, etc.) ............................................................................$500.00 per event Parking Lot Rental for use as a park-and-ride type of program .............. per rider charge with a min. $1,000.00 per event (This use may be negotiated per rider fee based on number of days, approved hours and purpose of event or by other contractual terms.) Security Services (Promoter must contact Town of Cary Police Department to arrange required security service. Technological Services/Phone (Price determined by Town of Cary Technology Service staff based on required services ordered.) NOTE: Fees for special athletic events such as tournaments, co-sponsored events and multi-field events, will be determined based on the number of matches, tournament structure, economic impact or other related criteria. Koka Booth Amphitheatre at Regency Park: Booth Amphitheatre is managed by an outside contractor who is responsible for setting the fee schedule for the current year. Current fees may be attained by calling (919) 462-2025. Sk8-Cary Annual Membership (Resident) ................................................................................................................................ $30.00 (Non-Resident) ........................................................................................................................ $60.00 Entry/Session members (Skate)................................................................................................................................... $4.00 Entry/Session members (Bike) .................................................................................................................................... $5.00 Entry/Session non-members (Skate)............................................................................................................................ $9.00 Entry/Session non-members (Bike)........................................................................................................................... $10.00 Annual Pass (Resident) ........................................................................................................................................... $300.00 Annual Pass (Non-Resident) .................................................................................................................................. $325.00 Annual Pass Renewal (Resident) .......................................................... (prior to current Annual Pass expiration) $275.00 Annual Pass Renewal (Non-Resident) ................................................. (prior to current Annual Pass expiration) $300.00 6 Month Pass (Resident).......................................................................................................................................... $150.00 6 Month Pass (Non-Resident) ................................................................................................................................. $175.00 Entry/Session with 6 Month Pass ................................................................................................................................ $1.00 Multi-Session Passes (Available for members only) Skate 10-session Pass ............................................................................................................................................... $30.00 Bike 10-session Pass.................................................................................................................................................. $38.00 Skate 25-session Pass ................................................................................................................................................ $70.00 Bike 25-session Pass.................................................................................................................................................. $87.00 Equipment Rental â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Helmet ............................................................................................................................. (each) $2.00 Knee/Elbow/Wrist pads...............................................................................................................................(each set) $2.00


ATTACHMENT A Instructional Programs Fees are set to recover a minimum of 175% of instructor cost based on minimum to average participation. Non-resident fees shall be an additional 30% of resident fee, not to exceed $30.00. Retail Sales ............................................................................................Retail price charges based on costs and inventory. Off-Leash Dog Park at Godbold Park: Single Dog Annual Membership (Resident).............................................................................................................. $40.00 Single Dog Annual Membership (Non-Resident) ..................................................................................................... $80.00 Multi Dog Annual Membership (Resident)............................................................................................................... $60.00 Multi Dog Annual Membership (Non-Resident)..................................................................................................... $120.00 Day Pass (Resident)..................................................................................................................................................... $5.00 Day Pass (Non-Resident) .......................................................................................................................................... $10.00

PUBLIC WORKS/UTILITIES FEES: Streets and Sidewalks: Fees for Pavement Cuts and Alterations: When Town resources are necessary to repair contractor pavement cuts: Maintenance Only: Min. charge for stone (includes labor, materials, & equip. costs) .................................. $100.00 Permanent Street Repairs: Full depth patches (includes labor, materials, and equipment costs): Asphalt 0-8 square yards ............................................................................................................................. $1,085.00 Asphalt over 8 square yards......................................................................................................... (per sq yd) $100.00 Fees for street cleaning: First hour..........................................................................................................................................................$300.00 Each additional hour ........................................................................................................................................$200.00

UTILITY CONNECTION TAP FEES – DEFINITIONS Street cut, bore and sidewalk/curb cut fees are charged when applicable. Tap Size: The diameter of the service line tap made into the main line at the connection point. Tap Type: Refers to water connection tap or sewer connection tap. Full Service Base Tap: (Water and Sewer) Includes the labor, equipment and materials needed to make the actual tap and connection to the main line and extend the service line to the property line. Fee includes meter, box and yolk assembly. Full Service Base Tap Charge for reclaimed water requests will be charged an additional $96 fee to cover the additional cost of the reclaimed water meter box. Meter Only Charge: The cost of the meter and the labor and equipment cost involved in placing the meter in the box or vault. Fee does not include box or yolk assembly. Meter Box Only Charge: The cost of the meter box only. Fee does not include meter or yolk assembly. Meter Yolk with Check Valve: The cost of the meter yolk and check valve only. Fee does not include meter or box assembly. Street Cut Charge: Cost for cutting of paved street for water or sewer connection and for repairs to return section back to acceptable engineering standards. Bore Charge: When time or conditions make it impractical to cut open a street, a bore may be made. The current fee schedule covers up to a 3” water bore and a 4” sewer bore. Any other size will be estimated on an individual basis. All bore charges will be more if a sleeve is deemed necessary under a state maintained road. Multiple Meters: Existing Service - The addition of one or more 3/4” meters on to an existing service line that is large enough to handle the flow requirements. New Service - At the time of a new service line connection, one or more additional 3/4” meters may be installed at the same time as long as the service line is of sufficient size to meet the flow requirements.


ATTACHMENT A

Well House: Meter Inside - The placement of a meter inside a well house for basing sewer charges on the amount of water from the well. Meter Outside - The placement of a meter outside a well house for basing sewer charges on the amount of water from the well. Water Only Tap: A tap which is made for the sole purpose of an irrigation system, fire sprinkler system, or as a method for filling a swimming pool, etc. In any case the water system will not be connected so that it will enter the sanitary sewer system. Curb Cut Charge: Charge made for the cost of repairing one section of curb which has been removed for the installation of a water service or a sewer service. Sidewalk Cut Charge: Charge for the cost of repairs for a sidewalk section which has been removed for the installation of a water service or a sewer service. Fees from the following schedule are charged when the Town makes a sewer or water service tap or installs a water meter only. Utility connections that are not included in the fees schedule will be referred by the Inspections and Permits Office to the Director of Public Works and Utilities who, after consultation with the Town Engineer for engineering feasibility, will prepare an estimate of costs. The estimated costs must be paid in advance; any difference between estimated and actual costs will result in either a refund or an additional charge. Utility Connection Fees Schedule: Item

1.

Tap Size

3/4” Meter

Full Service

Meter

Meter Box

Base Tap

Only

Only

Meter Yolk w/ Ck Valve

Street Cut

$1,760

$198

$95 WA

---

$1,085

---

---

$191 RW

---

---

Bore -----

Sidewal k/ Curb -----

2.

1” Water

$1,890

$228

$143

$201

$1,085

---

---

3.

1.5” Water

$2,110

$372

$143

$556

$1,085

---

---

4.

2” Water

$2,430

$462

---

---

3” Water

$2,560

$1,112

$587 ---

$1,085

5.

$143 ---

$1,085

---

---

6.

4” Water

$2,760

$1,509

---

---

$1,085

---

---

7.

3/4” Meter multiple service line tap

$716

$198

$95 WA

$97

$1,085

$1,326

$1,235

---

---

$191 RW

---

---

---

---

8.

1” Meter multiple service line tap (existin

$776

$228

$143

$201

$1,085

$1,326

$1,235

9.

Well House (meter inside)

$275

$198

---

$97

$1,085

$1,326

$1,235

10.

Well House (meter outside)

$650

$198

$95

$97

$1,085

$1,326

$1,235

11.

4” Sewer

$2,242

---

---

---

$1,085

$1,326

$1,235

12.

6” Sewer

$2,284

---

---

---

$1,085

$1,326

$1,235

NOTES: 1. The Town retains ownership of all meters, meter boxes, vaults, etc. 2. The meter box fee of $95, $143 or $191 (depending on size) includes the lid. A meter lid fee of $25 will be charged if only the meter lid is needed. 3. A water meter is required for sewer-only customers. Charges for the meter and meter installation shall be at the same rate charged to water customers.


4.

ATTACHMENT A There is a $60.00 fee for repeat calls for setting meters or anytime a second trip is necessary to perform a requested service.

Water Conservation Ordinance Civil Penalties: Civil Penalty Charges Water service provided by the Town includes only alternate day outdoor irrigation: 1st violation 2nd violation 3rd violation Subsequent violations

Residential $100 $250 $500 $1,000

Non-Residential $250 $500 $1,000 $2,000

Two notices of violation will be issued before civil penalties apply. Reference Section 36-80 in the Town of Cary Code of Ordinances for additional information. Water shortage response: 1st violation 2nd violation 3rd violation

$500 $1,000 Termination of Service

One notice of violation will be issued before civil penalties apply. Reference Section 36-81 in the Town of Cary Code of Ordinances for additional information. Water waste: 1st violation 2nd violation 3rd violation Subsequent violations

Residential $100 $250 $500 $1,000

Non-Residential $250 $500 $1,000 $2,000

A verbal or written notice will be issued before civil penalties apply. In the case of leaks, civil penalties may be issued at the discretion of the Public Works and Utilities Director based upon the leak severity and repair complexity . Reference Section 36-83 in the Town of Cary Code of Ordinances for additional information. Rain sensors on automatic irrigation systems: st

1 violation 2nd violation 3rd violation Subsequent violations

Residential $100 $250 $500 $1,000

Non-Residential $250 $500 $1,000 $2,000

Two notices of violation will be issued before civil penalties apply. Reference Section 36-84 in the Town of Cary Code of Ordinances for additional information. Water Conservation Incentive Rebates Toilet Flapper Rebate: Limited to two (2) $4.00 rebates per account address for the 3.5 gallon per flush Frugal Flush Early Closing Flapper from Ace Hardware Stores. Amount is credited on the customerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s utility bill. High Efficiency Toilet Rebate: Limited to two (2) $100.00 rebates per account address for residential customers who replace 3.5 gallon per flush (gpf) or greater toilets with a Water Sense labeled high efficiency toilet. Limited to five (5) $100.00 rebates per account address for non residential customers who replace 3.5 gpf or greater toilets with a Water Sense labeled high efficiency toilet. A limited number of rebates are available to residential and non-residential customers for first generation 1.6 gpf toilets. Rebate checks are sent directly to the customer. Funds are available until expended.


ATTACHMENT A

Turf Buy Back Rebate: Limited to $500.00 for utility customers who replace a minimum of 1,000 sq. ft. of turf with either a natural area or warm season grass. Area to be replaced must have been irrigated between May and September with a minimum of 2,500 gallons per month. Plans must be approved by Town Staff. Customer’s water budget will be adjusted. Rain Barrels: Sixty-Five gallon rain barrels-$87 each Build Your Own Rain Barrel (drum): $15.00 each Build Your Own Rain Barrel Kits (hardware for drum): $16.00 each

Bulk Water: Sales and Equipment Rental: Cary Commercial Potable Irrigation Rate ......................................................................(per thousand gallons) $6.38 Meter Setup Fee.............................................................................................................................. (per setup) $40.00 Meter Relocation Fee...............................................................................................................(per relocation) $40.00 Meter Rental ......................................................................................................................................(per day) $20.00 1 ½" or 2 ½” Hose rental (per 50’ section) ..........................................................................................(per day) $3.00 Nozzle Rental.......................................................................................................................................(per day) $4.00 Hydrant Wrench Rental .......................................................................................................................(per day) $4.00 Adapter Rental .....................................................................................................................................(per day) $4.00 Lost and Damaged Items (replacement cost plus 10%) Bulk Water Meter ........................................................................................................................................... $748.00 Backflow Preventer ................................................................................................................................................. $336.00 Meter Enclosure.............................................................................................................................................. $500.00 Meter Register .................................................................................................................................................. $60.00 Gate Valve Handle.............................................................................................................................................. $8.00 Gate Valve ........................................................................................................................................................ $60.00 NST Bushing .................................................................................................................................................... $57.00 Meter Handle .................................................................................................................................................... $45.00 Inlet Coupling ................................................................................................................................................. $210.00 Hydrant Wrench................................................................................................................................................ $30.00 Adapter ............................................................................................................................................................. $50.00 Nozzle ............................................................................................................................................................... $30.00 Cross Connection Control Ordinance Civil Penalties: Non-Compliance Activity.................................................................................................................Tier / Penalty Failure to respond to second notification of program requirements and/or plan to comply with Ordinance. ........................................................................................................................................................ (Tier 1) $300.00 Failure to comply with agreed upon plan of correcting stated/presented violation within prescribed time frame. Also, repetitive Tier 1 violations may result in a Tier 2 Penalty. ................................................... (Tier 2) $500.00 Cross Connection Control Ordinance Civil Penalties, continued: Failure to test/repair existing system or repetitively require notification to meet test deadlines. ........................................................................................................................................................ (Tier 3) $750.00 A 3rd or 4th , either repetitive or concurrent, violation of the program ordinance and requirements. ....................................................................................................................................................... (Tier 4) $1,000.00


ATTACHMENT A

Vehicle, Equipment and Labor Charges, Per Hour: Hazardous material emergency charges, natural disasters, and special events costs are charged according to the specific service needed. Most of the respective charges are detailed in this “Vehicle, Equipment and Labor Charges, Per Hour” section. For all services provided that are not specifically listed in that section, the Federal Emergency Management Agency’s (FEMA) schedule of equipment rates will be applied. Material and labor costs of personnel responding are not included in the FEMA equipment rates. The actual rates for personnel responding and materials utilized will be added accordingly. Detailed item and cost descriptions of those fees can be found at: http://www.fema.gov/government/grant/pa/eqrates.shtm Sedan ................................................................................................................................................................. $8.35 Minivan, Cargo .................................................................................................................................................. $6.90 Cargo Van, ¾ Ton ............................................................................................................................................ $10.12 Cargo Van, 1 Ton .............................................................................................................................................. $9.20 Utility Vehicle ................................................................................................................................................... $3.93 Pick-Up Truck, ¼ Ton ....................................................................................................................................... $7.40 Pick-Up Truck, ¾ Ton ...................................................................................................................................... $10.11 Pick-Up Truck, ¾ Ton Crew Cab ..................................................................................................................... $12.96 Pick-Up Truck 1 Ton Crew Cab ....................................................................................................................... $10.34 F-450 Super Duty Truck ................................................................................................................................... $13.98 F-550 Super Duty Truck Crew Cab ................................................................................................................. $19.66 F-550 Truck with Utility Body Crane Truck .................................................................................................... $28.25 F-550 Truck with Utility Body with Bucket..................................................................................................... $26.00 Dump Truck with Plow Attachment ................................................................................................................. $29.60 Street Flusher ................................................................................................................................................... $20.23 Catch Basin Cleaner ......................................................................................................................................... $28.50 Tandem Dump Truck........................................................................................................................................ $32.00 Sanitation Truck – rear load/automated............................................................................................................ $38.97 Recycling Truck – automated ........................................................................................................................... $38.97 Tractor with Flail Mower ................................................................................................................................... $6.60 Backhoe/Loader Tractor ................................................................................................................................... $26.25 Electric Lift – 47 ft ............................................................................................................................................. $6.25 Roller ................................................................................................................................................................ $16.80 Bobcat ............................................................................................................................................................... $20.96 Tracked Loader................................................................................................................................................. $42.00 Trailer- two axle tilt .......................................................................................................................................... $10.71 Trailer – two axle enclosed................................................................................................................................. $7.50 Trailer - triaxle.................................................................................................................................................. $32.00 Trailer – two axle no tilt and < 14 ft................................................................................................................... $4.69 Trailer – Sign/Line.............................................................................................................................................. $4.69 Trailer - Hudson.................................................................................................................................................. $8.50 Dump Trailer – 26 ft ......................................................................................................................................... $10.25 Fertilizer Spreader .............................................................................................................................................. $7.50 Sand/Salt Spreader............................................................................................................................................ $21.00 Seeder ................................................................................................................................................................. $4.80 Tiller ................................................................................................................................................................... $2.71 Mower – Walk Behind........................................................................................................................................ $4.16 Mower – Riding Excel 60 in............................................................................................................................... $7.50 Turf Sweeper ...................................................................................................................................................... $7.50 Bed Trencher ...................................................................................................................................................... $2.29 String Trimmer / Curb Edger.............................................................................................................................. $1.67 Tamp – Earth/Pressure Washer........................................................................................................................... $4.44 Auger – Post Hole Digger................................................................................................................................... $3.13 Boring/Pulverizer Attachment ............................................................................................................................ $3.33


ATTACHMENT A Brush Chipper................................................................................................................................................... $12.00 Leaf Collector ..................................................................................................................................................... $7.50 Flashing Arrow Panel ......................................................................................................................................... $1.60 Concrete/Pipe Saw.............................................................................................................................................. $2.57 Chainsaw............................................................................................................................................................. $1.88 Backpack Blower................................................................................................................................................ $2.30 Air Compressor with Dual Reel.......................................................................................................................... $4.70 Generator .......................................................................................................................................................... $10.25 Water Pump Centrifugal ..................................................................................................................................... $9.93 Valve Box Cleaner.............................................................................................................................................. $6.40 Pump – Trailer Mount 4 in ................................................................................................................................. $3.95 Aerator Attachment............................................................................................................................................. $2.70 Box Scraper ........................................................................................................................................................ $7.00 Street Sweeper .................................................................................................................................................. $42.57 Hurricane Sprayer/Ballfield Line Painter ........................................................................................................... $2.75 Concrete Mixer ................................................................................................................................................... $2.21 Irrigation Sprinkler – 1.5 in ................................................................................................................................ $2.40 Labor Fees ................................................................................................ (Actual hourly rate plus 40% for benefits) Administrative Fee............................................................................................................................................ $40.00

Services: Replace Clean Out Caps ................................................................................................................................... $24.00 Chipper Service (materials at curb – chipped and left) $3.00/minute ........................................... minimum $90.00 Chipper Service (materials at curb – chipped and hauled) $3.50/minute .................................... minimum $105.00 Special Event Traffic Control ....................................................... (per cone plus Labor and Equipment Fees) $1.00 Code Enforcements (charges consist of cleanup cost plus administrative charge) : Cleanup Cost............................................................................................................................................. Actual Cost Administrative Charge........................................... 10% of total cost to correct incident (minimum charge)$100.00 Special Collection: Bulky Item Collection.................................................................................................................. (for 1st item) $13.00 Additional Bulky Item ............................................................................................................................. (each) $7.00 Special Request Leaf Collection................................................................................................ (per request) $100.00 Yard Waste Debris Pickup Fee....................................................................................(per hour / 1 hr. min.) $250.00 Early Yardwaste Collection .............................................................................................(for 1st 10 minutes) $35.00 ......................................................................................................................(each additional 10 minutes) $12.00 Solid Waste or Recycling Overflow Collection (95 gallons or less) ................................................................ $10.00 Clean-out / Move-out Collection Fee .............................................................................................................. $50.00 Multiple Cart Exchange (solid waste or recycling) ............................................ (no charge for 1st exchange) $10.00 Roll-in Cart, Bin or Container Fee (solid waste, recycling or yard waste)............ (2nd offense in 12 months) $10.00 Late Set Out collection (solid waste, recycling or yard waste)............................... (4th offense in 12 months) $10.00 Damaged Cart Fee due to negligence (65 gallon or 95 gallon / solid waste or recycling) ............................... $50.00 Additional Solid Waste Cart Fee (65 gallon or 95 gallon) ...................................................................... $3.50/month Additional Recycling Cart Fee (65 gallon or 95 gallon) ......................................................................... $1.00/month Additional Recycling Bin ........................................................................................................................ (each) $8.00 Used Appliance Disposal Fees: Customer drop off at Citizens’ Convenience Center ................................................................. (per appliance) $9.00 Curb-side pick up..................................................................................................................... (per appliance) $19.00 Industrial Pretreatment Program Fees: Administrative Fees: Application Fee - The initial application for an industry to discharge to the Town of Cary wastewater system shall include an application fee of $500. This fee is for staff costs in reviewing the application and will not be refunded if a determination is made that the proposed industry does not need to be on the pretreatment program. Permit Renewal Fee - Each time a permit is renewed a $400 permit renewal fee shall be collected to cover staff time and resources.


ATTACHMENT A

Reinspection Fee â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Post initial inspection. If, after a facilityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s initial inspection, repeat inspections are necessary to confirm Sewer Use Ordinance adequacy, a $50.00 reinspection fee will apply for each inspection. Sampling Charges - Normal monitoring of industries is performed through a self-monitoring program; however, the Town is required to semi-annually monitor each industry. The following charges apply to semi-annual required monitoring as well as additional monitoring requested by any industry or for additional monitoring required due to real or suspected noncompliance: Sampling, monitoring, or variance fee per visit.............................................................................................. $195.00 Portable sampler per 24 hours .......................................................................................................................... $73.00 Biochemical Oxygen Demand Test .................................................................................................................. $37.00 Carbonaceous Biochemical Oxygen Demand Test........................................................................................... $37.00 Chemical Oxygen Demand Test ....................................................................................................................... $20.00 Total Suspended Solids Test............................................................................................................................. $10.00 Settlable Solids ................................................................................................................................................. $15.00 pH Test................................................................................................................................................................ $6.00 Metals Testing (in-house) - each ...................................................................................................................... $15.00 Phosphate Test .................................................................................................................................................. $25.00 Ammonia Test................................................................................................................................................... $15.00 Total Kjeldahl Nitrogen.................................................................................................................................... $45.00 Total Nitrogen Test........................................................................................................................................... $40.00 Testing through outside lab ................................................................................................................... (costs + 20%) Any labor charges not outlined above will be billed at actual payroll costs plus 32% for overhead. Express Plan Review Fee.................................................................................................................................. $50.00 Surcharges: Carbonaceous Biochemical Oxygen Demand (CBOD) for BOD above 250 mg/1 on a mass basis ..................................................................................(per 100 lbs) $12.82 Total Suspended Solids (TSS) for TSS above 250 mg/l on a mass basis ...................................(per 100 lbs) $11.56 Phosphorus for Total Phosphorus level above 7.0 mg/l on a mass basis...................................(per 100 lbs) $315.26 Total Nitrogen (TN) for TN above 40 mg/l on a mass basis ......................................................(per 100 lbs) $58.11 Sewer customers located in the Kit Creek Sewer Service Area are subject to the following surcharge parameters. Surcharge fee costs per parameter will be based on current Durham County surcharge fees and pollutant threshold levels. The Kit Creek Sewer Service Area surcharge fees recover costs of surcharge parameters with the Town of Cary inter-local wastewater agreement and wastewater treatment by Durham County: Biochemical Oxygen Demand (BOD) above 250 mg/L on a mass basis .............................................................................................. current Durham County surcharge fees Total Suspended Solids (TSS) above 180 mg/L on a mass basis............................................................................................... current Durham County surcharge fees Phosphorus for Total Phosphorus (TP) above 5.0 mg/L on a mass basis............................................................................................... current Durham County surcharge fees Total Nitrogen (TN) above 40 mg/L on a mass basis............................................................................................... current Durham County surcharge fees

Groundwater Remediation Program: Permit Application Fee: Each special groundwater remediation permit applicant will be charged an initial fee of $1,170 for permit processing and administration.


ATTACHMENT A

Permit Renewal Fee: Each time a groundwater remediation permit is renewed an $875 permit renewal fee shall be collected to cover staff time and resources. Fats, Oil and Greases Control Program (FOG Program) Each food services establishment (FSE) will pay a monthly $10 dollar fee. This fee recovers cost of program implementation requirements: sampling, site evaluation, compliance determination, and documentation. This program requires that all FSE’s are duly informed of the FOG Control Program and agree to comply with its provisions. Enforcement Response Plan - Fats, Oils, Greases Control Management: (CI) Class I - $50.00 (CII) Class II - $100.00 (CIII) Class III – $150.00 (TI) Tier I - $300.00 (TII) Tier II - $500.00 (TIII) Tier III - $750.00 (TIV) Tier IV - $1,000.00 Pretreatment Program Penalties/Rates: Rates: Each discharger will be required to pay standard in-Town rate for wastewater discharge. Each permittee will be required to furnish a water meter or method for measuring the quantity of wastewater discharged. Approval of alternative wastewater measurement methods shall be at the discretion of the Director of Public Works/Utilities. Enforcement Response Plan Fees: Civil Penalties issued as result of implementing enforcement response plan: Tier I $300.00 Tier II $500.00 Tier III $750.00 Tier IV $1,000.00 Tier V: Up to statutory limits defined pursuant to Section 307(b) and (c) of the Clean Water Act (40 CFR 405 et. seq.) Under North Carolina law the Director has the power to take enforcement ranging from a simple notice of noncompliance or notice of deficiency to a penalty of up to $10,000 per day per violation to severance of sanitary sewer service. Additionally, under North Carolina General Statute 143-215.6A(b)(1), any user who is found to have failed to comply with any provision of the Sewer Use Ordinance or the orders, rules, regulations and permits issued hereunder, may be fined by the director up to twenty-five thousand dollars ($25,000.00) per day per violation. Penalties between $10,000.00 and $25,000.00 per day per violation may be assessed against a violator only if: for any class of violation, only if a civil penalty has been imposed against the violator within the five years preceding the violation, b. or in the case of failure to file, submit, or make available, as the case may be, any documents, data, or reports required by this ordinance, or the orders, rules, regulations and permits issued hereunder, only if the POTW Director determines that the violation was intentional and a civil penalty has been imposed against the violator with the five years preceding the violation. a.

TOWN-WIDE PUBLIC INFORMATION FEES: Town-wide Charges for Copies and Certified Copies: All public records distributed by the Town of Cary will be distributed at the cost to the Town rounded to the nearest dollar. The following schedule is a summary of the current costs for information currently distributed. Photocopies – Black & White: 8-1/2” x 11” Copy Paper........................................................................................................(one sided copy) 8-1/2" x 11” Copy Paper....................................................................................................... (two sided copy) 8-1/2” x 14” Copy Paper........................................................................................................(one sided copy) 8-1/2" x 14” Copy Paper....................................................................................................... (two sided copy) 11” x 17” Copy Paper .............................................................................................................(one sided copy)

$0.03 $0.05 $0.03 $0.05 $0.04


ATTACHMENT A 11” x 17” Copy Paper ............................................................................................................ (two sided copy) $0.06

As per NCGS 132-6.2, the Town of Cary is permitted to charge the actual costs associated with fulfilling requests for public records, including without limitation, materials for typical, small requests for copies of public records that can be provided during normal working hours. Should the amount of time required to research and assemble the requested information require the use of staff overtime, costs associated with the overtime may also be recovered through a fee. Staff should provide the individual requesting the public records with an estimation of the costs associated prior to staff beginning work on the request. Costs will vary depending upon the amount of time involved and the actual staff performing the work. The detailed costs of materials for copies are below: The detailed costs of materials for copies are below: Cost Per Copy - $0.0075 Rental - $0.0157 8.5 x 11 paper - $0.0062 8.5 x 14 paper - $0.0075 11 x 17 paper - $0.0132 Charges For Maps and Documents: All public records distributed by the Town of Cary, will be distributed at the cost to the Town rounded to the nearest dollar. The following schedule is a summary of the current costs for information currently distributed. 18” x 24” Bond ................................................................................................................................ (per sheet) $5.00 24” x 36” Bond ................................................................................................................................ (per sheet) $5.00 30” x 42” Bond ................................................................................................................................ (per sheet) $8.00 All magnetic tapes (distributed by Technology Services & Engineering) ........................................... $12.00-$31.00 All diskettes (3 ½” X 5”) ..................................................................................................................(per disk) $2.00 All CD’s and DVD’s burned from existing digital file............................................................ (per CD/DVD) $5.00 Duplication of CD/DVD........................................................................................................... (per CD/DVD) $5.00 Specific items distributed by Planning, Engineering, and Inspections: 1,000’ Scale Zoning Map ...................................................................................................................... (each) $25.00 All 2,000’ Scale Maps ......................................................................................................................... (each) $10.00 Current Growth & Development Map – Aerial View .......................................................................... (each) $15.00 Prints from Microfilm: 11” x 17”.......................................................................................................................................... (per sheet) 18” x 24”.......................................................................................................................................... (per sheet) 24” x 36”.......................................................................................................................................... (per sheet) 30” x 42”.......................................................................................................................................... (per sheet) CD or DVD created from Microfilm ........................................................ $2.00 for CD/DVD plus (per page)

$1.00 $6.00 $6.00 $9.00 $1.00

Any additional items distributed by the Town will be distributed for a fee that represents cost rounded to the nearest dollar.

There will be no charge for photocopies of documents, maps, or standard technical reports unless the cost equals or exceeds $5.00. Staff has the authority to set minimum limits for all other items distributed.

A special service charge may be charged if the request requires “extensive use of information technology or extensive clerical or supervisory assistance”. The service charge shall be calculated based on Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP) and shall reflect the actual cost incurred including, but not limited to, the cost incurred for the extensive use of information technology or the labor costs of the personnel providing the service.


TOWN OF CARY FULL AND PART TIME BUDGETED POSITION AUTHORIZATIONS FY 2011

FULL TIME DEPARTMENT / POSITION POSITIONS

ATTACHMENT B

PART TIME POSITIONS E/NE POS# GRADE

CDL

HRSS BBP

COLUMN HEADING DESCRIPTIONS FT FTE - Full Time Full Time Equivalent PT FTE - Part Time Full Time Equivalent E/NE - Exempt or Non Exempt Position POS# - Position Number GRADE - Grade level of Position CDL - Commercial Drivers License Required for Position HRSS - High Risk Safety Sensitive Position BBP - Blood Borne Pathogen Risk Position GENERAL FUND LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT Town Clerk - 010-4130-511-0201 Town Clerk Deputy Town Clerk Admnistrative Secretary II Town Clerk Total Legal - 010-4140-511-0201 Town Attorney Assistant Town Attorney Legal Assistant Legal Total TOTAL LEGISLATIVE DEPARMENT ADMINISTRATION DEPARTMENT Town Manager's Office - 010-4200-511-0201 Town Manager Assistant Town Manager Downtown Development Manager Sustainability Manager Assistant to the Town Manager Administrative Assistant Administration Total Budget Office - 010-4210-511-0201 Budget Director Senior Budget and Management Analyst Budget & Management Analyst Budget Technician Budget Office Total Public Information Office - 010-4220-511-0201 Public Information Director Deputy Public Information Officer Government Access Channel Coordinator Government Access Channel Specialist Public Information Specialist Public Information Office Total TOTAL ADMINISTRATION DEPARTMENT

1 1 1 3

0.750 0.750

E NE NE

45 46 101

UC 21 14

X X X

1 1 1 3 6

0.750

E E NE

40 41 108

UC 36 20

X X X

1 1 1 1 1 1 6

-

E E E E E NE

35 30 31 32 106 102

UC NG 30 29 22 16

X X X X X X

1 1 2 1 5

-

E E E NE

20 28 21 23

NG 30 27 20

X X X X

E E NE NE NE

95 92 94 91 93

NG 27 25 23 23

X X

1 1 1 1 4 15

0.625 0.625 0.625


TOWN OF CARY FULL AND PART TIME BUDGETED POSITION AUTHORIZATIONS FY 2011

FULL TIME DEPARTMENT / POSITION POSITIONS FINANCE DEPARTMENT Accounting - 010-4410-511-0201 Director of Finance Controller Deputy Treasurer Accounting Operations Manager Financial Operations Analyst Senior Accountant Financial Reporting Analyst Accountant Payroll Specialist Collections Account Rep Finance Technician Accounting Technician Administrative Assistant Accounts Payable Technician Accounting Total Procurement and Risk Services - 010-4420-511-0201 Procurement and Risk Services Manager Purchasing Supervisor Risk Management Specialist Buyer Warehouse Supervisor Assistant Buyer Inventory Specialist Mail and Printing Technician Purchasing Total TOTAL FINANCE DEPARTMENT TECHNOLOGY SERVICES DEPARTMENT Technology Services - 010-4500-511-0201 Director of Technology Services Technology Services Applications Manager Technology Services Operations Manager Telecommunications Manager Technology Security Officer Technology Services Business Analyst Network Analyst Internet Applications Analyst Database Analyst Telecommunications Specialist Technology Services Specialist Technology Support Technician Technology Services Trainer Senior Technology Support Technician Technology Services Assistant TOTAL TECHNOLOGY SERVICES DEPARTMENT HUMAN RESOURCES DEPARTMENT Human Resources - 010-4600-511-0201 Director of Human Resources Employee Benefits Manager Employee Relations Manager Employee Safety Coordinator Senior Human Resources Consultant Human Resources Training Program Consultant Human Resources Consultant Senior Human Resources Assistant Human Resources Assistant Safety Technician Administrative Assistant TOTAL HUMAN RESOURCES DEPARTMENT

ATTACHMENT B

PART TIME POSITIONS E/NE POS# GRADE

CDL

HRSS BBP

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 3 1 1 1 1 1 2 17

-

E E E E E E E NE NE NE NE NE NE NE

225 220 28 27 26 210 209 218 215 202 217 219 102 203

NG 33 30 30 30 27 27 22 20 19 18 18 16 16

X X X X X X X X X X X X X X

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 8 25

-

E E NE NE NE NE NE NE

25 157 158 156 133 155 130 135

31 26 24 22 20 19 16 14

X X X X X X X X

1 1 1 1 1 3 1 2 2 1 5 2 1

-

E E E E E E E E E NE NE NE NE NE NE

325 332 317 1310 326 320 321 322 334 1315 310 305 307 306 308

NG 34 34 33 31 30 30 29 29 27 27 23 22 21 18

X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X

E E E E E E E NE NE NE NE

10 3 4 5 152 8 151 149 153 154 102

NG 31 31 29 28 27 26 21 19 18 16

X X X X X X X X X X X

1 23

1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 11

-

0.625 0.625 1.250


TOWN OF CARY FULL AND PART TIME BUDGETED POSITION AUTHORIZATIONS FY 2011

FULL TIME DEPARTMENT / POSITION POSITIONS POLICE DEPARTMENT Police - 010-5110-521-0201 Police Chief Lieutenant Colonel (Deputy Chief) Police Major Police Captain Police Lieutenant Police Support Services Manager Police Sergeant Emergency Communication Center Supervisor Police Corporal Police Records Supervisor Police Support Services Supervisor Emergency Communications Shift Supervisor Emergency Communications CAD Specialist Crime Analyst II Police Support Services Technician Total POI, POII, MPO, SPO (gr 21-24) Police Officer Overhire Animal Control Supervisor Crime Analyst I Senior Emergency Communications Officer Emergency Communications Officer II Investigative Assistant Emergency Communications Officer I Emergency Communications OVERHIRE Animal Control Officer I Police Records Technician Administrative Assistant E C O's - total I's, II's and Sr. Career Ladder Positions* Total I's, II's and Sr. Career Ladder Positions* Total Sworn Officers TOTAL POLICE DEPARTMENT

1 1 2 5 10 1 21 1 6 1 1 5 1 1 1 128 2 1 1 * * 1 * 2 2 3 1 16 * 215

FIRE DEPARTMENT Fire - 010-5300-521-0201 Fire Chief Deputy Fire Chief Assistant Fire Chief Battalion Chief Fire Marshal Deputy Fire Marshal Fire Captain Fire Captain (Training Officer) Fire Code Official (gr 20 - 25) Fire Code Official III (Education Specialist) Fire Engineer Master Firefighter Firefighter - Total of I's and II's (grades 19 - 20) Firefighter Overhire Senior Administrative Assistant Administrative Assistant Administrative Secretary II TOTAL FIRE DEPARTMENT

1 1 2 7 1 2 42 1 1 1 42 36 66 3 1 1 1 209

ATTACHMENT B

PART TIME POSITIONS E/NE POS# GRADE

0.500 0.500

-

E E E E E E NE E NE NE NE NE NE NE NE NE

1235 1232 1230 1227 1225 1245 1215 1301 1216 125 1239 1304 1307 1205 1240 1203

NE NE NE NE NE NE

1102 1202 1305 1303 122 1302

NE NE NE

1101 301 102

NG 36 33 31 29 29 27 26 25 23 23 22 22 21 21 21 20 20 20 19 18 18 18 17 17 16

CDL Sworn Officers 1 1 2 5 10 21 6

128 2

HRSS BBP

X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X

X X X X X X X

X X X

X

176

E E E E E NE NE NE NE NE NE NE NE

1430 1429 1427 1425 1422 1420 1409 1421 1419 1417 1407 1404 1403

NE NE NE

103 102 101

NG 34 32 30 30 26 26 26 25 24 22 19 18 16 14

X X X X X X X X X X X X X X

X X X X X X X

X X X X


TOWN OF CARY FULL AND PART TIME BUDGETED POSITION AUTHORIZATIONS FY 2011

FULL TIME DEPARTMENT / POSITION POSITIONS ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT Engineering - 010-5500-511-0201 Director of Engineering Associate Director of Engineering Traffic and Transportation Engineering Manger Engineering Services Manager Stormwater Engineering Manager Engineering Field Services Manager Transportation Engineering Supervisor Real Estate Manager Traffic Signal Systems Supervisor Senior Engineer Engineering Field Technician Supervisor Engineer Stormwater Engineer Total Engineers and Sr Engineers Career Ladder Positions* Stormwater Field Services Administrator Environmental Specialist Stormwater Program Analyst Civil Design Services Supervisor Engineering Field Technician Traffic Signal System Specialist Real Estate Specialist Senior Civil Design Technician Stormwater Engineering Technician Civil Design Technician Survey Crew Chief Engineering Administrative Services Supervisor Real Estate Technician Survey Technician II Administrative Assistant TOTAL ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT PLANNING DEPARTMENT Planning Administration - 010-5505-511-0201 Director of Planning Associate Director of Planning Planning Manager Principal Planner Zoning Compliance Supervisor Senior Planner Geographic Information System Planning Supervisor Planner I Planner I (CDBG) Zoning Compliance Officer Geographic Information System Planner Planning Specialist Administrative Specialist Administrative Assistant Customer Service Representative II Career Ladder Positions (Planner I's or II's)( gr 23-25) * Career Ladder Positions (Planner II's or Sr Planners)(gr 25-27) * Planning Administration Total Affordable Housing - 056-5507-511-0201 Senior Planner Affordable Housing Total Transit - 025-5700-511-0201 Transit Services Administrator Transit Services Assistant Transit Total TOTAL PLANNING DEPARTMENT

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 * 1 * 2 15 1 1 1 1 8 2 3 1 2 5 2 1 1 3 2 61

ATTACHMENT B

PART TIME POSITIONS E/NE POS# GRADE

1.000 1.000

CDL

HRSS BBP

E E E E E E E E E E E E E

930 929 940 927 845 917 928 910 941 924 832 926 844

NG 38 34 33 33 33 31 30 30 30 28 28 28

X X X X X X X X X X X X X

E E E E NE NE E NE NE NE NE NE NE NE NE

840 847 843 921 918 938 911 920 839 915 907 914 912 904 102

28 27 27 27 25 25 24 24 23 23 21 21 18 17 16

X X X X X X X X X X X X X

1 1 2 3 1 * 1 * * 3 1 1 1 1 1 1 6 24

-

E E E E E E NE E E NE NE NE NE NE NE E E

755 750 702 708 712 707 703 706 706 710 704 752 98 102 110

NG 36 32 29 27 27 27 23 23 23 23 22 20 16 16

X X X X X X X X X X X X

1 1

-

E

707

27

X

1 1 2 27

-

E NE

908 754

30 17

X X


TOWN OF CARY FULL AND PART TIME BUDGETED POSITION AUTHORIZATIONS FY 2011

FULL TIME DEPARTMENT / POSITION POSITIONS INSPECTIONS & PERMITS DEPARTMENT Inspections & Permits - 010-5510-511-0201 Inspections & Permits Director Inspections Development Review Manager Chief Code Enforcement Official Inspections & Permits Operations Analyst Permit Office Supervisor Minimum Housing & Post Construction Supervisor Plans Examiner Code Enforcement Officials (gr 20-25) Addressing Specialist Senior Permit Technician Permit Technician Customer Service Representative III Customer Service Representative II Administrative Assistant Permits Records Specialist Permit Clerk TOTAL INSPECTIONS & PERMITS DEPARTMENT PARKS, RECREATION & CULTURAL RESOURCES PRCR Administration - 010-6210-551-0201 Director of Parks, Recreation, and Cultural Resources Parks Planning Manager Senior Parks Planner Business Development Manager PR&CR Operations Analyst Parks Planner Recreation Projects Coordinator Parks Planning Technician Marketing Specialist Administrative Specialist Administrative Assistant Customer Service Representative I PRCR Administration Total Recreation Programs - 010-6221-551-0201 Recreation Manager Bond Park Supervisor Community Center Supervisor Nature Center Supervisor Senior Center Supervisor Assistant Community Center Supervisor Recreation Program Specialist Senior Park Operations Technician Recreation Program Assistant - Camps Customer Service Representative I Recreation Programs Total

1 1 3 1 1 1 4 21 1 1 2 1 4 2 1 45

1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 14 1 1 3 1 1 3 3 1 5 19

ATTACHMENT B

PART TIME POSITIONS E/NE POS# GRADE

0.625 0.625

0.750 0.750

CDL

HRSS BBP

E E E E E NE NE NE NE NE NE NE NE NE NE NE

860 168 804 170 169 811 823 801 166 164 165 116 111 102 160 163

NG 28 28 27 27 26 25 24 21 20 18 18 16 16 16 15

X X X X X X X X X X X X X

E E E E E E E NE NE NE NE NE

401 660 653 629 17 650 15 651 652 98 102 110

NG 33 28 28 27 27 25 23 22 20 16 14

X X X X X X X

E E E E E NE NE NE NE NE

620 535 643 536 615 640 625 539 626 110

33 25 25 25 25 21 21 18 18 14

X X X X X X X X X X

X


TOWN OF CARY FULL AND PART TIME BUDGETED POSITION AUTHORIZATIONS FY 2011

FULL TIME DEPARTMENT / POSITION POSITIONS Cultural Arts & Resources - 010-6222-551-0201 Cultural Arts Manager Community Arts Center Supervisor Festival Coordinator Public Art Coordinator Arts and History Center Supervisor Performing Arts/Operations Coordinator Youth Theatre Coordinator Arts Program Specialist Cultural Arts Program Specialist Ceramic Arts Specialist Technical Coordinator Box Office Manager Customer Service Representative I Cultural Resources Total Athletics - 010-6230-551-0201 Athletics Manager Athletics Facility Supervisor Coordinator of Athletics Program Athletics Program Supervisor Athletics Program Specialist Athletics Total Tennis Park - 014-6310-551-0201 Tennis Park Supervisor Administrative Assistant Head Tennis Professional Customer Service Representative Tennis Program Coordinator Junior Tennis Professional Tennis Professional III Tennis Park Total Skate Park - 016-6320-551-0201 Skate Park Supervisor Recreation Program Assistant Skate Park Total Wake Med Soccer Park - 017-6330-551-0201 Athletics Facility Supervisor Assistant Athletics Facility Supervisor SAS Soccer Park Total USA Baseball - 018-6340-551-0201 Assistant Athletics Facility Supervisor USA Baseball Total TOTAL PARKS, REC & CULTURAL RESOURCES PUBLIC WORKS & UTILITIES DEPARTMENT PWUT Administration - 010-7010-531-0201 Director of Public Works & Utilities Public Works Director Utilities Director Water Resources Manager PWUT Project Engineer PWUT Operations Analyst Supervisor Water Resources Engineer PWUT Operations Analyst PWUT Administrative Services Supervisor PWUT Data Analyst PWUT Customer Service Supervisor Fleet Data Control Technician Cross Connection Control Data Technician Administrative Assistant Customer Service Representative I PW/UT Administration Total

ATTACHMENT B

PART TIME POSITIONS E/NE POS# GRADE

CDL

HRSS BBP

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 3 15

-

E E E E E E NE NE NE NE NE NE NE

645 611 606 610 612 613 607 605 647 648 614 617 110

33 28 25 25 25 25 23 21 21 21 20 18 14

1 1 1 2 1 6

-

E E E NE NE

635 632 628 630 644

33 28 28 25 21

E NE NE NE NE NE NE

633 102 631 110 627 636 639

25 16 15 14 13 13 1

X X X

1 1 1 1 1 5

0.750 3.750 4.500

X X X X X X X X X X X X

X X X

X X

1 1 2

-

E NE

642 626

25 18

X X

1 1 2

-

E NE

638 634

28 23

X X

1 1 64

5.250

NE

634

23

X

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

0.750 0.750 2.500 4.000

E E E E E E E E NE NE NE NE NE NE NE

2103 2102 2115 2117 2130 2120 2118 2125 75 105 113 2518 117 102 110

NG NG NG 33 30 29 28 25 21 21 19 19 16 16 14

X X X X X X X X

2 14

X X


TOWN OF CARY FULL AND PART TIME BUDGETED POSITION AUTHORIZATIONS FY 2011

FULL TIME DEPARTMENT / POSITION POSITIONS Facilities Management Division - 010-7015-531-0201 Facilities Division Manager Facilities District Coordinator Facilities Maintenance Project Specialist Facilities Work Expeditor Facilities Specialist (Stormwater) Landscape Technician Special Events Lead Facilities Maintenance Mechanic II Athletic Field Maintenance Crew Leader Lead Right-of Way Worker Facilities Maintenance Mechanic I Lead Landscape Worker Facilities Maintenance Worker III Sweeper/Flusher Operator Special Events Worker Facilities Maintenance Worker II Facilities Attendant Facilities Maintenance Worker I Facilities Management Division Total Operations - 010-7020-531-0201 Operations Division Manager Operations Coordinator - Signs & Signal System Operations Coordinator - Street Mtc & Repair Operations Coordinator - Utilities Water Distribution System Operator Wastewater Collection System Operator Operations Project Specialist Traffic Operations Electronics Technician Crew Coordinator Collections Systems Investigations Supervisor Wastewater Collection Field Supervisor Water Distribution Field Supervisor Concrete Crew Coordinator Traffic Signal System Technician III Lead Water Service Technician Lead Line Locator Collections Systems Investigations Technicians Water Conservation Technicians Traffic Signal System Technician II Construction Worker III Traffic Signs & Marking Technician Concrete Worker III Line Locator Traffic Signal System Technician I *Traffic Signal System Tech - Total of 1's & II's gr 17-19 Water Service Technician III Equipment Operator Collection System Investigations Worker Construction Worker II Water System Worker Wastewater System Worker II Water Service Technician II Concrete Worker II Concrete Worker I Construction Worker I Traffic Sign & Markings Worker Wastewater System Worker I Operations Total

ATTACHMENT B

PART TIME POSITIONS E/NE POS# GRADE

1 3 1 7 1 1 1 3 3 4 12 7 7 1 2 19 14 17 104

-

E E E NE E NE NE NE NE NE NE NE NE NE NE NE NE NE

530 2315 2302 2411 2301 2245 2229 2256 2258 2257 2255 2254 2253 2232 2260 2252 2249 2251

33 28 25 25 24 22 21 19 19 17 17 17 16 16 15 14 12 10

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 7 1 2 2 1 4 1 1 1 2 * 10 1 1 3 * 4 1 1 4 9 14 10 3 2 1 11 2 11 118

-

E E E E E E E NE NE NE NE NE NE NE NE NE NE NE NE NE NE NE NE NE

2511 2309 2312 2312 2635 2623 2320 2224 2509 2585 2582 2612 2501 2227 2609 2618 2586 2663 2223 2507 2226 2503 2613 2228

35 30 28 28 26 25 25 23 22 22 22 22 21 21 20 20 20 20 19 19 18 18 17 17

NE NE NE NE NE NE NE NE NE NE NE NE

2614 2218 2587 2506 2611 2581 2608 2502 2504 2505 2230 2580

17 17 17 16 16 16 16 16 14 14 14 14

CDL

HRSS BBP X X X

X

X X X X

X

X X X X X X X X

X X X X X X X X X X X X X X

X X X X X X X X X X

X X X X X X

X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X

X


TOWN OF CARY FULL AND PART TIME BUDGETED POSITION AUTHORIZATIONS FY 2011

FULL TIME DEPARTMENT / POSITION POSITIONS

PART TIME POSITIONS E/NE POS# GRADE

Solid Waste Management - 010-7025-541-0201 Solid Waste Division Manager Solid Waste Operations Coordinator Solid Waste Supervisor Solid Waste Crew Leader Solid Waste Equipment Operator Convenience Center Attendant Cart Delivery/Repair Worker Special Waste Collector Solid Waste Collector I Solid Waste Management Total Recycling - 010-7026-541-0201 Recycling Supervisor Recycling Crew Leader Recycling Equipment Operator II Recycling Equipment Operator I Special Waste Collector Recycling Collector I Recycling Total TOTAL PUBLIC WORKS & UTILITES DEPARTMENT

1 1 9 2 1 1 15 302

4.000

GENERAL FUND TOTAL

1,003

14.000

1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 2 1 4 11 27

1 1 1 3

1 1 2 10 10 1 1 2 23 51

ATTACHMENT B

-

CDL

HRSS BBP

E E NE NE NE NE NE NE NE

2306 2307 2305 2213 2214 2205 2212 2207 2210

31 26 22 15 15 13 12 12 11

NE NE NE NE NE NE

2241 2242 2243 2238 2207 2237

22 15 15 14 12 11

0.625 1.000 0.500 2.125

E E E E NE NE NE NE NE NE NE NE

115 118 2604 2606 112 114 204 200 2607 201 110 2605

27 27 23 22 18 18 16 16 15 14 14 13

X X X X X X X X X X X X

0.500 0.500

E NE NE

2662 2664 2663

27 23 22

X X X

E NE

2660 2661

31 22

X X

X X

X

X X X X X X X X X

X X X X X X X

X

X

X X X X

X X X X

UTILITY FUND FINANCE DEPARTMENT Customer Accounting - 030-4440-571-0201 Utility Accounts Manager Financial Project Analyst Utility Accounts Customer Service Supervisor Meter Reader Supervisor Utility Billing Technician Utility Accounts Technician Utility Accounts Clerk Collections Clerk II Utility Field Service Technician Collections Clerk I Customer Service Representative I Meter Reader TOTAL FINANCE DEPARTMENT PUBLIC WORKS & UTILITIES DEPARTMENT Water Conservation - 030-7011-571-0201 Conservation Programs Supervisor Conservation Specialist Water Conservation Program Specialist Water Conservation Total Pretreatment - 030-7012-572-0201 Utility Pretreatment Manager Utility Pretreatment Technician Pretreatment Total

1 2 3

-


TOWN OF CARY FULL AND PART TIME BUDGETED POSITION AUTHORIZATIONS FY 2011

FULL TIME DEPARTMENT / POSITION POSITIONS Utility Systems Management - 030-7030-571-0201 Utility Systems Manager Chief of Utility Systems Maintenance Electronics Technician II Reclaimed Water Coordinator Lead Utility Systems Maintenance Mechanic Electronics Technician I Reclaimed Water Technician Utility Systems Maintenance Mechanic Utility Systems Maintenance Worker Utility Systems Management Total North Cary Water Reclamation Facility - 030-7051-571-0201 NWRF Manager WRF Chief of Operations and Maintenance WRF Laboratory Supervisor WRF Master Mechanic/Operator WRF Senior Mechanic/Operator WRF Mechanic/Operator II WRF Mechanic/Operator I Lab Analyst I Administrative Assistant Total of all NWRF Career Ladder Positions* North Cary Water Reclamation Facility Total South Cary Water Reclamation Facility - 030-7052-571-0201 SWRF Manager WRF Team Leader WRF Laboratory Supervisor WRF Master Mechanic/Operator WRF Senior Mechanic/Operator WRF Mechanic/Operator II WRF Mechanic/Operator I Total of all SWRF Career Ladder Positions* South Cary Water Reclamation Facility Total Western Wake Water Reclamation Facility 030-7055-571-0201 WWWRF Plant Manager Western Wake Water Reclamation Facility Total Cary/Apex Water Treatment Plant - 030-7053-571-0201 Water System Manager WTP Maintenance Supervisor WTP Operations Team Leader WTP Chemist/Lab Supervisor WTP Master Operations/Maintenance Technician Senior Laboratory Analyst WTP Senior Operations/Maintenance Technician WTP Operations/Maintenance Technician II Laboratory Analyst II Laboratory Analyst I WTP Operations/Maintenance Technician I Total of all CAWTP Career Ladder positions * Administrative Assistant Utility Plant Maintenance Worker Cary/Apex Water Treatment Plant Total TOTAL PUBLIC WORKS & UTILITIES DEPARTMENT UTILITY FUND TOTAL

1 1 1 1 3 1 1 7 2 18 1 1 1 * * * * 1 12 16

ATTACHMENT B

PART TIME POSITIONS E/NE POS# GRADE 0.750 0.750

CDL

HRSS BBP

E E NE E NE NE NE NE NE

2636 2634 2628 2657 2632 2630 2658 2631 2639

33 28 24 24 22 21 20 20 15

X X X X X X

E E E NE NE NE NE NE NE

2655 2653 2676 2648 2646 2642 2641 2674 102

33 28 26 24 22 21 20 20 16

X X X X X X X

X X

1 2 1 * * * * 15 19

-

E E E NE NE NE NE

2651 2644 2676 2648 2646 2642 2641

34 28 26 24 22 21 20

X X X X X X X

1 1

-

E

2655

33

X

E E E E NE NE NE NE NE NE NE

2684 2680 2670 2673 2679 2675 2678 2666 2671 2674 2665

35 28 28 27 24 23 22 21 21 20 20

X X X X X X X X X X X

NE NE

102 2640

16 15

X X

1 1 2 1 * * * * * * * 16 1 1 23 83

1.250

110

3.375


TOWN OF CARY FULL AND PART TIME BUDGETED POSITION AUTHORIZATIONS FY 2011

FULL TIME DEPARTMENT / POSITION POSITIONS

ATTACHMENT B

PART TIME POSITIONS E/NE POS# GRADE

CDL

HRSS BBP

FLEET MANAGEMENT FUND PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT Fleet Management - 039-5660-531-0201 Fleet Division Manager Lead Fleet Maintenance Technician Fleet Service Advisor Fleet Maintenance Technician II Fleet Maintenance Technician I Fleet Service Technician TOTAL PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT

1 1 1 3 1 3 10

-

FLEET MANANGEMENT FUND TOTAL

10

-

TOTALS (including overhires for which funds are not budgeted, 3 in Fire, 4 in Police) GENERAL FUND UTILITY FUND INTERNAL SERVICE FUND GRAND TOTAL INCLUDING OVERHIRES TOTALS - Budgeted Positions GENERAL FUND UTILITY FUND INTERNAL SERVICE FUND GRAND TOTAL BUDGETED POSITIONS

1,003 110 10 1,123 Total FTE =

14.000 3.375 17.375 1,140.375

996 110 10 1,116 Total FTE =

14.000 3.375 17.375 1,133.375

E NE NE NE NE NE

2519 2517 2512 2516 2515 2513

31 22 22 20 18 16

X X X

X X X X X X

X X X X


ATTACHMENT C

TOWN OF CARY FY 2011 PAY RANGES EFFECTIVE 7/1/2010

Non-Exempt DEVELOPMENTAL GRADE 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27

$21,320.00 $22,380.80 $23,504.00 $24,689.60 $25,916.80 $27,206.40 $28,579.20 $29,993.60 $31,491.20 $33,072.00 $34,736.00 $36,462.40 $38,292.80 $40,206.40 $42,203.20 $44,324.80 $46,529.60 $48,859.20 $51,313.60

-

$24,814.40 $26,041.60 $27,352.00 $28,724.80 $30,160.00 $31,657.60 $33,238.40 $34,902.40 $36,649.60 $38,480.00 $40,414.40 $42,432.00 $44,553.60 $46,779.20 $49,108.80 $51,563.20 $54,142.40 $56,867.20 $59,696.00

MARKET $24,835.20 $26,062.40 $27,372.80 $28,745.60 $30,180.80 $31,678.40 $33,259.20 $34,923.20 $36,670.40 $38,500.80 $40,435.20 $42,452.80 $44,574.40 $46,800.00 $49,129.60 $51,584.00 $54,163.20 $56,888.00 $59,716.80

-

PERFORMANCE

$26,187.20 $27,497.60 $28,870.40 $30,305.60 $31,824.00 $33,425.60 $35,089.60 $36,836.80 $38,688.00 $40,622.40 $42,640.00 $44,782.40 $47,028.80 $49,379.20 $51,833.60 $54,433.60 $57,158.40 $60,008.00 $63,003.20

$26,208.00 $27,518.40 $28,891.20 $30,326.40 $31,844.80 $33,446.40 $35,110.40 $36,857.60 $38,708.80 $40,643.20 $42,660.80 $44,803.20 $47,049.60 $49,400.00 $51,854.40 $54,454.40 $57,179.20 $60,028.80 $63,024.00

-

$31,200.00 $32,760.00 $34,403.20 $36,129.60 $37,918.40 $39,832.00 $41,808.00 $43,908.80 $46,092.80 $48,401.60 $50,835.20 $53,372.80 $56,035.20 $58,843.20 $61,776.00 $64,875.20 $68,120.00 $71,510.40 $75,088.00

HIGH PERFORMANCE $31,220.80 $32,780.80 $34,424.00 $36,150.40 $37,939.20 $39,852.80 $41,828.80 $43,929.60 $46,113.60 $48,422.40 $50,856.00 $53,393.60 $56,056.00 $58,864.00 $61,796.80 $64,896.00 $68,140.80 $71,531.20 $75,108.80

-

$33,051.20 $34,694.40 $36,441.60 $38,251.20 $40,164.80 $42,182.40 $44,283.20 $46,488.00 $48,817.60 $51,272.00 $53,830.40 $56,513.60 $59,342.40 $62,316.80 $65,436.80 $68,702.40 $72,134.40 $75,732.80 $79,518.40

There is a $20.80 gap between each range segment. This is due to the one penny ($.01) difference between the maximum hourly rate of each segment and the minimum hourly rate of the next segment.

Exempt DEVELOPMENTAL GRADE 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42

$36,462.40 $38,292.80 $40,206.40 $42,203.20 $44,324.80 $46,529.60 $48,859.20 $51,313.60 $53,872.00 $56,576.00 $59,404.80 $62,358.40 $65,478.40 $68,764.80 $72,196.80 $75,816.00 $79,601.60 $83,574.40 $87,755.20 $92,144.00 $96,740.80 $101,587.20 $106,662.40

-

$41,350.40 $43,430.40 $45,593.60 $47,881.60 $50,273.60 $52,769.60 $55,411.20 $58,198.40 $61,089.60 $64,147.20 $67,371.20 $70,720.00 $74,256.00 $77,979.20 $81,868.80 $85,966.40 $90,272.00 $94,785.60 $99,528.00 $104,499.20 $109,720.00 $115,211.20 $120,972.80

MARKET $41,371.20 $43,451.20 $45,614.40 $47,902.40 $50,294.40 $52,790.40 $55,432.00 $58,219.20 $61,110.40 $64,168.00 $67,392.00 $70,740.80 $74,276.80 $78,000.00 $81,889.60 $85,987.20 $90,292.80 $94,806.40 $99,548.80 $104,520.00 $109,740.80 $115,232.00 $120,993.60

-

$43,596.80 $45,780.80 $48,068.80 $50,460.80 $52,998.40 $55,640.00 $58,427.20 $61,339.20 $64,417.60 $67,620.80 $71,011.20 $74,568.00 $78,291.20 $82,201.60 $86,320.00 $90,625.60 $95,160.00 $99,923.20 $104,915.20 $110,156.80 $115,668.80 $121,451.20 $127,524.80

PERFORMANCE $43,617.60 $45,801.60 $48,089.60 $50,481.60 $53,019.20 $55,660.80 $58,448.00 $61,360.00 $64,438.40 $67,641.60 $71,032.00 $74,588.80 $78,312.00 $82,222.40 $86,340.80 $90,646.40 $95,180.80 $99,944.00 $104,936.00 $110,177.60 $115,689.60 $121,472.00 $127,545.60

-

$51,792.00 $54,392.00 $57,116.80 $59,966.40 $62,961.60 $66,123.20 $69,409.60 $72,883.20 $76,544.00 $80,371.20 $84,385.60 $88,608.00 $93,038.40 $97,676.80 $102,564.80 $107,681.60 $113,068.80 $118,726.40 $124,675.20 $130,894.40 $137,446.40 $144,310.40 $151,528.00

HIGH PERFORMANCE $51,812.80 $54,412.80 $57,137.60 $59,987.20 $62,982.40 $66,144.00 $69,430.40 $72,904.00 $76,564.80 $80,392.00 $84,406.40 $88,628.80 $93,059.20 $97,697.60 $102,585.60 $107,702.40 $113,089.60 $118,747.20 $124,696.00 $130,915.20 $137,467.20 $144,331.20 $151,548.80

-

$60,174.40 $63,169.60 $66,331.20 $69,659.20 $73,132.80 $76,793.60 $80,620.80 $84,656.00 $88,899.20 $93,329.60 $98,009.60 $102,897.60 $108,056.00 $113,443.20 $119,121.60 $125,091.20 $131,331.20 $137,904.00 $144,788.80 $152,027.20 $159,640.00 $167,627.20 $176,009.60

There is a $20.80 gap between each range segment. This is due to the one penny ($.01) difference between the maximum hourly rate of each segment and the minimum hourly rate of the next segment.


TOWN OF CARY DESCRIPTION OF BUDGET PROCESS

The Town's budget process begins each August with an evaluation of budget procedures used the prior year. Changes resulting from this evaluation are then implemented, and the budget planning process begins. During October and November, the Budget Office develops the Budget Manual as a reference tool for Town departments. The manual explains the budget processes and procedures and includes instructions, samples, and screen prints of forms, cost information on common purchases, line account definitions, schedules, deadlines, and policy directions. The Town mission statement, statement of values, and goals and initiatives are utilized by departments in the development of the Capital Improvements Budget/Plan (CIB/P) and Operating Budget requests. At the Budget KickOff meeting, held in December, the Town Manager and other key staff present information regarding the upcoming budget process. The departments then develop their narratives, their portion of the operating requests, and “special requests” such as positions, vehicles, computer equipment, and facility upgrades/repairs. Departments submit their Operating and Capial project requests in late January. After reviewing the initial department budget requests, the Town Manager, Assistant Town Manager, Budget Director and Budget Analysts meet with departments. These meetings allow departments to more fully explain their requests and respond to questions from the Town Manager. After these discussion meetings, expenditure decisions are made and the Town Manager's line item recommendations are returned to departments. The Manager's Recommended Budget is prepared and presented to the Council in early May and becomes available to the public for review. The Town Council holds budget worksessions during May and June. These worksessions focus on the Capital Improvements Budget and the Operating Budget as separate components, but often topics cross over from one to the other. For example, future staffing and operating cost impacts of certain capital projects need to be considered when evaluating the capital program. Council directives are stated during these meetings are then incorporated into each budget document. The recommended budget is officially presented at the first Council meeting in May, and a public hearing is held at the second regular Council meeting in May and June. The Council typically meets on the second and fourth Thursday of each month. The budget ordinance, along with any additional council directed changes, is adopted at the Council's second meeting in June prior to the start of the new fiscal year July 1. PROCEDURES FOR AMENDING THE BUDGET The Town adheres to the following procedures for amending the Budget during the year. The responsible department typically prepares all reports and other materials. 1.

2.

3. 4.

A transfer of funds between line accounts of the same division requires approval of the Manager (or his designee). The department completes a Budget Adjustment Request (BAR) for signature by the Controller’s office, the Budget Director, and in some cases, the Town Manager or Assistant Town Manager. The Finance Department maintains a BAR log on the Town-wide computer server to track the status of the adjustment throughout the authorization process. After completing the authorization process, the BAR form returns to the Finance Department, where the change is entered in the Town’s accounting system. A budget transfer between line items in the budget ordinance or across funds goes before a Council Committee and subsequently requires approval by the full Council. The responsible department prepares a Staff Report to Council explaining the reason for the transfer. Upon Council approval, a BAR is prepared, and is tracked throughout the process in the BAR log, as described above. The Council has given the Manager authority to make appropriations from contingency, which, by state statute, must be reported to the Council at its next regularly scheduled meeting. Recognition of unbudgeted revenues, such as a donation for an exhibit, must be presented to a Council Committee, and subsequently, the full Council for funding approval and to authorize the related expenditure.


FISCAL YEAR 2011 SUMMARY BUDGET SCHEDULE

Task

Date

Kickoff Meeting Operating and Pay Plan Database Input Due Capital Input Due in Request Database Public Input Sought on Budget Priorities Public Hearing on Budget Priorities Public Hearing on Budget Priorities Capital Budget and Plan Discussion Meetings Operating Budget Discussion Meetings Official Presentation of Budget at Council Meeting Council Budget Worksession #1 Public Hearing #1 Council Budget Worksession #2 Public Hearing #2 Council Budget Adoption

December 1, 2009 January 29, 2010 February 5, 2010 February 1 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 28, 2010 February 11, 2010 February 25, 2010 March 1 - 5, 2010 March 8 - 19, 2010 May 13, 2010 May 18, 2010 May 27, 2010 June 8, 2010 June 9, 2010 June 24, 2010


TOWN OF CARY SUMMARY OF OPERATING AND CAPITAL BUDGETS

OPERATING BUDGET GENERAL FUND Operating Expenditures Net Operating Transfers * Subtotal

$114,507,603 $1,068,067 $115,575,670

* This figure does NOT include transfers to Capital Project Funds totaling $2,226,756 as this amount is reflected in CIB expenditures.

UTILITY FUND Operating Expenses Net Operating Transfers**

$50,100,984 $1,113,830

Subtotal

$51,214,814

** This figure does NOT include transfers to Capital Project Funds totaling is reflected in CIB expenditures.

$576,417 as this amount

OTHER FUNDS Operating Expenditures***

$5,990,920

*** Includes the following funds; Fleet Management, CDGB, Transit, E911, Health and Dental, and Police Separation. These figures are net expenditures and transfers between funds are only counted as expenditures in the major fund, typically being the General Fund.

TOTAL OPERATING BUDGET

$172,781,404

CAPITAL IMPROVEMENTS BUDGET (CIB) UTILITY CIB Water Sewer Subtotal

$20,678,360 $144,887,507 $165,565,867

Transportation Fire Parks, Recreation and Cultural Resouces General Government Subtotal

$2,709,178 $3,034,000 $700,000 $2,803,173 $9,246,351

GENERAL CIB

TOTAL CIB PROJECTS

$174,812,218

TOTAL OPERATING PLUS CIB

$347,593,622


TOWN OF CARY REVENUE SOURCES ALL FUNDS

Other Funding Sources 1.7% Property Taxes 19.1%

Utility Capital Sources 18.9%

General Capital Sources 2.6% Other Taxes/Licenses 6.7%

Intergovernmental 1.9% Debt Proceeds 28.0%

User Fees/Permits 4.0%

Utility Fund 15.8%

Revenue Source Property Taxes Other Taxes/Licenses Intergovernmental User Fees/Permits Investment/Miscellaneous Utility Fund Debt Proceeds General Capital Sources Utility Capital Sources Other Funding Sources TOTAL REVENUE SOURCES

Amount $67,443,875 $23,839,243 $6,794,390 $14,244,211 $4,298,711 $55,935,460 $98,856,842 $9,246,351 $66,709,025 $5,990,920 $353,359,028

GF Net Fund Balance/Capital Contribution UF Net Fund Balance/Capital Contribution NET REVENUES APPROPRIATED

($1,044,760) ($4,720,646) $347,593,622

Investment/ Miscellaneous 1.8%

Property taxes make up 19.1% of all Town revenues. Additional General Fund revenues, such as user fees, sales taxes, intergovernmental revenues, and others make up 15.6% of all revenues. Water and sewer related fees in the Utility Fund comprise 15.8% of Town revenues. Debt proceeds total 28.0% of Town revenues while the remaining capital sources represent 21.5% of revenues and include Powell Bill funds, interest earnings, vehicle license fees, and cable TV franchise fees.


TOWN OF CARY EXPENDITURES BY FUNCTION ALL FUNDS

General Government 8.0%

Cultural / Recreational 3.4%

Public Safety 10.9%

General Capital Budget 2.7%

Public Works 7.1%

Other (General Fund) 3.7%

Utility Fund 14.7% Other Operating Funds 1.7%

Utility Capital Budget 47.6%

Expenditures by Function General Government Cultural / Recreational Public Safety Public Works Other (General Fund) Utility Fund Other Operating Funds Utility Capital Budget General Capital Budget TOTAL

Amount $27,952,140 $11,913,869 $38,047,187 $24,640,166 $13,022,308 $51,214,814 $5,990,920 $165,565,867 $9,246,351 $347,593,622

The General Fund makes up 33.3% of all Town expenditures. This includes 8.0% for General Government functions, 10.9% for Public Safety, and 10.5% for Public Works and Cultural / Recreational. The Utility Fund accounts for 14.7% of all Town expenditures, while spending on Capital Improvement Projects makes up 50.3%.

NOTE: These figures are net expenditures and transfers between funds are only counted as expenditures in one of the funds.


ALL FUNDS CONSOLIDATED BUDGET SUMMARY OPERATING AND CAPITAL EXPENDITURES

Utility CIB 47.63%

General Fund 33.25%

Utility Fund 14.73% General CIB 2.66%

Health and Dental Fund 0.79%

CDBG Fund 0.14%

911 Fund 0.18%

Fund General Fund Utility Fund Fleet Management Fund CDBG Fund Transit Fund 911 Fund Economic Development Fund Health and Dental Fund Police Separation Fund General CIB Utility CIB Total

Transit Fund 0.61%

Amount $115,575,670 $51,214,814 $0 $474,417 $2,128,382 $642,287 $0 $2,745,834 $0 $9,246,351 $165,565,867 $347,593,622

NOTE: These figures are net expenditures and transfers between funds are only counted as expenditures in one of the funds. General Fund expenditures include debt service related to general capital projects, such as streets and parks. The components of debt service are broken down as indicated below:

Utility Fund expenditures include debt service related to utility capital projects, such as water plant expansions and sewer projects. The components of debt service are broken down as follows:

General Fund Debt Service Debt Principal Debt Interest TOTAL

Utility Debt Service Debt Principal Debt Interest TOTAL

$8,102,588 $5,507,842 $13,610,430

$7,304,100 $5,358,816 $12,662,916


TOWN OF CARY BUDGET OVERVIEW - ALL FUNDS REVENUES AND EXPENDITURES Actual FY 2007

Actual FY 2008

Actual FY 2009

Estimated FY 2010

Budget FY 2011

54,293,575 25,321,569 5,924,264 14,991,080 8,025,900 (19,605,383)

58,208,899 27,195,153 6,135,787 15,488,389 7,383,921 (875,944) (12,272,000)

64,851,809 25,564,814 6,858,286 14,539,492 5,861,738 (7,572,996) (4,069,302)

66,868,968 23,456,967 7,317,213 14,212,759 4,696,722 2,929,338 500,000 (1,123,700)

67,443,875 23,839,243 6,794,390 14,244,211 4,298,711 1,181,996 423,583 (2,226,756)

46,858,235 (1,000,000) -

50,380,734 (10,404,653) -

48,567,653 (2,973,555) -

53,600,794 (500,000) (500,000)

55,935,460 (4,144,229) (576,417) (423,583)

REVENUES & SOURCES: General Fund Property Tax Other Taxes/Licenses Intergovernmental User Fees/Permits Investment/Miscellaneous Fund Balance Utility Fund Transfer to General Fund Transfer to Capital Utility Fund Operating Revenues Fund Balance Transfer to Capital Transfer to General Fund Other Funds Other Revenue Capital Revenue Sources Debt Proceeds General Capital Utility Capital Other Funding Sources Transfers for Capital

3,372,384

4,085,281

5,953,954

7,600,122

5,990,920

69,584,954 27,678,373 19,142,328 (67,701,775) 20,605,383

7,478,848 18,489,913 17,478,414 22,676,653

57,762,042 19,511,371 34,308,069 (68,524,980) 7,042,857

23,808,552 10,666,987 19,850,346 (8,413,620) 1,623,700

98,856,842 6,443,178 66,709,025 2,803,173

TOTAL REVENUES

207,490,887

211,449,395

207,681,252

226,595,148

347,593,622

101,264,205 40,641,847 (665,766)

106,033,841 47,137,532 (1,543,434)

118,358,267 49,281,167 3,819,627

115,575,670 51,214,814 -

(76,664) 444,067 1,313,427 303,926 2,060,076 40,449

139,628 554,110 1,887,061 225,824 3,151,028 (3,697)

EXPENDITURES & USES: General Fund Expenditures Contribution to Fund Balance Utility Fund Contribution to Fund Balance Other Funds Fleet Management Fund CDBG Fund Transit Fund 911 Fund Health and Dental Fund Economic Development Fund Police Separation Allowance Capital Expenditures General Capital Utility Capital TOTAL EXPENDITURES

91,736,329 (2,785,324) 36,534,930 9,323,305 2,074 499,967 1,706,850 329,247 834,246 -

92,689 474,446 2,160,918 302,102 4,491,486 $99,728 (21,247)

474,417 2,128,382 642,287 2,745,834 -

36,732,701 32,576,562

52,387,430 13,736,398

41,997,076 8,102,283

5,105,877 42,430,088

$9,246,351 $165,565,867

207,490,887

211,449,395

207,681,252

226,595,148

347,593,622

Note: These figures are net expenditures and transfers between funds are only counted as expenditures in one of the funds. Transfers to Capital Project Funds are reflected in Capital expenditures. FY 2007 through 2009 reflect actuals, while FY 2010 are estimated figures and FY 2011 reflect budgeted amounts.


TOWN OF CARY CHANGES IN FUND BALANCE ALL FUNDS

Estimated Beginning Fund Balance 7/1/2010

General Fund 71,319,676

Fleet Utility Management Fund Fund 50,947,247 1,501,550

Transit Fund 580,520

911 Fund 448,189

Health & Economic Dental Development Fund Fund 3,562,339 75,000

Police Community General Separation Development Capital Allowance Block Grant Reserve 1,212,713 --- 16,951,012

Utility Capital Reserve 34,087,995

Total 180,686,240 --206,364,352 --387,050,592 --217,322,633 ----------235,000 --------2,803,173 95,446 3,133,619 --220,456,252 ---

Total Revenues

116,620,430

55,935,460

1,106,876

2,128,382

434,032

13,193,710

285,000

900

474,417

6,585,503

9,599,642

Fund Balance plus Revenues

187,940,106

106,882,707

2,608,426

2,708,902

882,221

16,756,050

360,000

1,213,613

474,417

23,536,515

43,687,637

Total Expenditures/Expenses

128,380,619

36,522,657

956,063

3,770,758

642,287

13,259,545

360,000

236,975

474,417

6,443,178

26,276,134

Transfers Out/(In)/Other Adjustments Transfer to/from Insurance Funds Transfer to Police Separation Fund Transfer to Transit Fund Transfer to Economic Development Fund Reimb. fm Utility Fund - PWUT Reimb. to Gen. Fund-indirect costs Reimb. fm Utility Fund-indirect costs Transfer to Utility Capital Reserve Transfer to Cap. Imprvmt. Funds Other Transfers/Reimbursements Total Transfers Out (In)

(260,726) 236,975 1,642,376 235,000 (11,766,335) (215,589) (2,253,067) --2,226,756 (423,583) (10,578,193)

249,172 ------11,766,335 --2,253,067 --576,417 423,583 15,268,574

11,554 --------215,589 --------227,143

----(1,642,376) --------------(1,642,376)

------------------95,446 95,446

-----------------------

-----------------------

-----------------------

-----------------------

-----------------------

Total Expenditures and Inter-fund Transfers

117,802,426

51,791,231

1,183,206

2,128,382

737,733

13,259,545

360,000

---

474,417

6,443,178

26,276,134

Estimated Ending Fund Balance 6/30/2011

70,137,680

55,091,476

1,425,220

580,520

144,488

3,496,505

---

1,213,613

---

17,093,337

17,411,503

166,594,341

Estimated Change in Fund Balance

(1,181,996)

4,144,229

---

142,325

(16,676,492)

(14,091,900)

-48.9%

-7.8%

Percent Change

-1.7%

8.1%

(76,330) -5.1%

--0.0%

Designated for Capital Program

(14,528,722)

---

---

---

Restricted--State Statute, Encumbrances, and Inventories

(17,083,734)

---

---

---

---

---

---

---

38,525,223

55,091,476

1,425,220

580,520

Restricted by Use Estimated Undesignated and Unrestricted Ending Fund Balance 6/30/2011

--(236,975) ----------------(236,975)

(303,701)

(65,834)

(75,000)

900

-67.8%

-1.8%

-100.0%

0.1%

---

0.0%

0.8%

---

---

---

---

---

---

(14,528,722)

---

---

---

---

---

---

(17,127,031)

---

---

---

---

---

(9,291,691)

(6,964,550)

(16,256,241)

101,191

3,496,505

---

1,213,613

---

7,801,646

10,446,953

118,682,347

(43,297)


TOWN OF CARY ASSESSED VALUES AND CARY, WAKE COUNTY & CHATHAM COUNTY TAX RATES

`

Fiscal

Real

Year

2001* 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009* 2010 Estimate 2011 Budget

Combined

Chatham

Combined

Cary

Wake Co.

Wake/Cary

County

Chatham/Cary

Tax Rate

Tax Rate

Tax Rate

Tax Rate

Tax Rate

0.430 0.420 0.420 0.420 0.420 0.420 0.420 0.420 0.330 0.330 0.330

0.560 0.564 0.564 0.604 0.604 0.634 0.634 0.678 0.534 0.534 0.534

0.990 0.984 0.984 1.024 1.024 1.024 1.054 1.098 0.864 0.864 0.864

0.8500 0.6464 0.6464 0.6464 0.6464 0.5970 0.5970 0.6170 0.6530 0.6022 0.6219

1.2800 1.0664 1.0664 1.0664 1.0664 1.0170 1.0170 1.0370 0.9830 0.9322 0.9519

Personal

Property (1)

Property (2)

Total

$8,703,776,620 $9,126,144,568 $9,520,927,354 $9,858,139,614 $10,005,846,270 $10,468,719,181 $11,103,890,517 $11,883,076,481 $17,599,460,205 $18,374,691,607 $18,622,742,724

$1,545,142,309 $1,643,167,535 $1,626,979,056 $1,636,737,125 $1,664,336,766 $1,758,721,425 $1,927,562,043 $2,032,295,674 $2,096,585,627 $2,044,041,858 $1,963,355,939

$10,248,918,929 $10,769,312,103 $11,147,906,410 $11,494,876,739 $11,670,183,036 $12,227,440,606 $13,031,452,560 $13,915,372,155 $19,696,045,832 $20,418,733,465 $20,586,098,663

TOWN OF CARY ASSESSED VALUES FY 2001 - 2011 $25,000,000,000

Personal Property Real Property

$20,000,000,000

$15,000,000,000

$10,000,000,000

$5,000,000,000

Average annual tax base growth over the eight year revaluation cycle between 1992 and 2000 was 11.4% due to tremendous growth in both the residential and non-residential sectors. The average rate of growth rose to 6.8% in FY2008, and has slowed down significantly in recent years to an estimated 3.7% in FY2010 and 0.8% in FY2011.

$0 2001*

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009*

2010

2011

FISCAL YEAR

CARY, WAKE COUNTY & CHATHAM COUNTY PROPERTY TAX RATES 0.95 0.85 0.80 0.75 0.70 0.65 0.60 0.55 0.50 0.45 0.40 0.35 0.30 2001*

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009*

2010

CENTS PER $100 PROPERTY VALUE

0.90

2011

FISCAL YEAR

Cary

Wake County

Chatham County

Notes: 1) Includes public service companies, 2) Includes vehicle assessments * Wake County real property revaluation impacting land and building assessed values for FYs 2001 and 2009.

Property tax values in Wake County are revalued, or adjusted to approximate market value, every eight years. This occurred effective January 1, 2000 and January 1, 2008 impacting fiscal years 2001 and 2009 respectively. In each year, the tax rate was reduced in an effort to generate the same amount of revenues as if the revaluation had not taken place. In FY2001 the tax rate was reduced from 54 cents to 43 cents; in FY2009 the tax rate was reduced from 42 cents to 33 cents. Similarly, property tax values in Chatham County are revalued every four years (FYs2002, 2006, 2010). Approximately 98.5% of Cary's property tax base lies within the Wake County so the tax rate is adjusted in the respective Wake County revaluation year.


TOWN OF CARY RATES

PROPERTY TAX RATE: (per $100 of assessed value annually)

$0.33

SOLID WASTE FEE: (monthly charge)

$14.00

The Town of Morrisville water and sewer system was officially merged with the Town of Cary system effective April 1, 2006. As part of the merger agreement, merger related costs will be recovered through the rate differentials shown below until such time as the costs are fully recovered. WATER RATES: (monthly charge) Base Charges for water and irrigation

Meter Size 5/8" & 3/4" 1" 1 1/2" 2" 3" 4" 6"

Cary* $3.07 $6.61 $21.71 $26.41 $71.08 $107.70 $132.94

Morrisville* $5.00 $6.61 $21.71 $26.41 $71.08 $107.70 $132.94

Residential Charge (per 1,000 gallons) Tier 1 (usage 0 - 5,000 gallons) Tier 2 (usage 5,001 - 8,000 gallons) Tier 3 (usage 8,001 - 23,000 gallons) or up to water budget amount Tier 4 (usage > 23,000 gallons) or over water budget amount

Cary* $3.60 $4.08 $5.79 $11.29

Morrisville* $4.31 $4.31 $6.09 $11.88

Non-Residential & Multifamily Charge (per 1,000 gallons) Tier 1 (usage 0 - Water Budget Amount) Tier 2 (usage > than Water Budget Amount)

$4.08 $11.88

$4.31 $12.50

Single-Family Potable Irrigation (per 1,000 gallons) Tier 1 (usage 0 - 15,000 gallons) or up to water budget amount Tier 2 (usage > 15,000 gallons) or over water budget amount

$5.79 $11.29

$6.09 $11.88

Non-Residential & Multifamily Irrigation (per 1,000 gallons) Tier 1 (usage 0 - Water Budget Amount) Tier 2 (usage > than Water Budget Amount)

$6.38 $11.88

$6.73 $12.50

$3.60

$4.31

Reclaimed Water Rate (Non-potable Irrigation) (per 1,000 gallons) SEWER RATES: (monthly charge) Base Charges

Volume Charge - All Users (per 1,000 gallons)

Meter Size 5/8" & 3/4" 1" 1 1/2" 2" 3" 4" 6"

Cary* $3.07 $6.61 $21.71 $26.41 $71.08 $107.70 $132.94 $7.04

Morrisville* $5.00 $6.61 $21.71 $26.41 $71.08 $107.70 $132.94 $9.12

*For retail utility customers outside the corporate limits of the Town of Cary or the Town of Morrisville, the respective charges for water and/or sewer shall be triple the charges herein established.


The examples calculated below reflect the equivalent of a 2,700 square foot single family home with a tax value of $228,000 for FY01 through FY08 and $316,000 for FY09 through FY11 (reflecting the impact of property revaluation in FY09). The water and sewer fees are for a residential customer averaging 7,000 gallons of water per month.

HISTORY OF CARY ANNUAL HOUSEHOLD FEES FY 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011

Property Tax $980.40 $957.60 $957.60 $957.60 $957.60 $957.60 $957.60 $957.60 $1,042.80 $1,042.80 $1,042.80

Tax Rate 0.43 0.42 0.42 0.42 0.42 0.42 0.42 0.42 0.33 0.33 0.33

Solid Waste $92.04 $92.04 $92.04 $92.04 $92.04 $141.00 $141.00 $141.00 $168.00 $168.00 $168.00

Water $271.44 $286.68 $286.68 $272.28 $318.24 $319.92 $323.64 $323.64 $323.64 $325.56 $350.76

Sewer $230.28 $270.60 $270.60 $290.76 $344.76 $403.56 $445.08 $477.84 $521.52 $586.20 $628.20

Total $1,574.59 $1,607.34 $1,607.34 $1,613.10 $1,713.06 $1,822.50 $1,867.74 $1,900.50 $2,056.29 $2,122.89 $2,190.09

% Change 8.6% 2.1% 0.0% 0.4% 6.2% 6.4% 2.5% 1.8% 8.2% 3.2% 3.2%

YEARLY COMPARISON OF ANNUAL HOUSEHOLD FEES $2,500

10%

The average annual increase from FY01 through FY11 is 3.9%.

9%

$2,000

Annual Fee Total

7% $1,500

6% 5%

$1,000

4% 3%

$500

2% 1%

$0

0% 2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

Fiscal Year Property Tax

Solid Waste

Water

Sewer

% Change

2011

Percent Change Per Year

8%


DEBT SERVICE REQUIREMENTS

BACKGROUND In North Carolina, an agency known as the Local Government Commission, “the LGC”, oversees local government bonded debt. The LGC must approve all bonded debt of local units based on a conclusion that local units have sufficient fiscal capacity to repay debt and are within statutory limitations set forth by the Local Government Bond Act of North Carolina which limits the amount of net bonded debt of local units to 8% of the appraised value of property subject to taxation. The staff of the LGC, the State and Local Government Division of the State Treasurer’s office, supports the LGC, conducts competitive bond sales on behalf of units, closely oversees negotiated debt and assists local units with other fiscal management issues. The Town has four outstanding series of general obligation bonds, excluding refunding bonds. Principal and interest payments on general obligation bonds are collateralized by the full faith, credit and taxing power of the Town. Three of the four outstanding general obligations bonds bear interest, payable semi-annually, at rates varying from 3.0 to 5.0%. The 2006 Public Improvement bonds have a variable rate of interest with principal payments that started in FY 2009 and will continue through FY 2027. Interest payments for the variable rate bonds are made on a monthly basis. During FY 2010, the interest rates, which were adjusted on a weekly basis, ranged from a low of .12% to a high of .30%, but averaged approximately .20%. Principal and interest requirements are provided by appropriation in the year in which they are due. Two of the four series provided funding for utility projects. Although the bonds are secured by the taxing power of the Town, the debt service is funded through utility rates. The Town’s general obligation bonds have maintained the highest municipal rating possible, AAA, from all three rating agencies, Moody’s, Standard & Poor’s and Fitch, since 2001. These excellent bond ratings positively affect the Town’s interest costs through lower interest rates by demonstrating that investments in the Town’s obligations are low risk. The Town has one general obligation refunding bond issue outstanding. The series 2001 refunding bonds were paid in full in FY 2010, Refunding bonds are issued to retire existing bonds to achieve budgetary savings through lower interest rates. The newly issued series 2009 refunding bonds bear interest, payable semi-annually, at an average rate of 2.479%. Principal and interest requirements are provided by appropriation in the year in which they are due and are collateralized by the full faith, credit and taxing power of the Town. Portions of these refunding bonds have retired utility related debt, and the debt service on the utility portion of the refunding bonds is funded through utility rates. The Town has three revenue bond issues outstanding, with interest rates of 2.75 - 5.0% and anticipates a forth series to be issued during FY 2011. These revenue bonds are long-term debt instruments that will be repaid from the receipts of the utility system. Revenue bonds require a trust agreement between the Town and a trustee for the benefit of the bondholders. In this trust agreement, the Town made certain covenants, or promises, regarding utility rates and the operation of the utility system. The Town has one series of certificates of participation outstanding, with interest rates of 3.0 to 5.0%. Principal and interest requirements are provided by appropriation in the year in which they are due, and are secured by the Town Hall campus property. The Town has four outstanding installment purchase agreements with interest rates ranging from 2.65 to 4.73%. The debt service on these obligations is paid from the general revenues of the Town, and is collateralized by the property that is financed. The Town has two State Revolving Loans with interest rates ranging from 2.21 to 2.42%. These loans are financing improvements to the sewer system. These loans are long-term debt instruments that will be repaid from the receipts of the utility system.


HISTORICAL OVERVIEW OF OUTSTANDING DEBT 1986

A bond referendum of $27,000,000 was placed on the November 4, 1986 ballot. This referendum consisted of an additional $5,000,000 for construction of a water treatment plant, $5,000,000 for street construction and improvements, and $17,000,000 for construction of a wastewater treatment plant. Cary residents approved these three issues.

1987

A total of $20,500,000 in general obligation bonds was sold in July 1987. This sale included a portion of the 1986 authority and $10,000,000 in previously authorized but unissued water bonds for the treatment plant. These bonds were refunded in 1992 and in 2001.

1988

The Town sold an additional $2,000,000 in authorized street improvement bonds and $5,000,000 in authorized sewer bonds in August 1988. These bonds were refunded in 1992 and 2001.

1991

A bond sale was held in September 1991, at which time the remaining 1986 authority of $1,000,000 in street bonds and $8,500,000 in water bonds were sold. This offering completed the sale of all authorized general obligation bonds to date. These bonds were refunded in 1996.

1992

The Town refunded $20,125,000 in water, sewer, and street bonds in December 1992, at interest rates ranging from 5.5 to 5.6 percent. The original bonds issued in FY 1987 and FY 1988 were refunded to provide the Town approximately $726,000 in present value savings.

1994

In a March 1994 referendum, the Cary voters approved $9,075,000 in sewer bond authorizations and $9,425,000 in parks and recreation bond authorizations.

1996

A refunding transaction related to the 1991 general obligation issue occurred in April 1996. Interest rates ranged from 4.5 to 4.8 percent, and generated approximately $105,000 in savings to the Town. In April 1996, a total of $11,575,000 in general obligation bonds were sold with interest rates ranging from 5.1 to 5.25 percent. This sale included $9,075,000 of authorized sewer bonds and $2,500,000 of authorized parks and recreation bonds.

1997

In October 1997, the Town entered into an installment purchase agreement for $700,000 for the financing of two fire trucks. The debt will be repaid over a period of ten years and is budgeted in the General Fund. The first principal and interest payment was made in FY 1998. Principal and interest payments are made semi-annually based on a 4.83 percent annual interest rate. In November 1997, the Town entered into an installment purchase agreement for $6,920,000 to finance part of the $19,650,000 cost of the South Cary Water Reclamation Facility (SCWRF) expansion. The debt was to be repaid over a period of fifteen years and was budgeted in the Water/Sewer Operations Fund. The first principal and interest payment was made in FY 1998. Principal and interest payments were made semi-annually based on a 4.84 percent annual rate.

1998

In December 1998, $6,925,000 in general obligation bonds were sold with interest rates ranging from 4 to 4.2 percent. This sale was for the remaining parks and recreation authorization. In December 1998, the Town also entered into an installment purchase agreement for $2,200,000 for the financing of a water tank. The debt was to be repaid over a period of fifteen years and was budgeted in the Water/Sewer Operations Fund. The first principal and interest payment was made in FY 1999. Principal and interest payments were made semi-annually based on a 3.99 percent annual rate.

1999

In a February 2, 1999 referendum, the Cary voters approved $66,510,000 in water bond authorizations, $62,635,000 in street and sidewalk bond authorizations, and $10,000,000 in park and recreational facility bond authorizations. In October 1999, the Town entered into an installment purchase agreement for $1,983,275 to finance the cost of a new fire station on Ten-Ten Road. The debt will be repaid over a period of ten years and is budgeted in General Fund. The first principal and interest payment was made in FY 2000. Principal and interest payments will be made semi-annually based on a 4.73 percent annual rate.


HISTORICAL OVERVIEW (Continued) 2001

In February 2001, $76,900,000 in general obligation bonds were sold with interest rates ranging from 4.25 to 5.0 percent. This sale included $59,100,000 of authorized water bonds, $10,600,000 of authorized street and sidewalk bonds, and $7,200,000 of authorized park and recreational facility bonds. The Town also refunded $12,330,000 of the 1992 refunding in February 2001, at rates ranging from 4.0 to 4.2 percent, for approximately $459,000 in present value savings. In November 2001, the Town issued $19,135,000 of revenue bonds to finance the reclaimed water system, and to refund the 1997 SCWRF expansion installment purchase agreement and the 1998 water tank installment purchase agreement. The installment purchase agreements were refunded to remove the liens on the utility system. The revenue bonds will be repaid over a period of 25 years, semi-annually, from receipts of the utility system at interest rates ranging from 3.25 to 5.0 percent.

2002

In March 2002, the Town entered into an installment purchase agreement for $375,000 for the financing of a fire pumper. The debt will be repaid over a period of ten years and is budgeted in the General Fund. Principal and interest payments are made semi-annually based on a 4.04 percent annual interest rate with the first payment in FY 2003. In October 2002, the Town issued $46,695,000 of certificates of participation to finance the town hall expansion and to accelerate the widening of NC Highway 55. The certificates of participation are secured by the town hall campus property and will be repaid over a period of 20 years, semi-annually, at rates ranging from 2.5 to 5.0 percent. Debt service began in FY2003.

2003

Cary voters approved a bond referendum in April 2003 consisting of $130,000,000 streets and $30,000,000 recreation authorization. In May 2003, the Town issued $41,080,000 in general obligation bonds, comprised of $38,375,000 street bonds and $2,705,000 parks bonds with interest rates ranging from 2.0 to 4.0 percent. In July 2003, the Town entered into an installment purchase agreement for $1,322,688 for the financing of an aerial fire truck and two fire pumpers. The debt will be repaid over a period of ten years and is budgeted in the General Fund. Principal and interest payments are made semi-annually based on a 2.65 percent annual interest rate.

2004

In May 2004, the Town issued $25,605,000 of revenue bonds to finance certain water reclamation projects and to refund a portion of the 1996 sewer bonds. The refunding generated approximately $179,000 in present value savings. The revenue bonds will be repaid over a period of 25 years, semi-annually, from receipts of the utility system with interest rates ranging from 2.0 to 5.0 percent. Debt service began in FY 2005. The Town has also entered into a State Revolving Loan in the amount of $10,223,222 to finance the biosolids dryer project. Debt service commenced in FY 2006 and will be paid over a period of 20 years at 2.42% interest. The Town entered into an installment purchase contract in the amount of $780,000 during the fiscal year to purchase a fire aerial ladder platform truck. Debt service on this contract began in FY 2005.

2005

The Town entered into a State Revolving Loan in the amount of $3,958,771 to finance the planning, permitting, and a portion of the design for the Western Wake Regional Wastewater Facilities. Debt service commenced in FY 2008 and will be paid over a period of 20 years at 2.205% interest. Cary voters also approved a bond referendum in May 2005 consisting of $110,000,000 for wastewater facilities and $10,000,000 for open space acquisition.

2006

There was no additional debt issued in FY 2006.

2007

In July 2006, the Town issued $47,255,000 of general obligation bonds, comprised of $45,255,000 of street bonds and $2,000,000 of park bonds with a variable rate of interest. These bonds will be repaid over a 20 year period, with the first principal payment to be made in FY 2009. Additionally, the Town issued $35,710,000 in revenue bonds, including $22,240,000 to finance certain water reclamation projects and $13,470,000 to refund a portion of the 2001 revenue bonds, which resulted in a net present value savings in excess of $560,000. The revenue bonds will be repaid over a period of 25 years, semi-annually, from receipts of the utility system.

2008

There was no additional debt issued in FY 2008.

2009

In July 2008 the Town entered into an installment purchase agreement for two fire trucks in the amount of $1,315,000. Debt service commenced in FY2009 and will be paid over a period of 20 years at 3.56% interest. In April 2009 the Town issued $53,000,000 in general obligation bonds related to the 2003 and 2005 Referenda, which provided $7,000,000 for park related projects, $11,000,000 for street construction and improvements,


$10,000,000 for open space land purchases and $25,000,000 for sewer projects primarily related to the new Western Wake Regional Wastewater Facilities. These bonds will be repaid over a twenty year period with coupon rates ranging from 3.0 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 5.0% with an average total interest cost of 3.49%. In April 2009, the Town also issued $40,020,000 in refunding bonds to refinance general obligation bonds of $27,200,000 in 2001 Water series, $7,900,000 in 2001 Public Improvement Series, $3,925,000 in 1998 Parks series and $970,000 in 1996 Parks series. These refunding bonds bear interest coupons from 2.0 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 4.0% with an average rate of 2.479%, and provided approximately $2.7 million in present value savings over existing debt commitments. FY 2011 DEBT OUTLOOK The Town is planning to issue approximately $23,500,000 in revenue bonds during FY 2011 for water projects. The principal for this issue will be repaid over 25 years, beginning in FY 2012. Principal payments related to the new 2009 general obligation bonds commence in FY 2012. Principal repayment for the 2009 refunding bonds began in FY 2010. Debt service payments for the new and refunding bonds will continue through FY 2029 and FY 2020, respectively.

FY 2012 DEBT OUTLOOK The Town is planning to issue approximately $43,000,000 in revenue bonds during FY 2012 for sewer projects. Repayment will be over a 25 year period and principal repayment is expected to commence in FY 2013. The Town is also planning to enter into a State Revolving Loan for approximately $35,000,000 to finance a portion of the construction of the Western Wake Regional Wasterwater Management Facility. Repayment will be over a 20 year period with principal payments beginning in FY 2015.

EFFECTS OF DEBT If the Town issues the debt as planned in FY 2011, the general fund will have a debt balance of $137 million and the utility fund will have a debt balance of $148 million at June 30, 2011. For FY 2011, the general fund has a debt service obligation of $13,610,431. This includes principal and interest for street bonds, park and recreation bonds, certificates of participation and installment purchase obligations. For FY 2011, the utility fund has a debt service obligation of $12,662,916. This includes principal and interest on the two existing water reclamation facilities, the planned Western Wake Regional Wastewater Management Facility, the water treatment plant, the reclaimed water system and various water tanks and pump stations.


OUTSTANDING DEBT

ISSUE DATE

PRINCIPAL AS OF 7/1/10

SERIES WATER & SEWER DEBT 2-01 Water 11-01 Revenue Bonds 5-04 Revenue Bonds 5-04 State Revolving Loan 2-05 State Revolving Loan 4-06 Morrisville Bonds 6-07 Revenue Bonds 6-09 Sewer Bonds 6-09 Water Refunding FY11 Revenue Bonds TOTAL WATER & SEWER

2-01 3-02 9-02 5-03 7-03 5-04 7-06 8-08 6-09 6-09

GENERAL DEBT Public Improvement Fire Installment Purchase Town Hall/Hwy 55 COPS Public Improvement Fire Installment Purchase Fire Installment Purchase Public Improvement Bonds Fire Installment Purchase Public Improvement Bonds Public Improvement Refunding TOTAL GENERAL DEBT TOTAL

$

TO BE ISSUED

RETIRING IN FY 2011 PRINCIPAL INTEREST

12,500,000 1,410,000 18,740,000 8,178,578 3,364,955 1,540,000 34,150,000 25,000,000 27,370,000 132,253,533

23,500,000 23,500,000

3,300,000 690,000 1,660,000 511,161 197,939 390,000 555,000 7,304,100

583,250 42,255 793,844 197,922 74,197 51,075 1,462,387 1,059,086 1,094,800 5,358,816

9,200,000 720,000 17,080,000 7,667,417 3,167,016 1,150,000 33,595,000 25,000,000 27,370,000 23,500,000 148,449,433

1,800,000 87,445 30,325,000 27,080,000 503,074 345,502 43,655,000 1,079,511 28,000,000 12,190,000 145,065,532

---

900,000 42,849 2,335,000 2,000,000 139,031 81,836 1,800,000 118,873 685,000 8,102,589

78,750 3,103 1,272,660 1,003,200 12,434 11,637 1,414,900 37,382 1,186,176 487,600 5,507,842

900,000 44,596 27,990,000 25,080,000 364,043 263,666 41,855,000 960,638 28,000,000 11,505,000 136,962,943

23,500,000

$ 15,406,689

$

10,866,658

TOTAL PRINCIPAL PLUS INTEREST TO BE RETIRED IN FY 2011 $

26,273,347

277,319,065

$

DEBT LIMIT & LEGAL DEBT MARGIN

*Net assessed value

(Estimated)

(Budgeted)

As of 6/30/10 $ 20,418,733,465

As of 6/30/11 $ 20,586,098,663

1,633,498,677

1,646,887,893

181,609,065 193,500,000

196,297,376 193,500,000

**Debt limit - 8% of total assessed value Less: Amount of debt applicable to debt limit (Net bonded debt) Less: G.O. bonds authorized, not issued Legal debt margin

$

OUTSTANDING 6/30/2011

1,258,389,612

$

1,257,090,517

* Assessed values are estimated for FY 2010 and budgeted for FY 2011. ** Debt limit: The Town is subject to the Local Government Bond Act of North Carolina which limits the amount of net bonded debt the Town may have outstanding to 8% of the appraised value of property subject to taxation.

$

285,412,376


ANNUAL DEBT SERVICE REQUIREMENTS* Fiscal Years 2000 - 2021 Fiscal Year 00 01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21

General Debt Principal Interest

Utilities Debt Principal Interest

Total Principal Principal & Interest

General Debt

936,319 1,032,038 1,875,789 1,896,921 6,302,703 6,429,939 6,482,751 6,497,061 6,423,209 8,296,355 7,969,735 8,102,589 9,663,482 9,435,183 12,815,427 12,644,409 12,644,326 12,639,419 12,629,695 12,472,516 12,457,516 12,452,516

3,271,932 3,244,827 3,072,381 5,611,875 5,613,934 5,638,233 7,240,301 7,227,064 7,199,692 7,214,490 7,168,845 7,304,100 9,026,892 9,307,892 12,115,251 13,989,251 14,190,251 14,718,251 16,179,251 16,376,251 16,485,251 16,596,251

4,208,251 4,276,865 4,948,170 7,508,796 11,916,637 12,068,172 13,723,052 13,724,125 13,622,901 15,510,845 15,138,580 15,406,689 18,690,374 18,743,075 24,930,678 26,633,660 26,834,577 27,357,670 28,808,946 28,848,767 28,942,767 29,048,767

1,577,309 1,671,647 3,191,818 4,378,609 10,541,899 10,388,739 10,442,528 11,803,654 11,417,899 12,284,681 12,363,818 13,610,431 14,897,189 14,294,308 20,548,358 19,852,725 19,318,695 18,787,970 18,202,436 17,490,847 16,932,061 16,403,346

640,990 639,609 1,316,029 2,481,688 4,239,196 3,958,800 3,959,777 5,306,593 4,994,690 3,988,326 4,394,083 5,507,842 5,233,707 4,859,125 7,732,931 7,208,316 6,674,369 6,148,551 5,572,741 5,018,331 4,474,545 3,950,830

1,913,870 1,742,675 4,220,569 4,565,992 4,286,049 4,711,224 4,837,963 6,818,809 5,349,953 5,099,777 5,631,140 5,358,816 6,253,152 10,175,781 14,449,651 15,294,064 14,712,966 14,119,055 13,475,399 12,782,530 12,081,002 11,386,887

6,763,111 6,659,149 10,484,768 14,556,476 20,441,882 20,738,196 22,520,792 25,849,527 23,967,544 24,598,948 25,163,803 26,273,347 30,177,233 33,777,981 47,113,260 49,136,040 48,221,912 47,625,276 47,857,086 46,649,628 45,498,314 44,386,484

Utility Debt 5,185,802 4,987,502 7,292,950 10,177,867 9,899,983 10,349,457 12,078,264 14,045,873 12,549,645 12,314,267 12,799,985 12,662,916 15,280,044 19,483,673 26,564,902 29,283,315 28,903,217 28,837,306 29,654,650 29,158,781 28,566,253 27,983,138

*Represents principal and interest on existing bonds, existing installment contracts, and on debt that has been committed in FY 2010 and prior year budgets. It also includes debt impacts associated with the approved FY 2011 budget.

Utility Debt

Annual Debt Service

General Debt

$60,000,000

$50,000,000

$40,000,000

$30,000,000

$20,000,000

$10,000,000

$0 00

01

02

03

04

05

06

07

08

09

10

11

Fiscal Year

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21


GENERAL FUND DEBT RATIOS

Ratio of Debt Service to Total Expenditures

16% 14% 12% 10% 8% 6% 4% 2% 0% 2001

2002

2003

2004

2005 2006 2007 Fiscal Year

2008

2009

2010

2011

This chart compares total debt service paid out each year over an eleven-year period to total net expenditures for the general fund. Net expenditures are total expenditures, less reimbursements from the utility fund. These figures do not include any other transfers. The actual numbers on which this graph is based are included in the table at the bottom of this page.

Outstanding Debt per Capita

Debt issuances of $46.7 million for Town Hall expansion and the widening of NC55 combined with $38.3 million for streets and $2.7 million for parks helped drive the debt per capita higher in FY 2003. The Town issued $28 million in April 2009 for streets, parks and open space. With no new debt issuance in FY 2010 or FY 2011, the debt per capita decreased.

$1,200 $1,000 $800 $600 $400 $200 $0 2001

Fiscal Year End 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 1

2002

2003

General Debt Service1 $1,671,647 $3,191,818 $4,378,609 $10,541,899 $10,388,739 $10,442,528 $11,803,654 $11,417,899 $12,284,681 $12,572,089 $13,610,430

2004

2005

General Fund Net Expenditures $55,292,409 $61,323,495 $73,029,942 $75,126,017 $80,332,326 $85,870,102 $91,736,329 $101,264,205 $92,559,641 $118,358,267 $115,575,670

Represents principal and interest.

2006 2007 Fiscal Year

2008

2009

2010

Ratio of Debt Service to Total Operating Exp. 3.0% 5.2% 6.0% 14.0% 12.9% 12.2% 12.9% 11.3% 13.3% 10.6% 11.8%

Population 99,798 103,260 106,715 107,973 111,039 115,854 122,643 130,716 135,955 141,271 145,509

2011

General Outstanding

Outstanding Debt per

Debt 30,562,314 29,061,524 114,939,604 110,739,590 104,309,650 97,826,898 138,584,837 132,161,620 153,035,266 145,065,532 136,962,944

Capita 306 281 1,077 1,026 939 844 1,130 1,011 1,126 1,027 941


UTILITY FUND DEBT RATIOS Ratio of Debt Service to Operating Expenditures and Debt Service

45% 40% 35% 30% 25% 20% 15% 10% 5% 0% 2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

Fiscal Year

This chart compares debt service over a ten-year period to utility operating expenditures and debt service. Operating expenditures include reimbursements to the General Fund. These figures do not include any other transfers. The ratio of debt service to utility operating expenditures and debt service has been gradually decreasing since 2007.

Fiscal Year 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011

1

Utility Debt

Utility Operating Expenditures

and Debt Service Service1 $4,987,502 $25,904,816 $7,292,950 $25,350,584 $10,177,867 $27,362,083 $9,899,983 $28,450,285 $10,349,457 $30,089,566 $12,078,264 $33,090,435 $14,045,873 $36,534,930 $12,549,645 $40,641,847 $12,314,267 $43,094,385 $12,799,985 $49,281,167 $12,662,916 $51,214,814

Represents principal and interest.

Ratio of Debt Service to Utility Operating Exp. 19.3% 28.8% 37.2% 34.8% 34.4% 36.5% 38.4% 30.9% 28.6% 26.0% 24.7%


HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF CARY

The Town of Cary, located in Wake and Chatham Counties, is in North Carolina’s Piedmont region. The Town is located just southwest of the City of Raleigh, which serves as both the state capital and Wake County seat. Cary is a major hub of residential development for employees of the State of North Carolina, North Carolina State University and the Research Triangle Park—an industrial, governmental and scientific research area adjacent to the northwest Town limits. Cary is also home to a substantial mix of non-residential development including several major office parks and retail centers. Cary began as a settlement called Bradford's Ordinary in 1750. In 1854, a farmer and lumber man named Frank Page bought three hundred acres of land and established several enterprises, including a sawmill, general store, inn and Post Office. Page named his development Cary after Mr. Samuel Fenton Cary, a prohibition leader from Ohio whom he admired. The extension of the railroad through Cary enabled the Town to flourish, and on April 6, 1871, the Town of Cary was incorporated. In 1963, the State Legislature amended the Town’s charter to provide for a CouncilManager form of Government. One council member is elected from each of four voting districts, and two council members and the mayor are elected at-large. A prestigious, private boarding school developed in Cary during the late 1800's. This school later became famous as the first public high school in North Carolina. The school was located on the site currently occupied by Cary Elementary School. In 2002, the Wake County School System began building a new elementary school on the same site. The Town reached an agreement with the school system to purchase the former Cary Elementary School building. The Town is renovating this building to become the new Cary Community Arts Center with completion expected in May 2011. The 1990 Decennial Census reported the Town's population to be 44,276. The 2000 Decennial Census reported a population of 94,536, indicating a growth rate of 114% since 1990, which was an average of 11.3% per year. The Town of Cary's Planning Department estimates Cary’s July 1, 2010 population at 141,271, representing a 3.9% increase since July 1, 2009.

North Carolina


TOWN OF CARY KEY FACTS AND MISCELLANEOUS STATISTICS

The following charts and graphs display various key facts and statistics about the Town of Cary. In addition to providing insight into the Town, this information plays an important role in the development of the annual budget. Some sections included herein contain estimated information for Fiscal Years 2010 and 2011.

POPULATION Town of Cary Population History

40,000

10% 8% 6% 4%

2011

2010

2009

2008

2007

Population estimated by the Town of Cary Planning Department.

Fiscal Year Population

2006

2005

2004

2003

2002

2001

0% 2000

0 1999

2%

1998

20,000

1996

The Town of Cary's population continues to grow; however, the rate of growth decreased from over 10% as of July 1, 1996 to 1.3% as of July 1, 2004 and is estimated at a 3.6% rate for FY 2011. This growth rate decrease resulted from the combined impacts of a slowing economy and proactive growth management efforts. The Growth Management Element of the Townâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Comprehensive Plan has included measures such as an Adequate Public Facilities ordinance, and water, sewer, and transportation development fees to help ensure that additional growth does not occur before the required infrastructure is in place.

% Change

115,854

111,039

108,152

106,715

99,798

103,260

95,949

88,354

86,783

76,800

60,000

69,500

80,000

82,700

100,000

1997

Population (as of July 1)

120,000

140,857

12%

135,955

140,000

130,716

14%

122,643

160,000

% Change

All Sales Taxes, Wine and Beer Tax, and Powell Bill funds (in part) are distributed by the state or county based on the Town's percentage of total population for the county as calculated by the Office of State Planning (OSP) for July 1 of each fiscal year. If other municipalities within the county grow at a faster rate than Cary, the Town's proportionate share of the revenue to be distributed decreases.

Cary Apex Fuquay-Varina Garner Holly Springs Knightdale Morrisville Raleigh Rolesville Wake Forest Wendell Zebulon

% Change FY 06 to 07 4.3% 3.2% 9.3% 4.6% 19.8% 5.6% 7.0% 3.3% 4.0% 12.6% 4.0% 2.0%

% Change FY 07 to 08 5.9% 3.9% 5.7% 4.0% 8.9% 8.3% 4.0% 4.1% 72.6% 11.2% 4.0% 1.8%

% Change FY 08 to 09 6.6% 7.1% 5.7% 4.7% 8.2% 17.5% 3.9% 1.7% 40.0% 6.7% 2.1% 1.9%

% Change FY 09 to 10 4.0% 1.9% 12.2% 5.0% 7.6% 4.9% 1.2% 3.0% 0.7% 0.4% 5.9% 3.6%

% Change FY 10 to 11 3.6% 1.1% 5.7% 4.8% 7.0% 13.4% 2.3% 1.7% 1.1% 1.0% 1.0% 9.9%

ASSESSED VALUE and PROPERTY TAXES Assessed Value Components

$15 $10 $5

Fiscal Year Assessed Value

* Effective year of property revaluation

Fiscal Year Tax Rate

Vehicle

Non-Residential

Residential

2010

*2009

2008

2007

2006

2005

$0

2004

2011

2010

2008

*2009

2007

2006

2005

2004

$0.00

2003

$0

2002

$0.10

*2001

$5

$20

2000

$0.20

Tax Rate

$0.30 $10

2000

Assessed Value (In Billions)

$0.40 $15

In Billions of Dollars

$25

2003

$20

$0.50

2002

$0.60

*2001

$25


Assessed Value is a very important factor to the Town of Cary as the property tax revenue represents 54% of total general fund revenues. As represented by the three charts, Town's assessed value has continued to climb. The current mix of assessed value is 74% residential and 26% commercial.

History of Property Tax Revenue and Tax Rate $80

0.60

$70

0.50

$60 0.40

$50

0.30

$40 $30

0.20

The tax rate was reduced from 54 cents to 43 cents in FY 2001 as a result of property revaluation in Wake county. The tax rate was further reduced to 42 cents in FY 2002 and remained steady until it was reduced to 33 cents in FY 2009, again as a result of property revaluation which is conducted every eight years as dictated by state statute.

$20 0.10

$10

0.00

$0 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Est. budget Fiscal Year Ad Valorem Taxes

Property Tax Rate

GROWTH IN LAND AREA AND STREETS 60

40

0.3% 0.0% 4.5% 2.5%

3.7%

4.4%

Street Miles Maintained

7.7%5.1% 1.3% 5.1% 3.4%

500 400 300

30

200

20

2009

Est.2010

Fiscal Year

2008

2007

2006

2005

2004

0 2003

0 2002

100

2001

10 2000

Square Miles

50

Growth in Land Area: 2000 - 2010

2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

Est. 2010

Fiscal Year

Cary continues to grow not only in population but also in land area. As the land area of Cary increases, so do the street miles maintained by the Town. In 1987 the land area was 27.03 square miles. As of July 1, 2010, that figure is estimated to be 55.53 square miles. This rate of increase has primarily been accomplished through voluntary annexations requested by property owners.

PUBLIC SAFETY FIRE PROTECTION/SERVICES Number of Stations: 7 Number of Authorized Employees: 206 (Allowed 3 overhires for total of 209) Actual FY 2009 209 $3,425,000 6,472

Estimated FY 2010 209 $1,833,119 6,708

Dollar Loss Per Capita

2009

2008

2010 Est.

Fiscal Year

2007

2006

2005

2004

2003

There was a large apartment fire and a commercial building fire in FY 2007 that caused a large amount of fire loss as indicated in the statistics and chart.

Actual FY 2008 209 $1,738,000 6,398

$80 $70 $60 $50 $40 $30 $20 $10 $0

2002

The Town's plan review and building code inspection processes along with the fire department's risk management program are key to keeping the "Dollar Loss Per Capita" statistic low. The fire department conducts almost 5,000 inspections annually and strives to contact at least 10% of the population annually about fire and life safety techniques. The fire department was accredited by the Commission on Fire Accreditation International in August, 1999. The Town's seventh fire station opened in April of 2007.

Dollars

Number of Fire Positions (includes three overhires) Total Fire Loss in Dollars Number of Emergency Calls

Actual FY 2007 209 $8,324,367 6,204


POLICE Number of Full-Time Equivalent Employees (FTE): 211.5 (Allowed 4 overhires for total of 215.5) Actual Actual 2007 2008 Number of Police Positions (includes two Police and two Emergency Communications overhire postions) 192 199.5 Number of Sworn Officers 159 165 *Part I Crimes 2,443 2,636 **Part II Crimes 2,359 2,355 Arrests (Adult, over 16) 2,227 2,118 Arrests (Juvenile, under 16) 237 181

Actual 2009

Estimated 2010

Projected 2011

205 166 2,394 2,116 2,057 135

211 172 2,288 2,295 2,140 130

215.5 176 2,377 2,246 1,904 97

*Part I Crimes: Murder, Rape, Robbery, Aggravated Assault, Burglary, Larceny, Auto Theft, Arson **Part II Crimes: All others, including vandalism, drug violations, etc.

Calls for Police Service 50,000

According to theTown's biennial survey, conducted in February 2010, 98.7% of the respondents feel safe in Cary. The population of the Town has increased by 26.85% in the last five years however, there has been a 3.31% decrease in calls for service.

150,000

130,000 120,000 110,000

40,000

100,000

Population

Calls for Service

140,000 45,000

90,000

35,000

80,000 70,000

30,000 2003

2004

2005

2006 2007 Fiscal Year

2008

Calls for Service

2009

2010 Est. 2011 Est.

Population

PARKS AND RECREATION Number of Parks (Town-owned) Parks & Recreation Land in Acres (includes both developed & undeveloped land) Number of Soccer Fields Number of Town Ballfields (Softball & Baseball) Number of Greenways Greenway Mileage Number of Parks with Trail Systems Park Trail Mileage

Actual 2008 21

Actual 2009 22

Estimated 2010 23

Projected 2011 23

1,840 17 26 29 30.00 10 13.58

1,870 17 30 35 33.48 11 14.00

2,300 19 30 37 40.03 12 15.00

2,401 19 30 39 43.33 12 15.00

2,425 22 31 39 45.00 12 15.00

Developed Park Acres/1,000 Residents

43.3

2008

2009

2010

Total Greenway Miles

7.6

30.0 2007 Fiscal Year

7.3

2006

33.5

40.0 2005

7.3

7.4

2004

7.2

7.5

2003

6.9

26.0

20.5

16.0 7.8

14.0

48 44 40 36 32 28 24 20 16 12 8 4 0

45

Developed Park Acres/1,000 Residents and Total Greenway Miles

7.9

The Town of Cary has budgeted approximately $2.4 million during Fiscal Years 2010 and 2011 for Park & Greenway Renovation, Greenways, Neighborhood Parks, and Community Parks to enhance existing parks and recreation infrastructure. These investments will help meet goals of the Parks Master Plan.

Actual FY 2007 21

2011 Est.


INSPECTIONS AND PERMITS Actual FY 2007 3,688 100,872 1,836 42 $434.8 $128.5

Certificates of Occupancy Issued (new & existing buildings) Number of Inspections Performed (new & existing buildings) Number of New Residential Building Permits Issued Number of New Commercial Building Permits Issued Total Dollar Value of New Residential Building Permits (millions) Total Dollar Value of New Commercial Building Permits (millions)

2,000 # of New Permits

1,600 1,200 800 400

Estimated FY 2010 1,820 71,155 1,364 15 $207.5 $28.8

Projected FY 2011 1,933 65,500 1,179 27 $212.5 $54.0

Proj. 2011

2009

New Non-Residential FiscalNew Residential Year

Est. 2010

2008

2007

2006

2005

2004

2003

2002

2001

2000

1999

1998

1997

1996

1995

1994

1993

1992

1991

0 1990

Actual FY 2009 2,082 66,363 1,025 42 $197.7 $287.2

The number of new building permits issued is another representation of the Town of Cary's growth trend since 1990. From 1990 to 1994 there was a 172% increase in the number of new permits issued annually. This figure declined 394% from 1994 to 2003. Then this figure increased almost back to the same annual number of permits issued in 2008 as in 1994 increasing by 361%. The number of permits dropped 50% from FY2008 to FY 2009 but is projected to increase slightly up 10% in FY 2011 from FY 2009.

Total New Residential and Non-Residential Building Permits Issued

2,400

Actual FY 2008 2,301 95,979 2,066 89 $426.9 $188.5

Note: 1990 - 1992 is by calendar year due to the data collection process for those years. 1993 and beyond reflects fiscal year data.

UTILITIES Number of Cary Retail Utility Customers * Total Cary Meter Population *

Actual FY 2007 44,600 52,360

Actual FY 2008 48,000 54,000

Actual FY 2009 48,950 56,300

Estimated FY 2010 50,400 58,000

Projected FY 2011 52,000 59,700

31,400

33,450

27,608

29,600

31,500

* A single customer may have multiple meters under one account, so both of these figures are included

Number of Service Orders Written (mostly new service installations, turn ons and shut offs)

Average Daily Wastewater Flow

Average Daily Water Flow

12

Million Gallons Per Day

Million Gallons Per Day

14

10 8 6 4 2 0 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Est. Fiscal Year

North Plant

South Plant

20 18 16 14 12 10 8 6 4 2 0 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Est. Fiscal Year


MISCELLANEOUS DEMOGRAPHICS AND STATISTICS Median Age Finished High School Finished College Median Family Income Average Household Size Owner Occupied Homes Average Single Family House Sales Price Multi-Family Housing Growth (Fiscal Year 2009) Unemployment rate in Cary Gross Taxable Sales (Fiscal Year 2009) Race per 2008 Census

38.1 per 2008 Census 96% per 2008 Census 65% per 2008 Census $112,695 2.66 76.6% $263,000 3% 6.20% as of April 2010 $1.4 billion 78.5% White, 12.4% Asian, 6.6% African American, 2.5% Other

120,000

35%

100,000

30% 25%

80,000

20% 60,000 15% 40,000

10%

20,000

% Votes Cast

# of Registered Voters

History of Votes Cast in Municipal Elections

* Indicates a Bond Election. All other elections were for Council members with mayoral elections also in 1995, 1999, 2003, 2007.

5%

0

0% 11/91 11/93 *3/94 11/95 11/97 *2/99 11/99 11/01 *4/03 10/03 *5/05 10/05 10/07 10/09 Reg. Voters

% Votes Cast

MAJOR EMPLOYERS IN CARY

TOP TEN TAXPAYERS IN CARY

Employees 4,149 3,000 1,200 1,140 1,000 750 707 700 530 500

Assessed Value $311,472,726 118,135,814 74,973,888 71,252,784 67,007,891 64,559,994 62,744,438 60,134,014 56,377,254 55,039,601

SAS Institute, Inc. Verizon Affiliated Computer Services Town of Cary American Airlines Reservations Center Blue Phoenix Solutions Austin Quality Foods Siemens Medical Solutions USA Precision Walls John Deere

SAS Institute Cary Venture Limited Partnership RH Donnelley Inc Cary Crossroads De LLC Four Star Ventures LLC Weeks Realty LP MCI Communication Services Inc. PFRS Crossroads Corp Intercontinental Fund III Regency Kellogg/Austin Quality Food

Source: Wake County Revenue Department Statistics and Reports


TOWN OF CARY GENERAL FUND REVENUES AND EXPENDITURES PER CAPITA

$1,000 $900 $800

Per Capita

$700 $600 $500 $400 $300

Per Capita Revenues

$200

Per Capita Expenditures

$100 $0 1999 2000

2001

2002 2003 2004

2005 2006 2007 2008

2009 2010 2011

Fiscal Year

* Expenditures do not include transfers. FY 2010 numbers are as estimated; FY 2011 numbers are as budgeted.

Estimated Budget

Fiscal Year 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011

Per Capita Revenues $693 $775 $812 $757 $759 $789 $810 $892 $937 $933 $900 $857 $826

Per Capita Expenditures $468 $513 $588 $621 $677 $729 $736 $772 $789 $815 $820 $845 $811

Over the ten-year period from Fiscal Year 2002 through Fiscal Year 2011, per capita revenues have risen 9.4%. Per capita expenditures have risen 31%. The population of the Town has grown from approximately 99,798 at the beginning of FY 2002, to an estimated 141,271 for July 1, 2010, an increase of 41.6% or 4.6% per year on average.


GENERAL FUND REVENUES BY SOURCE

Actual FY 2007

REVENUE

Actual FY 2008

Actual FY 2009

Budget FY 2011

% Change 2010 / 2011

Ad Valorem Taxes

$54,293,575

$58,208,899

$64,851,809

$67,443,875

0.9%

Sales Tax Other Taxes & Licenses Intergovernmental Permits and Fees Sales and Services Interest Miscellaneous

$23,057,033 $2,264,536 $5,924,264 $6,205,435 $8,785,645 $5,020,809 $3,005,091

$24,168,199 $3,026,954 $6,135,787 $6,011,933 $9,476,456 $4,761,481 $2,622,440

$22,557,180 $3,007,634 $6,858,286 $3,354,994 $11,184,498 $2,561,110 $3,300,628

$21,291,535 $2,547,708 $6,794,390 $2,713,900 $11,530,311 $843,084 $3,455,627

2.0% -1.7% -7.1% -6.7% 2.0% -36.7% 2.7%

$108,556,388

$114,412,149

$117,676,139

$116,620,430

0.1%

TOTAL

FY 2011 General Fund Revenue Sources

Sales and Services 9.9% Permits and Fees 2.3%

Interest 1.1%

Miscellaneous 3.0%

Intergovernmental 5.8% Other Taxes & Licenses 2.2%

Sales Tax 18.3%

Ad Valorem Taxes 57.8%


GENERAL FUND EXPENDITURES AND TRANSFERS BY FUNCTION

Actual FY 2007

Actual FY 2008

Actual FY 2009

Budget FY 2011

% Change 2010 / 2011

$21,923,508 $29,912,730 $12,415,096 $7,904,703 $8,553,106 $11,930,360 $19,605,383 ($903,174)

$25,553,402 $32,746,570 $15,475,661 $6,436,084 $10,082,389 $11,493,976 $12,272,000 ($523,877)

$27,066,621 $34,014,789 $16,441,618 $6,738,107 $10,899,798 $12,619,974 $4,069,302 ($1,747,066)

$27,952,140 $38,047,187 $17,592,872 $7,047,294 $11,913,869 $13,710,430 $2,226,756 ($688,122)

-9% 3% -1% -6% 0% 5% 98% -195%

$111,341,712

$113,536,205

$110,103,143

$117,802,426

-1%

EXPENDITURE TYPE General Government Public Safety Public Works Environmental Protection Cultural/Recreation Debt Service Transfer to Capital Projects Transfers/Other* TOTAL

* "Transfers/Other" represents reimbursements from the Utility Fund, police separation allowance, self-insurance, class and pay study impacts, water and sewer payments, insurance and bonds, reimbursement from the internal service fund, and because of its relatively small (negative) size is not represented in the pie chart below.

FY 2011 General Fund Expenditures and Transfers Transfer to Capital Projects 0.8% Debt Service 12.2%

General Government 23.9%

Cultural/Recreation 9.9%

Environmental Protection 6.8%

Public Works 15.1%

Public Safety 31.9%


REVENUE SOURCES AND TRENDS GENERAL FUND

As a matter of general policy, revenue estimates during the 1990s were budgeted conservatively to promote contributions to fund balance and avoid revenue shortfalls due to unexpected weakness in the local economy or a slow-down in the rate of construction activity. A substantial shift to more realistic budgeting of revenues began in FY 1999, and this approach has been used to estimate FY 2009 ending revenues and forecast revenues for the FY 2011 budget. FY 2011 budgeted revenues for the general fund are projected to increase 0.1% over estimated FY 2010 revenues, while FY 2010 estimated revenues are projected to decrease 1.0% from actual FY 2009 revenues. The general fund’s major revenue source, the property tax, has continued to grow. However, growth has slowed from double-digits in the 1990s to 3.6% for FY 2011. The tax rate was reduced from 54 cents to 43 cents in FY 2001 as a result of property revaluation in Wake County. The tax rate was further reduced to 42 cents in FY 2002 and remained steady until it was reduced to 33 cents in FY 2009, again as a result of property revaluation which is conducted at least every eight years as dictated by state statute. The FY 2011 tax rate will remain the same at 33 cents. FY 2011 permit and fee revenue estimates reflect an 6.7% decrease from FY 2010. Population growth, which averaged 9.6% per year from FY 1994 through FY 1998, trended downward in the early 2000s, and was expected to be approximately 3.6% in FY 2011. Revenues have been estimated by analyzing the major drivers that affect each revenue source, how the economy affects those drivers, and the timing of when revenue is received Actions taken by the North Carolina General Assembly in the past have had a lasting impact on Cary and other North Carolina local governments. During the 1993 session, the Legislature changed the beer and wine and utility franchise taxes to an automatic distribution with growth, effective in FY 1996. In 1998, the General Assembly removed the natural gas portion of the utilities franchise tax and imposed a natural gas excise tax based on consumption. In April 1995, the General Assembly repealed the state's intangibles tax on stocks, bonds, and bank deposits, a portion of which was allocated to local governments. The state reimbursed local governments for this lost revenue based on the prior year’s allocation level, with no growth factor, until the reimbursements were repealed effective July 2002. These reimbursements were replaced with a new one-half cent sales tax (Article 44) beginning in December 2002. Annual revenues from this new sales tax are expected to exceed the amount Cary would have received in reimbursements by approximately $2.5 million in FY 2011. Fiscal problems at the state level directly affected local reimbursements during FY 2001. The state retained the spring FY 2001 inventory tax reimbursement to help address state budget shortfalls. These funds were later released by the Governor in June 2001. In May 2001, the state announced that it would also retain Emergency 911 revenues, and again the Governor released the funds in June 2001. While these actions ultimately had no impact on Cary in FY 2001, financial constraints at the state level led to other withholdings during FY 2002. The Town’s FY 2002 revenues were reduced by $2.35 million when the Governor withheld wine and beer taxes, as well as a portion of utility franchise taxes and inventory tax reimbursements, to help balance the state budget. The Town of Cary and the U.S. Census Bureau conducted two special censuses during the 1990s to quantify Cary’s rapid population growth. In effect, the Town updated its population numbers at a time when other Wake County municipalities did not. Because many shared revenues are distributed based on Cary’s percentage of the Wake County population, the updated population figures allowed the Town to receive a higher proportion of shared revenues than other Wake County municipalities. Subsequently, the 2000 Decennial Census resulted in only slight population growth over Cary’s 1998 special census figures. Cary’s Wake County neighbors, however, had experienced high levels of growth since the 1990 census, and their portion of shared revenues increased significantly, leaving a smaller share for Cary. This trend is expected to continue as Cary transitions from a “rapid growth” community to one of “managed growth.” Descriptions of major revenue sources and their related trends follow. Graphs showing ten years of actual data, FY 2010 estimated revenues, and FY 2011 budgeted revenues appear for each revenue category.


Ad Valorem Taxes = $67,443,875 $80,000,000 $70,000,000

This includes the current year Ad Valorem Taxes and the Prior Year Property Taxes, and Penalties & Interest.

Amount

$60,000,000 $50,000,000 $40,000,000 $30,000,000 $20,000,000 $10,000,000 $0 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Fiscal Year

Ad Valorem Taxes Revenue Detail: •

Current Year Ad Valorem Taxes = $67,043,875 According to North Carolina General Statute 160A-209, the Town levies ad valorem taxes on July 1, but interest does not accrue on unpaid bills until the following January 5. These taxes are based on assessed values as of January 1 of the prior year. The ad valorem tax on property is the Town’s major revenue source, representing 58% of all general fund revenues. Property taxes are assessed and collected by Wake and Chatham counties and remitted to the Town throughout the year. The property tax rate for fiscal year 2011 is 33 cents per $100 of assessed valuation. The FY 2011 budget includes a 0.9% projected increase over the FY 2010 revenue estimate for this category.

Prior Year Property Taxes: = $300,000 This revenue consists of late property tax payments from previous fiscal years received in the current fiscal year. FY 2011 is budgeted the same as FY 2010 estimated revenues.

Penalties & Interest = $100,000 This revenue comes from the fines and interest applied to overdue property taxes. FY 2011 is budgeted the same as estimated FY 2010 revenues.


Other Taxes & Licenses = $23,839,243 $30,000,000

The major revenue source within this category is Sales Tax, budgeted in FY 2011 at $10 million for the one-cent tax and $11.3 million for the three halfcent taxes. As the graph indicates, this revenue source has been impacted by both the 2002 and 2009 recessions.

$25,000,000

Amount

$20,000,000 $15,000,000

“Other Taxes and Licenses” also includes ABC revenue, privilege licenses, occupancy tax, and pet licenses.

$10,000,000 $5,000,000

2011

2010

2009

2008

2007

2006

2005

2004

2003

2002

2001

2000

$0

Fiscal Year

Other Taxes & Licenses Revenue Detail: •

ABC Revenue = $482,179 Pursuant to North Carolina General Statute 18B, ABC taxes are distributed quarterly by the county alcohol control board based on the ad valorem levy from the previous year after expenses are deducted for law enforcement, education, and rehabilitation according to North Carolina General Statute 10A15(14). The FY 2011 budget is projected to increase 2% over the estimated FY 2010 revenues.

One-Cent Sales Tax (Article 39) = $9,993,427 Wake and Chatham Counties levy a one-cent local sales tax on all retail sales, lease, or rental of tangible personal property, rental of motel or hotel rooms, and rendering of services according to Article 39 of North Carolina General Statute 105. Proceeds of the one-cent sales tax are distributed to municipalities in each respective county by a formula based on county point of sale. Once the county share is determined, municipalities and the county itself receive funding based on population within the respective County as recorded by the North Carolina Office of State Planning. Sales tax receipts are received monthly with the fourth quarter of each calendar year traditionally being the highest and first quarter being the lowest. The one cent sales tax revenues dipped in FY 2003 to $7.8 million in association with the declining economy, experienced a strong recovery through FY 2008 and since then have been experiencing declines due to the recession. FY 2011 revenues are expected to increase 2.1% over estimated FY 2010 and the estimated FY 2010 revenues represent a 7.5% decrease from FY 2009.

Half-Cent Sales Taxes (Articles 40 and 42) = $7,509,278 The North Carolina General Assembly authorized the half-cent sales tax as a local county option. Two half-cent sales taxes exist and both are currently collected statewide and then distributed to counties on a per capita basis according to Articles 40 and 42 North Carolina General Statutes 105. As of October 1, 2009, the Article 42 local option sales tax will be distributed to municipalities based on county point of sale. Wake and Chatham County’s total is then distributed to the municipalities therein and the county itself based on population as recorded by the North Carolina Office of State Planning. Prior to FY 2000, 70% of the total was budgeted in the general capital reserve and 30% in the utility capital reserve. In FY 2000 the Local Government Commission began requiring all sales tax revenue to be budgeted in the general fund as unrestricted revenue. FY 2010 revenue is estimated to decrease by 7.5% from FY 2009, however, a 2% increase is projected for FY 2011. Sales tax receipts are received monthly with the fourth and first quarters of each calendar year being the highest and lowest, respectively.

Half-Cent Sales Tax (Article 44) = $3,788,830 The North Carolina General Assembly, as a local county option, authorized this half-cent sales tax with proceeds going to counties and municipalities. Both Wake and Chatham Counties approved this new half-cent sales tax which took effect in December 2002 as a replacement for the repealed intangibles tax and inventory tax reimbursements, which were both repealed effective July 1, 2003. This tax is


different from the other sales taxes because it is not charged on food, and its distribution method is 50% on point of sale and 50% on per capita. In 2007, the state passed legislation to have the state assume county Medicaid costs, thus eliminating the Article 44 local option sales tax. Effective October 1, 2008, the state took over one quarter cent of the Article 44 sales tax as authorized by North Carolina General Statute 105, and effective October 1, 2009, the state will take over the remaining one-quarter cent. The legislation provides for municipalities to be completely reimbursed for the loss of their share of tax revenues, accounting for growth. The first onequarter cent will be replaced by a payment equal to 50% of the amount the Town receives from the Article 40 sales tax, and the second one-quarter cent will be replaced by a payment equal to 25% of the Town’s share of the Article 39 sales tax. These payments will come from Wake County’s share of sales tax revenues, but will be paid directly to the Town by the NC Department of Revenue. FY 2011 is budgeted to increase 2% over the FY 2010 estimated receipts. •

Privilege Licenses = $1,420,326 The Town levies local taxes on the businesses, trades, and professions operating within its corporate limits. The fee schedule is based on gross receipts and the nature of the business. Actual annual revenues can fluctuate considerably depending on whether fees are collected in June (the end of the fiscal year) or July (the beginning of the next fiscal year). This revenue source is not accrued from one year to the next, so the revenue shown is for privilege licenses paid as of June 30th. New privilege license requests have been slightly more numerous recently following several years of no growth, but the revenue growth recognized in FY 2006 was a result of the new rate structure implemented as part of the FY 2006 budget process that impacted revenues collected at the end of FY 2006 and there after. Thus, FY 2008 actually experienced a 4.1% increase in revenues, however, FY 2010 is estimated at an 20% decrease from FY 2009 and a 1% decrease is budgeted in FY2011 from FY 2010 due to the economic downturn.

Occupancy Tax = $570,000 Occupancy Tax in Wake County Wake County is authorized to levy an occupancy tax according to North Carolina General Statute 160A. Prior to 1991, the Town levied a separate occupancy tax. However, in 1991, the General Assembly amended the statute, repealing municipal authority to levy an occupancy tax in Wake County. In exchange for Cary’s loss of its taxing authority, the amendment provided for a share in Wake County’s occupancy tax revenues. The occupancy tax is 6% of the net receipts reported for all hotel and motel rooms in Wake County. Because Cary receives a flat 5% of the total occupancy tax revenues collected in the County, there is very little correlation between hotel/motel activity in Cary and the revenue the Town receives. Historical figures indicate Cary businesses contribute approximately 20% of all occupancy taxes collected within Wake County. FY 2010 is estimated at a decrease of 7.7% from FY 2009, and the FY 2011 budget is projected to decrease by 5.8% from estimated FY 2010 receipts. Occupancy Tax in Chatham County Senate Bill 1679, Chapter 642 was ratified by the North Carolina General Assembly with an effective date of July 1, 2004. This legislation grants Chatham County the authority to levy an occupancy tax of up to 3% of the gross receipts derived from the rental of any room, lodging or similar accommodations within Chatham County. The 3% rate is in effect for FY 2010. However, Chatham County’s legislation does not state that occupancy tax revenue generated in the county must be shared with its municipalities. Therefore, the Town of Cary receives no occupancy tax funding from Chatham County.

Pet Licenses = $7,203 The Town collects a one-time license fee from pet owners for every dog and cat tag issued in accordance with North Carolina General Statute 160A-212. The current license fees are $50 for nonneutered pets and $10 for neutered pets. In FY 2006, the Town experienced a large growth in pet tags issued based on the requirement that owners show proof of registration before being allowed access to the Town’s new dog park, which opened in January of 2006. However, FY 2010 is estimated to decrease 16.9% from FY 2009 and yet another decrease of 10% is expected in FY 2011.


Rental Vehicle Tax = $68,000 Session Law 2000-2 was signed into law on May 17, 2000 and is entitled “An Act to Repeal the Property Tax on Certain Vehicles Leased or Rented under Retail Short-Term Leases or Rentals and to Replace the Tax Revenue with a Local Tax on Gross Receipts Derived from Retail Short-Term Leases or Rentals”. As a result of this law, the new gross receipts tax was put into place, and the Town of Cary recognized revenue beginning in December 2000. FY 2011 is budgeted at a slight decrease of 4% from estimated FY 2010 revenues.

Intergovernmental Revenues: $6,794,390 The major revenue sources in this category are the utilities franchise tax and wireless communications sales tax, which are budgeted at a combined $6,377,071 in FY 2011.

$8,000,000 $7,000,000

Amount

$6,000,000 $5,000,000 $4,000,000

The drop in FY 2002 is due to the Governor withholding $2.4M to help balance the state budget.

$3,000,000 $2,000,000 $1,000,000

2011

2010

2009

2008

2007

2006

2005

2004

2003

2002

2001

2000

$0

FY 2004 includes disaster reimbursement for the ice storm in December 2002 and Hurricane Isabelle.

Fiscal Year

Intergovernmental Revenues Detail: •

Utilities Franchise Tax = $4,582,306 The State of North Carolina levies this tax on utility company gross receipts at a rate of 3.22% according to Article 3 of North Carolina General Statute 105. The state shares a portion of these taxes (3.09% of gross receipts of electric, gas, telephone, and street transportation companies) with local governments. Utilities franchise taxes are received quarterly with the highest receipts received in the fourth quarter of the fiscal year. Governor Easley withheld a portion ($1.7 million) of this revenue in FY 2002 to help balance the state budget. The FY 2011 budget is projected at a 5.1% decrease from the estimated FY 2010 revenues.

Wine and Beer Tax = $195,427 The State of North Carolina levies this tax on alcoholic beverages, and a municipality may share in the revenues if beer or wine is sold legally within its jurisdiction according to North Carolina General Statute 105-13.82. The statute provides that the state shares 23.75% of state beer tax collections, 62% of state unfortified wine tax collections and 22% of state fortified wine tax collections with local government units. The proceeds are distributed within 60 days of March 31, and local portions are based on the Town’s population as recorded by the North Carolina Office of State Planning. Governor Easley withheld $400,000 of this revenue in FY 2002 to help balance the state budget. FY 2011 is budgeted the same as estimated FY 2010 revenues. FY 2010 revenues are estimated at a 67.2% decrease from FY2009 revenue.

Wireless Communications Sales Tax = $1,794,765 Prior to FY 2004, this revenue was budgeted with the utility franchise tax. This revenue represents the Town’s share of the state gross receipts tax on wireless telecommunications providers, and like the utilities franchise tax, revenue is received quarterly. The FY 2011 budget is projected to decrease by 1% from the estimated FY 2010 revenues.

COPS Grant = $0 Funding for the Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS) Universal Hiring Program (UHP) dropped sharply as the nation increased its focus on homeland defense funding. As a result, Cary has not been awarded any new COPS UHP funding since FY 2000. As of FY 2004, the Town no longer receives any funding from the COPS UHP program. In FY 2005, Cary received a separate COPS grant


totaling $247,369 for the purchase of in-car video systems for police cruisers. This grant provided onetime funding, and no new funding is expected in FY 2011. •

High School Resource Officer Reimbursement = $151,352 This State revenue is a fixed reimbursement ($37,838 per officer) for the provision of one police officer in each of the four public high schools in Cary (Cary, Green Hope, Middle Creek and Panther Creek).

Permits and Fees: $2,713,900

Fees for new building permits are the major revenue source for this category, budgeted at $2 million in FY 2011. This category also includes various permits and fees detailed below.

The revenues in the Permits and Fees category depend heavily upon the level of new construction activity.

Permits and Fees Revenue Detail: •

Building Permits = $1,964,000 The Town charges these fees for providing construction permits, plan reviews, and inspection services to applicants in accordance with North Carolina General Statute 160A-414. Applicants must pay the fees at the time of permit issuance. FY 2011 revenues are budgeted to decrease 8% from the estimated FY 2010 revenues. Furthermore, FY 2010 revenues are estimated at a 2.9% decrease from FY2009. For single family residential construction, fees are based on the square footage of the residence.

Pavement/Curb Cuts = $9,700 Pursuant to North Carolina General Statute 160A-414, the Town charges this fee for permission to cut and repair a curb. This revenue fluctuates with the rate of new construction. FY 2011 is budgeted at a 6.1% decrease from the FY 2010 estimated revenue.

Rezoning/Variance Fees = $18,000 These are charges the Town collects to cover the administrative and advertising costs of public hearings for a rezoning or variance. FY 2011 revenue is budgeted to decrease 12.7% from FY 2010.

Site Plan/Final Review Charge = $52,000 The Town collects a fee from individuals to cover the costs of filing and reviewing site plans and for the final review of all subdivisions as authorized by North Carolina General Statute 160A-414. FY 2011 is budgeted to decrease 15.9% from the estimated revenue amount in FY 2010 as this revenue varies according to whether economic conditions are favorable or detrimental to subdivision development.

Inspection Fees = $206,500 These fees include commercial site inspections, street sign inspections, extra inspections, and reinspection fees. Applicants pay commercial site inspection fees of $515 per developed acre when a site plan approval is granted. Street sign inspection fees are $45 per sign. Re-inspection fees are charged when an inspector is called back out to a site, and an additional fee is charged for inspections conducted


at night or on weekends. The FY 2011 inspection fee revenue is projected to decrease by 7.4% from the estimated FY 20109 revenues. •

Sign Permits = $20,700 These fees are charged for the placement of temporary and permanent signs. FY 2011 is budgeted to decrease 4.7% from the FY 2010 estimated receipts.

Traffic Impact Analysis Reimbursement = $270,000 Developers must pay this fee before site plans are submitted for analysis of traffic impacts from the development. The Town charges developers 90% of the cost and the Town pays for the remaining 10%. The Town also pays for traffic studies related to park and capital projects. The average cost of a study is approximately $8,500. FY 2011 revenue is projected to increase 44.9% from FY 2010 estimated revenue.

Grading Permits = $15,000 According to North Carolina General Statute 160A-414, the Town charges these fees to developers (commercial and residential) based on the amount of acreage denuded by the development. These fees were changed in FY 1999 from a flat charge to a rate of $165 per denuded acre. Effective in FY 2007 the fee was increased to $500 per denuded acre. FY 2011 is budgeted to decrease 45.3% from the FY 2010 estimated revenue as this revenue fluctuates with the rate of new construction.

Watershed Maintenance Fees = $125,000 The Town collects a fee of 15% of the actual cost of a water quality structure from the developer when the development project is completed pursuant to North Carolina General Statute 160A-414 and in accordance with the Watershed/Water Supply Act of 1993. This is a state requirement to ensure that the water quality device will be maintained. FY 2011 is budgeted to decrease 33.7% from the estimated FY 2010 revenue.

Fire Permits = $33,000 In accordance with North Carolina General Statute 160A-414, the Town grants special permits for the possession or storage of hazardous/flammable materials. The state fire code requires these fees be charged for additional inspections. FY 2011 is budgeted to increase 1.2% over the FY 2010 estimated revenue.

Charges for Sales and Service: $11,530,311 $14,000,000

The major revenue source for this category is the solid waste and recycling fee, which is budgeted at $6,754,546 for FY 2011. The dip in FY 2001 revenue was created when the fee was lowered from $11.50 to $7.67 per month prior to it being increased to $11.50 starting in FY 2006. The fee has been stable since it was last increased to $14.00 in FY 2009.

$12,000,000

Amount

$10,000,000 $8,000,000 $6,000,000 $4,000,000 $2,000,000

Fiscal Year

2011

2010

2009

2008

2007

2006

2005

2004

2003

2002

2001

2000

$0

Other charges included in this category are used appliance fees and all recreation related fees.

Charges for Sales and Service Revenue Detail: •

Sanitation Fees = $6,754,546 Beginning in the fall of FY 2006, the Town began the process of switching from backyard solid waste collection to a more efficient curbside collection process. The Town provides residential customers


with once a week collection service for solid waste and recycling. In FY 2001, this fee was reduced from $11.50 per month to $7.67 per month, where it remained through FY 2005. In FY 2006 the monthly fee was increased to $11.75, which represented approximately 75% cost recovery. The fee was increased in FY 2009 to $14.00. The FY 2011 budget reflects a 1.5% increase over estimated FY 2010 revenues, while FY 2010 is estimated at a 3.3% increase over FY 2009 actual collections. The historical level of this monthly fee is presented in the graph below. Town of Cary Solid Waste and Recycling Fee History In 1994, service was changed from twice a week back yard collection to once a week. In 2006, the process of converting to curbside automation and dual stream recycling began with full implementation in effect beginning in FY 2008.

$16 $14.00 $14

$13.00 $11.50

Monthly Rate

$12

$11.75

$11.00

$10 $8.00

$7.67

$8 $6 $4 $2

2011

2010

2009

2008

2007

2006

2005

2004

2003

2002

2001

2000

1999

1998

1997

1996

1995

1994

1993

1992

1991

1990

1989

1988

1987

$0

Fiscal Year

Used Appliance Disposal Fees = $21,881 These fees are collected from residents who request that the Public Works/Utilities Department transport a used appliance to the county landfill. The FY 2011 budget is projected to decrease 10% from the estimated FY 2010 revenues.

Recreation Program Fees = $962,240 These fees are collected from participants in Town recreation activities such as classes, camps, workshops, trips, events, and ropes course programs held at community centers, the senior center, the stevens nature center and bond park. FY 2011 revenue is projected to increase 3.3% from FY 2010 expected revenues.

Athletic Fees = $697,390 These fees are collected from participants in youth and adult sports programs such as softball, volleyball, basketball leagues and short duration camps and clinics. FY 2011 revenues are budgeted 4.5% higher than expected FY 2010 receipts due to an increase in tournament rentals. All adult programs recover direct costs such as instructor costs and supplies. Youth programs are largely subsidized by the Town.

Tennis = $1,040,615 During FY 2004 the Town of Cary took over the operations of the tennis park. New York Tennis had previously operated the facility under a contract arrangement and paid the Town $2,000 a month for lights. However, due to performance issues which hinged upon NY Tennis’ lack of profitability, the Town assumed full operational responsibility in February, 2004. FY 2010 is estimated at 6.3% higher than FY 2009. The revenue budget for FY 2011 is budgeted to increase 5.1% over estimated FY 2010 revenue.

Wake Med Soccer Park = $550,000 The Town of Cary took over operations and maintenance of the Wake Med Soccer Park in August 2004. During FY 2007 the town entered into a contract with Triangle Professional Soccer who acquired a professional men’s soccer team, the Carolina Railhawks. This stated revenue amount is a total of various types of revenues collected. The breakdown is as follows: concession sales, program fees, ticket sales, sponsorships, and rental and events. FY 2011 is budgeted to increase 4.8% from FY 2010 which is expected to decrease 16.6% compared to FY 2009 actual revenue.


USA Baseball - $411,500 The USA Baseball complex officially opened in June 2007. The revenue consists of concessions, program fees, sponsorships, and rentals and events. The FY 2011 budget reflects a 1.8% increase over FY 2010 estimated revenues.

Skate Park - $178.000 The Town of Cary began operating the skate park in FY 2005. The revenue consists of pro shop sales, concessions, program fees, memberships, and sponsorships. FY 2011 is budgeted to increase 18.7% over FY 2010 estimated receipts.

Arts and Crafts = $246.260 These fees are charged to participants in Town-sponsored arts and crafts activities. FY 2011 revenues are budgeted to decrease 10.3% from FY 2010 estimated revenues.

Festivals = $130,890 The Town of Cary assumed all accounting responsibility for the Lazy Daze and Spring Daze festivals effective June 2003. FY 2011 is budgeted to increase 9.9% over FY 2010 estimated revenues.

Rents-Recreational Facilities = $285,000 These fees are collected for rental of Town recreational facilities. FY 2011 revenues are budgeted to increase 0.7% over FY 2010 receipts; which are estimated to increase 11% from FY 2009 collected revenue.

Cultural Arts Rentals = $41,500 Fees are collected for rental of the Page-Walker Arts & History Center for meetings, events and private parties. This rental revenue was previously included in the recreational facilities rental category above. It was separated into this category in FY 2007. FY 2011 is budgeted to increase 5.1% above FY 2010 estimates.

Rents-Fire = $70,000 These are fees collected for equipment rental and are budgeted to decrease 42% from FY 2010 estimated revenue which is also estimated at a 55.5% decrease from FY 2009 actual total revenue.

Other Minor Revenues Recreation Retail Sales = $40,000 - monies from the sale of articles by the Parks, Recreation & Cultural Resources Department. Recreation Ticket Sales = $33,489 - tickets sold for performances such as youth theatre, music series, etc. Dog Park = $40,000 – day or annual passes for using the facility which opened January 2006. Hazardous Waste Reimbursement = $20,000 - the cost to clean up hazardous waste spills which are then billed to the offender.


Investment Earnings = $ 843,084 $6,000,000 $5,000,000

Amount

$4,000,000 $3,000,000 $2,000,000 $1,000,000

2011

2010

2009

2008

2007

2006

2005

2004

2003

2002

2001

2000

$0

Fiscal Year

Investment earnings are the interest earned on the portion of the Town's pooled cash and investments attributable to the general fund in accordance with North Carolina General Statute 159-30. Earning levels are a function of market interest rates, the amount available for investment, and the choice of investments. Eligible types of investments are established by state law, and are further limited by the Town's investment policy. The Town's investment portfolio primarily includes fixed income high quality federal government debt instruments. Lower interest rates during the economic slowdown are the primary reason for the declines in investment earnings in recent years. FY 2011 investment earnings are projected based on an average investment yield of 1% as higher yielding investments in the existing investment portfolio mature and are reinvested at historically low yields.

Actual revenues were much higher than normal in FY 2002 due to a $1.1M one-time reimbursement received from Wake County for previously incurred project costs paid for with general fund revenue. Starting in FY 2003, employee dental premiums of $160K have been moved from the general fund to the health and dental fund.

Miscellaneous = $3,455,627 $4,000,000 $3,500,000

Amount

$3,000,000 $2,500,000 $2,000,000

The major FY 2011 revenues in this category are video programming sales tax of $972,917, cellular tower lease proceeds of $893,000, and NDOT Traffic Signal Reimbursement of $568,000.

$1,500,000 $1,000,000 $500,000

Fiscal Year

2011

2010

2009

2008

2007

2006

2005

2004

2003

2002

2001

2000

$0

The miscellaneous category also includes court costs, soil erosion fines, donations and other miscellaneous revenues.

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Miscellaneous Revenues = $300,000 These are revenues that do not fit into any other revenue category such as bank charges, returned check charges, fingerprinting fees and sale of town maps. FY 2011 revenue is budgeted the same as the FY 2010 estimate.

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Cable TV Franchise Fees = $991,795 The NC General Assembly approved a change related to this revenue source via its approval of house bill 2047 regarding video franchising during the 2006 short legislative session which became effective January 1, 2007. This bill makes the state the franchising authority for video services and preempts local government franchising authority. Under this arrangement, franchise fee revenue is made up


through state distribution of local shares of sales tax collections on telecommunications, cable, and satellite television services and includes video programming sales tax and PEG channel distribution. From January 1, 2007 through the end of FY 2009 the Town of Cary also received a small cable TV franchise fee from the local cable company for items in the Town’s pre-existing franchise agreement that were not covered by the state law that took effect. Sixty-percent of the video programming sales tax revenue goes to the general fund and forty-percent goes to the general capital reserve fund, while the full PEG channel distribution goes to the general fund. For both video programming sales tax and PEG channel distribution, FY 2011 revenue is budgeted to increase 1.0% from estimated FY 2010 revenues. •

Court Costs = $29,873 This revenue includes payments to the Town for civil or criminal penalties according to Article 28 of North Carolina General Statute 7A. The FY 2011 budget is budgeted to decrease 1.5% from the estimated FY 2010 revenues.

Recycled Goods = $125,000 This revenue results from the sale of recycled goods, (newspapers, glass, plastic bottles, etc.) on the private market. This revenue source fluctuates substantially from year to year primarily based on the market price for the recyclables. The FY 2011 revenue is budgeted to increase 3.2% from estimated FY 2010 revenues.

DMV Rental Revenue = $0 The State Division of Motor Vehicles originally leased the Cary Depot building to operate a Licensing Examiner’s facility which the Town of Cary owns. The State Division of Motor of Vehicles relocated in FY 2009, therefore the town is not expecting to receive lease payments in FY 2010. The Cary Depot is currently being expanded and renovated by NCDOT and upon completion in late FY 2010 will be leased to Amtrak. Future annual rental revenues of approximately $14,000 are expected to be offset by building operating and maintenance expenditures.

Cellular Tower Lease Proceeds = $893,000 These funds are from lease payments made by cellular telephone service providers to the Town for the lease of property on which cellular towers are built. These leases are short-term leases that can be cancelled within 30-90 days.

Donations/Contributions = $127,750 Donations are budgeted if there is an anticipated ongoing commitment. Equal expenditures are budgeted as well but are only approved to be spent at the level of donation. FY 2011 donations are budgeted for the following programs: Trees for Cary, Parks Scholarships, Memorial Benches and Parks Sponsorships.


TOWN OF CARY GENERAL FUND SUMMARY

Actual FY 2007

Actual FY 2008

Actual FY 2009

Estimated FY 2010

Adopted Budget FY2011

Assessed Value 13,031,452,560 13,915,372,155 19,696,045,832 20,418,733,465 20,586,098,663 REVENUES Current Year Ad Valorem Taxes Prior Year Ad Valorem Taxes Penalties and Interest Subtotal Ad Valorem Taxes

REVENUES 53,868,051 324,660 100,864 54,293,575

57,718,968 380,864 109,067 58,208,899

64,275,901 433,763 142,145 64,851,809

66,468,968 300,000 100,000 66,868,968

67,043,875 300,000 100,000 67,443,875

Current Year Ad Valorem Taxes Prior Year Ad Valorem Taxes Penalties and Interest Subtotal Ad Valorem Taxes

320,896 10,911,210 7,885,652 4,260,171 1,199,663 661,086 10,760 72,131 25,321,569

513,455 11,415,942 8,302,458 4,449,799 1,722,785 712,375 9,525 68,814 27,195,153

473,961 10,582,503 7,958,959 4,015,718 1,794,198 655,705 9,630 74,140 25,564,814

472,725 9,788,815 7,362,037 3,714,539 1,434,673 605,356 8,003 70,819 23,456,967

482,179 9,993,427 7,509,278 3,788,830 1,420,326 570,000 7,203 68,000 23,839,243

ABC Revenue 1 Cent Sales Tax-Article 39 1/2 Cent Sales Tax-Articles 40 & 42 1/2 Cent Sales Tax-Article 44 Privilege Licenses Occupancy Tax Pet Licenses Rental Vehicle Tax Subtotal Other Taxes & Licenses

3,292,735 525,287 15,300 1,536,112 134,693 98,723 151,352 170,062 5,924,264

3,536,858 563,515 --1,729,206 91,313 --151,352 63,543 6,135,787

3,994,051 595,521 --1,896,284 54,059 --151,352 167,019 6,858,286

4,830,915 195,427 --1,812,894 8,703 300,000 151,352 17,922 7,317,213

4,582,306 195,427 --1,794,765 ----151,352 70,540 6,794,390

Utility Franchise Taxes Wine and Beer Tax Wireless E911 Wireless Communications Sales Tax Gov's Hwy Program Grant COPS Grant High School Resource Officer Reimb. Other Restricted/Grants Subtotal Intergovernmental

3,492,419 11,449 50,150 151,270 1,290,501 24,871 26,551 477,076 352,523 328,625 6,205,435

3,622,697 20,874 59,475 112,375 861,715 28,060 33,650 458,151 556,372 258,564 6,011,933

2,198,304 11,658 30,700 91,460 360,995 22,625 31,063 321,584 173,687 112,918 3,354,994

2,135,340 10,332 20,619 61,840 222,904 21,711 32,613 188,648 186,300 27,408 2,907,715

1,964,000 9,700 18,000 52,000 206,500 20,700 33,000 125,000 270,000 15,000 2,713,900

Building Permits Pavement/Curb Cuts Rezoning/Var. Request Fees Site/Final Plan Review Fees Inspection Fees Sign Permits Fire Permits Watershed Maint. Fees Traffic Impact Analysis Reimb. Grading Permits Subtotal Permits & Fees

4,873,406 30,539 724,762 40,535 42,765 131,056 27,244 574,062 ---

5,171,995 32,923 766,085 42,393 41,065 167,258 25,326 590,633 266,714

6,445,186 28,542 922,308 41,293 37,030 147,709 34,230 606,564 395,683

6,654,725 24,313 937,941 39,600 39,674 150,000 34,975 667,590 404,342

6,754,546 21,881 969,240 40,000 40,000 178,000 33,489 697,390 411,500

Solid Waste and Recycling Used Appliance Disposal Recreation Program Fees Recreation Retail Sales Dog Park Skate Park Ticket Sales Athletic Fees USA Baseball

Other Taxes & Licenses ABC Revenue 1 Cent Sales Tax-Article 39 1/2 Cent Sales Tax-Articles 40 & 42 1/2 Cent Sales Tax-Article 44 Privilege Licenses Occupancy Tax Pet Licenses Rental Vehicle Tax Subtotal Other Taxes & Licenses

Other Taxes & Licenses

Intergovernmental Utility Franchise Taxes Wine and Beer Tax Wireless E911 Wireless Communications Sales Tax Gov's Hwy Program Grant COPS Grant High School Resource Officer Reimb. Other Restricted/Grants Subtotal Intergovernmental

Intergovernmental

Permits and Fees Building Permits Pavement/Curb Cuts Rezoning/Var. Request Fees Site/Final Plan Review Fees Inspection Fees Sign Permits Fire Permits Watershed Maint. Fees Traffic Impact Analysis Reimb. Grading Permits Subtotal Permits & Fees

Permits and Fees

Sales and Service Solid Waste and Recycling Used Appliance Disposal Recreation Program Fees Recreation Retail Sales Dog Park Skate Park Ticket Sales Athletic Fees USA Baseball

Assessed Value

Sales and Service


Actual FY 2007

Actual FY 2008

Actual FY 2009

Estimated FY 2010

Adopted Budget FY2011

Tennis Arts & Crafts Wake Med Soccer Park Festivals Recreational Facility Rentals Cultural Arts Rentals Rents-Fire Hazardous Waste Reimb. Subtotal Sales & Service

716,387 260,924 773,594 104,555 222,794 41,910 213,337 7,775 8,785,645

804,098 261,867 614,166 125,211 256,144 25,921 247,567 37,090 9,476,456

931,164 261,109 629,323 114,238 255,051 39,483 271,553 24,032 11,184,498

990,000 274,650 525,000 119,065 283,000 39,500 120,669 --11,305,044

1,040,615 246,260 550,000 130,890 285,000 41,500 70,000 20,000 11,530,311

Investment Earnings Unrealized Gains/Losses Net Investment Earnings

4,617,077 403,732 5,020,809

3,830,449 931,032 4,761,481

2,439,848 121,262 2,561,110

1,331,873 --1,331,873

843,084 --843,084

Miscellaneous Revenues CATV Franchise Fees Video Programming Sales Tax PEG Channel Distribution Court Costs Donations / Contributions Soil Erosion Fines Recycled Goods Disposable Rebate Police Reports/Fines Red Light Ticket Cellular Tower Lease Proceeds Morrisville Reimbursement NCDOT Traffic Signal Reimbursement DMV Rental Revenue Subtotal Miscellaneous

540,444 471,611 353,935 12,270 15,157 33,660 150 293,902 ----15,166 522,389 --698,557 47,850 3,005,091

379,043 114,938 853,736 14,604 25,511 23,619 --131,663 --25 11,039 698,370 7,089 332,446 30,357 2,622,440

355,903 114,574 1,022,366 20,618 31,453 29,676 --126,728 317,315 --7,879 694,091 4,563 562,256 13,206 3,300,628

300,000 --963,284 18,692 30,328 44,200 --121,155 418,522 --7,900 892,768 --568,000 --3,364,849

300,000 --972,917 18,878 29,873 127,750 --125,000 412,309 --7,900 893,000 --568,000 --3,455,627

TOTAL REVENUES

108,556,388

114,412,149

117,676,139

116,552,629

116,620,430

Miscellaneous

Tennis Arts & Crafts Wake Med Soccer Park Festivals Recreational Facility Rentals Cultural Arts Rentals Rents-Fire Hazardous Waste Reimb. Subtotal Sales & Service Investment Earnings Unrealized Gains/Losses Net Investment Earnings

Miscellaneous

EXPENDITURES

Miscellaneous Revenues CATV Franchise Fees Video Programming Sales Tax PEG Channel Distribution Court Costs Donations / Contributions Soil Erosion Fines Recycled Goods Disposable Rebate Police Reports/Fines Red Light Ticket Cellular Tower Lease Proceeds Morrisville Reimbursement NCDOT Traffic Signal Reimbursement DMV Rental Revenue Subtotal Miscellaneous

TOTAL REVENUES EXPENDITURES

Legislative Legislative-Town Council Legislative-Boards & Comm. Legislative-Town Clerk Legislative-Legal Subtotal Legislative

591,283 117,067 236,555 506,194 1,451,099

674,488 133,406 306,556 658,278 1,772,728

606,494 135,132 263,584 1,213,279 2,218,489

710,582 141,132 622,165 1,718,358 3,192,237

709,754 146,974 320,113 1,096,312 2,273,153

Legislative Legislative-Town Council Legislative-Boards & Comm. Legislative-Town Clerk Legislative-Legal Subtotal Legislative

Administration Town Manager's Office Budget Office Public Information Office Subtotal Administration

578,030 451,331 441,475 1,470,836

722,077 583,655 502,062 1,807,794

487,566 498,407 525,404 1,511,377

660,762 679,782 591,100 1,931,644

836,639 567,277 521,856 1,925,772

Administration Town Manager's Office Budget Office Public Information Office Subtotal Administration

General Government Finance-Accounting Finance-Purchasing Self Insurance (Small Claims) Technology Services Capital Leases Capital Lease Proceeds (contra exp) Technology Services Less Reimb. from Soccer Park Human Resources Self Insurance (Workman's Comp) Engineering WWRWMF Costs Reimb. from Utility Fund

1,668,921 662,082 228,511 1,046,076 -1,046,076 4,016,595 -6,940 1,216,452 849,210 4,884,750 -93,311 ---

1,819,954 736,516 311,565 1,095,961 -1,095,961 4,818,526 -6,940 1,226,022 828,443 5,880,551 -99,192 ---

1,858,139 802,758 528,776 2,129,500 -2,129,500 5,993,492 -7,218 1,358,701 718,523 5,515,868 -107,868 ---

2,417,935 880,369 396,370 1,300,000 -1,300,000 7,331,457 -7,218 1,559,221 1,000,000 6,047,351 -180,000 -1,917,850

2,315,840 911,397 325,000 1,300,000 -1,300,000 6,824,429 -7,218 1,567,186 1,000,000 6,371,702 -190,000 -2,004,561

General Government Finance-Accounting Finance-Purchasing Self Insurance (Small Claims) Technology Services Capital Leases Capital Lease Proceeds Technology Services Less Reimb. from Soccer Park Human Resources Self Insurance (Workman's Comp) Engineering WWRWMF Costs Reimb. from Utility Fund


Actual FY 2007

Actual FY 2008

Actual FY 2009

Estimated FY 2010

Adopted Budget FY2011

Planning Affordable/Empl Housing Fund Inspections & Permits

2,295,160 283,606 2,996,537

2,362,424 257,051 3,837,960

2,694,092 307,501 3,673,991

3,035,752 906,065 3,964,155

2,552,965 183,667 3,902,808

Subtotal General Government

21,923,508

25,553,402

27,066,621

30,557,488

27,952,140

Subtotal General Government

Public Safety Police Police Separation Fund Fire Subtotal Public Safety

14,959,643 199,375 14,753,712 29,912,730

16,866,331 151,547 15,728,692 32,746,570

17,227,114 242,853 16,544,822 34,014,789

19,592,973 263,742 16,931,450 36,788,165

19,957,495 236,975 17,852,717 38,047,187

Public Safety Police Police Separation Fund Fire Subtotal Public Safety

PRCR Administration Recreation Programs Cultural Arts Festival Amphitheatre Tennis Center Soccer Park Skate Park USA Baseball Athletics Subtotal PRCR

992,471 2,413,240 1,269,891 106,650 407,195 1,026,068 787,843 147,154 223,019 1,179,575 8,553,106

1,141,657 2,607,870 1,411,887 111,233 453,527 1,031,141 1,032,147 163,591 800,664 1,328,672 10,082,389

1,201,334 2,823,845 1,477,911 106,107 725,462 1,214,745 1,013,725 189,923 808,066 1,338,680 10,899,798

1,743,277 2,789,807 1,621,071 121,677 455,000 1,216,345 1,204,364 219,744 1,126,862 1,455,122 11,953,269

1,611,373 2,885,946 1,727,876 130,890 455,000 1,414,337 1,171,574 233,869 859,836 1,423,168 11,913,869

PRCR Administration Recreation Programs Cultural Arts Festivals Amphitheatre Tennis Center Soccer Park Skate Park USA Baseball Athletics Subtotal PRCR

Public Works/Utilities Administration Less Reimb. from Utility Fund Facilities Management Less Reimb. from Amphitheatre Less Reimb. from Tennis Less Reimb. from Skate Park Less Reimb. from Soccer Park Less Reimb. from USA Baseball Operations Less Reimb. from Utility Fund Solid Waste Management Recycling Subtotal Public Works/Utilities Subtotal Departmental Expenditures

1,355,607 -882,776 10,315,360 -241,499 -186,303 -11,986 -497,774 -113,273 8,255,557 -5,577,817 5,908,000 1,996,703 20,319,799 80,709,143

1,498,043 -984,262 12,604,202 -261,155 -187,286 -5,944 -705,157 -582,362 10,611,107 -6,511,525 5,194,908 1,241,176 21,911,745 90,294,106

1,701,726 -1,081,295 13,352,771 -214,354 -225,609 -8,263 -694,166 -529,948 11,579,937 -7,439,181 5,480,534 1,257,573 23,179,725 95,160,933

2,318,864 -1,232,536 14,285,232 -230,000 -198,120 -11,537 -844,810 -756,014 12,636,622 -8,189,233 6,383,357 1,123,172 25,284,997 104,583,919

2,021,888 -1,367,666 14,194,121 -230,000 -193,107 -13,495 -778,933 -500,585 12,854,757 -8,394,108 5,708,380 1,338,914 24,640,166 102,553,362

Department Allocation Accounts Class & Pay Study Market Adjustment on Pay Schedule Reimb. Util. Fund for Ind. Cost Reimb. from ISF for Ind. Cost Subtotal Non Departmental Expenses Installment Purchase / Related Fees Long Term Debt / Related Fees

-------1,758,778 -80,410 -1,839,188 126,707 11,803,653

-------2,424,342 -80,879 -2,505,221 76,077 11,417,899

-------2,453,267 -205,542 -2,658,809 335,293 12,284,681

682,467 5,000 25,000 -2,027,331 -199,835 -1,514,699 -----

682,467 5,000 25,000 -2,253,067 -215,589 -1,756,189 -----

Planning Affordable/Empl Housing Fund Inspections & Permits

Public Works/Utilities Administration Less Reimb. from Utility Fund Facilities Management Less Reimb. from Amphitheatre Less Reimb. from Tennis Less Reimb. from Skate Park Less Reimb. from Soccer Park Less Reimb. from USA Baseball Operations Less Reimb. from Utility Fund Solid Waste Management Recycling Subtotal Public Works/Utilities Subtotal Departmental Expenditures

Department Allocation Accounts Class & Pay Study Market Adjustment on Pay Schedule Reimb. Util. Fund for Ind. Cost Reimb. from ISF for Ind. Cost Subtotal Non Departmental Expenses Installment Purchase / Related Fees Long Term Debt / Related Fees


Actual FY 2007

Actual FY 2008

Actual FY 2009

Estimated FY 2010

Adopted Budget FY2011

------11,930,360 10,091,172 90,800,315

------11,493,976 8,988,755 99,282,861

------12,619,974 9,961,165 105,122,098

7,969,735 5,083,119 --13,052,854 11,538,155 116,122,074

8,102,588 5,507,842 100,000 13,710,430 11,954,241 114,507,603

Beginning Fund Balance

68,585,398

65,800,074

66,676,018

74,249,014

71,319,676

Total Revenues

108,556,388

114,412,149

117,676,139

116,552,629

116,620,430

Total Revenues

Beginning Fund Balance Plus Operating Revenues

177,141,786

180,212,223

184,352,157

190,801,643

187,940,106

Beginning Fund Balance Plus Operating Revenues

Total Expenditures

90,800,315

99,282,861

105,122,098

116,122,074

114,507,603

Total Expenditures

39,440 2,190 --260,000 10,590,000 834,000 588,000 1,587,903 -248,189 --600,000 ---

-225,649 -10,200 -13,474,200 601,524 2,700,000 454,438 13,787,540 1,481,803 -203,772 -130,439 -----

-278,299 -11,474 ----1,123,700 ----1,804,524 -125,000 598,102 248,340 ---

-249,172 -11,554 ----2,226,756 ----1,642,376 -125,000 -423,583 235,000 ---

Trans. from UF for Self-Insur/W/C/Sm Claims

Trans. to General Cap. Res. Trans. to Streets Cap. Proj. Fund Trans. to Gen Govt Cap Proj Fund Trans. to Fire Capital Proj Fund Trans. to Parks Cap Proj Fund Trans. to Transit Fund Sale of Assets Other Trans. Out (In) Transfer to Economic Develop Fund Bond Proceeds

----1,374,400 3,084,525 4,300,000 750,000 10,096,458 935,596 -534,872 --775,000 -239,710

Total Transfers (Net)

20,541,397

14,253,344

4,981,045

3,359,893

3,294,823

Total Transfers (Net)

Total Expenditures and Inter-Fund Transfers

111,341,712

113,536,205

110,103,143

119,481,967

117,802,426

Ending Fund Balance

65,800,074

66,676,018

74,249,014

71,319,676

70,137,680

Ending Fund Balance

Appropriation to (from) Fund Balance

-2,785,324

875,944

7,572,996

(2,929,338)

(1,181,996)

Appropriation to (from) Fund Balance

Debt Principal Debt Interest Debt Miscellaneous Expense Subtotal Debt Expenses Subtotal Non Departmental Expenses TOTAL EXPENDITURES BALANCES

Trans. from ISF for Self-Insur/W/C/Sm Claims

TOTAL EXPENDITURES BALANCES

Transfers Out (In) / Other Adjustments Trans. from UF for Self-Insur/W/C/Sm Claims

Debt Principal Debt Interest Debt Miscellaneous Expense Subtotal Debt Expense Subtotal Non Departmental Expenses

Beginning Fund Balance

Transfers Out (In) / Other Adjustments Trans. from ISF for Self-Insur/W/C/Sm Claims

Trans. to General Cap. Res. Trans. to Streets Cap. Proj. Fund Trans. to Gen Govt Cap Proj Fund Trans. to Fire Capital Proj Fund Trans. to Parks Cap Proj Fund Trans. to Transit Fund Sale of Assets Other Trans. Out (In) Transfer to Economic Develop Fund Bond Proceeds

Total Expenditures and Inter-Fund Transfers


LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT

TOWN COUNCIL

Boards and Commissions

*Town Clerk

*These positions are appointed by the Town Council.

*Town Attorney


LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT SUMMARY DIVISIONS WITHIN LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT Town Council Town Boards and Commissions Town Clerk Legal OTHER DEPARTMENTS CONTRIBUTING TO LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT PROGRAMS Administrative Finance Human Resources Police Fire Engineering Planning Inspections & Permits Technology Services Parks, Recreation, and Cultural Resources Public Works/Utilities

LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT FY 2011 BUDGET BY DIVISION Town Council 31% Legal 48%

Boards/ Commissions/ Non-Profit 6% Town Clerk 14%


TOWN COUNCIL Additional information about the Town Council may be obtained by calling Sue Rowland, Town Clerk, (919) 4694011, through e-mail at sue.rowland@townofcary.org or by visiting the Townâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s website at www.townofcary.org. MISSION STATEMENT The Town Council consists of a seven-member governing board of the Town elected by the citizens, which includes a Mayor and two at-large members elected by all voters; the other four members are elected by district. The mission of the Town Councilâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Office is to provide leadership to the Town of Cary by establishing ordinances and policies.

TOWN OF CARY GOALS AND INITIATIVES * Town Focus Areas Focus Area I: Community Planning

Focus Area II: Infrastructure

Focus Area III: Financial Condition

Achieve a well-planned community using innovative and proactive planning approaches and techniques.

Ensure that roads, water and wastewater facilities, parks, and other infrastructure exists for the existing citizens and for the future needs identified in the comprehensive plan.

Focus Area IV: Municipal Services

Town Goals Achieve a stable and strong financial position by accurately estimating, prudently allocating, and managing financial resources.

Achieve a high level of service to the citizens in a prompt, reliable, responsive, and cost-effective manner.

Deliver Services Promptly & Consistently

Provide Understandable & Convenient Services

Deliver Efficient & Effective Services

1

1

1

1

Improve Environment & Quality of Life

Operationalize Service Levels & Measure Success

1

Meet Or Exceed All Regulatory Requirements

Engage Citizens To Determine Levels Of Service

Comply With All Laws & Regulations

Proactively Manage Risk

Bill & Collect Revenues Accurately & Timely

Prudently Manage Debt, Cash, & Investments

Manage Fund Balance To Aid Financial Position

Forecast Operational & Fiscal Impacts

Estimate Revenues Conservatively

Provide Accountability Through Internal Controls

Promote Efficient & Effective Resource Allocation

Allocate Funding To Execute Priorities

Maintain Organization Credibility

Maintain AAA Bond Rating

Identification of Financial Strategy

Match Public Facilities With Community Expectations

Manage Infrastructure Plans To Schedule & Budget

1 3

Develop Alternative Financing Plans

Update Infrastructure Plans

1 2

Prioritize Capital Project Construction

Understand Forces Affecting the Built Community

1

Resolve Conflict Between Ordinances & Community Response

Respond To & Include Those Impacted by Development

1

Identify Development Trends & Related Policy Changes

Create Developer and Affected Citizen Connections

Administer Ordinances & Guidelines as Adopted

Town Initiatives

1 3

1 3

Department Goals and Initiatives 1

1 2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2 3

* Each narrative in this budget document contains Departmental Goals and Initiatives referenced in a table like the one above, showing how the respective departmental goals and initiatives support various Town initiatives.


GOALS AND INITIATIVES Mayor and Town Council 1. Establish policies and programs for effective delivery of Town services. 2. Approve annual financial plan and set property tax rate and all user fees. 3. Provide all ordinances, rules and regulations for the welfare of the Town. KEY WORKLOAD INDICATORS Workload Indicator

Actual FY 2009

Estimated FY 2010

Projected FY 2011

63

65

65

# Meetings Meetings include Town Council, Work Sessions and Committee Meetings.

ACTIVITY HISTORY Fund Number: 10-4110 Activity

Actual FY 2007

Actual FY 2008

Actual FY2009

Estimated FY2010

Budget FY2011

Personnel Services

$123,601

$133,406

$130,482

$143,167

$154,714

Operations and Maintenance

$467,682

$557,319

$481,729

$567,415

$555,040

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0

Boards and Commissions*

$117,067

$117,169

$129,415

$141,132

$146,974

Total

$708,350

$807,894

$741,626

$851,714

$856,728

7

7

7

7

7

Capital Outlay

Authorized FTEs

SIGNIFICANT BUDGET AND SERVICE LEVEL CHANGES BEYOND CURRENT LEVELS â&#x20AC;˘ There are no significant budget and service level changes for FY 2011.


LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT BOARDS AND COMMISSIONS GENERAL NON-PROFITS

The Town funds various boards, commissions, and other organizations each year. These requests go through budget review along with Town departments each year. External agencies must furnish financial statements and budgets to the Town, and may be requested to provide additional information regarding the use of Town funds. The following table summarizes the actual funding distributed during fiscal years 2007-2009, estimated amounts for FY 2010, and budgeted amounts for FY 2011.

Actual FY 2007

Actual FY 2008

Actual FY 2009

Estimated FY 2010

Budget FY 2011

Non-Profit Organizations Boards and Commissions

2,500 3,252 --1,382 -------

2,500 3,252 --1,382 -------

2,470 3,252 --1,410 -------

2,470 3,252 --1,410 -------

1,470 2,252 --1,410 467 375 2,000

Planning and Zoning Board Board of Adjustment Utility Board of Adjustment Town Center Review Commission Environmental Advisory Board PRCR Advisory Board Sister Cities

7,134

7,134

7,132

7,132

7,974

TOTAL BOARDS & COMMISSIONS General Non-Profit Organizations

6,681 --10,018 14,342 ----30,596 ------5,000 15,298 2,582 4,007 ----3,499 ----9,561 6,679 --5,737 114,000

7,500 ----14,000 --7,000 30,000 --5,000 ----3,500 16,000 --5,000 ----3,000 2,500 2,000 10,000 3,000 --6,000 114,500

8,500 ----16,000 ----31,000 3,000 5,000 --3,000 3,000 16,000 --5,000 5,000 3,000 3,000 4,000 2,000 8,000 3,000 3,500 6,000 128,000

5,000 ----16,000 2,000 --32,000 3,000 19,200 --3,000 --16,000 --5,000 --3,000 3,300 4,500 --8,500 3,000 3,500 7,000 134,000

4,000 2,500 --16,000 2,000 --32,000 2,000 20,000 2,500 3,500 --17,250 --2,500 5,000 3,500 1,750 4,000 2,000 5,000 3,000 3,500 7,000 139,000

Big Brothers Big Sisters of the Triangle, Inc. Bridge II Sports Cary Area EMS Carying Place, The Cary Family YMCA and Kraft Family YMCA Catholic Charities of the Diocese of Raleigh (Affordable Housing) Center for Volunteer Caregiving, The Child Care Services Association Christian Community in Action Communities in Schools of Wake County COPE Eldercare Crime Stoppers of Cary, Inc. Family Violence Prevention Center, Inc., The - dba Interact Hopeline Kid’s Voting Life Experiences, Inc. Lucy Daniels Center for Early Childhood Radio Reading Service, Inc. dba Triangle Radio Reading Service SAFEchild Special Olympics North Carolina Triangle Family Services White Oak Foundation White Plains Children's Center Women‘s Center of Wake County, Inc. TOTAL GENERAL NON PROFITS


TOWN CLERK DIVISION Additional information about the Town Clerk’s Office may be obtained by calling Sue Rowland, Town Clerk, (919) 4694011, through e-mail at sue.rowland@townofcary.org or by visiting the Town’s website at www.townofcary.org. MISSION STATEMENT The mission of the Town Clerk’s Office is to prepare and maintain complete and accurate records of Cary Town Council proceedings, to serve as the custodian of all permanent records, to provide staff support to the members of the Cary Town Council, and to furnish information and assistance to citizens.

TOWN OF CARY GOALS AND INITIATIVES Town Focus Areas Focus Area I: Community Planning

Focus Area II: Infrastructure

Focus Area III: Financial Condition

Focus Area IV: Municipal Services

Town Goals Achieve a wellplanned community using innovative and proactive planning approaches and techniques.

Ensure that roads, water and wastewater facilities, parks, and other infrastructure exists for the existing citizens and for the future needs identified in the comprehensive plan.

Achieve a stable and strong financial position by accurately estimating, prudently allocating, and managing financial resources.

Achieve a high level of service to the citizens in a prompt, reliable, responsive, and cost-effective manner.

3 5 7

3 5 7

Department Goals and Initiatives 7

5 7

5

5

5

5 7

5

7

Improve Environment & Quality of Life

3 5 7

Meet Or Exceed All Regulatory Requirements

4 7

Deliver Efficient & Effective Services

Operationalize Service Levels & Measure Success

4 6 7

Provide Understandable & Convenient Services

Engage Citizens To Determine Levels Of Service

1 3 4

Deliver Services Promptly & Consistently

Comply With All Laws & Regulations

Proactively Manage Risk

Bill & Collect Revenues Accurately & Timely

Prudently Manage Debt, Cash, & Investments

Manage Fund Balance To Aid Financial Position

Forecast Operational & Fiscal Impacts

Estimate Revenues Conservatively

Provide Accountability Through Internal Controls

Promote Efficient & Effective Resource Allocation

Allocate Funding To Execute Priorities

Maintain Organization Credibility

Maintain AAA Bond Rating

Identification of Financial Strategy

Match Public Facilities With Community Expectations

Manage Infrastructure Plans To Schedule & Budget

Develop Alternative Financing Plans

Prioritize Capital Project Construction

Update Infrastructure Plans

Understand Forces Affecting the Built Community

Resolve Conflict Between Ordinances & Community Response

Identify Development Trends & Related Policy Changes

Respond To & Include Those Impacted by Development

Create Developer and Affected Citizen Connections

Administer Ordinances & Guidelines as Adopted

Town Initiatives


DIVISION GOALS AND INITIATIVES “Sunshine” Duties: Public Records and Open Meetings 1. Provide public notice of all official meetings, and prepare agenda and minutes for all Cary Town Council regular meetings, special meetings, emergency meetings and work sessions. 2. Manage Town of Cary permanent records and town clerk and town Council department records. 3. Respond to public records requests in a timely manner with accurate information. 4. Educate elected officials, boards/commissions members and staff on open meetings and public records requirements. Town Council Support 5. Provide staff support to the members of the Cary Town Council. 6. Manage Town boards/commissions and task forces that are appointed by Council. Citizen Services 7. Serve as a liaison with the citizens and the Town Council, helping those citizens that we can help and for others ensuring that correspondence and phone messages are routed to the appropriate persons for prompt response.

FY 2010 ACCOMPLISHMENTS • Established and implemented training opportunities for staff and elected and appointed officials on the NC Sunshine Laws, which included the following learning opportunities: word games, jeopardy, on-line records management quiz, class with David Lawrence, and a panel discussion. • Helped implement the Climate for Student Success forum • Worked with boards and commissions staff liaisons to create and/or update the following: board bylaws, general rules of order, appointment policy, mission statements, lifespan, goals and responsibilities, specific rules of order, and Citizen Issue Review Commission policy. • Coordinated and attended meetings with key staff from all town departments to review and establish a plan for records retention & disposal. • Exceeded 10 out of 12 expected departmental performance measures

KEY PERFORMANCE OBJECTIVES • Ensure 95% of all agenda and supporting documents, except prior minutes to be approved, are available on the Web the week prior to the Town Council meetings. • Process 99% of all action agenda (synopsis of action taken at Council meeting) the day following Town Council meetings. • Ensure 95% of all minutes from previous Council meetings and work sessions scheduled for approval are available on the Web by 5 p.m. on Monday the week of the Council meeting. • Process 95% of official documents within two business days after a Council meeting. • Ensure 90% of all draft minutes are accurate. • In 90% of cases, respond to citizens, Council and staff requests (non-public records requests) within two business days of receipt with a response or with a response action plan. • In 95% of cases, respond to public records requests for records in our possession within two business days with an accurate reply or with a response action plan. Meet established response action plan deadline in 95% of all cases. • In 95% of cases to ensure as much “sunshine” as possible, provide public notice of official meetings at least five days prior to special called meetings and within 48 hours as required by state law in 100% of all cases. • In 95% of cases, provide orientation to newly elected officials within 60 days after the election and before officials take office, including information about and the importance of open meetings and public records laws, and provide at least two follow up reminders to these officials each year about public records and open meetings laws. • In 95% of cases, provide orientation to newly appointed board/commission members within 45 days after appointment, including information about and the importance of open meetings and public records laws, and provide at least two follow up reminders to these officials each year about public records and open meetings laws.


KEY PERFORMANCE MEASURES Actual FY 2009

Estimated FY 2010

Projected FY 2011

98%

95%

95%

100%

99%

99%

% of minutes available by 5 p.m. on Monday the week of the Council meeting when they are to be approved

98%

95%

95%

% of time documents processed within two business days after Council meetings

94%

95%

95%

100%

90%

90%

84%

90%

90%

% of public records requests responded to either with actual response or response action plan within two business days of receipt of request

100%

95%

95%

% when above public records request action plan targets met

100%

95%

95%

% of citizen, Council and staff requests for services (non-public records related) responded to with actual response or response action plan within two business days of receipt of request

100%

95%

95%

99%

95%

95%

Orientation provided to elected officials within 60 days after election and before they take office and to appointed board/commission members within 45 days of appointment

100%

95%

95%

At least two reminders during the fiscal year to elected officials and appointed board/commission and committee members about importance of â&#x20AC;&#x153;sunshineâ&#x20AC;? laws (public records and open meetings).

100%

95%

95%

Performance Measure % of agendas available within time frame % of action agendas processed the day following Council meetings

% of draft minutes accurate (measure changed for FY2010 and 2011) % of public notices posted at least 5 days prior to meeting

% when above citizen, Council and staff inquiry action plan targets met (non-public records)

KEY WORKLOAD INDICATORS Actual FY 2009

Estimated FY 2010

Projected FY 2011

186

200

200

Resolutions processed

74

100

100

Ordinances processed

34

55

55

Contracts processed (if small group proposals are approved and move forward, numbers will be reduced for FY 2010 and FY 2011)

307

250

250

Proclamations processed

105

110

110

Public records requests processed

118

130

130

1,658

1,700

1,700

Workload Indicator Number of Council related agenda and minutes prepared and meetings attended (including any special task force meetings; includes agendas, minutes and council action agendas)

Requests for services processed


ACTIVITY HISTORY Fund Number: 10-4130 Activity

Actual FY 2007

Actual FY 2008

Actual FY2009

Estimated FY2010

Budget FY2011

Personnel Services

$188,758

$200,274

$220,361

$254,788

275,170

$47,796

$106,281

$43,223

$367,377

$44,943

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$236,554

$306,555

$263,584

$622,165

$320,113

3

3

3.75

3.75

3.75

Operations and Maintenance Capital Outlay Total Authorized FTEs

SIGNIFICANT BUDGET AND SERVICE LEVEL CHANGES BEYOND CURRENT LEVELS â&#x20AC;˘

There are no significant budget and service level changes for FY 2011.


LEGAL DIVISION Additional information about the Legal Division may be obtained by calling Christine B. Simpson, Town Attorney, at (919) 469-4008.

INTRODUCTION AND MISSION STATEMENT The Town Attorney is the legal advisor to the Town Council and Town staff and performs such duties as may be specified by the Council or by law. The Legal Division cannot provide legal advice or representation to citizens on any matter. The Legal Division serves as the primary legal advisor to the Town Council, Town Manager, Department Directors, Town employees and Boards and Commissions (‘clients’), providing legal advice, research and information on matters of Town business. The Legal Division manages the legal program of the Town. Most ordinances, contracts and legal instruments adopted or approved by the Town Council and most of those of a non-routine nature, are drafted or reviewed by the Division. Outside counsel are retained where specialized expertise is required and for litigation. Outside counsel are appointed by the Town’s insurer for litigation where there is insurance coverage The Legal Division is committed to supporting the mission, goals and initiatives of the Town through the delivery of timely, cost-effective, high quality legal advice and services, unaffected by politics, personality or self-interest.

TOWN OF CARY GOALS AND INITIATIVES Town Focus Areas Focus Area I: Community Planning

Focus Area II: Infrastructure

Focus Area III: Financial Condition

Achieve a well-planned community using innovative and proactive planning approaches and techniques.

Ensure that roads, water and wastewater facilities, parks, and other infrastructure exists for the existing citizens and for the future needs identified in the comprehensive plan.

Focus Area IV: Municipal Services

Town Goals Achieve a stable and strong financial position by accurately estimating, prudently allocating, and managing financial resources.

Achieve a high level of service to the citizens in a prompt, reliable, responsive, and cost-effective manner.

Department Goals and Initiatives 1

1

1

1

1

Improve Environment & Quality of Life

Meet Or Exceed All Regulatory Requirements

Deliver Efficient & Effective Services

Provide Understandable & Convenient Services

Deliver Services Promptly & Consistently

1

Operationalize Service Levels & Measure Success

Comply With All Laws & Regulations

1

Engage Citizens To Determine Levels Of Service

Proactively Manage Risk

Bill & Collect Revenues Accurately & Timely

Prudently Manage Debt, Cash, & Investments

Manage Fund Balance To Aid Financial Position

Forecast Operational & Fiscal Impacts

Estimate Revenues Conservatively

Provide Accountability Through Internal Controls

Promote Efficient & Effective Resource Allocation

Allocate Funding To Execute Priorities

Maintain Organization Credibility

Maintain AAA Bond Rating

Identification of Financial Strategy

Match Public Facilities With Community Expectations

Manage Infrastructure Plans To Schedule & Budget

Develop Alternative Financing Plans

Prioritize Capital Project Construction

Update Infrastructure Plans

Understand Forces Affecting the Built Community

Resolve Conflict Between Ordinances & Community Response

Identify Development Trends & Related Policy Changes

Respond To & Include Those Impacted by Development

Create Developer and Affected Citizen Connections

Administer Ordinances & Guidelines as Adopted

Town Initiatives


DIVISION GOALS AND INITIATIVES Legal Services

Goal #1. Provide knowledgeable, effective and proactive legal consultation and advice. A. The Legal Division provides legal counsel and advice to its clients, and attends all Council meetings and work sessions, Planning and Zoning Board and Board of Adjustment meetings, and other open meetings as requested or required. B. The Legal Division works closely with the Manager and department directors to provide legal services necessary to implement Council direction and Town goals and initiatives. The Division negotiates and drafts contracts, ordinances and other legal instruments as requested. It reviews contracts, ordinances, and other legal instruments as requested. It reviews ‘as to form’ most non-routine contracts, ordinances, and instruments. All such services are consistent with the direction and objectives communicated by the Town Council and the Manager. The Division works collaboratively with the Planning, Inspections & Permits, and other departments regarding enforcement issues.. C. The Legal Division communicates with citizens and others about Town legal business. Strategies: • Prioritize provision of legal services to meet Council and Manager priorities; • Provide clear, understandable and consistent interpretations, communications and opinions; • Be and remain knowledgeable of federal, state and local laws, rules and regulations that affect N.C, cities and of Town ordinances, operations, personnel and policies; • Improve opportunities for education, communication and preventive strategies relative to legal issues; Goal #2. Provide high quality, efficient and effective legal advocacy and representation. The Division retains and manages outside counsel for specialized expertise and for litigation including appeals. Outside counsel is appointed by the Town’s insurance carrier where there is insurance coverage, and is retained in other cases. Strategies: • Select and retain outside counsel who provide high quality legal services at reasonable cost; • Develop method to project cost and workload estimates quarterly; • Continue development of Litigation Hold notice and process; • Develop internal processes to efficiently address litigation demands. Goal #3 Provide efficient and effective management of the Legal Division. The Divisions develops and implements office policies and procedures; monitors overall office performance, prepares and administers the Division budget; recruits, reviews, develops and retains high performing staff and, maintains Division records as required by law. Strategies • Ensure excellent customer service delivery through appropriate work acceptance and assignment processes to ensure prompt, high quality responses; • Be accessible and responsive; • Promote learning and growth by providing for continued legal education and training and encouraging staff to undertake activities that demonstrate their commitment to professionalism and learning; • Attend professional organizational meetings and develop relationships with state, federal and governmental and other legal professionals

KEY PERFORMANCE OBJECTIVES • • • • • •

Attend all meetings of the full Council Draft, review and revise ordinances and ordinance amendments within required times-frames and generally within thirty days Draft contracts and other instruments within required time-frames and generally within thirty days Review and revise contracts and other instruments drafted by other departments within required time frames and generally within three weeks Review contracts as to form within required time-frames and generally within two days Review all other legal matters as time requires and generally within thirty days.


• • •

Prepare and record or file all legal documents within time frame designated by law or court. Provide Manager with quarterly updates as to lawsuits and outside counsel expenditures. Respond to public records requests within appropriate time frame.

KEY PERFORMANCE MEASURES Performance Measure % Council open meetings attended % ordinances reviewed within time frame % contracts/instruments drafted within timeframe % contracts reviewed/revised within time frame % other legal matters reviewed within time frame % legal documents submitted within time frame designated by court/law % quarterly reports to council submitted within time frame % quarterly reports to Manager submitted within time frame # of litigation actions initiated # of litigation actions resolved % of public record requests received and responded to within time frame

Actual FY 2009 100% 99% 99% 99% 99% 100%

Estimated FY 2010 100% 99% 99% 99% 99% 100%

Projected FY 2011 100% 99% 99% 99% 99% 100%

100% 100% 2 4 100%

100% 100% 0 7 100%

100% 100% 0 8 100%

KEY WORKLOAD INDICATORS Workload Indicators *Open Meetings attended Contracts reviewed or written Ordinances reviewed or written Standard Policies and Procedures reviewed or written Code enforcement actions Board of Adjustment (BOA) cases Staff meetings/client interviews Advice, report, memorandum to Council, staff, board or commission written opinions/research Public records requests fulfilled

Actual FY 2009 50 250 30 5 15 3 425 250

Estimated FY 2010 60 250 30 8 20 0 450 250

Projected FY 2011 60 250 15 8 20 2 450 250

2

5

5

* Town Council meetings, Planning and Zoning Board meetings, Board of Adjustment, Special Sessions, and Work Sessions only – does not include meetings with staff, citizens, attorneys, or committees.

ACTIVITY HISTORY Fund Number: 10-4140 Activity

Actual FY 2007

Actual FY 2008

Actual FY2009

Estimated FY2010

Budget FY2011

Personnel Services

$315,378

$354,028

$291,872

$340,117

$355,815

Operations and Maintenance

$190,816

$304,249

$921,408

$1,380,779

$740,497

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$506,194

$658,277

$1,213,280

$1,720,896

$1,096,312

3

3

3

3

3

Capital Outlay Total Authorized FTEs

SIGNIFICANT BUDGET AND SERVICE LEVEL CHANGES BEYOND CURRENT LEVELS • None


ADMINISTRATION DEPARTMENT

TOWN MANAGER*

Administrative Support

Town Managerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Office

Budget Office

* This position is appointed by the Town Council.

Public Information Office


ADMINISTRATION DEPARTMENT SUMMARY MISSION STATEMENT The Administration Department is committed to developing citizen awareness of Town government and ensuring that Town services are planned for and delivered to all citizens in the most efficient, economical, and effective manner possible.

OTHER DEPARTMENTS CONTRIBUTING TO ADMINISTRATION DEPARTMENT PROGRAMS Legislative Department Finance Technology Services Human Resources Police Fire Engineering Planning Inspections & Permits Parks, Recreation, and Cultural Resources Public Works/Utilities

Public Information Office 27%

Budget Office 30%

ADMINISTRATION DEPARTMENT FY 2011 BUDGET BY DIVISION Town Manager's Office 43%


ADMINISTRATION DEPARTMENT Information about Town-wide management may be obtained by calling Ben Shivar, Town Manager, at (919) 469-4002 or through e-mail at ben.shivar@townofcary.org. Information about the Public Information Office may be obtained by calling Susan Moran, Public Information Officer, at (919) 460-4951 or through e-mail at susan.moran@townofcary.org. Information about the Budget Office may be obtained by calling Scott Fogleman, Budget Director, at (919) 462-3911 or through e-mail at scott.fogleman@townofcary.org. You may also visit the Townâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Web site at www.townofcary.org. MISSION STATEMENT The Administration Department is committed to developing citizen awareness of Town government and ensuring that Town services are planned for and delivered to all citizens in the most efficient, economical, and effective manner possible.

TOWN OF CARY GOALS AND INITIATIVES Town Focus Areas Focus Area I: Community Planning

Focus Area II: Infrastructure

Focus Area III: Financial Condition

Focus Area IV: Municipal Services

Achieve a well-planned community using innovative and proactive planning approaches and techniques.

Ensure that roads, water and wastewater facilities, parks, and other infrastructure exists for the existing citizens and for the future needs identified in the comprehensive plan.

Achieve a stable and strong financial position by accurately estimating, prudently allocating, and managing financial resources.

Town Goals Achieve a high level of service to the citizens in a prompt, reliable, responsive, and cost-effective manner.

Improve Environment & Quality of Life

Meet Or Exceed All Regulatory Requirements

Deliver Efficient & Effective Services

2 5 12

Provide Understandable & Convenient Services

Operationalize Service Levels & Measure Success

3 4

Deliver Services Promptly & Consistently

Engage Citizens To Determine Levels Of Service

Comply With All Laws & Regulations

2

Proactively Manage Risk

Prudently Manage Debt, Cash, & Investments

11

Bill & Collect Revenues Accurately & Timely

Manage Fund Balance To Aid Financial Position

Forecast Operational & Fiscal Impacts

Estimate Revenues Conservatively

Provide Accountability Through Internal Controls

Promote Efficient & Effective Resource Allocation

Allocate Funding To Execute Priorities

Maintain Organization Credibility

Maintain AAA Bond Rating

Identification of Financial Strategy

Match Public Facilities With Community Expectations

1 11

Manage Infrastructure Plans To Schedule & Budget

Prioritize Capital Project Construction

1 9

Develop Alternative Financing Plans

Update Infrastructure Plans

3 4

Understand Forces Affecting the Built Community

Respond To & Include Those Impacted by Development

3 4

Resolve Conflict Between Ordinances & Community Response

Create Developer and Affected Citizen Connections

1 2

Identify Development Trends & Related Policy Changes

Administer Ordinances & Guidelines as Adopted

Town Initiatives

Department Goals and Initiatives 11

1 9 11

1

9 11

9 11

2 11

2 9 11

DEPARTMENTAL GOALS AND INITIATIVES Town-wide Management 1. Implement the policies and directives approved by the Town Council. 2. Exercise management responsibility over all Town departments. 3. Solicit community involvement in Town government and respond to citizen concerns.

2 4

2

1 2 12

2 12

1 3 4


4. Develop and execute a comprehensive sustainability program 5. Implement / monitor EECBG projects and meet all applicable federal requirements Public Information 6. Develop and execute a comprehensive communication program for publicizing and promoting the mission, goals, services, accomplishments, and programs provided by the Town. 7. Establish and maintain effective media relations by conducting staff training, issuing news releases, coordinating news conferences, and serving as a spokesperson. 8. Manage the Town’s government access channel on cable television including scheduling, programming, and production. 9. Manage the cable franchise including service monitoring, citizen complaint resolution, and regulatory enforcement. 10. Oversee the content of the Town’s primary communications tool – www.townofcary.org – to ensure that information is timely, accurate, and complete. Budgeting and Evaluation 11. Manage the development and preparation of the Town-wide operating budget for Council approval and adoption. 12. Manage the development and preparation of the capital improvement budget and ten-year capital improvements plan. 13. Monitor revenue and expenditures throughout the year, review/approve budget adjustments, and consult with departments on mid-year service level changes. 14. Develop/administer the Town-wide internal performance measurement program, participate in the Statewide performance measurement program, and perform operational studies on municipal services. FY 2010 ACCOMPLISHMENTS • Provided overall management of the implementation of the 2010 adopted operating and capital budgets and development of the 2011 budgets. • Facilitated a smooth transition to new Town Manager and hired a new Assistant Town Manager. • Planned, prepared and managed the annual council/staff retreat and 20 council worksessions to develop, refine and clarify policy and program issues. • Provided policy and management oversight for significant policy, program and service development including water resource planning, Chatham County / Town of Cary Joint Land Use Plan, economic development program, Western Wake Regional Water Reclamation Facility, renovation of Old Cary Elementary and construction of Cary Community Arts Center and environmental stewardship program. • Recruited and hired a Sustainability Manager for the Town of Cary. • Developed and managed the Town’s state and federal legislative programs including funds from American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. • Managed existing budgetary authority despite significant downturn in economy-specific revenues. • Coordinated the collection of public input regarding FY 2011 budget priorities. • Earned the Distinguished Budget Presentation Award from the Government Finance Officers Association for the FY 2010 Budget. • Completed the FY 2010 Municipal Rate Comparison Study comparing tax rates, solid waste fees, utility rates, development fees, and stormwater fees. • Completed fifth overhaul of the Town’s Web site. • Completed the annual comprehensive communications plan. • Produced monthly issues of the Town’s utility bill newsletter, BUD, and its video counterpart, BUD TV. • Produced monthly Cary Matters television show. KEY PERFORMANCE OBJECTIVES • Maintain a 6 or higher on key indicators of citizen satisfaction with Town government in the biennial survey. • Receive above-average ratings from regional media contacts on key indicators in annual media relations survey. • Maintain current information on the web page for all public service announcements, news releases and media advisories.


• • •

Strive for no more than 5% variance between budgeted and actual operating revenues for all major funds. Earn the Government Finance Officers Association distinguished budget award. Manage budget execution to ensure 100% compliance with Town Council approved budget ordinances.

KEY PERFORMANCE MEASURES Actual FY 2009

Estimated FY 2010

Projected FY 2011

N/A (Survey done every 2 years)

96.5

N/A (Survey done every 2 years)

8.0

8.0

8.5

Post PSAs, media advisories and news releases to Web site within 1 work day

100%

100%

100%

Year-end operating revenue variance [excess, (shortfall)] from adopted budget to actual for all major funds

-4.0%

4.7%

0%

Achieved

Achieved

Expected

100%

100%

100%

Performance Measure Citizen satisfaction - % of respondents rating Cary’s overall desirability as a place to live at a '6' or higher on a scale of 1-9 on Biennial Survey* Media relations - Average score of media respondents rating the Town on Media Relations Survey**

Earn GFOA budget award Budget Ordinance Compliance Rate

*Biennial Citizen Survey is reported every two years. Survey question “How would you rate Cary overall as a place to live?” is used here as the sole source for this measure. **Annual Media Relations Survey takes an overall average using survey questions 5 – 20.

KEY WORKLOAD INDICATORS Actual FY 2009

Estimated FY 2010

Projected FY 2011

No. of original programs cablecast

150

156

163

No. of hours of original programming

296

282

285

No. of news releases, PSAs, and advisories issued

375

408

423

23-23

24-24

25-25

998

1,000

1,000

Workload Indicator

No. of GFOA Awards received out of no. applied for No. of content updates to www.townofcary.org

ACTIVITY HISTORY Fund 10-4200 Town Manager’s Office

Activity

Actual FY 2007

Actual FY 2008

Actual FY2009

Estimated FY2010

Budget FY2011

Personnel Services

$519,820

$550,461

$445,130

$601,990

$730,116

$58,209

$171,616

$42,436

$58,772

$106,523

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$578,029

$722,077

$487,566

$660,762

$836,639

4

4

5

5

6

Operations & Maintenance Capital Outlay Total Authorized FTEs


Fund 10-4210 Budget Office Activity

Actual FY 2007

Actual FY 2008

Actual FY2009

Estimated FY2010

Budget FY2011

Personnel Services

$416,573

$449,477

$464,903

$493,263

$526,959

$34,756

$134,178

$33,505

$185,519

$40,318

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$451,329

$583,655

$498,408

$678,782

$567,277

5

5

5

5

5

Activity

Actual FY 2007

Actual FY 2008

Actual FY2009

Estimated FY2010

Budget FY2011

Personnel Services

$335,426

$352,156

$378,901

$392,312

$413,314

Operations and Maintenance

$106,048

$111,759

$95,241

$179,888

$89,484

$0

$38,147

$51,262

$18,900

$19,058

$441,474

$502,062

$525,404

$591,100

$521,856

4.625

4.625

4.625

4.625

4.625

Operations and Maintenance Capital Outlay Total Authorized FTEs

Fund 10-4220 Public Information Office

Capital Outlay Total Authorized FTEs

SIGNIFICANT BUDGET AND/OR SERVICE LEVEL CHANGES BEYOND CURRENT LEVELS â&#x20AC;˘ The new Sustainability Manager will allow the Town to coordinate its sustainability efforts and pursue new opportunities in the future. The salary for this position is currently supported by $116,680 of Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant (EECBG) funding. Unspent grant funding at the end of FY 2010 will be utilized in FY 2011, and supported to the degree necessary by Town funding going forward. â&#x20AC;˘ With the addition of a Downtown Development Manager, the town will be able to better focus on facilitating private redevelopment efforts that will leverage past, current, and future Town efforts to revitalize the Town Center Area.


FINANCE DEPARTMENT

DIRECTOR

Controller Accounting & Reporting Accounts Payable Payroll Accounts Receivable

Financial Operations Analyst

Financial Project Analyst

Deputy Treasurer

Utility Accounts

Procurement & Risk Services

Customer Service

Purchasing

Collections

Risk Management

Utility Billing

Warehouse Operations

Meter Reading

Mail & Print Services


FINANCE DEPARTMENT SUMMARY MISSION STATEMENT The Finance Department strives to provide quality service to all customers at the highest achievable levels of customer satisfaction through the continuing progress and contribution of its employees. The Department will provide the citizen-customer with state-of-the-art financial management, financial reporting, and cost effective acquisition of goods and services for the Town government consistent with local, state and federal laws and governmental accounting and regulatory requirements.

DIVISIONS WITHIN FINANCE Accounting Customer Accounting Purchasing OTHER DEPARTMENTS CONTRIBUTING TO FINANCE DEPARTMENT PROGRAMS Public Works/Utilities Administration/Budget Human Resources

FINANCE DEPARTMENT FY 2011 BUDGET BY DIVISION Purchasing 16% Accounting 40%

Customer Accounting 44%


ACCOUNTING DIVISION Additional information about the Accounting Division may be obtained by calling Michelle Price, Controller, at (919) 469-4048 or through e-mail at michelle.price@townofcary.org. TOWN OF CARY GOALS AND INITIATIVES Town Focus Areas Focus Area I: Community Planning

Focus Area II: Infrastructure

Focus Area III: Financial Condition

Focus Area IV: Municipal Services

Town Goals Achieve a well-planned community using innovative and proactive planning approaches and techniques.

Ensure that roads, water and wastewater facilities, parks, and other infrastructure exists for the existing citizens and for the future needs identified in the comprehensive plan.

Achieve a stable and strong financial position by accurately estimating, prudently allocating, and managing financial resources.

Achieve a high level of service to the citizens in a prompt, reliable, responsive, and cost-effective manner.

Department Goals and Initiatives 4

3 4

3 4

11 12 13 14

11 14 15

2 3

4

16

DIVISION GOALS AND INITIATIVES Treasury Management 1. Manage cash balances in accordance with the Town’s financial policies to protect capital, provide liquidity and then to maximize investment earnings to provide funds for the Town’s operational and capital needs. 2. Forecast cash flow to maximize investment earnings and postpone debt issuance. 3. Manage the Town’s debt through long-term planning, debt issuance, covenant compliance, arbitrage management and application of bond proceeds. 4. Participate in long-range financial planning for the Town.

10 13 17

9 16

Improve Environment & Quality of Life

13 13

Meet Or Exceed All Regulatory Requirements

Provide Understandable & Convenient Services

9 17

Deliver Efficient & Effective Services

Deliver Services Promptly & Consistently

Operationalize Service Levels & Measure Success

Engage Citizens To Determine Levels Of Service

5 6 7 8 16

Comply With All Laws & Regulations

Bill & Collect Revenues Accurately & Timely

1 2 3

Proactively Manage Risk

Prudently Manage Debt, Cash, & Investments

Manage Fund Balance To Aid Financial Position

Forecast Operational & Fiscal Impacts

Estimate Revenues Conservatively

Provide Accountability Through Internal Controls

Promote Efficient & Effective Resource Allocation

Allocate Funding To Execute Priorities

Maintain Organization Credibility

Maintain AAA Bond Rating

Identification of Financial Strategy

Match Public Facilities With Community Expectations

Manage Infrastructure Plans To Schedule & Budget

Develop Alternative Financing Plans

Prioritize Capital Project Construction

Update Infrastructure Plans

Understand Forces Affecting the Built Community

Resolve Conflict Between Ordinances & Community Response

Identify Development Trends & Related Policy Changes

Respond To & Include Those Impacted by Development

Create Developer and Affected Citizen Connections

Administer Ordinances & Guidelines as Adopted

Town Initiatives


Revenue and Expenditure Management 5. Manage delinquent collections of final utility bills and collections for all other areas of the Town. 6. Manage invoicing for all non-utility bill charges. 7. License and provide customer service to over 8,000 businesses subject to the Town’s privilege licensing laws. 8. Implement financial procedures for new programs and monitor existing revenue systems Town-wide. 9. Prepare accurate bi-weekly payroll and provide payroll customer service to over 1,300 Town employees. 10. Prepare weekly vendor payments maximizing cash balances, discount opportunities and staff and vendor relationships. Financial Transactions, Records & Reporting 11. Maintain financial records through timely and accurate accounting, analysis and reconciliation. 12. Provide customer service and transparency to Town staff and public through compilation and analysis of meaningful financial reports. 13. Prepare and distribute an audited Comprehensive Annual Financial Report of the Town of Cary accurately on or before regulatory due dates. 14. Reduce the risk of error, fraud and waste through the performance of Town wide internal reviews to ensure policy compliance, to identify efficiencies and to improve internal control. 15. Provide training to employees in areas such as the security of sensitive information, the use of the Town’s financial information system and purchasing/accounts payable process and guidelines. Grant and Contract Management 16. Provide technical assistance and accounting for acquisition, reporting and management of grant funding. 17. Review Town contracts for compliance with financial policies.

FY 2010 ACCOMPLISHMENTS Treasury Management • Managed investment portfolio of over $370 million to stated goals of safety, liquidity and then maximization of yield through cash flow forecasting, daily oversight and market analysis. • Responded to audit by the IRS of the 2003 General Obligation Bond Issue. No findings issued. Revenue and Expenditure Management • Coordinated with other departments to establish procedures related to stormwater, payroll expense tracking and improve efficiency for procedures related to employee computer purchase program, ticketing procedures and other key operational areas. • Coordinated with Public Works/Utilities department to continue implementation of the new time and attendance system for the Public Works/Utilities Department with consideration for expanded application in other departments. • Through the use of a consultant, worked to amend previous years sales tax refund reports which will likely result in sales tax revenue for the Town. • Continued to facilitate the external review of the development process in conjunction with the Planning, Engineering and Inspections/Permits departments. • Internal audits were completed during the year for accounts payable and purchasing card transactions,


Financial Transactions, Records and Reporting • Created Finance records inventory and identified vital records. • Created Accounting business plan and created a basic plan for developing meaningful performance measures in an efficient manner. • Conducted financial management training for Town staff including quarterly training for new users, required annual training for the security of sensitive information and other miscellaneous training requested by departments. • By utilizing current staff strengths and filling previously vacated positions, improved procedures surrounding monthly closings, which resulted in a standard of closing within 10 business days of month end. • Produced the FY 2009 Comprehensive Annual Financial Report (CAFR) on time and without management letter comment from external auditors. • Enhanced information provided to Town Manager’s office through the quarterly report process, administrative task force and other avenues. • Began process of documenting the opportunities, methods and level of detail for financial information that is shared with Town management, Council, and citizens. • Finalized the internal control risk assessment report and began implementing certain recommendations as noted by management response in the report. Grant and Contract Management • Supported multiple departments in their attainment, receipt and management of grant awards and federal appropriations through the review of grant agreements, management support and compliance with complex grant requirements, including the management and oversight of stimulus funds through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act program. I think this covers it, it’s really just a group of complex grants. • A special review of the Railhawks compliance with contract terms was completed. • With the guidance from NC State University, the process of value stream mapping began by applying the techniques to the contract control process. Finance staff took the lead as project facilitator/champion with the expectation that this will result in improvements to the existing process.

KEY PERFORMANCE OBJECTIVES • Ensure that the average daily invested cash as a percentage of average daily cash ledger balance is greater than or equal to 90%. • Earn an average rate of return on investments that is at least 50 basis points higher than the average twoyear Treasury Bill rate. • Ensure that no more than 10% of average receivables are greater than 60 days old. • Earn the Certificate of Excellence in Financial Reporting from the Government Finance Officers Association. • Submit CAFR to regulatory agencies by regulatory deadlines. • Close the monthly general ledger within 10 business days of month end. • Reconcile major balance sheet accounts within 30 days of month end. • Address 95% of employee and departmental questions within two business days. • Pay 20% of vendors electronically per week.


KEY PERFORMANCE MEASURES Actual FY 2009

Estimated FY 2010

Projected FY 2011

99%

99%

90%

25

20

15

6.5%

10%

10%

Receipt of Certificate of Excellence in Financial Reporting

Yes

Goal

Goal

Submitted CAFR to the Local Government Commission by October 31

Yes

Goal

Goal

15-20

15

10

30 days

30 days

30 days

% of departmental and employee inquiries addressed within two business days

95%

95%

95%

% of payments made electronically per week

18%

12%

25%

Actual FY 2009

Estimated FY 2010

Projected FY 2011

2,850

2,900

2,900

25 220 55

25 200 30

25 250 90

$362,000,000

$370,000,000

$370,000,000

$3,100,000

$3,750,000

$3,800,000

$202,000

$370,000

$380,000

8,130

8,300

8,300

Performance Measure % average daily cash invested Basis points over average two-year Treasury note rate % of average receivables over 60 days old

Average business days after month end period close Average no. of days spent to reconcile major balance sheet accounts

KEY WORKLOAD INDICATORS Workload Indicator Average no. of payroll transactions per pay period (a) Average no. of accounts payable payments processed per week (b) In-house checks Outsourced checks Electronic payments (c) Average pooled cash balance Average receivable balance Average receivables over 60 days old No. privilege licenses issued

No. of contracts reviewed annually 425 450 500 (a) In addition to standard payroll payments, it also includes benefit changes like retirement system updates and other file maintenance issues like bank account updates for direct deposit. (b) Does not include procurement card transactions. (c) Includes vendor direct deposit, wires and direct drafts.


ACTIVITY HISTORY Fund Number: 10-4410 Activity Personnel Services Operations and Maintenance Capital Outlay Total Authorized FTEs

Actual FY 2007

Actual FY 2008

Actual FY2009

Estimated FY2010

Budget FY2011

$1,159,192

$1,271,731

$1,295,182

$1,462,647

$1,536,066

$509,728

$548,223

$562,957

$955,288

$779,774

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$1,668,920

$1,819,954

$1,858,139

$2,417,935

$2,315,840

16

16

17

17

17

SIGNIFICANT BUDGET AND SERVICE LEVEL CHANGES BEYOND CURRENT LEVELS â&#x20AC;˘ There are no significant budget and service level changes for FY 2011.


PROCUREMENT AND RISK SERVICES DIVISION Additional information about the Procurement and Risk Services Division may be obtained by contacting Cheryl Perry, Procurement & Risk Services Manager, at (919) 469-4077, through e-mail at cheryl.perry@townofcary.org or by visiting the Townâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s website at www.townofcary.org. TOWN OF CARY GOALS AND INITIATIVES Town Focus Areas Focus Area I: Community Planning

Focus Area II: Infrastructure

Focus Area III: Financial Condition

Focus Area IV: Municipal Services

Town Goals Achieve a well-planned community using innovative and proactive planning approaches and techniques.

Ensure that roads, water and wastewater facilities, parks, and other infrastructure exists for the existing citizens and for the future needs identified in the comprehensive plan.

Achieve a stable and strong financial position by accurately estimating, prudently allocating, and managing financial resources.

Achieve a high level of service to the citizens in a prompt, reliable, responsive, and cost-effective manner.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

Department Goals and Initiatives 1 10

1 10

8

8 9

1 3 10

1 3 4 5 6 8 9

DIVISION GOALS AND INITIATIVES Purchasing and Warehousing Services 1. Provide centralized purchasing services in support of Town government operations. 2. Operate a central warehouse with approximately 1,700 items valued at approximately $ 1,045,000 consisting of water and sewer parts, traffic signal maintenance parts, employee safety products, office and paper products, chemicals, and general maintenance and repair items. Approximately $1,500,000 issued

1

Improve Environment & Quality of Life

Deliver Efficient & Effective Services

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

Meet Or Exceed All Regulatory Requirements

Provide Understandable & Convenient Services

Deliver Services Promptly & Consistently

Operationalize Service Levels & Measure Success

Engage Citizens To Determine Levels Of Service

Comply With All Laws & Regulations

Proactively Manage Risk

Bill & Collect Revenues Accurately & Timely

Prudently Manage Debt, Cash, & Investments

Manage Fund Balance To Aid Financial Position

Forecast Operational & Fiscal Impacts

Estimate Revenues Conservatively

Provide Accountability Through Internal Controls

Promote Efficient & Effective Resource Allocation

Allocate Funding To Execute Priorities

Maintain Organization Credibility

Maintain AAA Bond Rating

Identification of Financial Strategy

Match Public Facilities With Community Expectations

Manage Infrastructure Plans To Schedule & Budget

Develop Alternative Financing Plans

Prioritize Capital Project Construction

Update Infrastructure Plans

Understand Forces Affecting the Built Community

Resolve Conflict Between Ordinances & Community Response

Identify Development Trends & Related Policy Changes

Respond To & Include Those Impacted by Development

Create Developer and Affected Citizen Connections

Administer Ordinances & Guidelines as Adopted

Town Initiatives


to departments. 3. Assist Accounting Division with the review and approval of expenditure contracts for compliance with purchasing law and policy, financial policy and risk management policy. Mail, Copy, and Courier Services 4. Process large volumes of copy/print jobs. 5. Distribute internal and external mail for all Town departments. 6. Provide courier/delivery services for all Town departments. Risk Management Services 7. Administer the Town’s insurance program including yearly evaluation and procurement of the Town’s property and casualty, public officials, and law enforcement insurance with premiums valued at approximately $750,000. 8. Provide customer service and process claims for damages against the Town and to Town-owned property. 9. Analyze incidents for trends and risk indicators. Employ risk prevention methods to minimize losses in the property and casualty areas. Capital Asset Inventory Management 10. Maintain accountability for the Town’s capital asset inventory valued at approximately $1.3 billion.

FY 2010 ACCOMPLISHMENTS • Approximately $25,000 (25%) postage savings through presort and standard (bulk) mail processing methods. Continued utilization of postal software to check Town-wide address databases for Change of Address notices allows the Town to continue to receive up to 35% postage discounts on large mailings. Additional savings are realized as incorrect or bad addresses are removed. • Approximately $783,547 calculated purchasing savings from formal and informal bids and use of state & national contracts. • Utilized the statutory procedure for “piggybacking” on other governmental entities bid awards resulting in cost savings, reduced delivery times and staff efficiencies. • Insurance premiums per dollar of coverage increased by only 2% over previous year while the industry average was up 5-6%. This is a result of the continued emphasis by the Town on safety, risk management, and timely reporting. • Participated in planning for acquisition and implementation of advanced meter infrastructure project. • Utilized national on-line surplus property sales methods resulting in the collection of approximately $202,000. These methods have allowed us to extend our reach to a much broader national market with buyers from 18 different states that have traveled distances as far as 1,000 miles to obtain property. • Prepared written formal bid for the sale of 10 surplus recycling trucks which resulted in net revenue of $558,409 and saved an auction fee of $41,881 (7.5%). • In conjunction with Accounting, conducted financial management training for Town staff including quarterly training for new users and refresher training for existing staff. • Worked with staff town-wide to improve digital and traditional record storage and toward improved State of North Carolina record retention regulations. • Leased a high speed color printer to provide full-color copies at a cost of $0.035/each. • Coordinated a Town-wide recycling campaign for sensitive documents resulting in the shredding of 5,166 pounds of materials which could be recycled. • In conjunction with Fleet Management, monitored bulk fuel availability to ensure adequate supplies were kept on hand during emergency weather events. • Began utilizing new bar code technology in the warehouse due to the obsolescence of the existing handheld scanners. Since the new scanners will accommodate tracking capital assets through bar codes, a bar code label printer for permanent labels was also obtained. KEY PERFORMANCE OBJECTIVES • Process 90% of all (routine and non-routine) orders within one day. • Provide warehouse inventory products 90% of the time upon request. • Produce a 40% savings on postage charges through presort and bulk mail processing. • Resolve 50% of all small claims within one month. • Maintain 100% end of year reconciliation on capital asset inventory.


KEY PERFORMANCE MEASURES Actual FY 2009

Estimated FY 2010

Projected FY 2011

% of all orders placed within one day

90%

90%

90%

Warehouse stock item availability

90%

90%

90%

Postage savings

28%

25%

25%

% of small claims resolved within one month

50%

55%

55%

100%

100%

100%

Actual FY 2009

Estimated FY 2010

Projected FY 2011

6,742

6,800

7,000

27,840

25,000

28,000

Number of small claims processed

400

320

350

Number of copies/prints produced

988,509

1,200,000

1,200,000

Pieces of external mail processed

442,857

462,000

475,000

Annual postage expenditures

125,905

145,000

146,000

Performance Measure

Year end fixed asset reconciliation

KEY WORKLOAD INDICATORS Workload Indicator Purchase orders processed Number of issues from inventory

ACTIVITY HISTORY Fund Number: 10-4420 Activity

Actual FY 2007

Actual FY 2008

Actual FY2009

Estimated FY2010

Budget FY2011

Personnel Services

$426,548

$481,463

$537,927

$557,658

$588,092

Operations & Maintenance

$235,534

$255,053

$264,831

$286,386

$305,460

$0

$0

$0

$36,325

$17,845

Small Claims

$228,511

$311,565

$528,776

$396,370

$325,000

Total Authorized FTEs

$890,593 7.0

$1,048,081 8.0

$1,331,534 8.0

$1,276,739 8.0

$1,236,397 8.0

Capital Outlay

SIGNIFICANT BUDGET AND SERVICE LEVEL CHANGES BEYOND CURRENT LEVELS â&#x20AC;˘

There are no significant budget and service level changes for FY 2011.


TECHNOLOGY SERVICES DEPARTMENT

DIRECTOR

Administrative Support

Operations

Infrastructure

Applications


TECHNOLOGY SERVICES DEPARTMENT SUMMARY MISSION STATEMENT The Technology Services Department will strive to provide the highest quality computer and communication services to other Town departments and the citizens of Cary. Technology Services seeks to improve efficiency and productivity, and maintain hardware and software cost effectiveness, while maximizing both the access to information and the utilization of all Town computer resources and communication capability.

OTHER DEPARTMENTS CONTRIBUTING TO TECHNOLOGY SERVICES DEPARTMENT PROGRAMS Finance Budget Public Works/Utilities â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Buildings and Grounds

TECHNOLOGY SERVICES FY 2011 BUDGET BY CATEGORY Capital Outlay 0% Personnel Services 28%

Operations & Maintenance 72%


TECHNOLOGY SERVICES DEPARTMENT Additional information about Technology Services may be obtained by calling Bill Stice, Director of Technology Services, at (919) 469-4027, through e-mail at bill.stice@townofcary.org or by visiting the Townâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s website at www.townofcary.org.

TOWN OF CARY GOALS AND INITIATIVES Town Focus Areas Focus Area I: Community Planning

Focus Area II: Infrastructure

Focus Area III: Financial Condition

Focus Area IV: Municipal Services

Town Goals Achieve a well-planned community using innovative and proactive planning approaches and techniques.

Ensure that roads, water and wastewater facilities, parks, and other infrastructure exists for the existing citizens and for the future needs identified in the comprehensive plan.

Achieve a stable and strong financial position by accurately estimating, prudently allocating, and managing financial resources.

Achieve a high level of service to the citizens in a prompt, reliable, responsive, and cost-effective manner.

3

1 2 3

3

3

1 2 3

3

DEPARTMENTAL GOALS AND INITIATIVES Operational Support 1. Provide installation and support for two AS/400 minicomputers, a microcomputer network, geographic information services, emergency radio system, phone system, paging system, voice mail, electronic mail and the Townâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s site on the World Wide Web.

Improve Environment & Quality of Life

1 2 3

Meet Or Exceed All Regulatory Requirements

Provide Understandable & Convenient Services

1 2 3

Department Goals and Initiatives

Deliver Efficient & Effective Services

Deliver Services Promptly & Consistently

Operationalize Service Levels & Measure Success

Engage Citizens To Determine Levels Of Service

Comply With All Laws & Regulations

Proactively Manage Risk

Bill & Collect Revenues Accurately & Timely

Prudently Manage Debt, Cash, & Investments

Manage Fund Balance To Aid Financial Position

Forecast Operational & Fiscal Impacts

Estimate Revenues Conservatively

Provide Accountability Through Internal Controls

Promote Efficient & Effective Resource Allocation

Allocate Funding To Execute Priorities

Maintain Organization Credibility

Maintain AAA Bond Rating

Identification of Financial Strategy

Match Public Facilities With Community Expectations

Manage Infrastructure Plans To Schedule & Budget

Develop Alternative Financing Plans

Prioritize Capital Project Construction

Update Infrastructure Plans

Understand Forces Affecting the Built Community

Resolve Conflict Between Ordinances & Community Response

Identify Development Trends & Related Policy Changes

Respond To & Include Those Impacted by Development

Create Developer and Affected Citizen Connections

Administer Ordinances & Guidelines as Adopted

Town Initiatives


Technology Training 2. Provide training for all technology related areas. Include training for AS/400 use, Internet and Email, Microsoft Office, general computer use, and information management strategies. Asset Management 3. Develop strategic plans and keep technology current with Town Council and staff needs. Technology needs are assessed through annual meetings with department representatives and through annual surveys. Additional discussions are held with the Council and Town Manager.

FY 2010 ACCOMPLISHMENTS • • • • • • • • • •

Completed web site redesign. Completed launch of web content management software. Implemented public wireless access in several park sites and on the Town Hall Campus. Implemented new On-Line Plans Review process. Completed VOIP (Voice Over Internet Protocol) telephone system implementation Town wide. Completed the implementation of new Call Center Management Software and Hardware for four call centers in Town. Launched a document collaboration system for efficiency improvement. Rewrote the Operations Budget database and application to improve the budget planning process. Implemented a new web forms software application. Implemented a new field data collection application.

KEY PERFORMANCE OBJECTIVES • • • • •

Resolve 90% of calls for service within 24 hours of receipt. Resolve 75% of calls for service within four hours during regular business hours. Resolve 65% of calls for service within two hours during regular business hours. Obtain an 85% approval rating on all Technology Services training sessions held. Ensure that 90% of all computer systems are no more than three generations old.

KEY PERFORMANCE MEASURES Performance Measure % calls for service resolved within 24 hours % calls for service resolved within 4 hours % calls for service resolved within 2 hours % approval for Technology training sessions % systems greater than three generations old

Actual FY 2009

Estimated FY 2010

Projected FY 2011

81 74 61 94 3

82 75 63 94 3

82 75 64 94 3

Actual FY 2009

Estimated FY 2010

Projected FY 2011

1,800 4,800 775 1,700 3,800

1,850 5,100 830 1,750 3,900

1,800 5,300 850 1,790 4,100

KEY WORKLOAD INDICATORS Workload Indicator Number of classroom hours Total number of trouble calls Total number of computers supported Total number of software support calls Total number of requests for service


ACTIVITY HISTORY Fund Number: 10-4500 Actual FY 2007

Actual FY 2008

Actual FY2009

Estimated FY2010

Budget FY2011

Personnel Services

$1,592,708

$1,827,020

$2,077,828

$2,157,518

$2,244,205

Operations and Maintenance

$3,469,963

$4,087,465

$6,037,461

$6,452,960

$5,848,924

$0

$0

$7,702

$56,060

$31,300

-$6,940

-$6,940

-$7,218

-$7,218

-$7,218

-$1,046,076

-$1,095,961

-$2,129,500

-$1,300,000

-$1,300,000

$4,009,655

$4,811,584

$5,986,273

$7,359,320

$6,817,211

20

23

24

24

23

Activity

Capital Outlay Reimb. From Soccer Park Capital Lease Proceeds Total Authorized FTEs

SIGNIFICANT BUDGET AND SERVICE LEVEL CHANGES BEYOND CURRENT LEVELS • • •

Technology Services will make several changes to improve our mission critical application availability in tandem with the development of a Business Continuity Plan. Technology Services will start the upgrade of the Town’s 800 megahertz Radio System that is used by every department. A Database Programmer position that was approved initially in the FY09 budget was never approved to be filled. It was held vacant and has been removed from the FY11 staffing document.


HUMAN RESOURCES DEPARTMENT

DIRECTOR

Employee Benefits, Wellness, and Workerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Compensation

Compensation and Policy Development

Recruitment and Selection

Organizational Development and Employee Relations

Employee Safety


HUMAN RESOURCES DEPARTMENT SUMMARY MISSION STATEMENT The mission of the Human Resources Department is to increase the quality of life for Cary citizens by supporting operating and staff departments of the Town with quality, state-of-the-art municipal personnel services. As a service provider, the Town relies on well-trained, motivated, caring and professional employees.

OTHER DEPARTMENTS CONTRIBUTING TO HUMAN RESOURCES DEPARTMENT PROGRAMS Administration Legislative Department Finance Technology Services Police Department Fire Department Engineering Planning Inspections & Permits Parks, Recreation, and Cultural Resources Public Works/Utilities

Operations & Maintenance 21%

Personnel Services 79%


DEPARTMENTAL GOALS AND INITIATIVES

Recruitment 1. Attract and retain an adaptable, flexible, team-oriented workforce. 2. Ensure that an appropriate number of capable and motivated employees are available to provide quality service. 3 5 1

4

6

2

Improve Environment & Quality of Life

Meet Or Exceed All Regulatory Requirements

Deliver Efficient & Effective Services

Provide Understandable & Convenient Services

Deliver Services Promptly & Consistently

Achieve a stable and strong financial position by accurately estimating, prudently allocating, and managing financial resources.

Operationalize Service Levels & Measure Success

Focus Area III: Financial Condition

Engage Citizens To Determine Levels Of Service

Comply With All Laws & Regulations

Proactively Manage Risk

Bill & Collect Revenues Accurately & Timely

Prudently Manage Debt, Cash, & Investments

Manage Fund Balance To Aid Financial Position

Forecast Operational & Fiscal Impacts

Estimate Revenues Conservatively

Provide Accountability Through Internal Controls

Promote Efficient & Effective Resource Allocation

Allocate Funding To Execute Priorities

Maintain Organization Credibility

Ensure that roads, water and wastewater facilities, parks, and other infrastructure exists for the existing citizens and for the future needs identified in the comprehensive plan.

Maintain AAA Bond Rating

Focus Area II: Infrastructure

Identification of Financial Strategy

Match Public Facilities With Community Expectations

Manage Infrastructure Plans To Schedule & Budget

Develop Alternative Financing Plans

Achieve a well-planned community using innovative and proactive planning approaches and techniques.

Prioritize Capital Project Construction

Focus Area I: Community Planning

Update Infrastructure Plans

Understand Forces Affecting the Built Community

Resolve Conflict Between Ordinances & Community Response

Identify Development Trends & Related Policy Changes

Respond To & Include Those Impacted by Development

Create Developer and Affected Citizen Connections

Administer Ordinances & Guidelines as Adopted

HUMAN RESOURCES DEPARTMENT

Additional information about Human Resources may be obtained by calling Valiria C. Willis, Director of Human Resources, at (919) 469-4070, through e-mail at valiria.willis@townofcary.org or by visiting the Townâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s website at www.townofcary.org.

TOWN OF CARY GOALS AND INITIATIVES Town Focus Areas Focus Area IV: Municipal Services

Town Goals Achieve a high level of service to the citizens in a prompt, reliable, responsive, and costeffective manner.

Town Initiatives

Department Goals and Initiatives

6


Human Capital Management 3. Design and maintain systems that realistically and appropriately reward success using a market-based pay structure, a competitive pay plan which rewards performance, a well-maintained job classification program, and a comprehensive benefits program that is employee work/life focused. 4. Provide health education, opportunities, and resources that foster a culture of employee health and well being. 5. Provide employee development opportunities and supervisory skills training to enhance professional growth. 6. Strengthen every employee's personal commitment to the Town's Goals and Objectives with recognition programs, employee and supervisory skills training to enhance professional growth, progressive discipline to promote positive outcomes, and internal support and consulting on employee relations issues. Safety and Workers’ Compensation 7. Encourage behaviors that minimize risks and injuries to employees by focusing on employee safety. 8. Perform safety audits/compliance reviews, conduct safety education and compliance training, and administer the workers' compensation program.

FY 2010 ACCOMPLISHMENTS • • • • •

Completed recruitment for key organizational positions: Assistant Town Manager, Director of PW/UT, Associate Engineering Director, and Sustainability Manager. Also began the recruitment process for the PRCR Director position. Improved employment process by Implementing new Online Employment Application tool Provided more health education and awareness opportunities and attracted increased participation in employee health promotion activities and events which positively impacted a below market trend health insurance renewal increase for the coming fiscal year. Initiated the quarterly distribution of real time, personalized employee compensation and benefit statements to those employees receiving salary increases and/or annual reviews. Introduced or prepared new safety policies and procedures to comply with regulation or law changes and to ensure the organization is prepared for a disaster or pandemic; employee cell phone use, use of electronic devices while driving, social distancing guidelines, Human Resources disaster preparedness and continuity of operations, and smoking.

KEY PERFORMANCE OBJECTIVES • • • • •

Fully utilize the online application system to maintain efficiencies to the job application process, to minimize recruitment and selection costs for the applicant and the organization, and to ensure the successful hiring of the best employees. Develop, evaluate, and modify employee benefits, compensation, and performance appraisal programs that sufficiently reward employees within fiscal constraints and help to maintain voluntary turnover below industry average. Provide employee health promotion education, resources, and opportunities that will foster an organizational culture that pursues optimal employee health and well being and results in health insurance cost increases that are below market trend. Identify strategic staffing and succession planning methods to ensure the most effective use of human capital and to prepare and position existing staff to assume leadership roles due to retirements. Perform detailed job analyses on job specifications that contain essential functions requiring specific physical capability to better prepare for an aging workforce, and to provide employees with the education, tools, and resources enabling them to reduce risk of injury.

KEY PERFORMANCE MEASURES Actual FY 2009

Estimated FY 2010

Projected FY 2011

85

80

60

Turnover (% reported for the calendar year ending during the fiscal year)

7%

4.3%

4.0%

Total employee attendance in health promotion activities, events, and screenings (reported for the calendar year ending during the fiscal year)

2,912

3,250

3,500

$39.48

$31.47

$39.86

2.8

4.4

3.5

Performance Measure Average number of days to fill vacancies

Budgeted Staff Development and Training dollars per regular employee Workers’ Comp Lost Time Days per 100 employees


KEY WORKLOAD INDICATORS Workload Indicators Number of normal recruitments* # of terminations / average # of employees Total # of health promotion activities, events, and screenings (reported for the calendar year ending during the fiscal year Total # internal training contact hours (reported for the calendar year ending during the fiscal year) Total # of OSHA Recordable Lost Days for Workers' Comp

Actual FY 2009

Estimated FY 2010

Projected FY 2011

150

100

70

77 / 1,094

48 / 1,106

45 / 1,115

14

17

20

1,487

1,500

1,500

31

50

40

* Does not include special recruitments that take place over an extended period of time (i.e. public safety recruitments), internal recruitments and recruitments for temporary positions.

ACTIVITY HISTORY Fund Number: 10-4600 Activity

Actual FY 2007

Actual FY 2008

Actual FY2009

Estimated FY2010

Budget FY2011

Personnel Services

$911,826

$907,198

$1,086,072

$1,225,762

$1,243,753

Operations and Maintenance

$304,624

$318,824

$272,629

$334,459

$323,433

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$849,210

$828,443

$950,000

$1,000,000

$1,000,000

$2,065,660

$2,054,465

$2,308,701

$2,560,221

$2,567,186

10.375

11.625

12.25

12.25

12.25

Capital Outlay Self Insurance – Workers’ Comp Total Authorized FTEs

SIGNIFICANT BUDGET AND SERVICE LEVEL CHANGES BEYOND CURRENT LEVELS • Appropriately administering recently updated federal regulations, particularly with respect to the Americans with Disabilities Act, will have a significant impact on staff workload.


POLICE DEPARTMENT

CHIEF OF POLICE

Deputy Chief

Operations Bureau

Professional Standards

Services Bureau

Patrol District #1

Criminal Investigations Division

Patrol District #2

Traffic Safety Team

Patrol District #3

Special Operations Civilian Support Staff


POLICE DEPARTMENT SUMMARY MISSION STATEMENT The Town of Cary Police Department is dedicated to quality professional service, while protecting life and property, through community partnerships.

OTHER DEPARTMENTS CONTRIBUTING TO POLICE DEPARTMENT Administration Department Legislative Department Technology Services Human Resources

POLICE DEPARTMENT FY 2011 BUDGET BY CATEGORY Opera tions & Ma intena nce 9%

Ca pita l Outla y 4%

Personnel Services 87%


POLICE DEPARTMENT Additional information about the Police Department may be obtained by calling Chief Pat Bazemore at (919) 469-4022, through email at pat.bazemore@townofcary.org or by visiting the Townâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s website at www.townofcary.org.

TOWN OF CARY GOALS AND INITIATIVES Town Focus Areas Focus Area I: Community Planning

Focus Area II: Infrastructure

Focus Area III: Financial Condition

Focus Area IV: Municipal Services

Town Goals Achieve a well-planned community using innovative and proactive planning approaches and techniques.

Ensure that roads, water and wastewater facilities, parks, and other infrastructure exists for the existing citizens and for the future needs identified in the comprehensive plan.

Achieve a stable and strong financial position by accurately estimating, prudently allocating, and managing financial resources.

Achieve a high level of service to the citizens in a prompt, reliable, responsive, and cost-effective manner.

Deliver Efficient & Effective Services

2

1

Improve Environment & Quality of Life

Provide Understandable & Convenient Services

4

Meet Or Exceed All Regulatory Requirements

Deliver Services Promptly & Consistently

Operationalize Service Levels & Measure Success

Engage Citizens To Determine Levels Of Service

Comply With All Laws & Regulations

Proactively Manage Risk

Bill & Collect Revenues Accurately & Timely

Prudently Manage Debt, Cash, & Investments

Manage Fund Balance To Aid Financial Position

Forecast Operational & Fiscal Impacts

Estimate Revenues Conservatively

Provide Accountability Through Internal Controls

Promote Efficient & Effective Resource Allocation

Allocate Funding To Execute Priorities

Maintain Organization Credibility

Maintain AAA Bond Rating

Identification of Financial Strategy

Match Public Facilities With Community Expectations

Manage Infrastructure Plans To Schedule & Budget

Develop Alternative Financing Plans

Prioritize Capital Project Construction

Update Infrastructure Plans

Understand Forces Affecting the Built Community

Resolve Conflict Between Ordinances & Community Response

Identify Development Trends & Related Policy Changes

Respond To & Include Those Impacted by Development

Create Developer and Affected Citizen Connections

Administer Ordinances & Guidelines as Adopted

Town Initiatives

Department Goals and Initiatives 2 3

2 3 6

DEPARTMENTAL GOALS AND INITIATIVES 1. Increase community interaction, involvement, and education. 2. Improve organizational accountability and responsiveness to citizen concerns. 3. Effectively utilize personnel resources and capitalize on the skill sets of all personnel. 4. Respond to all emergency calls within 5 minutes or less. 5. Improve roadway safety and reduce traffic related crashes, injuries, and deaths. 6. Reduce crime through proactive geo-policing methods. 7. Conduct two Citizenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Police Academy classes during the upcoming year.

4 5 6

1 7


FY 2010 ACCOMPLISHMENTS • • • • • • • • • •

Cary continues to be ranked as one of the safest cities in the country. Responded to 124,770 calls for service. Investigated 4,524 reported criminal offenses. Continued participation in the “Aggressive Driving Enforcement” grant through the Governor’s Highway Safety Program. Implementation of the “2008 and 2009 COPS Technology” grants in which the Department has installed camera systems in 48 vehicles. Total goal for this project is 81 camera systems. The Department conducted two Citizens Police Academy classes for the community. Citizens Assisting Police (CAP) volunteered 6,785 hours for the Police Department. Implementation of the Geo-Policing strategy to better serve our citizens. Six additional sworn positions added to prepare for an additional patrol sector out west. New Emergency Communications Center Supervisor added to the 911 Center.

KEY PERFORMANCE OBJECTIVES • • • • • •

Maintain a response time to emergency calls for service of five minutes or less. Clear 30% or more Part I Crimes in the year assigned. Maintain the Town of Cary’s ranking as the safest of the State’s fifteen largest municipalities, based on the State of North Carolina’s annual Uniform Crime Reporting database. Reduce serious injuries in traffic crashes by maintaining a community seat belt usage of 90% or above. Maintain average time from call received to dispatch, for emergency calls for service, of less than 120 seconds. Increase the number of crimes cleared (all classes) per year.

KEY PERFORMANCE MEASURES Actual FY 2009

Estimated FY 2010

Projected FY 2011

Below 5:00

Below 5:00

Below 5:00

% of Part I Crimes Cleared in Year Assigned

30%

30%

30%

UCR Crime Index of NC’s 15 Largest Cities

Lowest of 15

Lowest of 15

Lowest of 15

94%

94%

94%

65 seconds

65 seconds

65 seconds

2,245

2,004

1,997

Actual FY 2009

Estimated FY 2010

Projected FY 2011

123,014

124,770

131,081

240

280

260

Motor Vehicle Accidents Reported & Investigated

3,807

3,716

3,621

Part I Crimes (typically felonies or serious misdemeanors) Reported & Investigated

2,394

2,262

2,356

Part II Crimes (typically misdemeanors) Reported & Investigated

2,116

2,262

2,219

27% 52% 2,057 135 10,176

20% 47% 2,140 130 10,412

20% 47% 1,906 97 9,309

Performance Measure Response Time to Emergency (Life Threatening) Calls for Service

% of Community Seat Belt Usage Average time from call received to dispatch for Emergency (Life Threatening) Calls for Service Crimes Cleared (All Types)

KEY WORKLOAD INDICATORS Workload Indicator Calls for Service Emergency Calls for Service

Part I Crimes Cleared Part II Crimes Cleared Adult Arrests Juvenile Arrests Traffic Citations Issued


ACTIVITY HISTORY Fund Number: 10-5110 Activity Personnel Services Operations and Maintenance Capital Outlay Total Authorized FTEs

Actual FY 2007

Actual FY 2008

Actual FY2009

Estimated FY2010

Budget FY2011

$13,050,131

$14,767,154

$15,764,564

$16,896,326

$18,261,605

$1,500,731

$1,695,312

$1,549,882

$1,900,452

$1,626,785

$608,156

$555,412

$155,522

$1,392,638

$301,080

$15,159,018

$17,017,878

$17,469,968

$20,189,416

$20,189,470

192

199.5

205

211

215.5

SIGNIFICANT BUDGET AND SERVICE LEVEL CHANGES BEYOND CURRENT LEVELS • • • • •

In Mid Year FY 2010 six new police officers were added to the department to establish an additional patrol beat in the western part of Cary. Addition of one Middle School Resource Officer to Mills Park Middle School opening in the fall of 2010. New CAD Administrator added to the Communications (911) Center. This position will be responsible for programming new locations and set-ups within the Computer Aided Dispatch program for emergency call responses. Three new officers will be added to implement the new initiative called Crime-Free neighborhoods. The officers will work with property managers to improve quality of life issue and help prevent crime. A part time Police Support Services Technician position was vacant during FY10 and has been removed from the FY11 staffing document.


FIRE DEPARTMENT

FIRE CHIEF

Deputy Fire Chief Operations Section

Battalion Chiefs A-1, A-2, B-1, B-2, C-1, C-2

Assistant Fire Chief Logistics Section Risk Management Supervisor

Training Group

Support Staff Supervisor

Support Staff

Assistant Fire Chief Planning & Budget Section

Support Staff


FIRE DEPARTMENT SUMMARY MISSION STATEMENT The primary mission of the Cary Fire Department is to protect and enhance the high quality of life for the citizens and visitors of the Town of Cary from the adverse affects of natural and man-made emergencies. Our goal is to provide a model customer oriented Fire Protection program through an innovative, proactive, and cost efficient approach to emergency response, fire code application, and public fire education.

OTHER DEPARTMENTS CONTRIBUTING TO FIRE DEPARMENT PROGRAMS Administration Technology Services Human Resources Police Department Engineering Planning Inspections & Permits Parks, Recreation, and Cultural Resources Public Works/Utilities

FIRE DEPARTMENT FY 2011 BUDGET BY CATEGORY Operations & Maintenance 7%

Capital Outlay 1%

Personnel Services 92%


FIRE DEPARTMENT Additional information about the Fire Department may be obtained by calling the Fire Chief, Allan Cain, at (919) 469-4058, through e-mail at allan.cain@townofcary.org, or by visiting the Townâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s website at www.townofcary.org. TOWN OF CARY GOALS AND INITIATIVES Town Focus Areas Focus Area I: Community Planning

Focus Area II: Infrastructure

Focus Area III: Financial Condition

Focus Area IV: Municipal Services

Town Goals Achieve a well-planned community using innovative and proactive planning approaches and techniques.

Ensure that roads, water and wastewater facilities, parks, and other infrastructure exists for the existing citizens and for the future needs identified in the comprehensive plan.

Achieve a stable and strong financial position by accurately estimating, prudently allocating, and managing financial resources.

Achieve a high level of service to the citizens in a prompt, reliable, responsive, and cost-effective manner.

1 2 3 7 9

Improve Environment & Quality of Life

7 9 1 2 3

Meet Or Exceed All Regulatory Requirements

Deliver Efficient & Effective Services

1 2 3 4 6

Provide Understandable & Convenient Services

Operationalize Service Levels & Measure Success

7 9

Deliver Services Promptly & Consistently

Engage Citizens To Determine Levels Of Service

Comply With All Laws & Regulations

Proactively Manage Risk

Bill & Collect Revenues Accurately & Timely

Prudently Manage Debt, Cash, & Investments

Manage Fund Balance To Aid Financial Position

Forecast Operational & Fiscal Impacts

Estimate Revenues Conservatively

Provide Accountability Through Internal Controls

Promote Efficient & Effective Resource Allocation

Allocate Funding To Execute Priorities

Maintain Organization Credibility

Maintain AAA Bond Rating

Identification of Financial Strategy

Match Public Facilities With Community Expectations

Manage Infrastructure Plans To Schedule & Budget

Develop Alternative Financing Plans

Prioritize Capital Project Construction

Update Infrastructure Plans

Understand Forces Affecting the Built Community

Resolve Conflict Between Ordinances & Community Response

Identify Development Trends & Related Policy Changes

Respond To & Include Those Impacted by Development

Create Developer and Affected Citizen Connections

Administer Ordinances & Guidelines as Adopted

Town Initiatives

Department Goals and Initiatives 4 5 6 8 11

4 8

DEPARTMENTAL GOALS AND INITIATIVES Operations 1. Provide prompt emergency response to control fires and mitigate hazardous conditions throughout the Town. 2. Provide prompt and effective emergency medical care to citizens and visitors when needed. 3. Provide technical rescue service for confined space, extrication, high-angle, trench, and water emergencies. 4. Respond to 90% of emergency calls within a travel time of 5-minutes or less.

5 6 8 11

5 6 7 9 11


5. Enforce fire code. 6. Complete building and site plan reviews within due dates. 7. Educate citizens and visitors on fire and life safety issues. 8. Conduct routine fire inspections within the state mandated time frame. 9. Continually work to maintain public education contacts. 10. Coordinate continuing education program to maintain employee certifications. 11. Ensure compliance with related safety regulation and standards.

FY 2010 ACCOMPLISHMENTS • Completed ISO Grading Inspection. • Replaced 3 engines; one sedan. • Complete rewriting on the SOC document in accordance with the 5th edition. • Complied with State mandated inspections schedule. • Updated Business Plan. • Continued regular CERT training. • Improved Standard of Coverage from 90% to 91%. KEY PERFORMANCE OBJECTIVES • Respond to 90% of emergency calls for service within travel time of five minutes or less. • Comply 100% with the State Fire Code Inspection Schedule. • Review all building and site plans by due date. • Ensure that 100% of certificate of occupancy inspections conducted by fire inspectors comply with approved plan reviews. • Strive to provide that 85% of all employees are rated above standard in job knowledge based on annual fire training objectives. • Apply for reaccredidation. • Contact 10% of the Town’s population about fire and life safety techniques. • Update Business Plan. KEY PERFORMANCE MEASURES Actual FY 2009

Estimated FY 2010

Projected FY 2011

91%

90%

90%

% inspection schedule compliance

100%

100%

100%

% plans reviewed by due date

100%

100%

100%

% CO inspections comply with approved plans

100%

100%

100%

% employees rated proficient in job knowledge

94%

96%

96%

Y

Y

NA*

15%

12%

12%

Performance Measure % of emergency calls responded within 5 minutes

Complete and implement the criteria established in the annual Accreditation Compliance Report % Town population contacted regarding fire and life safety * Re-accreditation in process

KEY WORKLOAD INDICATORS Actual FY 2009

Estimated FY 2010

Projected FY 2011

Number of Emergency Calls

6,472

6,708

6,953

Number of Inspections

4,564

5,217

5,321

20,647

17,186

17,530

3,425,000

1,833,119

2,778,200

25.52

14.21

20.07

59,706

54,500

54,500

Workload Indicator

Public Education Contacts Annual Fire Loss in Dollars Fire Loss per Capita Number of Training Hours

ACTIVITY HISTORY


Fund Number: 10-5300 Actual FY 2007

Actual FY 2008

Actual FY2009

Estimated FY2010

Budget FY2011

$13,450,435

$14,307,245

$15,120,087

$15,658,252

$16,528,153

Operations and Maintenance

$1,303,276

$1,364,184

$1,350,591

$1,242,213

$1,200,114

Capital Outlay Total

$0 $14,753,711

$57,261 $15,728,690

$74,144 $16,544,822

$20,985 $16,921,450

$114,450 $17,842,717

211

209

209

209

209

$14,753,711

$15,728,690

$16,544,822

$16,921,450

$17,842,717

Other Fire Department

$0

$0

$0

$5,000

$5,000

Seagrave Fire Engine

$0

$0

$0

$5,000

$5,000

$14,753,711

$15,728,690

$16,544,822

$16,931,450

$17,852,717

Activity Personnel Services

Authorized FTEs Fund Number: 051-5300 Donations

Grand Total

SIGNIFICANT BUDGET AND SERVICE LEVEL CHANGES BEYOND CURRENT LEVELS â&#x20AC;˘

One Training & Safety Captain will be upgraded to a Battalion Chief to reduce the Deputy Fire Chief's span of control, to establish more direct leadership/supervision within the training/safety group and to assume responsibility for coordinating USAR training and exercises, team planning, and deployment supervision. This will enable the department to better meet its operational needs and objectives.


ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT

ADMINISTRATION

Engineering Services/ Traffic and Transportation

Engineering Services/ Stormwater

Engineering Technical Services

Engineering Field Services

Engineering Services/ Utilities Real Estate


ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT SUMMARY MISSION STATEMENT

The primary mission of Engineering is to provide a well-designed, high-quality community through development and implementation of policies, standards, ordinances, and infrastructure. To accomplish this mission, we will be responsive, innovative, professional, and will strive for excellence in delivery of service to the public.

DIVISIONS WITHIN ENGINEERING Engineering Services/Transportation Engineering Tech Services Engineering Services/Stormwater Engineering Services/Utilities Development Inspections Survey/Real Estate OTHER DEPARTMENTS CONTRIBUTING TO ENGINEERING Administration Finance Fire Technology Services Parks, Recreation, and Cultural Resources Police Public Works/Utilities Legislative

ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT FY 2011 BUDGET BY CATEGORY Operations & Maintenance 15%

Capital Outlay 1%

Personnel Services 84%


ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT Additional information about the Engineering Department may be obtained by calling Tim Bailey, P.E., Director of Engineering, at (919) 469-4030, through e-mail at tim.bailey@townofcary.org or by visiting the Townâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s website at www.townofcary.org.

TOWN OF CARY GOALS AND INITIATIVES Town Focus Areas Focus Area I: Community Planning

Focus Area II: Infrastructure

Focus Area III: Financial Condition

Focus Area IV: Municipal Services

Town Goals Achieve a well-planned community using innovative and proactive planning approaches and techniques.

Ensure that roads, water and wastewater facilities, parks, and other infrastructure exists for the existing citizens and for the future needs identified in the comprehensive plan.

Achieve a stable and strong financial position by accurately estimating, prudently allocating, and managing financial resources.

Achieve a high level of service to the citizens in a prompt, reliable, responsive, and cost-effective manner.

Meet Or Exceed All Regulatory Requirements

Improve Environment & Quality of Life

2 3 7

Deliver Efficient & Effective Services

Operationalize Service Levels & Measure Success

2 3

Provide Understandable & Convenient Services

Engage Citizens To Determine Levels Of Service

1 6

Deliver Services Promptly & Consistently

Comply With All Laws & Regulations

Proactively Manage Risk

Bill & Collect Revenues Accurately & Timely

Prudently Manage Debt, Cash, & Investments

Manage Fund Balance To Aid Financial Position

Forecast Operational & Fiscal Impacts

Estimate Revenues Conservatively

Provide Accountability Through Internal Controls

Promote Efficient & Effective Resource Allocation

Allocate Funding To Execute Priorities

1

Maintain Organization Credibility

1

Maintain AAA Bond Rating

1 2

Identification of Financial Strategy

1 4

Match Public Facilities With Community Expectations

4 5

Manage Infrastructure Plans To Schedule & Budget

Develop Alternative Financing Plans

4

Prioritize Capital Project Construction

2

Update Infrastructure Plans

2 3

Understand Forces Affecting the Built Community

Identify Development Trends & Related Policy Changes

2 3 4

Resolve Conflict Between Ordinances & Community Response

Respond To & Include Those Impacted by Development

Create Developer and Affected Citizen Connections

Administer Ordinances & Guidelines as Adopted

Town Initiatives

1 2 4

1 2 4

4 5 6

1 2 6

Department Goals and Initiatives 4 5 6

2 3

1 2

1

1

1 4

1

7

6

7

2 3

DEPARTMENTAL GOALS AND INITIATIVES Capital Improvements Projects 1. Provide or coordinate design, project management and construction administration services for a majority of the Townâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s capital improvements projects, including streets, sidewalks, traffic signals, water distribution system projects, sanitary sewer collection system projects, treatment plants, parking lots, buildings and parks.


Engineering Studies 2. Address community issues related to public infrastructure problems beyond routine maintenance with outcomes ranging from overall policy changes to unique solutions. 3. Examples of investigations related to past development activities include neighborhood/cut-through traffic issues, traffic signal studies, flooding problems, sight distance, and roadway safety. Development Activities 4. Involves planning, review and inspection for water, sanitary sewer, transportation, and stormwater systems through implementation of standard specifications or master plans. 5. Includes a range of issues such as floodplain management, street lighting, development agreements and the maintenance of infrastructure records. 6. Enforces or administers requirements of the following acts, regulations, ordinances, policies, or programs: • Floodplain Management (National Flood Insurance Act) • National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (Clean Water Act) • Sedimentation Pollution Control Law of 1973 • Powell Bill Reimbursement (GS 136-41.1) • Neuse River Rules • Land Development Ordinance Business Planning 7. Short and long range planning necessary to enhance our focus on key businesses as well as strategic issues that could affect future operations.

FY 2010 ACCOMPLISHMENTS Coordinate the design, project management and construction services for a majority of the Town’s Capital Improvement Projects including the following: • Completed the widening of Kildaire Farm Road. • Completed the Trinity Road extension. • Completed the Walnut Street Park. • Completed the resurfacing of Cary Parkway. • Completed the Cary Traffic Signal System. • Completed the Morris Branch Pump Station and force main. • Completed Crabtree Interceptor/York Interceptor. • Completed Summerwinds water/sewer annexation projects. • Completed Holly Springs Road waterline. • Completed the Lily Atkins Road waterline. • Purchased the majority of the properties for the Streetscape project. • Completed storm drain/utility improvements on Ralph Drive, McIntosh Court, King Street and Madison Avenue. • Completed Cary Elementary Roof renovation. • Completed Wake Med Soccer Park Concession Renovation. • Completed the N. Academy Railroad crossing upgrade. • Completed the Regency Crescent Kitchen Renovation. • Completed the 2009 Street Improvements Project. • Completed 10 sidewalks from the annual sidewalk project. • Completed traffic calming projects in Wellington and MacGregor West. • Completed the Water Distribution System Master Plan update. • Completed the Reedy Creek Pump Station Elimination. • Completed the Batchelor Branch Interceptor. • Completed the White Oak Interceptor. • Completed the Campbell Road Interceptor. • Completed the Terrington Pump Station. • Completed the Penny Road Waterline Connector (at Ederlee Drive). • Completed design of the Kit Creek Pump Station expansion. • Implemented traffic signal at Green Level Church (formerly Green Level to Durham Road) and Cary Glen Boulevard. • Began construction on Morrisville Parkway from Davis to NC 55. • Made significant progress on the design for the Lake Drive extension.


• • • • • • • • • • • •

Made significant progress on the design for Louis Stephens Road extension. Made significant progress on the design for Green Level Church Road (formerly Green Level to Durham Road) widening. Made significant progress on the design for the Walker Street Extension project. Made significant progress on the Windsor Oaks water/sewer annexation project. Managed the design of Cary Community Arts Center and began construction. Managed the design of Bartley Park. Managed the design of the expansion of the Cary Depot. Managed the design of the driveway for Fire Station #5. Initiated a project for Fire Station #8 planning. Coordinated with NCDOT Davis Drive North construction. Completed the design process on the Western Wake Regional Water Reclamation Facility. Purchased numerous properties for Town projects, parks and open space.

KEY PERFORMANCE OBJECTIVES • Ensure project bids received are within 5% of the engineer’s post-design estimate. • Ensure that final construction cost of capital improvements projects is within 5% of the bid cost for items in the original scope of work. • Ensure total project cost is within 15% of the original budget. • Maintain the average street pavement condition rating. • Begin design on all projects the same fiscal year funding is allocated. • Construct 6,000 feet of sidewalk annually. KEY PERFORMANCE MEASURES Actual FY 2009

Estimated FY 2010

Projected FY 2011

% of bids received for which engineer’s post-design estimate is within 5% of bid prices received

25

50

50

% of projects with change orders less than 5%

70

70

70

% of bids received for which pre-design budget estimate is within 15% of total project cost

100

95

95

% of streets resurfaced

2.5

2.5

1.25

% of CIB* projects started design within FY funded

100

100

100

15,000

15,000

15,900

Performance Measure

Feet of sidewalk constructed

* CIB refers to the Capital Improvements Budget.

KEY WORKLOAD INDICATORS Actual FY 2009

Estimated FY 2010

Projected FY 2011

Number of bids

18

15

17

Number of CIB projects completed

15

15

12

10.5/422

11.2/437

6/440

$50,000,000

$30,000,000

$21,000,000

Number of development plans reviewed

358

300

200

Number of development plans constructed

150

100

75

Number of properties acquired

164

150

120

64

50

60

$99,400,000

$158,200,000

$180,000,000

$1,500,000

$2,000,000

$1,000,000

Workload Indicator

Number of miles resurfaced/number of miles maintained Value of Engineering projects completed

Number of Engineering CIB projects funded Value of Engineering CIB projects funded Value of street resurfacing


ACTIVITY HISTORY Fund Number: 10-5500 Actual FY 2007

Actual FY 2008

Actual FY2009

Estimated FY2010

Budget FY2011

$4,286,787

$4,777,013

$4,906,678

$5,274,471

$5,383,508

Operations and Maintenance

$597,964

$943,592

$609,190

$772,880

$946,963

Reimbursement from WWWRMF Project Engineer

-$93,311

-$99,192

-$166,205

-$180,000

-$180,000

Reimbursement from UF Admin

$0

$0

-382,895

-1,917,850

-1,917,850

Capital Outlay

$0

$159,946

$0

$0

$41,231

$4,791,440

$5,781,359

$4,966,768

$3,949,501

$4,273,852

59

64

64

64

62

Activity Personnel Services

Total Authorized FTEs

SIGNIFICANT BUDGET AND SERVICE LEVEL CHANGES BEYOND CURRENT LEVELS • A new water quality engineer position has been added since Stormwater continues to be a growing area within municipal operations caused by a combination of increased regulations and citizen expectations. This position would assist with management of two new mandates for local government from the State and help with overall stormwater management functions of the group which continues to increase regardless of slow development. The two new mandates are the Jordan Lake Rules and the Swift Creek TMDL. • The Cary Signal system is made up of over 150 traffic signals, 80 miles of fiber optic cable, 23 CCTV traffic surveillance cameras, 2 dynamic message signs, traffic adaptive software, and a web based traffic information system. All of these tools are controlled by central system computer software (the brain) that talks to each of the computers in the field in each of these devices and controls all of the information back and forth and the information that is sent to the public. Up until January 2010, our contractor was still responsible for the operation of the signal system. It is now completely owned by the Town and we are responsible for operating the system. The central computer system software is one of the most critical components. This software needs to be updated almost continuously to keep up with the changes in technology. • Implementation of Business Plan activities for the key business area of Stormwater. The development of a stormwater master plan is proposed. • A total of three positions were vacant during FY10 and have been removed from the FY11 staffing document: - One Stormwater Engineering Technician (workload is primarily development related) - One Engineering Field Technician - One Engineering Development Review Manager


PLANNNG DEPARTMENT

ADMINISTRATION

Comprehensive Planning

Current Planning

Land Use and Design

Rezoning and Development Regulations

Community Improvement and Transportation

Development Review

Transit

Zoning and Enforcement


PLANNING DEPARTMENT SUMMARY MISSION STATEMENT The primary mission of the Planning Department is to manage long-term growth and create a well-designed, high quality community through effective planning, zoning, plan review, and ordinance enforcement activities to preserve and enhance the quality of life for all residents of the Town of Cary.

DIVISIONS WITHIN PLANNING Planning Affordable Housing Transit CDBG OTHER DEPARTMENTS CONTRIBUTING TO PLANNING PROGRAMS Administration Finance Fire Technology Services Parks, Recreation, and Cultural Resources Police Public Works/Utilities Legislative

PLANNING DEPARTMENT FY 2011 BUDGET BY DIVISION CDBG 7%

Transit 54%

Planning and Zoning 36%

Affordable Housing 3%


PLANNING DEPARTMENT Additional information about the Planning Department may be obtained by calling Jeff Ulma, Planning Director, at (919) 319-4580, through e-mail at jeff.ulma@townofcary.org or by visiting the Townâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Web site at www.townofcary.org.

TOWN OF CARY GOALS AND INITIATIVES Focus Area I: Community Planning

Town Focus Areas Focus Area III: Financial Condition

Focus Area II: Infrastructure

Focus Area IV: Municipal Services

Town Goals Achieve a well-planned community using innovative and proactive planning approaches and techniques.

Ensure that roads, water and wastewater facilities, parks, and other infrastructure exists for the existing citizens and for the future needs identified in the comprehensive plan.

Achieve a stable and strong financial position by accurately estimating, prudently allocating, and managing financial resources.

Achieve a high level of service to the citizens in a prompt, reliable, responsive, and cost-effective manner.

Improve Environment & Quality of Life

Meet Or Exceed All Regulatory Requirements

Deliver Efficient & Effective Services

Provide Understandable & Convenient Services

Deliver Services Promptly & Consistently

Operationalize Service Levels & Measure Success

Engage Citizens To Determine Levels Of Service

Comply With All Laws & Regulations

Proactively Manage Risk

Bill & Collect Revenues Accurately & Timely

Prudently Manage Debt, Cash, & Investments

Manage Fund Balance To Aid Financial Position

Forecast Operational & Fiscal Impacts

Estimate Revenues Conservatively

Provide Accountability Through Internal Controls

Promote Efficient & Effective Resource Allocation

Allocate Funding To Execute Priorities

Maintain Organization Credibility

Maintain AAA Bond Rating

Identification of Financial Strategy

Match Public Facilities With Community Expectations

Manage Infrastructure Plans To Schedule & Budget

Develop Alternative Financing Plans

Prioritize Capital Project Construction

Update Infrastructure Plans

Understand Forces Affecting the Built Community

Resolve Conflict Between Ordinances & Community Response

Identify Development Trends & Related Policy Changes

Respond To & Include Those Impacted by Development

Create Developer and Affected Citizen Connections

Administer Ordinances & Guidelines as Adopted

Town Initiatives

Department Goals and Initiatives 16 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 30 31

6 33

6 8 19 31 33

7 8 10 11 28 29 31 32 33

8 1 7 28 30 31 33

7 8 10 13 29 31 32 33

8 9 13 14 15 18 19 25

7 8 9 14 28 29

9

9 14 25 29

7 8 9 14 15 28

30

30 31

7 8 9 13 14 15

6 7 8 9

18 19 25

28 29

8 9 10 11 29

13

20 33

8 13 22 30

8 13 31 33

7 8 17

DEPARTMENTAL GOALS AND INITIATIVES Administration 1. Coordinate all activities regarding growth management, land use planning, zoning administration, code enforcement, transportation planning, and plan review.

9 30 31 33

8 17 28 31 33

7 8 9 14 30 31 33

6 8 19 20 30

6 7 8 9 12 13 14 15 17 27 28 32 33


2.

Process staff reports, legal advertising, and notification letters related to ordinance amendments, annexations, special uses and development plan applications. 3. Oversee budget and personnel. 4. Handle monthly preparation, printing, Web publishing, presentations and distribution of agendas and supporting materials for the Town Council, Planning & Zoning Board, and the Board of Adjustment. 5. Complete and Implement a Department Strategic Plan. Long Range Planning Section 6. Coordinate staff reports, legal advertising, and notification letters related to Comprehensive Plan Amendments (CPA). 7. Coordinate activities related to downtown redevelopment. 8. Coordinate the development and updates of all elements of the Comprehensive Plan with other divisions and departments. 9. Develop Department Capital Improvement Program requests. 10. Develop official population forecasts based on current development. 11. Employment, and development estimates and forecasts; track historical data. 12. Address environmental and historic resources planning issues. 13. Administer the Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) and affordable housing programs. 14. Manage multi-modal transportation system components (pedestrian, thoroughfares, transit, and bicycle). 15. Participate in the administration of the open space and historic resources plan. Current Planning Section 16. Administer, review, and prepare/present staff reports to Town Council and Planning & Zoning (P&Z) Board regarding rezoning and planned development district applications. 17. Manage overall Land Development Ordinance (LDO) amendment process, including review, preparation, and presentation of proposed amendments/staff reports to Town Council and P&Z Board. 18. Inspect approved site and subdivision plans during and after construction to ensure compliance with applicable regulations and approvals. 19. Enforce approved development plans and all zoning regulations within the Land Development Ordinance through regular and/or unscheduled inspections, including responses to citizen complaints or inquiries. 20. Preparation of Notices and/or Citations related to violations of the LDO and approved development plans, and necessary follow-up to ensure the matter is resolved. 21. Review applications for sign permits, uniform sign plans, temporary uses and accessory uses. 22. Review requests for zoning verification letters, and research and prepare necessary documentation. 23. Administer Zoning Board of Adjustment cases including applications for variances, and appeals, interpretations of decisions. 24. Administer, review and prepare/present staff reports for Town Council consideration of Special Use applications. 25. Review and process proposed plans for new development and modifications to existing development such as subdivisions, commercial, office and industrial developments, and other physical development of properties within the Town limits and its Extraterritorial Jurisdiction (ETJ) to ensure compliance with relative ordinances, policies and standards. 26. Process all citizen-initiated annexations of properties associated with rezonings, development plans, or individual residential lots. 27. Maintain and apply design guidelines and appearance manuals associated with development plans. 28. Prepare policies and procedures for land use regulations. 29. Maintain database of all development plans, rezonings and related data, and prepare monthly reports of development activity. 30. Administration of, including interpreting/applying, Land Development Ordinance, Site Design Guidelines, Community Appearance Manual and all other zoning and site design requirements in reviewing rezoning and development plan applications, responding to customer inquiries, and enforcement activities. 31. Respond to citizen and development-related inquiries regarding specific rezoning, development plan and other zoning-related permit applications, including understanding and mitigating issues/concerns within parameters established by regulations. 32. Conduct research and attend professional training opportunities to keep informed of emerging trends and techniques in the development industry. 33. Maintain consistent and accurate communication with other departments, developers and citizens involved in the development review process. (Please note that the Transit program is included in a separate section, but is part of the Planning Department.) FY 2010 ACCOMPLISHMENTS â&#x20AC;˘ Managed the exterior restoration of the Waldo Rood house.


• • • • •

Developed a revision for the Downtown and presented it to the council at their January 2010 retreat. Developed a wayfinding signage program for Downtown and coordinated with PRCR on town-wide wayfinding Completed draft of the Historic Resources Master Plan and moved it towards adoption. Completion and adoption of Round 12 LDO Amendments, including major revisions to the mixed use sketch plan process by creating MXD zoning. Completion and adoption of Round 13 LDO amendments including: revisions to requirements for day care homes, parking and buffer maintenance responsibilities; creation of a new low-density residential sub-district within the Town Center District and related dimensional standards; revisions for consistency with NC General Statutes and NC Building Code requirements; correction/updates of certain references and illustrations; and minor revisions to better clarify existing requirements and/or standards. Completed implementation of electronic plan submittal and review software required for all site/subdivision plan applications; created user-friendly documentation for applicants and citizens to facilitate use of, and access to, system; assisted with training of employees from various Town departments in use of electronic plan review system.

KEY PERFORMANCE OBJECTIVES • Increase the community participation rate (defined as the percentage of affected citizens who participate) at plan public meetings. • Ensure that 100% of development plan reviews are delivered according to published schedule. • Ensure that 100% of the initial development plans receive site visits. • Ensure that the GIS database is maintained at a minimum 95% accuracy level. • Increase the efficiency of employees to access data and information needed to meet department objectives. • Establish specifications for the submittal of digital maps related to rezonings, planned developments, and site plans. KEY PERFORMANCE MEASURES Actual FY 2009

Estimated FY 2010

Projected FY 2011

% of plans reviewed on schedule

100%

98%

96%

% of accuracy of GIS Data Bases

97%

97%

97%

% of development plans receiving a site visit

95%

95%

92%

Actual FY 2009

Estimated FY 2010

Projected FY 2011

134 0

63 2

161 2

17 399 502 182 74 246 16 16 250

18 400 595 196 100 145 15 14 240 400

22 475 500 215 90 357 18 15 240 400

15 46

15 46

16.7 48

10 72

10 70

10 68

Performance Measure

KEY WORKLOAD INDICATORS Workload Indicators Number of zoning violation cases Number of Board of Adjustment variances and administrative appeals Zoning citations Number of accessory use permits Number of sign permits issued Number of temporary use permits issued Number of zoning verification letters issued Acres Annexed Annexation Petitions processed Number of rezonings (including PDDs) Number of development plan reviews Number of residents who participated in a comprehensive planning effort or project Number of miles of striped bicycle lanes Number of GIS tables maintained Number of data audits Number of GIS analysis projects completed

320


ACTIVITY HISTORY Fund Number: 10-5505 Activity Personnel Services Operations and Maintenance Capital Outlay Total Authorized FTEs

Actual FY 2007

Actual FY 2008

Actual FY2009

Estimated FY2010

Budget FY2011

$1,972463

$2,046,614

$2,092,623

$2,301,192

$2,171,356

$322,697

$315,810

$601,468

$700,560

$381,609

$0

$0

$0

$34,000

$0

$2,295,160

$2,362,424

$2,694,091

$3,035,752

$2,552,965

30

30

30

30

24

SIGNIFICANT BUDGET AND SERVICE LEVEL CHANGES BEYOND CURRENT LEVELS • Funding for training/professional development for staff has been included to learn about emerging design standards and techniques; expand customer service capabilities; and maintain professional certifications. • A total of six positions were vacant during FY10 and have been removed from the FY11 staffing document: - One GIS Applications Specialist - One Rezoning Facilitator - One Planning Clerk - Two Planner I/II’s - One Planner II/Sr. Planner


AFFORDABLE HOUSING PROGRAM Additional information about the Affordable Housing Program may be obtained by calling Tracy Stone-Dino, Senior Planner – Affordable Housing, at (919) 380-2782, through e-mail at tracy.stone-dino@townofcary.org, or by visiting the Town’s Web site at www.townofcary.org.

TOWN OF CARY GOALS AND INITIATIVES Focus Area I: Community Planning

Town Focus Areas Focus Area III: Financial Condition

Focus Area II: Infrastructure

Focus Area IV: Municipal Services

Town Goals Achieve a well-planned community using innovative and proactive planning approaches and techniques.

Ensure that roads, water and wastewater facilities, parks, and other infrastructure exists for the existing citizens and for the future needs identified in the comprehensive plan.

Achieve a stable and strong financial position by accurately estimating, prudently allocating, and managing financial resources.

Achieve a high level of service to the citizens in a prompt, reliable, responsive, and cost-effective manner.

1 2

1 2

1 2

1 2

Improve Environment & Quality of Life

1 2 3 4

Meet Or Exceed All Regulatory Requirements

1 2 3 4

Deliver Efficient & Effective Services

1 2

Provide Understandable & Convenient Services

Comply With All Laws & Regulations

1 2

Deliver Services Promptly & Consistently

Proactively Manage Risk

1 2

Operationalize Service Levels & Measure Success

Bill & Collect Revenues Accurately & Timely

1 2

Engage Citizens To Determine Levels Of Service

Prudently Manage Debt, Cash, & Investments

Manage Fund Balance To Aid Financial Position

Forecast Operational & Fiscal Impacts

Estimate Revenues Conservatively

Provide Accountability Through Internal Controls

Promote Efficient & Effective Resource Allocation

Allocate Funding To Execute Priorities

Maintain Organization Credibility

1 2 3 4

Maintain AAA Bond Rating

1 2 3 4

Identification of Financial Strategy

Match Public Facilities With Community Expectations

1 2 3 4

Manage Infrastructure Plans To Schedule & Budget

Prioritize Capital Project Construction

1 2 3 4

Develop Alternative Financing Plans

Update Infrastructure Plans

Understand Forces Affecting the Built Community

Resolve Conflict Between Ordinances & Community Response

Identify Development Trends & Related Policy Changes

Respond To & Include Those Impacted by Development

Create Developer and Affected Citizen Connections

Administer Ordinances & Guidelines as Adopted

Town Initiatives

Department Goals and Initiatives 3

1 2 3

3 4

3 4

1 2

2 3 4

1 2 3 4

1 2 3 4

1 2

1 2

PROGRAM GOALS AND INITIATIVES 1. Administer the affordable housing program. 2. Administer the Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) Program. 3. Prepare recommendations and oversee new or revised practices, policies, ordinances, or programs related to housing and community development. 4. Support multi-department efforts to improve declining neighborhoods. 5. Prepare reports and plans to address Cary’s housing needs.

1 2 3 4


FY 2010 ACCOMPLISHMENTS • Prepared the FY2011 Annual Action Plan to receive $474,446 in Federal funds and reprogrammed funds carried over from previous years. • Prepared the Consolidated Annual and Performance Evaluation Report on 2009 CDBG activities. • Rehabilitated 7 homes with major repairs through the Housing Rehabilitation Program. • Provided CDBG funds for non profit housing support agencies in Cary (Habitat for Humanity, the Carying Place, Inc. and Builders of Hope • Provided CDBG-R (American Recovery and Reinvestment Act) funding to Christian Community in Action and the Serving Cup, Inc.). • Awarded 4 grants through the Neighborhood Improvement Matching Grant program. (Program not funded in FY 2010) KEY PERFORMANCE OBJECTIVES • Meet the housing performance measures established in the Affordable Housing Plan. • To the extent allowed by funding, implement the Town of Cary housing rehabilitation program to provide financial assistance to lower-income owners of older properties within the Town limits. • Implement the housing, public infrastructure and economic development projects contained in the FY 2010 CDBG Annual Action Plan while complying with all federal regulations. • Make adjustments to Cary’s affordable housing programs, with focus on performance targets, concentration issues, and location goals. KEY PERFORMANCE MEASURES Actual FY 2009

Estimated FY 2010

Projected FY 2011

% of housing funds expended in same fiscal year budgeted

63%

N/A*

75%

% of CDBG funds expended in same fiscal year budgeted

44%

90%

75%

% of affordable housing targets achieved

50%

50%

50%

Actual FY 2009

Estimated FY 2010

Projected FY 2011

Number of housing units rehabilitated with housing funds

8

6

6

Number of new affordable housing strategies implemented

0

0

2

Number of previously-implemented affordable strategies carried forward an additional year

8

8

8

Number of affordable housing units committed as a result of Town actions

86

13

48

$450,746

$596,879

$474,446

Performance Measure

*No Affordable Housing Funds were allocated in FY 2010.

KEY WORKLOAD INDICATORS Workload Indicators

Amount of state, county, federal funds secured for affordable housing


ACTIVITY HISTORY Fund Number: 056-5507

Actual FY 2007

Actual FY 2008

Actual FY2009

Estimated FY2010

Budget FY2011

$46,868

$68,766

$70,750

$76,878

$80,048

$3,477

$3,412

$2,220

$3,784

$3,619

$0

$29,872

$24,796

$80,332

$0

Other

$211,275

$129,966

$184,735

$745,071

$100,000

Total

$261,620

$232,016

$282,501

$906,065

$183,667

Fund Number: 056-5504

$261,620

$232,016

$282,501

$906,065

$183,667

$21,985

$25,034

$70,720

$0

$0

$283,605

$257,050

$353,221

$906,065

$183,667

1

1

1

1

1

Activity Personnel Services Operations and Maintenance Capital Outlay

Employee Housing Total Authorized FTEs

SIGNIFICANT BUDGET AND SERVICE LEVEL CHANGES BEYOND CURRENT LEVELS â&#x20AC;˘ Funding for the Neighborhood Improvement Program and the Housing Rehabilitation Program was suspended in FY 2010. The funding has been restored in the FY 2011 budget.


INSPECTIONS AND PERMITS DEPARTMENT

ADMINISTRATION

Permit Services

Building Development Plan Review

Code Enforcement Building

Permitting / Permit Fee Collection

Plan Review Electrical Platting & Addressing Development Fee Collection (for Planning & Engineering)

Plumbing Mechanical Minimum Housing


INSPECTIONS AND PERMITS DEPARTMENT SUMMARY MISSION STATEMENT

The primary mission of the Inspections and Permits Department is to enhance the quality of life for all citizens of Cary by providing for their health, safety and welfare through the effective and efficient administration and enforcement of the North Carolina State Building Code and applicable local ordinances. The department will promote customer satisfaction by serving as a liaison between local government and the Cary construction community while ensuring that a service oriented, professional atmosphere is always present. All employees will strive to develop the best building inspection program in the State of North Carolina.

DIVISIONS WITHIN INSPECTIONS AND PERMITS Permit Services Building Code Enforcement OTHER DEPARTMENTS CONTRIBUTING TO INSPECTIONS AND PERMITS Administration Finance Fire Technology Services Parks, Recreation, and Cultural Resources Police Public Works/Utilities Legislative

INSPECTIONS & PERMITS DEPARTMENT FY 2011 BUDGET BY CATEGORY Operations & Maintenance 5%

Capital Outlay 1%

Personnel Services 94%


INSPECTIONS AND PERMITS DEPARTMENT Additional information about the Inspections and Permits Department may be obtained by calling Russ Overton, Director of Inspections and Permits, at (919) 469-4033, or through email at russ.overton@townofcary.org.

TOWN OF CARY GOALS AND INITIATIVES Town Focus Areas Focus Area I: Community Planning

Focus Area II: Infrastructure

Focus Area III: Financial Condition

Focus Area IV: Municipal Services

Town Goals Achieve a well-planned community using innovative and proactive planning approaches and techniques.

Ensure that roads, water and wastewater facilities, parks, and other infrastructure exists for the existing citizens and for the future needs identified in the comprehensive plan.

Achieve a stable and strong financial position by accurately estimating, prudently allocating, and managing financial resources.

Achieve a high level of service to the citizens in a prompt, reliable, responsive, and cost-effective manner.

Improve Environment & Quality of Life

Meet Or Exceed All Regulatory Requirements

Deliver Efficient & Effective Services

Provide Understandable & Convenient Services

Deliver Services Promptly & Consistently

Operationalize Service Levels & Measure Success

Engage Citizens To Determine Levels Of Service

Comply With All Laws & Regulations

Proactively Manage Risk

Bill & Collect Revenues Accurately & Timely

Prudently Manage Debt, Cash, & Investments

Manage Fund Balance To Aid Financial Position

Forecast Operational & Fiscal Impacts

Estimate Revenues Conservatively

Provide Accountability Through Internal Controls

Promote Efficient & Effective Resource Allocation

Allocate Funding To Execute Priorities

Maintain Organization Credibility

Maintain AAA Bond Rating

Identification of Financial Strategy

Match Public Facilities With Community Expectations

Manage Infrastructure Plans To Schedule & Budget

Develop Alternative Financing Plans

Prioritize Capital Project Construction

Update Infrastructure Plans

Understand Forces Affecting the Built Community

Resolve Conflict Between Ordinances & Community Response

Identify Development Trends & Related Policy Changes

Respond To & Include Those Impacted by Development

Create Developer and Affected Citizen Connections

Administer Ordinances & Guidelines as Adopted

Town Initiatives

Department Goals and Initiatives 3 4

5

5

1

2

1 6

1 6 8 9 11 12

DEPARTMENTAL GOALS AND INITIATIVES Permitting & Plan Review 1. Process construction and development related permits including building permits, electrical permits, plumbing permits, HVAC (Heating, Ventilation & Air Conditioning) permits and sign permits in accordance with the state building code and local ordinances, completely, efficiently, and expeditiously. 2. Collect fees and provide additional customer service support for development services (Engineering & Planning). 3. Review plans to ensure that structures meet the setback requirements as noted by Town ordinance. 4. Coordinate review and approvals of plat maps and addresses for appropriateness in accordance with Town regulations.

7

9 10 11


5. Track and analyze building and permitting activities to identify trends and develop information that will be useful in making decisions. Inspections 6. Perform inspections of residential and commercial buildings and structures before, during, and after construction in a thorough and efficient manner. 7. Ensure compliance with the North Carolina State Building Code and the applicable sections of the Town of Cary Code of Ordinances. 8. Consult with design professionals, builders, subcontractors and property owners on code related issues and offer assistance with the construction process. Minimum Housing/Post Construction 9. Respond to complaints from residents regarding violations of the Town’s minimum housing ordinance; this may include conducting hearings, researching records, and providing follow-up activities. 10. Provide support for the Healthy Neighborhoods Initiative. 11. Respond to citizen inquiries into perceived building code violations in homes constructed within the past six years by investigating, inspecting and consulting with homeowners/tenants, and subcontractors. 12. Contact builders of record when applicable to request their assistance in correcting code violations.

FY 2010 ACCOMPLISHMENTS • • • • • • • • • •

All Code Officials and Plan Review Staff completed continuing education training on the North Carolina State Building Code. Increased community outreach through participation in programs such as Spring Daze, Lazy Daze, and Building Safety Week. Initiated project to implement online permitting. Initiated planning process to resume residential plan review. Successfully reallocated resources to match current needs by moving one building inspector to the Minimum Housing division and assigning one building inspector to the Fire Department. Successful departmental reorganization to create a Development Plan Review group. Developed and adopted I&P Communications Plan. Completed I&P Business Plan. Developed a new permit application for the installation of irrigation systems. Participated in the Matrix review of the Town’s development review process.

KEY PERFORMANCE OBJECTIVES • • • • •

Maintain an average inspection disapproval rate of 30% or less. Conduct all building construction inspections within 24 business hours of request. Perform all initial plan reviews within the time prescribed by the department’s turnaround time chart. Maintain a 75% or greater average rate of compliance within the allotted time following notice of violation of Minimum Housing code. Participate in at least one community outreach event per quarter (or four annually).

KEY PERFORMANCE MEASURES Performance Measure % of total inspection requests that are disapproved % of scheduled inspections conducted within 24-hours

Actual FY 2009

Estimated FY 2010

Projected FY 2011

25%

22%

30%

100%

100%

100%

-----

-----

90% 90% 90% 90%

52%

64%

75%

--

--

4

% of initial plan reviews completed within prescribed time ¾ ¾ ¾ ¾

New commercial buildings Commercial fit-ups New detached single-family dwellings New attached single-family dwellings (townhomes) Avg rate of compliance following notice of violation of MH code. Number of community events attended.


KEY WORKLOAD INDICATORS Actual FY 2009

Estimated FY 2010

Projected FY 2011

8,049 1,025 42 6,982

7,772 1,364 15 6,394

7,771 1,179 27 6,565

Number of re-inspections

24,222

23,473

21,000

Number of inspections performed

66,363

71,155

65,500

99

124

155

Residential Certificates of Occupancy (CO) issued

2,082

1,820

1,933

Total construction value (in millions of dollars)

$628

$356

$454

Workload Indicator Number of Permits Issued -New Residential -New Non-residential -Other (Additions/Alterations, Individual Trade Permits)

Number of minimum housing cases

ACTIVITY HISTORY Fund Number: 10-5510 Activity Personnel Services Operations and Maintenance Capital Outlay Total Authorized FTEs

Actual FY 2007

Actual FY 2008

Actual FY2009

Estimated FY2010

Budget FY2011

$2,801,612

$3,319,228

$3,473,235

$3,591,309

$3,656,294

$194,923

$341,734

$200,757

$244,096

$211,814

$0

$176,996

$0

$128,750

$34,700

$2,996,535

$3,837,958

$3,673,992

$3,964,155

$3,902,808

42

50.625

49.625

49.625

45.625

SIGNIFICANT BUDGET AND SERVICE LEVEL CHANGES BEYOND CURRENT LEVELS . • The implementation of online permitting is on schedule to launch July 1, 2010. Staff expects that this new service will improve turnaround times (from application submittal to permit issuance), will reduce costs, and will dramatically improve customer convenience. • The residential plan review program, scheduled to begin July 1, 2010, will enable the I&P Department to examine residential plans much more thoroughly for Code compliance prior to the issuance of permits. Among the anticipated benefits of this new program are building code inspectors will be able to work more efficiently by not having to review some plans in the field, and that we may identify construction design errors earlier in the process, saving customers time and money. • A total of four positions were vacant during FY10 and have been removed from the FY11 staffing document: - One Plans Examiner - One Code Official - One Zoning Permit Specialist - One Customer Service Representative II


PARKS, RECREATION AND CULTURAL RESOURCES DEPARTMENT

DIRECTOR

Administration

Recreation Programs

Cultural Arts & Resources

Athletics

Parks Planning

Cultural Facilities

Park Operations

Youth and Adult Sports

Administration Analysis

Events and Festivals

Senior and Teen Programs

Cary Tennis Park

Marketing

Public Art

Community Centers

Wake Med Soccer Park

Youth Theatre and Performances

Skate Park

Baseball and Softball Complexes

Environmental Education


PARKS, RECREATION AND CULTURAL RESOURCES SUMMARY MISSION STATEMENT The mission of Cary Parks, Recreation and Cultural Resources Department (PRCR) is to serve, educate and enhance life for the citizens of Cary. Our professional staff plans and provides a variety of enjoyable and cost effective recreation, sports, environmental, historical and cultural arts programs and services. We acquire, develop, beautify, conserve and maintain a system of parks, greenways and recreation facilities that will assure quality leisure opportunities for all Cary residents. DIVISIONS WITHIN PARKS, RECREATION AND CULTURAL RESOURCES Administration Division Recreation Programs Division Cultural Resources Division Festivals Division Athletic Division Tennis Division Soccer Park Skate Park USA Baseball Koka Booth Amphitheatre OTHER DEPARTMENTS CONTRIBUTING TO PARKS, RECREATION AND CULTURAL Administration Public Works/Utilities (Buildings & Grounds) Police

PARKS, RECREATION & CULTURAL RESOURCES FY 2011 BUDGET BY DIVISION

Soccer Park 11%

Tennis 12%

Skate Park 2%

USA Baseball 7%

Koka Booth Amphithea tre 4%

Administration 13%

Athletics 12%

Festivals 1% Cultural Resources 15%

Recreation Programs 24%


PARKS, RECREATION AND CULTURAL RESOURCES ADMINISTRATION DIVISION Additional information about the Administration Division may be obtained by calling Bruce Crocker, Operations Analyst at (919) 462-2073, through e-mail at bruce.crocker@townofcary.org or visiting the Townâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s website at www.townofcary.org.

TOWN OF CARY GOALS AND INITIATIVES Town Focus Areas Focus Area I: Community Planning

Focus Area II: Infrastructure

Focus Area III: Financial Condition

Focus Area IV: Municipal Services

Achieve a well-planned community using innovative and proactive planning approaches and techniques.

Ensure that roads, water and wastewater facilities, parks, and other infrastructure exists for the existing citizens and for the future needs identified in the comprehensive plan.

Achieve a stable and strong financial position by accurately estimating, prudently allocating, and managing financial resources.

Town Goals Achieve a high level of service to the citizens in a prompt, reliable, responsive, and cost-effective manner.

Comply With All Laws & Regulations

Engage Citizens To Determine Levels Of Service

Operationalize Service Levels & Measure Success

Deliver Services Promptly & Consistently

Provide Understandable & Convenient Services

Deliver Efficient & Effective Services

Meet Or Exceed All Regulatory Requirements

Improve Environment & Quality of Life

Proactively Manage Risk

Bill & Collect Revenues Accurately & Timely

Prudently Manage Debt, Cash, & Investments

Manage Fund Balance To Aid Financial Position

Forecast Operational & Fiscal Impacts

Estimate Revenues Conservatively

Provide Accountability Through Internal Controls

1 2 3

Promote Efficient & Effective Resource Allocation

Match Public Facilities With Community Expectations

1 2 3

Allocate Funding To Execute Priorities

Manage Infrastructure Plans To Schedule & Budget

1 2 3

Maintain Organization Credibility

Develop Alternative Financing Plans

1 2 3

Maintain AAA Bond Rating

Prioritize Capital Project Construction

1 2 3

Identification of Financial Strategy

Update Infrastructure Plans

Understand Forces Affecting the Built Community

Resolve Conflict Between Ordinances & Community Response

1 3

Identify Development Trends & Related Policy Changes

Create Developer and Affected Citizen Connections

1 3

Respond To & Include Those Impacted by Development

Administer Ordinances & Guidelines as Adopted

Town Initiatives

1 2 3

1 2 3

1 2 3

1 2 3

1 2 3

1 2 3

1 2 3

1 2 3

Department Goals and Initiatives 1 2 3

1 2 3

3

1 2 3

3

1 2 3

1 3

1 2 3

1 3

DIVISION GOALS AND INITIATIVES Planning & Design: Parks, Greenways and Open Space 1. Responsible for the acquisition of land and the design and development of a system of parks, greenways, recreation facilities, and open space areas. 2. Current system includes twenty one public park areas (includes mini, neighborhood, community, metro, school/athletic, and natural areas), Fourteen special use facilities including: three Community Centers with gyms, one Senior Center, one Tennis Center, one National Baseball Training Center, one Nature Center, two Arts/Historical Centers, two outdoor Amphitheaters, a Skate Park, a Soccer Park, Cary Dog Park and approximately forty-one miles of greenways and trails.


Program Support 3. Responsible for public information and marketing, customer service and staff training, grant writing, internal controls, Town ordinance, polices and procedure requirements and program evaluation and analysis.

FY 2010 ACCOMPLISHMENTS Administrative and Program Support • CLASS Work Team implemented processes for checking availability and reserving picnic shelters on the web and created procedures to implement procedures. • CLASS Work Team developed a comprehensive Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ’s) for the EZ-Reg website to improve customer friendly processes for registration, facility availability and facility reservations. • Community Outreach and Awareness Work Team developed an extensive public awareness presentation focusing on PRCR facilities, parks, greenways, events and programs offerings. • PRCR Relief for Recreation Scholarship program awarded scholarships to 17 participants totaling $1,298 and raised $4,586 in scholarship funds as of January 1, 2010. • PRCR Advisory Board held the first annual Silent Auction in conjunction with the annual Volunteer Awards Banquet and raised $3,500 for the PRCR Relief for Recreation Scholarship program. • Achieving Greater Efficiencies Workteam members reviewed departmental practices and procedures formulating efficiency opportunity recommendations in the areas of staffing, general office practices, purchasing, sponsorships, donations, programs, events, planning and design. • Administrative processes and procedures were developed and implemented to minimize credits and debits on CLASS customer user accounts. • Data Collection and Management Workteam devised a method to track temporary payroll costs through the current payroll system eliminating the need for staff to manually enter payroll in two different systems. • Staff Development Work Team offered a variety of team building opportunities for the members of the Department and facilitated a multi-hazard training in the area of blood spills and suspicious packages. • Staff Development Work Team established a system of quarterly KEYS classes for temporary staff and a system of quarterly email reminders to full staff to ensure new temporary staff training is conducted. • Staff Development Work Team worked with Human Resources to develop a workteam leader training program. • Security/Risk Management Work Team members reviewed and made recommendations for patron and staff safe zones within each of the PRCR facilities. • Security/Risk Management Work Team members recommended and purchased severe weather notification radios for each PRCR facility and megaphones as needed for public announcements in the event of severe weather. • Conducted 7 public meetings to provide public input regarding current parks, special use and greenway projects. • Completed the Commission for Accreditation of Park and Recreation Agencies (CAPRA) agency annual report outlining the agency’s current compliance status and significant events. Park & Facility Development • Completed construction of updated concession facility for Crescent at Koka Booth Amphitheatre. • Completed construction of updated concession facility at WakeMed Soccer Park. • Completed update of master plan for WakeMed Soccer Park. • Completed Management Plan for Kids Together Play Area. • Completed construction of batting cages and new gate access for signature field at USA Baseball National Training Complex. • Completed construction of 30 car parking lot and new 1000’ paved trail surrounding soccer fields at Davis Drive Park. • Completed construction to replace the existing playground equipment at Lexie Lane Park. • Completed installation of lighting for both basketball and volleyball courts at North Cary Park. • Completed construction of new ramp at SK8 Park facility. • Completed conversion of existing comfort station to new storage facility and construction of 2nd phase of lighting project at the Tennis Park. • Completed planning for Wayfinding Sign Plan and obtained Council approval. Initiated installation of new signs at all Town parks, greenways and special use facilities.


• • •

Initiated construction of new greenway trail at Green Hope Elementary School Park that will link to Louis Stevens Road. Initiated construction of Cary Community Arts Center. Initiated construction of updated landscaping at Sears Farm Road Park.

Greenways • Completed construction of 4.67 mile segment of the American Tobacco Trail through Chatham County in partnership with Department of Transportation. • Completed construction of .21 mile extension of Piney Plains Greenway linking residents who live along Forest Parkway to Hinshaw Greenway, Marla Dorrel Park and McDonald Wood’s Park. • Completed construction of Kildaire Farm Road Multi-use Trail as part of the Kildaire Road Widening project. • Completed construction of “fitness” trail links to Senior Center & Community Center as part of $120,000 FitCommunity Grant. The remaining funding after completion of the sidewalk and trail connection was used for trail and greenway signage and markers in Bond Park. • Obtained approval for resolution supporting East Coast Greenway through Cary. • Completed construction of developer-built .38 mile Olde Carpenter Greenway located off of Morrisville Parkway in the Olde Carpenter PDD. • Completed construction of Bower’s Lane Connecting Trail located within the Ashley Glen PDD, providing a neighborhood connecting trail to the White Oak Creek Greenway. • Completed final reviews of 4 greenway crossings of the Triangle Expressway. • Initiated construction of Morris Branch pedestrian underpass as part of Green Level Church Road widening project. • Initiated construction of “Hub” greenway project within Bond Park linking Black Creek and White Oak Creek Greenways. • Initiated construction of next segment of Black Creek Greenway (from Credit Union to Shell station) • Initiated construction of .3 mile segment of Southbridge Greenway to link with greenway surrounding Cary Park Lake. • Finalized design of NC 55 multi-use trail linking White Oak Creek and Batchelor Branch Greenways. • Finalized design of trail linking Swift Creek Greenway to Symphony Lake Greenway. • Finalized design linking Speight Branch Greenway to grade separated crossing under Tryon Road providing pedestrian access to Walnut Street. • Initiated design of Swift Creek Greenway to be located between Lake Wheeler and Holly Springs Road in partnership with Wake County, the City of Raleigh, and the Triangle Land Conservancy.

Grants & Acquisitions • Successfully coordinated obtaining $3.4 million in grant funding for 2009 for open space, greenway and stream restoration projects. • Awarded $75,000 in October 2009, for the Recreational Trails Grant for the Black Creek - “Hub” Segment (within Bond Park). Coordinated grant application, meetings with grants staff and grant agreement and contract approval process. • Awarded $222,000 in July, 2009, in Congestion, Mitigation and Air Quality Program grant funding (CMAQ) for the development of a trailhead for the ATT to be located on New Hope Church Road in west Cary. This grant has not traditionally been awarded to bike/pedestrian projects in the past. As such, this is the first time PRCR has applied for this type of grant. Successfully researched emission requirements and successfully developed a grant application indicating the reduction of emissions with the development of “park and ride” trailhead with access to RTP. Represented the Town of Cary at grant committee meetings. • Tentatively awarded $2.3 million in August, 2009, in Congestion, Mitigation and Air Quality Program grant funding (CMAQ) for the development of a greenway along the Crabtree Creek corridor. Coordinated grant application with CAMPO, the Planning Department as well as the Town of Morrisville. Completion of this greenway will extend a greenway from Davis Drive through Morrisville and link with the Black Creek Greenway, a distance of 4 miles. • Awarded $400,000 in Energy Efficient Block Grant to replace the field lights at Phase I Softball Fields at Tom Brooks Park with new energy efficient “green” light system. • Successfully completed first conversion of a PARTF grant in State of North Carolina. Coordinated conversion of $217,000 grant originally designated for the Town Center Park to new park site in west Cary to achieve grant requirements. Completed all steps required in PARTF conversion, which took over 1 year to complete.


• • • • • • • • • •

Successfully coordinated the completion of the $600,000 Clean Water Management Trust Fund grant obtained in 2004 for purchase of open space along the White Oak Creek. Completed the final project management documents to officially obtain $1.8 million Corps of Engineers West Cary Watershed Project funding for the construction of stormwater management devices along the White oak Creek Greenway between Davis Drive and NC 55. Submitted 2009 application for a Clean Water Management Trust Fund for the purchase of the Cochrane tract. Submitted 2009 application for a Recreational Trail grant for the construction of a multi-use trail along NC 55. Submitted 2009 application for Adopt-a-Trail grant for signage along the American Tobacco Trail segment in Chatham County. Coordinated acquisition of .48 acre lot at 310 South Walker Street as part of Town Center Park. Coordinated acquisition of +/- 4.1 acre site located at 102 Old Place Road off Green Hope School Road. (adjacent to USA Baseball National Training Complex) Coordinated donation of 4.38 acre open space located at Crescent Green Drive. Specifically coordinated completion of land dedications with developers, including: Amberly PDD, Cameron Pond PDD and Twin Lakes PDD. Obtained conservation easement for Tryon Village properties.

Development Review & Planning • Reviewed and commented on 40 new site/subdivision plans, 25 re-submittals, 15 new rezoning & MUSP cases and approximately 25 plats. • Negotiated with developers for the following land dedications, donations and/or greenway easements, including: Weatherfield PDD, Weldon Ridge PDD, Highland Village, Searstone PDD, Amberly PDD, and Twin Lakes PDD. • Coordinated the design of developer-built greenways at the Woodlands, Manors at Green Level, Toscana, Weldon Ridge, Amberly M/U trail and Greystone PDD. • Obtained Council approval for resolution supporting Center of the Region (Core) Plan for regional greenways.

KEY PERFORMANCE OBJECTIVES • Provide 7.5 acres of developed parks per 1,000 residents annually. (This level of service is based on a combination of the current population projections, geographic facility distribution needs, programmed activity needs, citizen survey results, in accordance with the Parks, Recreation and Cultural Resources Facilities Master Plan.) • Increase the total mileage of greenways by 2 miles/year. • Achieve an Above Average or Excellent rating on 95% of customer service evaluations. KEY PERFORMANCE MEASURES Performance Measure Developed park acres/1,000 residents Greenway miles/year % participants rating Customer Service Level as Above Average or Excellent

Actual FY 2009

Estimated FY 2010

Projected FY 2011

7.31

7.31

7.56

6.0

3.0

2.0

97%

97%

97%

Actual FY 2009

Estimated FY 2010

Projected FY 2011

1,130

1,130

1,150

40

43

58**

KEY WORKLOAD INDICATORS Workload Indicator # of developed park acres* # of greenway miles

*Includes mini, neighborhood, community, metro parks, special use facilities and athletic venues. ** Includes greenways and multi-use trails (parallel to road)


ACTIVITY HISTORY Fund Number: 10-6210 Activity

Actual FY 2007

Actual FY 2008

Actual FY2009

Estimated FY2010

Budget FY2011

Personnel Services

$798,112

$885,294

$988,117

$1,213,805

$1,274,564

Operations and Maintenance

$189,480

$218,335

$212,247

$511,972

$299,309

$0

$34,492

$0

$0

$0

$987,592

$1,138,121

$1,200,364

$1,725,777

$1,573,873

12

13

15

15

14

$987,592 $0

$1,138,121 $0

$1,200,364 $0

$1,725,777 $0

$1,573,873 $0

Memorial Benches

$2,960

$209

$0

$7,500

$7,500

Parks Scholarship

$1,919

$3,328

$967

$10,000

$30,000

$992,471

$1,141,658

$1,201,331

$1,743,277

$1,611,373

Capital Outlay Total Authorized FTEs Fund Number: 051-6210 Miscellaneous

Grand Total

SIGNIFICANT BUDGET AND SERVICE LEVEL CHANGES BEYOND CURRENT LEVELS â&#x20AC;˘ One Parks Planner position was approved as part of the FY09 budget but has never been approved to be filled. It is being removed from the FY11 staffing document.


RECREATION PROGRAMS DIVISION Additional information about the Recreation Programs Division may be obtained by calling Dwayne Jones, Recreation Manager at (919) 469-4064, through e-mail at dwayne.jones@townofcary.org or by visiting the Townâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s website at www.townofcary.org.

TOWN OF CARY GOALS AND INITIATIVES Town Focus Areas Focus Area I: Community Planning

Focus Area II: Infrastructure

Focus Area III: Financial Condition

Focus Area IV: Municipal Services

Achieve a well-planned community using innovative and proactive planning approaches and techniques.

Ensure that roads, water and wastewater facilities, parks, and other infrastructure exists for the existing citizens and for the future needs identified in the comprehensive plan.

Achieve a stable and strong financial position by accurately estimating, prudently allocating, and managing financial resources.

Town Goals Achieve a high level of service to the citizens in a prompt, reliable, responsive, and cost-effective manner.

Improve Environment & Quality of Life

Meet Or Exceed All Regulatory Requirements

Deliver Efficient & Effective Services

Provide Understandable & Convenient Services

Deliver Services Promptly & Consistently

Operationalize Service Levels & Measure Success

Engage Citizens To Determine Levels Of Service

Comply With All Laws & Regulations

Proactively Manage Risk

Bill & Collect Revenues Accurately & Timely

Prudently Manage Debt, Cash, & Investments

Manage Fund Balance To Aid Financial Position

Forecast Operational & Fiscal Impacts

Estimate Revenues Conservatively

Provide Accountability Through Internal Controls

Promote Efficient & Effective Resource Allocation

Allocate Funding To Execute Priorities

Maintain Organization Credibility

Maintain AAA Bond Rating

Identification of Financial Strategy

Match Public Facilities With Community Expectations

Manage Infrastructure Plans To Schedule & Budget

Develop Alternative Financing Plans

Prioritize Capital Project Construction

Update Infrastructure Plans

Understand Forces Affecting the Built Community

Resolve Conflict Between Ordinances & Community Response

Identify Development Trends & Related Policy Changes

Respond To & Include Those Impacted by Development

Create Developer and Affected Citizen Connections

Administer Ordinances & Guidelines as Adopted

Town Initiatives

Department Goals and Initiatives 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

DIVISION GOALS AND INITIATIVES Leisure Services 1. Provide a wide range of recreational programs for adults, children, and senior adults including dance, exercise, adventure, trips, confidence building, social interaction, and camps. 2. Provide monthly High School and Middle School events, classes and activities for Teens. Programs are offered at the Community Centers, Bond Park Facilities, and the Cary Senior Center.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8


Environmental Education 3. Provide programs in ecology, environmental stewardship, preservation, and nature appreciation for adults and youth. 4. Offer programs at Hemlock Bluffs Nature Preserve and the Stevens Nature Center. Facility Rentals 5. Provide Town citizens with the opportunity to reserve facilities for group functions, such as picnics, meetings, and other social occasions. 6. Manage and coordinate reservation space for picnic shelters at Bond Park, Ritter Park, Davis Drive Park, Kids Together Park, North Cary Park, White Oak Park, Thomas Brooks Park and Green Hope School Park. 7. Manage and coordinate reservation space for meeting rooms at community centers and the Cary Senior Center. Management of Contracted Facilities 8. Collaborate with Resources for Senior’s at Cary Total Life Center to provide residents, as well as surrounding communities, with adult day care opportunities.

FY 2010 ACCOMPLISHMENTS • The Cary Senior Center staff, in conjunction with the Planning Department staff, was instrumental in the Town of Cary being awarded the 2009 Achievement Award from the Environmental Protection Agency. The Achievement Award recognizes communities for overall excellence in building healthy communities for active aging. • Submitted the Town of Cary’s 2010 Fit Community re-designation application to the North Carolina Health and Wellness Trust Fund. • Completed and closed out the 2007-10 Active Community and Neighborhood Grant for Bond Park, which included: Added additional sidewalks and paved walking paths Installed signage on natural-surface park trails and along interior roads Installed Bond Park Wayfinding Maps in facility parking areas Printed new full-color Bond Park Brochure/Maps. • Hosted the 2010 Wake County Special Olympics Basketball Competition in February 2010 at Bond Park Community Center. • Bond Park, Middle Creek and Herb Young Community Center staff successfully planned and implemented 33 week-long track out camps for year round students with total revenue of $98,954. A full time Program Assistant was hired in May 2009 to coordinate day-to-day operations for Track-Out and Summer Day/Teen Camps. • 6.659 acres of property were added to Hemlock Bluffs, converted from an old land lease with Wake County Schools. Due to the Town’s Kildaire Farm Road widening project, the property was given to the State as mitigation by the Jones and Montague families. • Cary Teen Council planned and implemented the annual Cary Teen Forum themed; “Around the World in 4 ½ Hours”, with over 90 registrants. • Hosted the 2010 "Cary Cup" Table Tennis Tournament at the Bond Park Community Center which is an international event attended by over 250 table tennis participants. • Coordinated with NC Senior Games to use Bond Park as a site for 2010 State Finals events in October hosting Badminton at Bond Park Community Center and Archery and Croquet at Fred G. Bond Park. • Coordinated additional Open Gym Volleyball opportunities at BPCC on Sunday mornings from 9:3011:30 a.m. beginning October 2009 to present. • Coordinated additional Badminton Open Gym opportunities at BPCC for Seniors on the second Wednesday of each month. • Recorded over 30,000 visits to the Cary Dog Park for calendar year 2009, averaging 84.7 park visitors per day. • Partnered with Harris Teeter for product donations to implement a successful Easter Egg Hunt with an estimated 5,000 participants. • Worked with volunteers to organize and host a number of disc golf tournaments and leagues at the new Middle Creek Disc Golf Course, including Summer Doubles, Saturday Singles, Winter Solstice Glow Tournament, 2 North Carolina Flying Disc Championships, RADL Homecoming Tournament, First Annual Ice Bowl and Chili Cook-off, and promoted the course through the media and at the Wellness World Booth at the annual Lazy Daze Arts and Crafts Festival.


• • • •

• • • • • •

Utilized volunteer labor to install 16 concrete tee pads on the Middle Creek Disc Golf Course, improving the quality and appearance of the course while saving the Town over $14,000 in installation costs. Hemlock Bluffs staff coordinated with the Friends of Hemlock Bluffs for the Annual Recycle Sale which raised $2,075 to support the events, programs, projects and exhibits at Hemlock Bluffs. The Friends of Hemlock Bluffs received three grants earmarked to fund Art Gates at the entrance of Hemlock Bluffs Nature Preserve. They have over $6,000 dedicated to assist the town in funding the project. Hemlock Bluffs Nature Preserve logged over 2,700 volunteer hours for volunteer workdays, special events, wildflower garden work, program assistance, and scout projects. Staff coordinated volunteer workdays for Cary Teen Council, the Green Hope High School AP Environmental Club, and Honor Society students, Service Raleigh, REI, Inc., Haven House and other individual groups helping them meet their community service hours while accomplishing projects at the nature preserve. Bond Park utilized volunteers (Primarily-Cary Teen Council) at boathouse which resulted in cost savings of $4,222. The Stevens Nature Center Staff held an International Migratory Bird Event sponsored by the Friends of Hemlock Bluffs. The event included educational displays, games and guided bird hikes and had approximately 300 participants (in 2009). The Cary Senior Center hosted 11 public art gallery exhibitions during 2009, including 5 co-sponsored exhibitions with various community arts organizations. Coordinated with NC Big Sweep for Bond Park to be a host site. The event generated 82 volunteers collecting 13 bags of recycling and 37 bags of trash. The Town of Cary honored former Cary resident and nationally acclaimed women’s basketball coach, Kay Yow, by dedicating the gymnasium court in her honor on Saturday, November 14, at the Herbert C. Young Community Center in downtown Cary. Herb Young Community Center hosted One Stop Voting for Wake County for the General Election and Run-Off Election.

KEY PERFORMANCE OBJECTIVES • Achieve an Above Average or Excellent rating on 98% of evaluations for Leisure Service programs. • Achieve an Above Average or Excellent rating on 100% of evaluations for Environmental Education programs. • Achieve an Above Average or Excellent rating on 93% of evaluations for picnic shelter reservations. • Achieve an Above Average or Excellent rating on 94% of evaluations for meeting room reservations.

KEY PERFORMANCE MEASURES Actual FY 2009

Estimated FY 2010

Projected FY 2011

96.2%

97%

98%

99%

100%

100%

% groups rating picnic shelter usage as Above Average or Excellent

96.4%

94.7%

93%

% groups rating meeting room usage as Above Average or Excellent

93.5%

94%

94%

Performance Measure % participants rating Leisure Service programs as Above Average or Excellent % participants rating Environmental Education programs as Above Average or Excellent


KEY WORKLOAD INDICATORS Workload Indicator Leisure Service/Environmental Education program participants Leisure Service/Environmental Education program hours Number of Community/Senior Center rentals Number of Picnic Shelter rentals

Actual FY 2009

Estimated FY 2010

Projected FY 2011

63,531

64,300

65,000

22,032 1,210 694

23,000 1,150 700

23,500 1,200 720

ACTIVITY HISTORY Fund Number: 10-6221

Actual FY 2007

Actual FY 2008

Actual FY2009

Estimated FY2010

Budget FY2011

$1,668,396

$1,833,492

$1,889,013

$1,887,140

$1,943,154

$742,318

$761,891

$879,204

$886,967

$939,542

$0

$0

$5,079

$0

$0

$2,410,714

$2,595,383

$2,773,296

$2,774,107

$2,882,696

18.25

19.5

21

21

19.75

Fund Number: 051-6221

$2,410,714

$2,595,383

$2,773,296

$2,774,107

$2,882,696

Stevens Exhibits / Interest Teen Forum Senior Program Grand Total

$0 $0 $2,525 $2,413,239

$12,488 $0 $0 $2,607,871

$50,550 $0 $2,500 $2,826,346

$8,200 $5,000 $2,500 $2,789,807

$750 $0 $2,500 $2,885,946

Activity Personnel Services Operations and Maintenance Capital Outlay Total Authorized FTEs

SIGNIFICANT BUDGET AND SERVICE LEVEL CHANGES BEYOND CURRENT LEVELS • Expand Track Out Camp to 40 maximum participants. • A total of 1.25 vacant positions are being removed from the FY11 staffing document: - One full time Park Operations Technician - The Senior Parks Operations Technician was a part time position working 30 hours per week. Council approved an additional 10 hours (.25 FTE) for this position which would make it a full time 40 hour per week position. This 10 hours was held and is being removed from the FY11 staffing document.


SKATE PARK Additional information about the Skate Park may be obtained by calling Dwayne Jones, Recreation Manager at (919) 469-4064, through e-mail at dwayne.jones@townofcary.org or by visiting the Townâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s website at www.townofcary.org.

TOWN OF CARY GOALS AND INITIATIVES Town Focus Areas Focus Area I: Community Planning

Focus Area II: Infrastructure

Focus Area III: Financial Condition

Focus Area IV: Municipal Services

Achieve a well-planned community using innovative and proactive planning approaches and techniques.

Ensure that roads, water and wastewater facilities, parks, and other infrastructure exists for the existing citizens and for the future needs identified in the comprehensive plan.

Achieve a stable and strong financial position by accurately estimating, prudently allocating, and managing financial resources.

Town Goals Achieve a high level of service to the citizens in a prompt, reliable, responsive, and costeffective manner.

Improve Environment & Quality of Life

Meet Or Exceed All Regulatory Requirements

Deliver Efficient & Effective Services

Provide Understandable & Convenient Services

Deliver Services Promptly & Consistently

Operationalize Service Levels & Measure Success

Engage Citizens To Determine Levels Of Service

Comply With All Laws & Regulations

Proactively Manage Risk

Bill & Collect Revenues Accurately & Timely

Prudently Manage Debt, Cash, & Investments

Manage Fund Balance To Aid Financial Position

Forecast Operational & Fiscal Impacts

Estimate Revenues Conservatively

Provide Accountability Through Internal Controls

Promote Efficient & Effective Resource Allocation

Allocate Funding To Execute Priorities

Maintain Organization Credibility

Maintain AAA Bond Rating

Identification of Financial Strategy

Match Public Facilities With Community Expectations

Manage Infrastructure Plans To Schedule & Budget

Develop Alternative Financing Plans

Prioritize Capital Project Construction

Update Infrastructure Plans

Understand Forces Affecting the Built Community

Resolve Conflict Between Ordinances & Community Response

Identify Development Trends & Related Policy Changes

Respond To & Include Those Impacted by Development

Create Developer and Affected Citizen Connections

Administer Ordinances & Guidelines as Adopted

Town Initiatives

Department Goals and Initiatives 4 7

11

3

2 5 7

5

FACILITY GOALS AND INITIATIVES 1. 2. 3. 4.

To enhance the quality of life for the residents of the Town of Cary and surrounding area by providing a permanent and safe recreation facility for skating and biking. To create and execute an operating philosophy which is consistent with the Mission Statement, Statement of Values and Goals of the Town of Cary. To staff, manage, operate, and maintain the Skate Park to the highest industry standards in the best interest of the Town of Cary and the general public. To develop and consistently implement policies and procedures that ensures the safety of facility patrons.

5 9 10 12

1 5 6 8


5.

To develop programming that maximizes facility use and revenue including opportunities for “drop in” or “session” participation, instruction, clinics, and special events. 6. To provide a wholesome social environment for youth. 7. To protect and maintain the facility’s condition so as to preserve and improve the Town’s capital investment. 8. To provide the highest level of friendly, accurate, and responsive customer service. 9. To maximize revenues and provide convenient services such as concessions, retail sales, rentals, and/or other opportunities. 10. To promote the facility and programming in such a manner that enhances the reputation of the Town of Cary in the provision of recreation opportunities. 11. To include input from users in developing operations and programming. 12. To provide revenues that offset operating costs.

FY 2010 ACCOMPLISHMENTS • • • • • • • •

Extended summer camps a day to meet customer needs. Developed and coordinated commercial to promote Sk8-Cary on Time Warner Cable. Planned and implemented BMX Day to coincide with Go SK8 Day. Further developed relationship with Whole Foods as a contest in-kind sponsor. Increased pass sales by $3,239 in the first six months of fiscal year. Increased Member participation by 840 sessions in the first half of fiscal year. Increased participation by 638 for open skate sessions. Planned and implemented four annual skate/bike contests.

KEY PERFORMANCE OBJECTIVES • • • •

Achieve an Above Average or Excellent overall program satisfaction rating on 98% of program evaluations for camps/clinics. Achieve an average of $4,800 in monthly sales revenue from membership and entry. Solicit and secure $4,000 annually in sponsorship funds to help offset operational costs. Recover 85% of operational costs through membership/entry, program, retail, sponsorship and concessions revenue.

KEY PERFORMANCE MEASURES Actual FY 2009

Estimated FY 2010

Projected FY 2011

98.7%

98%

98%

$5,488

$5,100

$5,400

$0

$4,000

$4,000

$147,708

$151,000

$160,000

Actual FY 2009

Estimated FY 2010

Projected FY 2011

437

440

460

11,813

12,450

13,000

Number of camp/clinic participants

407

440

460

Number of Session Passes Sold

177

210

225

Performance Measure Above Average or Excellent Program Satisfaction of 96% of program evaluations for camps/clinics (93 evals as of 3/09) Average $4,800 per month in paid entries and membership sold Secure $4,000 in sponsorship per year Total Revenue

KEY WORKLOAD INDICATORS Workload Indicator Memberships Sold Paid Entries


ACTIVITY HISTORY Activity Personnel Services Operations and Maintenance Capital Outlay Public Works Services Total Authorized FTEs

Actual FY 2007

Actual FY 2008

Actual FY2009

Estimated FY2010

Budget FY2011

$89,770 $45,396 $0 $11,986

$115,957 $41,690 $0 $5,944

$139,424 $42,236 $0 $8,263

$152,756 $55,451 $0 $11,537

$162,115 $58,259 $0 $13,495

$147,152

$163,591

$189,923

$219,744

$233,869

1

2

2

2

2

SIGNIFICANT BUDGET AND SERVICE LEVEL CHANGES BEYOND CURRENT LEVELS â&#x20AC;˘ No significant budget or service level changes for FY 2011.


CULTURAL ARTS AND RESOURCES DIVISION Additional information about the Cultural Arts and Resources Division may be obtained by calling Lyman Collins, Cultural Arts and Resources Manager at 462-3861, through e-mail at lyman.collins@townofcary.org or by visiting the Townâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s website at www.townofcary.org.

TOWN OF CARY GOALS AND INITIATIVES Town Focus Areas Focus Area I: Community Planning

Focus Area II: Infrastructure

Focus Area III: Financial Condition

Focus Area IV: Municipal Services

Town Goals Achieve a well-planned community using innovative and proactive planning approaches and techniques.

Ensure that roads, water and wastewater facilities, parks, and other infrastructure exists for the existing citizens and for the future needs identified in the comprehensive plan.

Achieve a stable and strong financial position by accurately estimating, prudently allocating, and managing financial resources.

Achieve a high level of service to the citizens in a prompt, reliable, responsive, and costeffective manner.

Improve Environment & Quality of Life

Meet Or Exceed All Regulatory Requirements

Deliver Efficient & Effective Services

1 7 8

Provide Understandable & Convenient Services

Operationalize Service Levels & Measure Success

2 3 4 5 7 8

Deliver Services Promptly & Consistently

Engage Citizens To Determine Levels Of Service

Comply With All Laws & Regulations

Proactively Manage Risk

Bill & Collect Revenues Accurately & Timely

Prudently Manage Debt, Cash, & Investments

Manage Fund Balance To Aid Financial Position

Forecast Operational & Fiscal Impacts

Estimate Revenues Conservatively

Provide Accountability Through Internal Controls

Promote Efficient & Effective Resource Allocation

Allocate Funding To Execute Priorities

Maintain Organization Credibility

Maintain AAA Bond Rating

Identification of Financial Strategy

Match Public Facilities With Community Expectations

Manage Infrastructure Plans To Schedule & Budget

Develop Alternative Financing Plans

Prioritize Capital Project Construction

Update Infrastructure Plans

Understand Forces Affecting the Built Community

Resolve Conflict Between Ordinances & Community Response

Identify Development Trends & Related Policy Changes

Respond To & Include Those Impacted by Development

Create Developer and Affected Citizen Connections

Administer Ordinances & Guidelines as Adopted

Town Initiatives

Department Goals and Initiatives 5

5 6 9

1 7 9

1 4 5 7 9

DIVISION GOALS AND INITIATIVES Cultural Education & Outreach 1. Provide a wide-ranging schedule of classes in dance, visual arts, music, theatre, history, architecture, film and videography and international cuisine to enrich the lives of Town citizens. 2. Provide the citizens of Cary and area visitors with means of understanding and recording local history through the Cary Heritage Museum at the Page-Walker Arts & History Center. 3. Provide programs that create a better understanding of our multicultural society. 4. Provide communication, coordination, and support for Cary cultural groups.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9


Public Art and Exhibition 5. Provide opportunities to enhance Cary’s character through the inclusion of public art in designated capital improvements projects and provide assistance to developers to include public art in private development projects. 6. Provide exhibition space and coordination for temporary exhibits in Town facilities, including but not limited to Jordan Hall Arts Center, Page-Walker Arts & History Center, Town Hall, Herb Young Community Center and the Cary Senior Center. Special Program & Events 7. Provide a variety of festivals and events to give Town citizens the opportunity to come together as a community to experience artistic excellence. Examples of such programs include Lazy Daze and Spring Daze Arts & Crafts Festivals, Holiday Tree Lighting ceremony, Fourth of July celebration, and performing arts events at Sertoma Amphitheatre, the Koka Booth Amphitheatre at Regency Park, the Page-Walker Arts & History Center, the Herb Young Community Center and other locations throughout the Town. 8. Provide instructional classes, camps and workshops to Cary youth interested in theatre and drama, including opportunities for performance and technical theatre production. Facility Rentals 9. Provide Town citizens and others with the opportunity to rent facilities for group activities, such as meetings, performances, and other community functions.

FY 2010 ACCOMPLISHMENTS • Spring Daze Arts & Craft Festival received the award for Best Festival Poster in its category at the NC and SC Association of Festivals & Events joint meeting. • Received the Arts & Humanities Award from the NC Recreation & Parks Association for Edge of the Day, the Cary/County Meath Photography Exchange and Exhibit. • Began design development for the Walker Street extension public art project. • Presented first Town employee art exhibition. • Broke ground for the new community arts center in the renovated Old Cary Elementary School building. • Developed first Haunted Twilight Tour of downtown Cary. • Page-Walker Arts & History Center developed the first African-American Literary Tea, the Scots Ceilidh Concert, Nazim Hikmet Poetry Festival and La Feria Del Libro. • Partnered with the Puerto Rican Association of North Carolina to present the first Caribbean Festival. • Jordan Hall Arts Center expanded its summer camp revenue by 14% and youth arts program revenue by 20%. • Applause! Cary Youth Theatre successfully expanded Track Out programs and maintained all other programs despite loss of program space due to the renovation of Old Cary Elementary. • Marvelous Music Series celebrated its 10th season with an audience selected series featuring favorites from the past 10 years. • Began planning process for first full theatre production at Koka Booth Amphitheatre to take place in the summer of 2010. • Developed successful partnership with Wake County Public Schools and other Cary schools to present a joint choral program including a residency program to benefit teachers and students. KEY PERFORMANCE OBJECTIVES • Achieve Above Average or Excellent participant satisfaction evaluation on 95% of all class evaluations. • Achieve Above Average or Excellent participant satisfaction evaluation on 93% of all special event evaluations. • Communicate annually with all Cary based cultural groups included in the division data base. KEY PERFORMANCE MEASURES Actual FY 2009

Estimated FY 2010

Projected FY 2011

% participants rating classes at Above Average or Excellent

98%

98.3%

98.5%

% participants rating special events at Above Average or Excellent

92%

93.5%

94%

100%

100%

100%

Performance Measure

% of known Cary cultural groups contacted


KEY WORKLOAD INDICATORS Actual FY 2009

Estimated FY 2010

Projected FY 2011

Class Program Hours

5,403

5,682

5,800

Class participants (includes drama, dance, music, studios & visual arts)

9,417

9,854

9,800

456

565

615

1,362

1,525

1,570

Number of cultural groups worked with

63

68

70

Number of exhibits

53

60

65

106

107

110

Workload Indicator

Rental hours Community use hours

Number of concerts, performances

ACTIVITY HISTORY Fund Number: 10-6222 - Cultural Arts Activity

Actual FY 2007

Actual FY 2008

Actual FY2009

Estimated FY2010

Budget FY2011

Personnel Services

$851,528

$939,738

$982,522

$1,074,217

$1,158,486

Operations and Maintenance

$418,364

$471,593

$489,192

$546,854

$569390

$0

$553

$6,197

$0

$0

$1,269,892

$1,411,884

$1,477,911

$1,621,071

$1,727,876

9.5

12

12

12

15

Actual FY 2007

Actual FY 2008

Actual FY2009

Estimated FY2010

Budget FY2011

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$106,649

$111,233

$106,106

$121,677

$130,890

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$106,649

$111,233

$106,106

$121,677

$130,890

0

0

0

0

0

Capital Outlay Total Authorized FTEs

ACTIVITY HISTORY Fund Number: 051-6223 - Festivals Activity Personnel Services Operations and Maintenance Capital Outlay Total Authorized FTEs

SIGNIFICANT BUDGET AND SERVICE LEVEL CHANGES BEYOND CURRENT LEVELS The new community arts center (renovated Old Cary Elementary) is anticipated to open in spring 2011. In addition to the current staff that will move from Jordan Hall to the new Cary Community Arts Center, three new positions are being added and two are being reclassified as part of the FY11 budget. - One new Technical Coordinator - One new Box Office Manager - One new Customer Service Representative I - Reclassify the current Arts Center Supervisor to a Community Arts Center Supervisor. - Reclassify the current Performing Arts Coordinator to a Performing Arts/Operations Coordinator

• •


CULTURAL ARTS NON-PROFITS

These requests are reviewed by the Town Cultural Arts Committee and Town departments each year. External organizations must furnish financial statements and budgets to the Town, and may be requested to provide additional information regarding the use of Town funds.

The following table summarizes the actual funding distributed during fiscal years 2007-2009, estimated amounts for 2010, and adopted budget amounts for FY 2011.

Actual FY 2007

Actual FY 2008

Actual FY 2009

Estimated FY 2010

Adopted Budget FY 2011

--500 1,000 500 --6,000 1,200 7,000 10,000 5,000 3,000 ----4,050 --45,000 750 ---

----2,000 875 --7,000 1,000 9,500 13,000 6,000 3,000 --750 6,125 --45,000 750 ---

--1,000 --900 --7,500 500 9,500 16,250 10,000 3,000 --750 8,500 1,000 58,350 1,000 ---

--1,000 1,000 900 1,000 7,900 550 9,500 16,500 9,400 3,400 --750 8,900 1,250 60,050 1,000 1,500

1,000 1,000 1,500 900 --8,500 800 9,500 16,500 9,900 3,400 1,500 750 9,500 1,500 62,000 1,250 1,750

------1,000 4,000

--2,000 --1,500 ---

----1,000 1,750 5,000

--2,000 1,900 2,500 3,000

Continued Use of Cary Space for Rehearsals 2,250 2,000 2,500 1,000

89,000

103,500

128,000

134,000

139,000

Non-Profit Organizations American Turkish Association of NC, ATA-NC Cary Apex Piano Teachers Assoc. Cary Ballet Cary Community Choir Cary Photographic Artist Cary Players Cary Town Band Cary Visual Arts Concert Singers of Cary Diamante, Inc. Fine Arts League (Cultural Arts Assoc.) Friends of the Brussels Chamber Orchestra Friends of Page-Walker Hum Sub, Inc. NC EID Festival NC Symphony Philharmonic Association, Inc. Puerto Ricans of NC Association Really Terrible Orchestra Of The Triangle (RTOOT) Sister Cities Association Triangle Brass Band Triangle Wind Ensemble The Ujima Group, Inc. TOTALS


KOKA BOOTH AMPHITHEATRE Additional information about Koka Booth Amphitheatre may be obtained by calling Lyman Collins, Cultural Arts Manager at 462-3861, through e-mail at lyman.collins@townofcary.org or by visiting the Townâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s website at www.townofcary.org.

TOWN OF CARY GOALS AND INITIATIVES Focus Area I: Community Planning

Town Focus Areas Focus Area III: Financial Condition

Focus Area II: Infrastructure

Focus Area IV: Municipal Services

Town Goals Achieve a well-planned community using innovative and proactive planning approaches and techniques.

Ensure that roads, water and wastewater facilities, parks, and other infrastructure exists for the existing citizens and for the future needs identified in the comprehensive plan.

Achieve a stable and strong financial position by accurately estimating, prudently allocating, and managing financial resources.

Achieve a high level of service to the citizens in a prompt, reliable, responsive, and cost-effective manner.

Improve Environment & Quality of Life

Meet Or Exceed All Regulatory Requirements

Deliver Efficient & Effective Services

Provide Understandable & Convenient Services

Deliver Services Promptly & Consistently

Operationalize Service Levels & Measure Success

Engage Citizens To Determine Levels Of Service

Comply With All Laws & Regulations

Proactively Manage Risk

Bill & Collect Revenues Accurately & Timely

Prudently Manage Debt, Cash, & Investments

Manage Fund Balance To Aid Financial Position

Forecast Operational & Fiscal Impacts

Estimate Revenues Conservatively

Provide Accountability Through Internal Controls

Promote Efficient & Effective Resource Allocation

Allocate Funding To Execute Priorities

Maintain Organization Credibility

Maintain AAA Bond Rating

Match Public Facilities With Community Expectations

Manage Infrastructure Plans To Schedule & Budget

Develop Alternative Financing Plans

Prioritize Capital Project Construction

Update Infrastructure Plans

Understand Forces Affecting the Built Community

Resolve Conflict Between Ordinances & Community Response

Identify Development Trends & Related Policy Changes

Respond To & Include Those Impacted by Development

Create Developer and Affected Citizen Connections

Administer Ordinances & Guidelines as Adopted

Town Initiatives

Department Goals and Initiatives 7

2 5 7

8

8

4 5 7

6

2 4 7

AMPHITHEATRE GOALS AND INITIATIVES 1. 2. 3. 4.

Provide performances by nationally acclaimed artists. Continue to offer, develop, and expand opportunities with the North Carolina Symphony Orchestra. Develop a Summer Theater program specifically designed for the amphitheater. Develop partnerships for performances with quality local, regional, and statewide performing arts organizations. 5. Develop festivals that provide community participation and help establish a community identity. 6. Develop a rental program for the use of the amphitheater space that does not compete with performance times.

1 2 3 4 5


7. Provide cooperative opportunities with the amphitheater “neighbors.” 8. Provide revenues that more than offset the operating cost. * Due to the amphitheatre’s fiscal year running from November 1 to October 31, the 2011 management plan is not presented to Council until October each year. Therefore, accomplishments, performance objectives, performance measures and workload indicators providing actual and projected data are shown one year behind other projects with fiscal years running from July 1 to June 30.

FY 2009 ACCOMPLISHMENTS * • Introduced new season ticket program, Best of the Booth Mini Packs, and sold out of available packages. • Operating balance was only one-third of what had been budgeted, the best ratio ever for the Amphitheatre. • Selected new national preferred promoter, Outback Concerts, to present a wider variety of touring performances. • Provided improved opportunities for community events.  • Introduced successful new movie series – Reel-ly Scary Cary – for Halloween. • Used Ticket Master system to survey ticket buyers for selected events (10) and achieved an overall grade of B+.  • Raised almost $5,000 for the PRCR Scholarship Fund through the lawn chair rental program. • Recognized by readers of the Independent as the Best Outdoor Music Venue. KEY PERFORMANCE OBJECTIVES * • To increase sponsorship revenue • To increase season ticket numbers KEY PERFORMANCE MEASURES * Performance Measure Percentage Increase in sponsorship revenue Percentage Increase in season tickets

Actual 2007

Actual 2008

Actual 2009

Projected 2010

0%

12%

(23%)

52%

17%

(26%)

60%

18%

KEY WORKLOAD INDICATORS * Actual 2007 Season

Actual 2008 Season

Actual 2009 Season

Projected 2010 Season

148,761

148,221

134,176

103,200

59 + 40 days Tinsel Town

64 + 38 days Tinsel Town

60

60

20

22

20

10

8

10

10

10

Number of National Acts

16

14

20

20

Number of Season Tickets

90

66

106

125

$117,250*

$121,750*

$98,500*

$150,000

*includes $13,250 for Tinsel Town

*includes $21,500 for Tinsel Town

*no Tinsel Town sponsorships

Workload Indicator Attendance Total Number of Events Number of Rentals Number of Community Events

Sponsorship Revenue


ACTIVITY HISTORY Fund Number: 012-6222 Activity

Actual FY 2008

Actual FY2009

Estimated FY2010

Budget FY2011

Net Operating Expense

$429,734

$387,586

$793,554

$430,000

$55,996

$20,965

$61,312

25,000

$485,730

$408,551

$854,866

$455,000

$0

$0

$0

$0

$485,730

$408,551

$854,866

$455,000

----

----

----

----

Capital Total Operational Expenses Cash Flow Reserve Total Budget Authorized FTEs

SMG, the management company operating Koka Booth Amphitheatre’s fiscal year begins November 1 and ends October 31.

SIGNIFICANT BUDGET AND SERVICE LEVEL CHANGES BEYOND CURRENT LEVELS • Completed expansion of Crescent kitchen area allowing for increased concession offerings. • New preferred promoter allowed for variety in national concerts.


ATHLETICS DIVISION Additional information about the Athletics Division may be obtained by calling William Davis, Athletic Manager at (919) 460-4964, through e-mail at william.davis@townofcary.org or by visiting the Townâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s website at www.townofcary.org.

TOWN OF CARY GOALS AND INITIATIVES Town Focus Areas Focus Area I: Community Planning

Focus Area II: Infrastructure

Focus Area III: Financial Condition

Focus Area IV: Municipal Services

Town Goals Ensure that roads, water and wastewater facilities, parks, and other infrastructure exists for the existing citizens and for the future needs identified in the comprehensive plan.

Achieve a well-planned community using innovative and proactive planning approaches and techniques.

Achieve a high level of service to the citizens in a prompt, reliable, responsive, and costeffective manner.

Achieve a stable and strong financial position by accurately estimating, prudently allocating, and managing financial resources.

Deliver Efficient & Effective Services

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

Improve Environment & Quality of Life

Provide Understandable & Convenient Services

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

Meet Or Exceed All Regulatory Requirements

Deliver Services Promptly & Consistently

Operationalize Service Levels & Measure Success

Engage Citizens To Determine Levels Of Service

Comply With All Laws & Regulations

Proactively Manage Risk

Bill & Collect Revenues Accurately & Timely

Prudently Manage Debt, Cash, & Investments

Manage Fund Balance To Aid Financial Position

Forecast Operational & Fiscal Impacts

Estimate Revenues Conservatively

Provide Accountability Through Internal Controls

Promote Efficient & Effective Resource Allocation

Allocate Funding To Execute Priorities

Maintain Organization Credibility

Maintain AAA Bond Rating

Identification of Financial Strategy

Match Public Facilities With Community Expectations

Manage Infrastructure Plans To Schedule & Budget

Develop Alternative Financing Plans

Prioritize Capital Project Construction

Update Infrastructure Plans

Understand Forces Affecting the Built Community

Resolve Conflict Between Ordinances & Community Response

Identify Development Trends & Related Policy Changes

Respond To & Include Those Impacted by Development

Create Developer and Affected Citizen Connections

Administer Ordinances & Guidelines as Adopted

Town Initiatives

Department Goals and Initiatives

DIVISION GOALS AND INITIATIVES Youth Sports 1. Provide team league play opportunities in tennis, basketball, baseball, volleyball and softball for boys and girls age 5 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 18. Adult Sports 2. Provide team league play opportunities in basketball, softball, volleyball, and tennis for adult participants 16 and over.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8


Special Events 3. Host annual events of short duration that appeal to Local, State, and Regional participants. 4. Provide Special Events as public recreational opportunities such as the Hershey Track & Field, Cary Road Race, Baseball Tournaments and adult/youth Softball Tournaments. Camp/Clinic Management 5. Conduct intense, short duration, and sports-specific instructional programs conducted by contract instructors. Camp and clinic opportunities include youth sports camps (in the areas of baseball, softball, basketball, golf and volleyball) and clinics such as basketball, softball, baseball, golf and volleyball. Softball/Baseball Complex Tournament Rentals 6. Host Weekend tournament rentals March through November at Thomas Brooks Park and Middle Creek Softball Complex. Community Sports Initiatives 7. Assist local youth sports organizations by providing resources such as field space. Special Venues and Event Management 8. Oversee the operations and management of the department’s special facilities including the WakeMed Soccer Park, Cary Tennis Park and the USA Baseball National Training Center facilities.

FY 2010 ACCOMPLISHMENTS • Successfully conducted the 32nd Annual Cary Road Race at Booth Amphitheater at Regency Park, hosting 1,229 runners. • Planned and prepared for American Softball Association (ASA) state tournaments in adult divisions to be conducted during the summer of 2010. • Hosted 40 youth baseball and youth and adult softball tournaments at Thomas Brooks Park and Middle Creek Park softball complexes by working with 17 different sports organizations. • Worked with Greater Raleigh Convention and Visitors Bureau (GRCVB), Raleigh Jaycees and Pony Softball representatives to successfully coordinate hosting the PONY 12 & Under and 14 & Under Girls Fast-pitch National Tournament held in July 2010. • With the addition of basketball and volleyball court lighting at North Cary Park, staff was able to schedule Summer volleyball league matches later in the evening, which is more in accordance with participant preferences. Summer volleyball leagues expanded by 82% in number of teams over FY09 . • Staff continues to further regionalize youth sports leagues to specific areas of town for parent, player and coach’s convenience. • Added fall youth baseball and softball for boys and girls ages 9 to 16. Those leagues totaled 505 participants. • The Fall Senior Softball program for men and women ages 50 and above continued to grow, and the success of the program has led to the addition of a Spring Senior softball league in FY10. • Expanded marketing efforts for promotion of baseball/softball and fall and winter basketball registration through television advertising, emails, increased print advertising, including registration information in Wake County Summershine brochure, and park banners. • Worked jointly with the facility managers of the Division’s special venues and facilities to provide planning, management assistance to ensure success of special events and operations at the venues. KEY PERFORMANCE OBJECTIVES • Certify 95% of Youth Sports coaches in National Youth Sports Coaches Association. • Youth Sports Philosophy achievement: - Achieve a participant satisfaction rating of Above Average from 95% in the category of participation. - Achieve a participant satisfaction rating of Above Average from 95% in the category of skill development. - Achieve a participant satisfaction rating of Above Average from 95% in the category of sportsmanship. - Achieve a participant satisfaction rating of Above Average from 95% in the category of fun/enjoyment. • Achieve a participant satisfaction rating of Above Average from 90% of Adult Sports Programs participants. • Achieve a participant satisfaction rating of Above Average from 90% of Youth Sports Programs participants.


Achieve a participant satisfaction rating of Above Average from 95% of instructional camp and clinic participants.

KEY PERFORMANCE MEASURES Performance Measure

Actual FY 2009

Estimated FY 2010

Projected FY 2011

95%

95%

95%

90% 79% 94% 93% 92% 93% 99%

90% 80% 95% 95% 90% 90% 95%

90% 85% 95% 95% 90% 90% 95%

Actual FY 2009

Estimated FY 2010

Projected FY 2011

4,099 352 1,028 365

4,530 360 1,025 365

4,650 365 1,075 365

% coaches certified Philosophy components: Participation Skill development Sportsmanship Fun/enjoyment % rating above average (Adult Sports Leagues) % rating above average (Youth Sports Leagues) % rating above average (Camps/Clinics)

KEY WORKLOAD INDICATORS Workload Indicator *Youth sports (# participants) Adult sports (# teams) Adult/Youth camps/clinics (# participants) ** Softball Tournament Rental (# fields used) *Increase in FY10 due to addition of Fall Baseball and Softball ** Tracked by calendar year.

ACTIVITY HISTORY Fund Number: 10-6230 Activity

Actual FY 2007

Actual FY 2008

Actual FY2009

Estimated FY2010

Budget FY2011

Personnel Services

$581,183

$678,042

$695,513

$701,218

$742,874

Operations and Maintenance

$598,393

$650,630

$614,875

$746,704

$680,294

$0

$0

$28,291

$7,200

$0

$1,179,576

$1,328,672

$1,338,679

$1,455,122

$1,423,168

5

5

6

6

6

Capital Outlay Total Authorized FTEs

SIGNIFICANT BUDGET AND SERVICE LEVEL CHANGES BEYOND CURRENT LEVELS •

Addition of a Senior softball league in the spring for ages 50 and above will help meet a large and growing demand for additional senior athletic opportunities.


TENNIS PARK Additional information about the Tennis Park may be obtained by calling William Davis, Athletic Manager at (919) 460-4964, through e-mail at william.davis@townofcary.org or by visiting the Townâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s website at www.townofcary.org.

TOWN OF CARY GOALS AND INITIATIVES Town Focus Areas Focus Area I: Community Planning

Focus Area II: Infrastructure

Achieve a well-planned community using innovative and proactive planning approaches and techniques.

Focus Area III: Financial Condition

Ensure that roads, water and wastewater facilities, parks, and other infrastructure exists for the existing citizens and for the future needs identified in the comprehensive plan.

Focus Area IV: Municipal Services

Town Goals Achieve a stable and strong financial position by accurately estimating, prudently allocating, and managing financial resources.

Achieve a high level of service to the citizens in a prompt, reliable, responsive, and costeffective manner.

Improve Environment & Quality of Life

6

Meet Or Exceed All Regulatory Requirements

1

Deliver Efficient & Effective Services

3 6 7

Provide Understandable & Convenient Services

4 9

Deliver Services Promptly & Consistently

Operationalize Service Levels & Measure Success

2 3

Engage Citizens To Determine Levels Of Service

Proactively Manage Risk

2 7

Comply With All Laws & Regulations

Bill & Collect Revenues Accurately & Timely

Prudently Manage Debt, Cash, & Investments

Manage Fund Balance To Aid Financial Position

Forecast Operational & Fiscal Impacts

Estimate Revenues Conservatively

Provide Accountability Through Internal Controls

Promote Efficient & Effective Resource Allocation

Allocate Funding To Execute Priorities

Maintain Organization Credibility

Maintain AAA Bond Rating

Identification of Financial Strategy

Match Public Facilities With Community Expectations

Manage Infrastructure Plans To Schedule & Budget

Develop Alternative Financing Plans

Prioritize Capital Project Construction

Update Infrastructure Plans

Understand Forces Affecting the Built Community

Resolve Conflict Between Ordinances & Community Response

9

Identify Development Trends & Related Policy Changes

Create Developer and Affected Citizen Connections

2

Respond To & Include Those Impacted by Development

Administer Ordinances & Guidelines as Adopted

Town Initiatives

Department Goals and Initiatives 7

9 6

9 1

2 3 7

7

3 7

2 3 8

FACILITY GOALS AND INITIATIVES 1. To enhance the quality of life for the residents of the Town of Cary and surrounding area by providing a first class tennis facility and tennis programs that address the communityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s recreation needs while providing opportunities for major tournaments and events. 2. To create and execute a management and operating philosophy which is consistent with the Mission Statement, Statement of Values and Goals of the Town of Cary. 3. To staff, manage, operate, and maintain the Tennis Center to the highest industry standards in the best interest of the Town of Cary and the general public.

2 3

2

1 2 8


4. To develop town wide programs that serve diverse age groups for all levels of play that maximize facility use and revenue including opportunities for open court use, individual reserved court use, team and league play, challenge ladder play, group and individual instruction, tournaments (local, state, and national), youth camps, special clinics, and special events. 5. To protect and maintain the facility’s condition so as to preserve and improve the Town’s capital investment. 6. To provide the highest level of courteous, accurate, and responsive customer service. 7. To maximize revenues and provide convenient services such as concessions, retail sales, rentals, and/or other opportunities. 8. To promote the facility and tennis services in such a manner that enhances the reputation of the Town of Cary in the provision of recreation opportunities. 9. To include input from the local tennis community in developing operations and programming.

FY 2010 ACCOMPLISHMENTS • Received honorable mention from the USTA in the “Best Tennis Town” competition. o Town received a $2,000 equipment grant for tennis programs. • Received the bid for the 2010 USTA National Zone Team Championships. • Implemented the Champions ladder; a ladder for all skill level players male or female. The fall season registered 42 participants, making the Champions ladder the largest ladder the Tennis Park offers. • Received the bid for the 2011 & 2012 USTA National Campus Championships. • Introduced a wheelchair tennis program for youth and adults. Program was offer from April to October. • League teams registered to play out of the Tennis Park have grown from 200 to 213 over the past year. • New youth programs; Academy I and a winter Junior Team Tennis league were added. • The Youth Academy program had several participants achieve success at premier national events. • Special Events & Tournaments: Polar Doubles, Cary Junior Championships, Cary Tennis Park Junior Classic, Cary Spring Junior Open, Western Wake Tennis Association (WWTA) Cinco de Mayo Tournament, North Carolina High School Athletics Association (NCHSAA) Men’s Championships, Cary Memorial Day Tournament, WWTA Summer Adult Tournament, Boys and Girls 12 Southern Championships, NC Junior Closed, WWTA Women’s and Men’s Doubles Charity Classic, Bullfrog Southern Tennis Association (STA) Designated, NCHSAA Women’s State Championships, Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC) Men’s and Women’s Tennis Championships, Cary Towne Championships, Cary Fall Futures, WWTA Harvest Futures Tournament, • ACC Men’s and Women’s Tennis Championships was hosted in Cary for the fifth time. The ACC voted to keep the Championships in Cary through 2013. • Implement QuickStart tennis programs. QuickStart is a USTA tennis format for young players ages 4-10 with modified courts, racquets and balls o Introduced 36’ and 60’ format in clinics and junior team tennis leagues o Hosted a 36’ tournament KEY PERFORMANCE OBJECTIVES • Facilitate facility use to include all play opportunities at a minimum of 60,000 hours per year. • Maintain a Peak facility usage percentage between 70-80%. • Track and categorize Facility Usage to ensure the following types of play meet or exceed usage goals (hours per fiscal year): - Rentals/Leagues- 40,000 hrs 72% - Private Lessons4,000 hrs 7% - Programs11,500 hrs 21% - Tournaments10,000 hrs 18% • Recruit and host tournaments and events that will result in an estimated economic impact of more than $1,000,000 per calendar year. • Foster facility attendance by offering quality programs, tournaments, events and other spectator opportunities to meet or exceed 200,000 visitors per year to the park. • Achieve a participant satisfaction rating of Above Average or higher from 90% of program participants.


KEY PERFORMANCE MEASURES Performance Measure

Actual FY 2009

Estimated FY 2010

Projected FY 2011

*Peak Facility Usage

81%

82%

83%

Rentals/Leagues

55,271hrs / 63%

57,000hrs / 64%

58,000hrs / 64%

Private Lessons

4,839hrs / 6%

5,000hrs / 5%

5,000hrs / 5%

Programs

12,278hrs / 14%

12,500hrs / 14%

12,700hrs / 14%

Tournaments

14,322hrs / 17%

15,000hrs / 17%

16,000hrs / 17%

86,710

89,500

92,700

$1,127,000

$1,322,000

1,600,000

176,068

230,650

235,000

87.5%

90%

90%

Facility Use Balance

Facility Usage total hours **Economic Impact Total Attendance Satisfaction Levels

*Peak Facility Usage: Mon-Th 4:30-8:30 p.m.; Saturday 9 a.m.-1 p.m. and Sunday 1p.m.-5p.m. **Data tracked for the calendar year.

KEY WORKLOAD INDICATORS Workload Indicators Youth programs (# participants) Youth camps (# participants) Adult programs (# participants) Special events (# offered)

Actual FY 2009

Estimated FY 2010

Projected FY 2011

3,686

3,800

3,850

355

400

425

1,290

1,350

1,375

19

20

21

ACTIVITY HISTORY Activity

Actual FY 2007

Actual FY 2008

Actual FY2009

Estimated FY2010

Budget FY2011

Personnel Services

$651,311

$658,138

$773,604

$774,551

$966,922

Operations and Maintenance

$188,453

$185,716

$215,534

$236,474

$254,308

Internal Services

$186,303

$187,286

$225,609

$198,120

$193,107

$0

$0

$0

$7,200

$0

$1,026,067

$1,031,140

$1,214,747

$1,216,345

$1,414,337

5.5

8.25

8.5

8.5

9.5

Capital Outlay Total Authorized FTEs

SIGNIFICANT BUDGET AND SERVICE LEVEL CHANGES BEYOND CURRENT LEVELS • Implement the use of the Town satellite tennis courts for league play to balance court use at the Tennis Park • Met with local High schools that use Town courts to coordinate future use of satellite courts in conjunction with growing Tennis Park programs. • The addition of one new Tennis Program Coordinator will help administer the increasing volume of programs offered by supervising, scheduling, and mentoring adult, developmental and camp program staff. The new Tennis Programs Coordinator will also provide approximately 20-24 hours of instruction per week.


WAKEMED SOCCER PARK Additional information about the WakeMed Soccer Park may be obtained by calling William Davis, Athletic Manager at (919) 460-4964, through e-mail at william.davis@townofcary.org or by visiting the Townâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Web site at www.townofcary.org.

TOWN OF CARY GOALS AND INITIATIVES Town Focus Areas Focus Area I: Community Planning

Focus Area II: Infrastructure

Focus Area III: Financial Condition

Achieve a well-planned community using innovative and proactive planning approaches and techniques.

Ensure that roads, water and wastewater facilities, parks, and other infrastructure exists for the existing citizens and for the future needs identified in the comprehensive plan.

Focus Area IV: Municipal Services

Town Goals Achieve a stable and strong financial position by accurately estimating, prudently allocating, and managing financial resources.

Achieve a high level of service to the citizens in a prompt, reliable, responsive, and costeffective manner.

Improve Environment & Quality of Life

6

Meet Or Exceed All Regulatory Requirements

1

Deliver Efficient & Effective Services

3 6 7

Provide Understandable & Convenient Services

4 9

Deliver Services Promptly & Consistently

Operationalize Service Levels & Measure Success

2 3

Engage Citizens To Determine Levels Of Service

Proactively Manage Risk

2 7

Comply With All Laws & Regulations

Bill & Collect Revenues Accurately & Timely

Prudently Manage Debt, Cash, & Investments

Manage Fund Balance To Aid Financial Position

Forecast Operational & Fiscal Impacts

Estimate Revenues Conservatively

Provide Accountability Through Internal Controls

Promote Efficient & Effective Resource Allocation

Allocate Funding To Execute Priorities

Maintain Organization Credibility

Maintain AAA Bond Rating

Identification of Financial Strategy

Match Public Facilities With Community Expectations

Manage Infrastructure Plans To Schedule & Budget

Develop Alternative Financing Plans

Prioritize Capital Project Construction

Update Infrastructure Plans

Understand Forces Affecting the Built Community

Resolve Conflict Between Ordinances & Community Response

Identify Development Trends & Related Policy Changes

Respond To & Include Those Impacted by Development

Administer Ordinances & Guidelines as Adopted

Create Developer and Affected Citizen Connections

Town Initiatives

Department Goals and Initiatives 2

9

7

6 9

1 9

2 3 7

7

3 7

2 3 8

2 3

FACILITY GOALS AND INITIATIVES 1. To enhance the quality of life for the residents of the Town of Cary, Wake County, and surrounding area by providing a world class athletic facility that meets a variety of athletic program needs and addresses the communityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s desire for recreation and athletic programming while providing opportunities for major tournaments and events. 2. To create and execute a management and operating philosophy which is consistent with the Mission Statement, Statement of Values, and Goals of the Town of Cary. 3. To staff, manage, operate, and maintain the WakeMed Soccer Park to the highest industry standards in the best interest of the Town of Cary and the general public.

2

1 2 8


4. To facilitate town wide programs that serve diverse age groups for all levels of play that maximizes facility use and revenue including opportunities for field and cross country course use, individual and team reserved field and cross country course use, team and league play, team and individual instruction, tournaments, (local, state, national, and international), youth camps, special clinics, and special events. 5. To protect and maintain the facility’s condition so as to preserve and improve the Town’s investment in the facility. 6. To provide the highest level of courteous, accurate, and responsive customer service. 7. To maximize revenues and provide convenient services such as concessions, rentals, parking, and/or other opportunities. 8. To promote the facility in such a manner that enhances the reputation of the Town of Cary in the provision of recreation and athletic opportunities. 9. To include input from the local sports community in developing operations and programming.

FY 2010 ACCOMPLISHMENTS • Collaboratively worked with Greater Raleigh Convention and Visitors Bureau to seek and obtain local, state and national level events. • WakeMed Cross Country Course was the official course for multiple cross country events including the NC High School Athletic Association (NCHSAA) local and regional meets, the Triangle Independent Schools Athletic Conference (TISAC), and Central Intercollegiate Athletic Association (CIAA) conference championships, North Carolina State University (NCSU) Invitational, the ACC Cross Country Championships as well as several privately sponsored cross country events. The National Scholastic Sports Foundation sponsored and ran the Great American Cross Country Festival as well as the Nike Cross Nationals Regional Cross Country Race. • Hosted the Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC) Women’s and Men’s Soccer Championships in November 2009 by using a combination of Koka Booth Stadium and WakeMed Stadium to once again bring the premier soccer conference’s two major conference tournaments to the park in the same year. In addition, the National Collegiate Athletics Association (NCAA) Men’s Division One College Cup was held for the 3rd time since 2003. The North Carolina Senior Games Opening Ceremonies and several Senior Games field events were held at the facility. • Conducted 18 successful soccer camps, 6 lacrosse camps, and 4 cross country camps. • The Carolina RailHawks completed their third season of play and the park hosted regular season, US Open Cup, and several exhibition matches throughout the calendar year. The 2009 season kicked off with several exhibition matches in March featuring Major League Soccer teams as well as a Honduran Professional Team. • Completed the renovation of field 4 and WakeMed Stadium. • Town co-hosted the National Soccer Coaches Association of America’s College Cup Symposium Special Topics Diploma as part of the NCAA College Cup and also co-hosted the NSCAA Non Residential National Diploma in August 2009. • Initiated and implemented an operating business plan for the park for optimum use of facility, revenue generation and programming opportunities. • The WakeMed Soccer Park is currently undergoing a Master Plan Process. KEY PERFORMANCE OBJECTIVES • Achieve a participant satisfaction rating of Above Average from 95% of instructional camp and clinic participants. • Facilitate facility use to include all play opportunities at a minimum of 4,000 hours of use per year. • Track and Categorize Facility Usage to ensure the following types of play meet or exceed usage goals (hours per fiscal year and % of total use). Below are the established targets for each type of use. - Sport Field Use Balance: Community Group Use Youth 1,880 hrs 47% Community Group Use Adult 160 hrs 4% School Group Use 200 hrs 5% College Use 160 hrs 4%


Tournament Rental Special Events Facility Tenant Town Programs -

• •

600 hrs 160 hrs 560 hrs 280 hrs

15% 4% 14% 7%

Facility Use Balance Cross Country Course: Community Group Use Adult 57 hrs School Group Use 115 hrs College Use 14 hrs Tournament Rental 14 hrs Special Events 57 hrs Town Programs 28 hrs

20% 40% 5% 5% 20% 10%

Recruit and host tournaments and events that will result in an estimated economic impact of more than $3,500,000 per calendar year. Foster facility attendance by offering quality programs, tournaments, events, field rental capabilities, and other spectator opportunities to meet or exceed 500,000 visits per year.

KEY PERFORMANCE MEASURES Actual FY 2009

Estimated FY 2010

Projected FY 2011

98%

95%

95%

Field Rental

1177 hrs / 36.33%

0 hrs / 0%

0 hrs / 0%

Community Group Use Youth

900 hrs / 27%

1,388 hrs / 38%

1,981 hrs / 43%

Community Group Use Adult

98 hrs / 3%

193 hrs / 5%

359 hrs / 7%

School Group Use

74 hrs / 2%

177 hrs / 4%

96 hrs / 2%

College Use

54 hrs / 1%

107 hrs / 2%

292 hrs / 6%

Tournament Rental

0 hrs / 0%

95 hrs / 2%

0 hrs / 0%

Special Events

179 hrs / 5%

94 hrs / 2%

0 hrs / 0%

Facility Tenant

500 hrs / 15%

749 hrs / 20%

818 hrs / 18%

Town Programs

255 hrs / 7%

843 hrs / 23%

973 hrs / 21%

Sports Field Usage Total Hours

3,238

3648

4520

Community Sports Group Use Adult

5 hrs /1%

34hrs / 11%

15 hrs / 5%

Community Sports Group Use Youth

18 hrs /6%

53 hrs / 18%

30 hrs / 10%

Field Rental

200 hrs / 71%

0 hrs / 0%

0 hrs / 0%

School Group Use

1 hrs / 0.5%

130 hrs / 44%

175 hrs / 59%

College Use

0 hrs /0%

27 hrs / 9%

15 hrs / 5%

Tournament Rental

0 hrs /0%

0 hrs / 0%

0 hrs / 0%

Special Events

24 hrs /8%

0 hrs / 0%

0 hrs / 0%

Town Programs

30 hrs /10%

46 hrs / 15%

34 hrs / 11%

Facility Usage (Cross Country) Total Hours

279

291

295 hrs

Economic Impact (Tracked per calendar year)

$3,400,000

$3,500,000

$3,500,000

Total Attendance

163,105

160,000

175,000

Performance Measure % rating above average (Camps / Clinics) Field Use Balance Fields (in hrs and % of total)

Facility Use Balance Cross Country Course


KEY WORKLOAD INDICATORS Workload Indicator Number of field rental hours booked Number of different groups utilizing facilities Youth Camps / Clinics (# of participants) Total Revenue

Actual FY 2009

Estimated FY 2010

Projected FY 2011

3,517

3,940

4,815

50

50

50

350

650

700

$552,230

$525,000

$550,000

ACTIVITY HISTORY Fund Number: 017-6330 Activity

Actual FY 2007

Actual FY 2008

Actual FY2009

Estimated FY2010

Budget FY2011

Personnel Services

$157,851

$173,307

$155,827

$184,315

$194,049

Operations and Maintenance

$125,276

$146,543

$156,514

$175,239

$191,374

Public Works Services

$504,714

$712,297

$701,384

$844,810

$786,151

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$787,841

$1,032,147

$1,013,725

$1,204,364

$1,171,574

2

2

2

2

2

Capital Outlay Total Authorized FTEs

SIGNIFICANT BUDGET AND SERVICE LEVEL CHANGES BEYOND CURRENT LEVELS • Continue to expand offerings with Carolina RailHawks men’s professional soccer team for revenue sharing programming such as soccer camps for the summer of 2010. •

Continue to work closely with ACC and NCAA to host soccer championships through the Championship City Program in order to retain these events year after year.


USA BASEBALL NATIONAL TRAINING COMPLEX AT THOMAS BROOKS PARK Additional information about the USA Baseball National Training Complex may be obtained by calling William Davis, Athletics Manager at (919) 460-4964, through e-mail at william.davis@townofcary.org or by visiting the Townâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s website at www.townofcary.org.

TOWN OF CARY GOALS AND INITIATIVES Town Focus Areas Focus Area I: Community Planning

Focus Area II: Infrastructure

Focus Area III: Financial Condition

Focus Area IV: Municipal Services

Achieve a well-planned community using innovative and proactive planning approaches and techniques.

Ensure that roads, water and wastewater facilities, parks, and other infrastructure exists for the existing citizens and for the future needs identified in the comprehensive plan.

Achieve a stable and strong financial position by accurately estimating, prudently allocating, and managing financial resources.

Town Goals Achieve a high level of service to the citizens in a prompt, reliable, responsive, and cost-effective manner.

Improve Environment & Quality of Life

6

Meet Or Exceed All Regulatory Requirements

1

Deliver Efficient & Effective Services

3 6 7

Provide Understandable & Convenient Services

4 9

Deliver Services Promptly & Consistently

Operationalize Service Levels & Measure Success

2 3

Engage Citizens To Determine Levels Of Service

Proactively Manage Risk

2 7

Comply With All Laws & Regulations

Bill & Collect Revenues Accurately & Timely

Prudently Manage Debt, Cash, & Investments

Manage Fund Balance To Aid Financial Position

Forecast Operational & Fiscal Impacts

Estimate Revenues Conservatively

Provide Accountability Through Internal Controls

Promote Efficient & Effective Resource Allocation

Allocate Funding To Execute Priorities

Maintain Organization Credibility

Maintain AAA Bond Rating

Identification of Financial Strategy

Match Public Facilities With Community Expectations

Manage Infrastructure Plans To Schedule & Budget

Develop Alternative Financing Plans

Prioritize Capital Project Construction

Update Infrastructure Plans

Understand Forces Affecting the Built Community

Resolve Conflict Between Ordinances & Community Response

Identify Development Trends & Related Policy Changes

Respond To & Include Those Impacted by Development

Create Developer and Affected Citizen Connections

Administer Ordinances & Guidelines as Adopted

Town Initiatives

Department Goals and Initiatives 2

9

7

6 9

1 9

2 3 7

7

3 7

2 3 8

FACILITY GOALS AND INITIATIVES 1. To enhance the quality of life for the residents of the Town of Cary and surrounding area by providing a baseball facility and baseball programs that address the communityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s recreation needs while providing opportunities for major tournaments and events. 2. To create and execute a management and operating philosophy which is consistent with the Mission Statement, Statement of Values and Goals of the Town of Cary. 3. To staff, manage, operate, and maintain the USA Baseball Complex to the highest industry standards in the best interest of the Town of Cary and the general public. 4. To develop town-wide programs that serve diverse age groups for all levels of play and maximize facility use and revenue including opportunities for open field use, team and league play, group training, tournaments (local, state, and national), youth camps, special clinics, and special events.

2 3

2

1 2 8


5. To protect and maintain the facility’s condition so as to preserve and improve the Town’s capital investment. 6. To provide the highest level of courteous, accurate, and responsive customer service. 7. To maximize revenues and provide convenient services such as concessions, retail sales, rentals, and/or other opportunities. 8. To promote the facility and baseball services in such a manner that enhances the reputation of the Town of Cary in the provision of recreation opportunities. 9. To include input from the local baseball community in developing operations and programming.

FY 2010 ACCOMPLISHMENTS • Successfully hosted the USA Olympic Baseball Team game between the USA and Canada. • Hosted a NCAA Division I Preseason Tournament • Hosted the 2010 National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division II Baseball Championships in May as part of the Championship City Program. • Was awarded the 2010 NCAA Division II Baseball Championships as part of the Championship City Program. • Held 8 new baseball programs in conjunction with USA Baseball focused on developing youth skills and abilities. • Hosted the 2010 St. Augustine’s College Home Baseball Season at the USA Baseball National Training Complex. • Hosted the inaugural Wake Tech Baseball season in 2010 • Completed over 1,500 rental and programming hours. These hours include rentals from over 27 user groups, including College, High School, USA Baseball, Adult and Youth Weekend Tournaments, in addition to Town Programs. • The Town of Cary and USA Baseball joined together to host the “Triangle Classic”, a local 12 & Under event focused on participation, fun, skill development and sportsmanship. • In conjunction with USA Baseball, hosted the 8th Annual Spring Training Baseball Clinic at the National Training Complex. The clinic was for participants ages 6-12. USA baseball coaches and staff gave instruction on fundamentals of the game of baseball, skill development and sportsmanship while emphasizing the fun of the sport. • The Town of Cary and USA Baseball hosted a coach’s clinic for all coaches in Cary and surrounding areas. This clinic focused on fundamentals of baseball from a coach’s perspective. • The Town has added some improvements to the complex including: Awning for the ticket booths and game day and event signage. • The Complex hosted three local high school baseball games, including the 2010 Bobby Murray Invitational Easter Tournament. • Completed a business plan for optimizing facility use, revenue generation and programming opportunities. • Staff completed an operations plan for the complex. • Held a variety of Duke University games and practices at the complex. • Numerous college practices and games were held at the complex in Spring 2010, including, Michigan, Xavier, Elizabeth City State and more. • The Tobacco Road Marathon was held at the complex, consisting of 2300+ runners. • Worked with Major League Baseball to host an European Fall Showcase • Successfully developed and hosted a Town of Cary Fall Baseball League at the complex. • With USA Baseball , hosted the National Team Identification Series ad Labor Day Cup tournaments at the complex KEY PERFORMANCE OBJECTIVES • Facilitate facility use to include all play opportunities at a target maximum of 1,750 hours per calendar year for the four fields at the National Training Complex (NTC). This target is determined by maximum turf and field performance and market needs. • Track and categorize field usage based on the following target goals (hours per year and percentages): - USA Baseball 750 hrs 43% - Town Programs 250 hrs 14% - Schools/Colleges 225 hrs 13% - Tournaments 390 hrs 22%


• • •

- Community Use 68 hrs 4% - Special Events 68 hrs 4% Recruit and host tournaments, rentals and events that will result in an estimated economic impact of more than $1,200,000 per calendar year. Foster facility attendance by offering quality programs, tournaments, events and other spectator opportunities to meet or exceed 100,000 visits per year. Achieve a participant satisfaction rating of Above Average or higher from 95% of program participants.

KEY PERFORMANCE MEASURES Actual 2009*

Estimated 2010*

Projected 2011*

USA Baseball

720 hrs / 42%

670 hrs / 36%

830 hrs / 44%

Schools/Colleges

195 hrs / 11%

290 hrs / 16%

260 hrs / 14%

Town Programs

218 hrs / 13%

250 hrs / 14%

240 hrs / 13%

Tournaments

405 hrs / 23%

480 hrs / 26%

410 hrs / 22%

Community Use

111 hrs / 6%

97 hrs / 5%

95 hrs / 4%

Special Events

96 hrs / 5%

68 hrs /4%

68 hrs / 3%

1,745

1,855

1,903

Economic Impact

$990,000

$1,100,000

$1,250,000

Total Attendance

110,000

125,000

150,000

NA

90%

93%

Actual 2009

Estimated 2010

Projected 2011

Rental Hours (Stadium and Training)

807

935

833

Programming Hours (Camps, Clinics, Town of Cary League Play)

218

250

240

USA Baseball Hours

720

670

830

$431,000

$405,000

422,300

Performance Measure Field Use Balance (in hrs and % of total)

Field Usage total hours*

Satisfaction Levels * The Field Usage Hours for this chart is based on Calendar year.

KEY WORKLOAD INDICATORS Workload Indicators

Revenue

ACTIVITY HISTORY Actual FY 2007

Actual FY 2008

Actual FY2009

Estimated FY2010

Budget FY2011

Personnel Services

$27,798

$76,913

$79,553

$102,002

$109,684

Operations and Maintenance

$81,948

$141,388

$183,179

$268,846

$249,567

$113,273

$582,362

$529,948

$756,014

$500,585

$0

$0

$15,385

$0

$0

$223,019

$800,663

$808,065

$1,126,862

$859,836

1.0

1.0

1.0

1.0

1.0

Activity

Internal Services Capital Outlay Total Authorized FTEs

SIGNIFICANT BUDGET AND SERVICE LEVEL CHANGES BEYOND CURRENT LEVELS There are no significant budget and/or service level changes for FY 2011.


PUBLIC WORKS AND UTILITIES DEPARTMENT

DIRECTOR Administration

Public Works Director

Utilities Director

Operations

North Cary Water Reclamation Facility

Facilities Management

South Cary Water Reclamation Facility

Solid Waste Management and Recycling

Western Wake Water Reclamation Facility

Fleet Management

Utility Systems Management Cary/Apex Water Treatment Plant

Water Conservation

Pretreatment


PUBLIC WORKS AND UTILITIES SUMMARY MISSION STATEMENT The PW/UT Department holds that our customers and the employees who directly serve them are most important to our continued success. Through citizen input and departmental staff/management collaboration, we strive to meet or exceed the standards set by Citizen/Council directives, regulatory compliance, and professional judgment. We provide services in areas such as customer service, water and wastewater management/maintenance, facilities and grounds maintenance, and utility repair/construction work. We will limit disruption of services in these areas, while continually developing innovative and costeffective methods to best serve the citizens of the Town of Cary. DIVISIONS WITHIN PUBLIC WORKS/UTILITIES Administration Water Conservation Buildings and Grounds Operations Solid Waste Management Recycling Pretreatment Utility Systems Maintenance Cary/Apex Water Treatment Plant North Cary Water Reclamation Facility South Cary Water Reclamation Facility Western Wake Water Reclamation Facililty Fleet Management OTHER DEPARTMENTS CONTRIBUTING TO DIVISION PROGRAMS Administration/Budget Engineering Parks, Recreation and Cultural Resources

PUBLIC WORKS/UTILITIES FY 2011 BUDGET BY DIVISION Utility Systems Maintenance 5% Recycling 2% Solid Waste Management 10%

Cary/Apex Water Treat. Plant 11%

North Cary WRF 13% South Cary WRF 6% Fleet Management 2% Water Conservation 1% Pretreatment 1% Western Wake WRF 0%

Operations 22%

Administration 3% Facilities Management 24%


PUBLIC WORKS AND UTILITIES ADMINISTRATION DIVISION Additional information about Public Works & Utilities Administration Division may be obtained by calling Steve Brown, Director of Public Works & Utilities, at (919) 469-4092, through e-mail at steve.brown@townofcary.org, or by visiting the Townâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s website at www.townofcary.org. TOWN OF CARY GOALS AND INITIATIVES Town Focus Areas Focus Area I: Community Planning

Focus Area II: Infrastructure

Focus Area III: Financial Condition

Achieve a well-planned community using innovative and proactive planning approaches and techniques.

Ensure that roads, water and wastewater facilities, parks, and other infrastructure exists for the existing citizens and for the future needs identified in the comprehensive plan.

Focus Area IV: Municipal Services

Town Goals Achieve a stable and strong financial position by accurately estimating, prudently allocating, and managing financial resources.

Achieve a high level of service to the citizens in a prompt, reliable, responsive, and costeffective manner.

Department Goals and Initiatives 5

5 6

7

7

7

3

7

1 2 3

1 2 3 4 5 6

1 2 3

DIVISION GOALS AND INITIATIVES 1. Ensure Council goals and objectives are met by providing quality, customer oriented, cost effective services through budgetary and operational planning/development. 2. Manage preventive and corrective maintenance programs to ensure quality, customer oriented and cost effective services throughout the department. 3. Manage and plan for long range regulatory, infrastructure, and natural resource needs to support the Townâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s water and wastewater treatment needs.

1 2 3 4 5 6

4 6

Improve Environment & Quality of Life

Meet Or Exceed All Regulatory Requirements

Deliver Efficient & Effective Services

Provide Understandable & Convenient Services

Deliver Services Promptly & Consistently

Operationalize Service Levels & Measure Success

Engage Citizens To Determine Levels Of Service

Comply With All Laws & Regulations

Proactively Manage Risk

Bill & Collect Revenues Accurately & Timely

Prudently Manage Debt, Cash, & Investments

Manage Fund Balance To Aid Financial Position

Forecast Operational & Fiscal Impacts

Estimate Revenues Conservatively

Provide Accountability Through Internal Controls

Promote Efficient & Effective Resource Allocation

Allocate Funding To Execute Priorities

Maintain Organization Credibility

Maintain AAA Bond Rating

Identification of Financial Strategy

Match Public Facilities With Community Expectations

Manage Infrastructure Plans To Schedule & Budget

Develop Alternative Financing Plans

Prioritize Capital Project Construction

Update Infrastructure Plans

Understand Forces Affecting the Built Community

Resolve Conflict Between Ordinances & Community Response

Identify Development Trends & Related Policy Changes

Respond To & Include Those Impacted by Development

Create Developer and Affected Citizen Connections

Administer Ordinances & Guidelines as Adopted

Town Initiatives


4. Provide information to citizens related to service provision, emergency situations, and individual citizen service needs. 5. Responsible for maintaining work order system for operational divisions, addressing customer inquiries and service needs. 6. Provide telephone customer service information concerning all Public Works/Utilities operations. 7. Ensure compliance with the post 2010 inter-basin transfer requirements.

FY 2010 ACCOMPLISHMENTS • Submitted Local Water Supply Plan to North Carolina Department of Environment and Natural Resource Division (NCDENR) of Water Resources. • Developed an updated Water Shortage Response Plan to comply with recent legislation. • Worked with US Army Corps of Engineers, NCDENR and Western Wake Partners to have Draft Environmental Impact Statement for Western Wake Regional Wastewater Management Facilities published for public comment. Expect to hold public hearings, address comments, and have Final Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) submitted to Corps of Engineers in FY09 by the consultant, after which they will review and publish the final EIS and Record of Decision. • Worked on development of and began participation in the Jordan Lake Partnership, with the City of Durham as the lead agency, to plan for future water supply needs in the Triangle Region. • Developed an updated wastewater treatment agreement with Durham County, to provide wastewater service for Research Triangle Park (RTP) South, northwest Cary, and parts of Morrisville until the Western Wake Regional Wastewater Management Facilities are online. • Developed an updated water supply mutual aid agreement with the City of Durham, providing for increases in interconnection capacity and defining the terms under which we will provide water to each other in emergencies. • Received final Finding of No Significant Impact (based on Environmental Report submitted to Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and NCDENR) for the joint (with Durham County and Wake County) reclaimed water project that will serve RTP South down to Thomas Brooks Park. • Submitted Jordan Lake Allocation and Interbasin Transfer Annual Report to NCDENR Division of Water Resources. • Submitted Biennial Report on Secondary and Cumulative Impacts Master Mitigation Plan to NCDENR. • Water demand never exceeded the Inter-Basin Transfer certificate limit. • Implementation of a time and attendance software package which will substantially automate the payroll process for the more than 350 employees staged at the Operation Center. Training to begin in the fourth quarter. • Added a regular 30 hour administrative assistant to assist with Public Works/Utilities division support. This resulted in greater level of service for division managers and field personnel by the existing departmental administrative support staff. • Continue to utilize departmental support staff in assigning work throughout the department’s support staff (departmental staff are at five locations, Operations Center, Fleet, North Cary Water Reclamation Facility, South Cary Water Reclamation Facility, and the Cary/Apex Water Treatment Plant). • Continue to utilize an administrative support person dedicated for two hours on-site for Fleet Management. • Staff continued to provide Public Works/Utilities Capital Improvements Budget project cost tracking, payroll/personnel data management, and overall administrative support for the department. KEY PERFORMANCE OBJECTIVES • Achieve a minimum of a 95% customer service rating of “satisfied” for customer call back surveys. • Ensure that customers are on hold for no more than 30 seconds before receiving service. • Ensure that the Town of Cary is capable of meeting post 2010 Inter-basin Transfer (IBT) requirements by January 1, 2011.


KEY PERFORMANCE MEASURES Actual FY 2009

Estimated FY 2010

Projected FY 2011

96%

97%

97%

20 Seconds

19 Seconds

19 Seconds

1.55/1.30 MGD

1.60/1.60 MGD

1.60/1.60 MGD

Actual FY 2009

Estimated FY 2010

Projected FY 2011

78,744

76,000

76,000

Number of Personnel Transaction Forms (PTF) processed

925

925

925

Number of customer service telephone inquiries

80,095

90,000

91,000

Performance Measure % customer call back rating of “satisfaction” Time customers spend waiting for service Required Interbasin return - Post 2010 / Actual Amount of Water Returned

KEY WORKLOAD INDICATORS Workload Indicator Service and Preventive Maintenance work order requests

(inbound and outbound)

ACTIVITY HISTORY Fund Number: 010-7010 Activity Personnel Services Operations and Maintenance Capital Outlay Reimb. from Utility Fund Total Authorized FTEs

Actual FY 2007

Actual FY 2008

Actual FY2009

Estimated FY2010

Budget FY2011

$1,182,122

$1,275,528

$1,497,614

$1,609,989

$1,763,394

$173,485

$222,516

$204,112

$691,625

$258,494

$0

$0

$0

$17,250

$0

$1,355,607 -882,776

$1,498,044 -$984,262

$1,701,726 -$1,081,295

$2,318,864 -$1,232,536

$2,021,888 -$1,367,666

$472,831

$513,782

$620,431

$1,086,328

$654,222

14

16.5

17.75

18.50

18

SIGNIFICANT BUDGET AND SERVICE LEVEL CHANGES BEYOND CURRENT LEVELS • The Cross Connection Control Technician position was reduced from 40 hours to 30 hours during FY 2010, resulting in a reduction of .25 FTE. • One part time (.50 FTE) Data Control Technician was vacant during FY10 and is being removed from the FY11 staffing document.


FACILITIES MANAGEMENT DIVISION Additional information about the Facilities Management Division may be obtained by calling Larry Dempsey, Division Manager, at (919) 469-4361, through e-mail at larry.dempsey@townofcary.org, or by visiting the Townâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s website at www.townofcary.org. TOWN OF CARY GOALS AND INITIATIVES Town Focus Areas Focus Area I: Community Planning

Focus Area II: Infrastructure

Focus Area III: Financial Condition

Focus Area IV: Municipal Services

Town Goals Achieve a well-planned community using innovative and proactive planning approaches and techniques.

Ensure that roads, water and wastewater facilities, parks, and other infrastructure exists for the existing citizens and for the future needs identified in the comprehensive plan.

Achieve a stable and strong financial position by accurately estimating, prudently allocating, and managing financial resources.

Achieve a high level of service to the citizens in a prompt, reliable, responsive, and costeffective manner.

Improve Environment & Quality of Life

Meet Or Exceed All Regulatory Requirements

Deliver Efficient & Effective Services

Provide Understandable & Convenient Services

Deliver Services Promptly & Consistently

Operationalize Service Levels & Measure Success

Engage Citizens To Determine Levels Of Service

Comply With All Laws & Regulations

Proactively Manage Risk

Bill & Collect Revenues Accurately & Timely

Prudently Manage Debt, Cash, & Investments

Manage Fund Balance To Aid Financial Position

Forecast Operational & Fiscal Impacts

Estimate Revenues Conservatively

Provide Accountability Through Internal Controls

Promote Efficient & Effective Resource Allocation

Allocate Funding To Execute Priorities

Maintain Organization Credibility

Maintain AAA Bond Rating

Identification of Financial Strategy

Match Public Facilities With Community Expectations

Manage Infrastructure Plans To Schedule & Budget

Develop Alternative Financing Plans

Prioritize Capital Project Construction

Update Infrastructure Plans

Understand Forces Affecting the Built Community

Resolve Conflict Between Ordinances & Community Response

Identify Development Trends & Related Policy Changes

Respond To & Include Those Impacted by Development

Create Developer and Affected Citizen Connections

Administer Ordinances & Guidelines as Adopted

Town Initiatives

Department Goals and Initiatives 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12

3

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12

DIVISION GOALS AND INITIATIVES Roadside and Median Maintenance 1. Perform and/or coordinate all activities related to landscape maintenance along the Townâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s main thoroughfares from roadside mowing to median beautification programs.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12

3

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12


2. Coordinate scheduled street cleaning of all Town residential streets (4 times annually) and main thoroughfares (monthly). 3. Oversee and implement code enforcement measures to address safety issues regarding intersection sight distances, or public sidewalk obstructions along with complaints of hazardous trees or tall grass. 4. Provide for annual removal and disposal of leaves and Christmas trees from Town streets through a recycling or reuse program. Parks and Recreation Support 5. Perform and coordinate all maintenance activities for parks and related facilities including ballfields, playgrounds, developed acres, park landscapes, and park structures. 6. Provide all logistical support for activities, programs, and special events sponsored by the Town. 7. Perform routine and citizen requested upkeep and care at the Town’s Hillcrest Cemetery. 8. Coordinate all maintenance and repairs for greenways and park trails. Town Facility Maintenance 9. Provide all maintenance to landscapes and site amenities at public buildings. 10. Perform and coordinate maintenance or renovations to all Town buildings. 11. Review all plans for public facilities. 12. Coordinate removal of graffiti from all Town facilities.

FY 2010 ACCOMPLISHMENTS • • • • • • • • • • •

Assumed athletic turf grow-in maintenance responsibilities for Mills Park – 2 softball fields, soccer/football field, and multi purpose field. Facility preparation and events support for major events at Wake Med Soccer Park to include NCAA/ACC soccer and Carolina Railhawks. Facility preparation and events support for Tarheel Baseball, USA Baseball and NCAA Division II championship at the USA Baseball National Training Center. Facility preparation and events support for ACC Tennis and general event support at the Cary Tennis Park. Facility preparation and support for PONY Softball Championships. Completion of Wake Med Soccer Park concession upgrade project. Completion of HVAC upgrade project at the William Garmon Operations Center, buildings A and B. Constructed salt dome and spreader racks on Dixon Avenue site in order to increase salt storage / improved inclement weather response. Completed study and design of the Town Hall Finance Window for improved employee ergonomics. Completed annual major maintenance projects to include parking lot resurfacing, tennis court resurfacing, tennis court fence replacement, greenway resurfacing, and athletic bleacher replacement per capital budget plan. Initiated retro-commissioning plan for Town Hall Complex as a component of the Town’s EECGB program funding.

KEY PERFORMANCE OBJECTIVES • • • • • •

Ensure that 100% of thoroughfare street sweepings are completed (4 sweeps annually residential streets – 12 sweeps annually for thoroughfare streets). Ensure that 100% of roadside mowing and litter collection cycles are completed on schedule (2 service levels – Cary Parkway service level – 5 working day cycle; and Maynard Road service Level – 7 working day cycle). Perform code enforcement investigations within 48 hours and close all complaints within 14 days of complaint received. Perform loose leaf collections within 3 business days from Customer Service notification. Maintain Parks, Recreation and Cultural Resources (PRCR) facilities to a 95% Overall Satisfaction Rating as surveyed among program participants. Obtain a 90% compliance rate of facility quality standards inspections for public facilities.


KEY PERFORMANCE MEASURES Actual FY 2009

Estimated FY 2010

Projected FY 2011

Ensure that 100% of thoroughfare street sweepings are completed (4 sweeps annually residential streets – 12 sweeps annually for thoroughfare streets)

100%

100%

100%

Ensure that 100% of roadside mowing and litter collection cycles are completed on schedule (2 service levels – Cary Parkway svc. level – 5 working day cycle; and Maynard Road svc. Level – 7 working day cycle).

100%

100%

100%

% Initial code enforcement inspections performed on time (48 hrs from complaint received)

97%

95%

98%

Percentage of commitments met for loose leaf call-in program

96%

82%

95%

PRCR Facility Overall Satisfaction Rating (from PRCR participant survey results)

95%

95%

95%

Compliance rating % of facility preventive maintenance inspections for all maintained facilities

83%

66%

80%

Performance Measure

FY10 YTD

FY10 YTD

KEY WORKLOAD INDICATORS Workload Indicator Miles of thoroughfares maintained Number of athletic fields maintained Number of special events supported Special Event support (manhours) Developed facility acreage Greenway/park trail maintained (miles) Leaf collection (tons) Conditioned space maintained (sq. ft.) Service contracts negotiated (dollars) Roadside maintenance (square feet)

Actual FY 2009

Estimated FY 2010

Projected FY 2011

118

125

125

54

54

54

1,085

1,015

1,120

17,020

18,700

18,500

1,241

1,241

1,300

59.6

59.6

69.6

4,774

4,900

5,000

479,502

502,415

502,465

$2,150,140

$2,150,140

$2,475,632

8,746,311

8,975,071

8,037,869


ACTIVITY HISTORY Fund Number: 10-7015

Actual FY 2007

Actual FY 2008

Actual FY2009

Estimated FY2010

Budget FY2011

Personnel Services

$4,880,751

$5,390,249

$5,677,804

$6,007,850

$6,345,885

Operations and Maintenance

$4,986,875

$6,401,479

$7,550,602

$7,691,582

$7,499,151

Reimb. From Amphitheatre*

($241,499)

($261,155)

($214,354)

($230,000)

($230,000)

Reimb. From Tennis Center

($186,303)

($187,286)

($225,609)

($198,120)

($193,107)

Reimb. From Skate Park

($11,986)

($5,944)

($8,263)

($11,537)

($13,495)

Reimb. From Soccer Park

($497,774)

($705,157)

($694,166)

($844,810)

($778,933)

Reimb. From USA Baseball

($113,273)

($582,362)

($529,948)

($756,014)

($500,585)

$446,262

$812,267

$123,358

$584,800

$340,085

$9,263,053 106

$10,764,492 106.5

$11,679,424 106.5

$12,243,751 106.5

$12,469,001 104

$9,263,053 $1,470 $0 $9,264,523

$10,764,492 $208 $0 $10,764,700

$11,679,424 $1,000 $0 $11,680,424

$12,243,751 $1,000 $0 $12,244,751

$12,469,001 $4,000 $5,000 $12,478,001

Activity

Capital Outlay Total Authorized FTEs Fund Number: 051-7015 Trees for Cary Trees & Plant Donations Grand Total

*The budget and related Koka Booth Amphitheater reimbursement for FY 2011 will be formulated by staff and approved by Town Council in the fall of 2010 to coincide with the performance and event cycle which runs from November 1, 2010 through October 31, 2011.

SIGNIFICANT BUDGET AND SERVICE LEVEL CHANGES BEYOND CURRENT LEVELS • With the completion of Mills Park Facilities Maintenance Worker II position that was being held vacant during FY10 is approved to be filled in FY11. Facilities Management will absorb the additional maintenance associated with this facility with existing staff. • One new Facilities Maintenance Mechanic I position is being added for the maintenance of the new Cary Community Arts Center. • Cost savings will be generated through HVAC maintenance and comfort station cleaning using existing in house staff. Currently these functions are performed using contracted services. This extra workload is expected to be equivalent to 1.3 full time employees. • A total of three full time positions were held vacant in FY10 and are being removed in the FY11 staffing document: - One Landscape Turf Technician - Two Facility Maintenance Worker II’s


OPERATIONS DIVISION Additional information about the Operations Division may be obtained by calling Bob Bilodeau, Operations Division Manager, at (919) 469-4055, through e-mail at bob.bilodeau@townofcary.org, or by visiting the Townâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s website at www.townofcary.org.

TOWN OF CARY GOALS AND INITIATIVES Town Focus Areas Focus Area I: Community Planning

Focus Area II: Infrastructure

Focus Area III: Financial Condition

Achieve a well-planned community using innovative and proactive planning approaches and techniques.

Ensure that roads, water and wastewater facilities, parks, and other infrastructure exists for the existing citizens and for the future needs identified in the comprehensive plan.

Focus Area IV: Municipal Services

Town Goals Achieve a stable and strong financial position by accurately estimating, prudently allocating, and managing financial resources.

Achieve a high level of service to the citizens in a prompt, reliable, responsive, and cost-effective manner.

132

Department Goals and Initiatives 132

DIVISION GOALS AND INITIATIVES Wastewater Collection Systems & Maintenance 1. Perform sewer line preventive maintenance programs, including Closed Circuit Television (CCTV) inspections and high pressure jetting in order to reduce the occurrences of sanitary sewer overflows. 2. Perform televised underground inspections of sewers and create databases with digital images in order to identify problems for repair and to minimize sanitary sewer overflows. 3. Conducts smoke testing of sewers to identify, locate and repair sewer system defects and reduce inflow and infiltration. 4. Provide support for sewer line rehabilitation and installation construction projects. 5. Installs and monitors flow monitoring equipment to quantify inflow and infiltration. Analyzes data to determine sewer drainage basins requiring rehabilitative work. 6. Maintain easement cutting and line obstruction clearing to ensure access to and reduce sanitary sewer overflows.

7

Improve Environment & Quality of Life

Deliver Efficient & Effective Services

132

Meet Or Exceed All Regulatory Requirements

Provide Understandable & Convenient Services

Deliver Services Promptly & Consistently

Operationalize Service Levels & Measure Success

Engage Citizens To Determine Levels Of Service

Comply With All Laws & Regulations

Proactively Manage Risk

Bill & Collect Revenues Accurately & Timely

Prudently Manage Debt, Cash, & Investments

Manage Fund Balance To Aid Financial Position

Forecast Operational & Fiscal Impacts

Estimate Revenues Conservatively

Provide Accountability Through Internal Controls

Promote Efficient & Effective Resource Allocation

Allocate Funding To Execute Priorities

Maintain Organization Credibility

Maintain AAA Bond Rating

Identification of Financial Strategy

Match Public Facilities With Community Expectations

Manage Infrastructure Plans To Schedule & Budget

Develop Alternative Financing Plans

Prioritize Capital Project Construction

Update Infrastructure Plans

Understand Forces Affecting the Built Community

Resolve Conflict Between Ordinances & Community Response

Identify Development Trends & Related Policy Changes

Respond To & Include Those Impacted by Development

Create Developer and Affected Citizen Connections

Administer Ordinances & Guidelines as Adopted

Town Initiatives


7. Respond to trouble calls from both internal and external customers regarding sewer line problems in a timely manner. 8. Perform utility location services for Town-owned wastewater collection system and components with a high degree of accuracy. 9. Perform storm water system maintenance and repair on Town rights of way, ensuring compliance with all regulatory requirements. Water Distribution Systems 10. Install, replace, and maintain commercial and residential water metering devices throughout the Town. 11. Supports the Water Conservation Program through field observation and enforcement in order to meet the longrange water supply needs of our community. 12. Operates flow and pressure monitoring equipment to system performance. 13. Conduct preventive and ongoing maintenance of fire hydrants on a semi-annual basis. 14. Provide support for line rehabilitation and installation construction projects. 15. Perform preventive maintenance on reclaimed water system lines and appurtenances on an annual basis. 16. Perform leak detection and leak correlation services for the water distribution system in order to ensure a high degree of reliability and minimize water loss within the water distribution system. 17. Oversee residential, commercial and town cross connection control programs. 18. Gather water samples to ensure high water quality throughout the distribution system. 19. Inspect, operate, maintain and map water distribution system components. 20. Inspect, operate, and maintain reclaimed water system lines and appurtenances. 21. Manage the bulk water program field activities for customers. Street Maintenance 22. Perform pothole repairs, utility and street maintenance cuts and concrete repairs in a timely and cost effective manner. 23. Perform greenway and parking lot pavement maintenance to ensure safety of citizens using the Town's facilities. 24. Respond to adverse weather conditions, including snow and ice control services on approximately 450 streetcenter-line miles of Cary streets and 116 miles of North Carolina Department of Transportation (NCDOT) maintained roads. 25. Maintain and repair curb, gutters, and sidewalks to ensure the proper drainage and safety of our citizens. 26. Provide facility, utility and traffic operations support for their activities. 27. Perform corrective maintenance on Town bridges, culverts and storm drainage structures within the right of way. Traffic Operations 28. Maintain 165 computerized traffic signals and a 102 miles of fiber optic network supporting signalized intersections in Cary, Morrisville and Apex. Fiber network also provides communications to Town facilities. 29. Perform fiber optic system relocations in support of road widening and development projects. 30. Perform fiber optic fusion splicing to minimize impact to critical fiber communications. 31. Maintain traffic signs and markings to ensure safety and visibility of traffic patterns. 32. Maintain, troubleshoot and repair 23 Closed Circuit Television (CCTV) systems. 33. Maintain, troubleshoot and repair of 13 Dynamic Message Systems (DMS) associated with the computerized traffic signal system. 34. Install, troubleshoot and maintain traffic signal emergency pre-emption systems. 35. Provide contract oversight and inspection of traffic signals, fiber optic installation, CCTV and DMS signs. 36. Provide support to the Traffic Operations Work Center, which serves as the Natural Incident Management System (NIMS) Incident Command Center during emergencies employing CCTV/DMS to observe and manage event progression.

FY 2010 ACCOMPLISHMENTS • Wrote inter local government agreement for the operation and maintenance of non-DOT traffic signals in Morrisville. Comprehensive agreement provides same level of service as Cary under DOT’s schedule C & D; includes reimbursement PWUT and EN services. • Planned and organized the third annual Snow Rodeo event at USA Baseball and conducted a command center exercise with multiple incident scenarios. Combined ice and snow scenarios familiarizing command staff and equipment operators by providing realistic exposure and training for winter weather events. • Managed the 2009 contract inspection and testing program with Infinity Fire Protection for residential cross connection control devices to ensure the safety of the potable water system.


• •

• • • •

• • • • •

• • • • • • • •

Transferred multiple fiber optic cabling systems in support of Town and Department of Transportation road widening projects and development in Cary and Morrisville. Maintained training and certifications within the Operations Division, 85 employees trained on NIMS, Incident Command System 100 & 700, 50 sewer certifications and 35 water certifications. All signal employees International Municipal Signal Association (IMSA) certified. Maintained proficiency training within the division such as shoring and trenching, heavy equipment operations and confined space entry. Hosted a Class III asbestos certification initial and annual refresher training for 83 employees. Organized and scheduled “Career Day” presentations for several schools within the Town of Cary. Coordinated detailed water and sewer system studies for the upcoming streetscape project. Realigned staff and equipment to form a Collection System Investigations (CSI) Team. CSI improves the organizations ability to identify and quickly repair collection system defects and reduce unwanted inflow and infiltration from the collection system. CSI element consolidated redundant video inspection operations, added flow monitoring and smoke testing to identify and resolve system defects. Resolved long standing space issues by combining Water Distribution Shop with USM. Initiated manhole checklist inspections by all Operations Collections staff. Inspections now being accomplished by easement inspectors, CSI, and sewer jet teams. Organized efforts to correct a damaged spillway at Macedonia Lake after torrential rains undermined the dam and Tryon Road. Managed contract repairs in coordination with Engineering Staff. Coordinated staff support for numerous traffic signal upgrades and the rapid installation of a traffic signal at Cary Glen Blvd and Green Level to Durham Road after a fatal accident. Constructed additional signals at Carpenter Fire Station and Mccrimmon Parkway at Green Level to Durham Road intersections. Installed rumble strips, turn around areas and “intersection ahead” signage to improve safety in the western part of Town. Installed warning beacons and four way flashers on Green Level to Durham Road to enhance motorist safety. Completed revisions of the Operations Division Business Plan which identifies strengths, weaknesses, threats and challenges and addresses organizational issues. Tested and developed a sewer spill estimation matrix based on measuring flow column height. Initial results show that past sewer spill quantities may have been overstated. Managed numerous utility projects such as water line replacements, contract and in house point sewer repairs, point repairs in support of the PWUT Engineer’s sewer rehab/CCTV projects, multiple insertion valve installations and identification and excavation of several buried water line valves. Planned Town responses and oversaw logistic preparation for three significant snow storms including the five inch winter storm in January 2009. Corrected bridge/culvert discrepancies at 20 Cary locations identified in DOT annual report. Assumed responsibility for NC55 corridor traffic signals. Upgraded intersections to meet Cary standards, installed mast arm, span wire and street name signs from Jenks Road to I-540. Expanded snow removal capability by adding four spreaders and one additional tandem plow. Provides faster response to snow/ice situations in Cary during inclement weather. Initiated cost benefit analysis to identify best use of video detection for traffic signals.


KEY PERFORMANCE OBJECTIVES • Repair 95% of potholes within one business day. • Successfully transmit 100% of the annual wastewater flow to the wastewater reclamation facilities. • Ensure that 100% of damaged or nonfunctioning hydrants are replaced within 5 business days. • Respond to 100% of traffic signal emergencies within one hour. • Install 85% of water meters within one business day. • Achieve a compliance rate of 97% for residential customers and 80% for commercial customers, on an annual basis, for the cross connection control program. • Ensure that the failure rate of backflow prevention devices is less than 15% on an annual basis. • Televise 8% of the sewer collection system annually. • Ensure that there are fewer than 5 water quality complaints per 1,000 customers annually. • Ensure regulatory compliance by jetting at least 10% of the wastewater collection system annually. • Maintain a 99.9% success rate of utility line locators on an annual basis. KEY PERFORMANCE MEASURES Actual FY 2009 14,394

Estimated FY 2010 14,000

Projected FY 2011 14,000

100%

100%

100%

% of out of service fire hydrants repaired/replaced within five business days

90%

93%

95%

% of asphalt cuts for utility repairs completed within five business days

90%

93%

95%

100%

100%

100%

82%

85%

85%

5

5

5

% of compliance for commercial cross connection control devices

60%

80%

80%

% of compliance for residential cross connection control devices

95%

97%

97%

% failure rate of backflow devices

8%

6%

6%

% of wastewater collection system televised

5%

5%

6%

99.9%

100%

100%

18%

18%

18%

Performance Measure Gallons of untreated wastewater spilled % of potholes repaired within one business day

% of traffic signal emergency calls responded to within one hour % of water meters installed within one business day Water complaints per 1,000 customers

% of line locate successes % of the wastewater collection system that is jetted

KEY WORKLOAD INDICATORS Actual FY 2009 845

Estimated FY 2010 851

Projected FY 2011 875

Street maintenance – Total street-center-line miles maintained by Town of Cary (TOC)

450

475

475

Street maintenance – Total NCDOT center-line miles for snow removal by TOC

116

116

116

Sidewalk maintenance – Total miles of sidewalks

335

340

350

1,600

1,750

1,750

165

171

171

Signal System – video detection systems

12

12

12

Signal System – dynamic message systems

13

13

13

Workload Indicator Sewer system – total miles of collection lines

Number of traffic signal trouble calls received (all sources) Traffic Signal System – total signal intersections maintained by TOC


Water system – total miles of distribution lines

924

935

950

58,000

59,000

59,000

Number of water line repairs completed

250

250

250

Number of sewer line repairs completed

50

60

60

Miles of sewer easement cleared/mowed

80 Miles

90 Miles

90 Miles

Water system – total number of commercial/residential water metering devices

ACTIVITY HISTORY Fund Number: 10-7020

Actual FY 2007

Actual FY 2008

Actual FY2009

Estimated FY2010

Budget FY2011

Personnel Services

$5,229,363

$5,924,639

$6,460,219

$7,114,244

$7,634,658

Operations and Maintenance

$2,820,075

$3,924,254

$3,895,049

$4,603,539

$4,775,651

$206,120

$778,539

$1,224,668

$918,839

$444,448

$8,255,558

$10,627,432

$11,579,936

$12,636,622

$12,854,757

-$6,511,525

-$7,439,181

-$8,189,233

-$8,394,108

$0

-$16,325

$0

$0

$0

$2,677,741

$4,099,582

$4,140,756

$4,447,389

$4,460,649

106

116

122

122

118

Activity

Capital Outlay

Reimb. From Utility Fund Reimb. From General Gov’t Projects Total Authorized FTEs

-$5,577,817

SIGNIFICANT BUDGET AND SERVICE LEVEL CHANGES BEYOND CURRENT LEVELS • Two Water Conservation Technicians were moved here from Water Conservation division in Utility fund. • A total of six full time positions were vacant during FY10 and are being removed from the FY11 staffing document: - One Wastewater System Worker I - Five Construction Worker I’s


SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT AND RECYCLING DIVISION Additional information about the Solid Waste and Recycling Division may be obtained by calling Scott Hecht, Solid Waste Division Manager at (919) 469-4388, through e-mail at scott.hecht@townofcary.org, or by visiting the Townâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s website at www.townofcary.org.

TOWN OF CARY GOALS AND INITIATIVES Town Focus Areas Focus Area I: Community Planning

Focus Area II: Infrastructure

Focus Area III: Financial Condition

Focus Area IV: Municipal Services

Achieve a well-planned community using innovative and proactive planning approaches and techniques.

Ensure that roads, water and wastewater facilities, parks, and other infrastructure exists for the existing citizens and for the future needs identified in the comprehensive plan.

Achieve a stable and strong financial position by accurately estimating, prudently allocating, and managing financial resources.

Town Goals Achieve a high level of service to the citizens in a prompt, reliable, responsive, and cost-effective manner.

Meet Or Exceed All Regulatory Requirements

Improve Environment & Quality of Life

Deliver Efficient & Effective Services

8 10

Provide Understandable & Convenient Services

Operationalize Service Levels & Measure Success

5

Deliver Services Promptly & Consistently

Engage Citizens To Determine Levels Of Service

Comply With All Laws & Regulations

Proactively Manage Risk

Bill & Collect Revenues Accurately & Timely

Prudently Manage Debt, Cash, & Investments

Manage Fund Balance To Aid Financial Position

Forecast Operational & Fiscal Impacts

Estimate Revenues Conservatively

Provide Accountability Through Internal Controls

Promote Efficient & Effective Resource Allocation

Allocate Funding To Execute Priorities

Maintain Organization Credibility

Maintain AAA Bond Rating

Identification of Financial Strategy

Match Public Facilities With Community Expectations

Manage Infrastructure Plans To Schedule & Budget

Develop Alternative Financing Plans

Prioritize Capital Project Construction

Update Infrastructure Plans

Understand Forces Affecting the Built Community

Resolve Conflict Between Ordinances & Community Response

Identify Development Trends & Related Policy Changes

Respond To & Include Those Impacted by Development

Create Developer and Affected Citizen Connections

Administer Ordinances & Guidelines as Adopted

Town Initiatives

6 7

4 8

Department Goals and Initiatives 3

1 2 4

DIVISION GOALS AND INITIATIVES Solid Waste Collection 1. Provide household garbage, yardwaste, and curbside recycling collection services on a weekly basis to 39,500 households and 224 businesses. 2. Provide special services and collections on an as-requested basis including, bulky trash, electronics, used oil, used appliances, and dead animal collection/removal. 3. Enforce Town health and sanitation ordinances. 4. Provide the citizens a Citizen Convenience Center to dispose of bulk trash, white goods, yard waste and recycling that they choose not to have collected via the Townâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s curbside program.

5

1 2 4 8


Waste Diversion 5. Coordinate a solid waste education program to increase citizen understanding of waste reduction and diversion opportunities. 6. Keeping with North Carolina state law, maintain a waste reduction goal of 40%. Long-Range Planning 7. Actively monitor and update the Town’s ten year solid waste plan as required by state law. 8. Seek long-term disposal options that ensure environmentally sound disposal practices at competitive rates. 9. Evaluate the functionality and continued use and need for the Dixon Service Yard.

FY 2010 ACCOMPLISHMENTS • Continued to carry out the division’s assigned mission of providing garbage and recycling services that exceeded customer expectations. • Continued safety training and bi-monthly meetings that have reduced accident and injury rates. • Successful routing of 10 automated solid waste routes, 2 mutli-family routes, 4 yard waste routes and 7 recycling routes. • Successfully collected, hauled and mulched 13,009 tons of yard waste and 4,750 tons of leaves. • Successfully collected and disposed of 34,000 tons of garbage and processed 10,000 tons of recyclables. • 100% of solid waste and recycling routes were completed on their designated collection day. KEY PERFORMANCE OBJECTIVES • Ensure that 40% of the Town’s waste is diverted from the landfill annually. • Maintain a rate of valid “missed service collection complaints” below 1.3% per 1,000 collection points for solid waste, yard waste and recycling collection on an annual basis. • Deliver the recycling information packet and new recycling carts to all new customers within one working day. • Deliver the solid waste information packet and a new roll-out cart to all new customers within one working day. • Achieve a 75% set-out rate for the curbside recycling program. KEY PERFORMANCE MEASURES Actual FY 2009

Estimated FY 2010

Projected FY 2011

40.8%

41.0%

41%

Number of homes collected per route per day (Solid Waste)

902

905

920

Number of homes collected per route per day (Recycling)

776

780

790

71%

73%

75%

.28

.26

.25

Actual FY 2009

Estimated FY 2010

Projected FY 2011

Number of customers

39,500

40,100

41,500

Materials to landfill (tons)

34,000

35,200

35,000

Materials diverted from landfills (Recycling)

9,300

9,600

10,300

Materials diverted from landfills (Yardwaste)

10,000

10,500

13,000

4,774

4,900

5,000

15,342

16,250

15,200

Performance Measure % of waste diversion from landfill

Recycling set-out rate percentage Number of valid missed service complaints per 1,000 collection points

KEY WORKLOAD INDICATORS Workload Indicator

Materials diverted from landfills (Leaves) Number of service requests received


Number of code enforcement investigations

122

120

145

8

19

14

6,451

6,900

8,500

97%

95%

95%

1,316

275

400

Total number of bins delivered (replacement)

773

145

1,100

Total number of recycle carts delivered (new)

35,131

1,260

400

2,411

3,300

3,300

91%

86%

100%

1,484

1,545

1,500

591

700

500

$38.00

$38.00

$36.00

166

450

500

Gallons of cooking oil collected

664.75

1,100

1,400

MSW* cost per ton direct to South Wake Landfill

$30.00

$30.00

$30.00

Average days to close code enforcement Total number of special collections Commitment met % for special collections Total number of bins delivered (new)

Total number of recycle carts delivered (existing) Commitment met % â&#x20AC;&#x201C; delivery within 5 business days Total number of solid waste carts delivered (new) Total number of solid waste carts delivered (existing) MSW* cost per ton through transfer station Cooking oil collections completed

*MSW (Municipal Solid Waste).

ACTIVITY HISTORY: Solid Waste Management Fund Number: 10-7025

Actual FY 2007

Actual FY 2008

Actual FY2009

Estimated FY2010

Budget FY2011

Personnel Services

$2,427,846

$2,368,640

$2,477,562

$2,656,371

$2,774,400

Operations and Maintenance

$2,528,967

$2,702,260

$2,944,680

$3,358,986

$2,933,980

$951,188

$124,008

$58,291

$368,000

$0

$5,908,001

$5,194,908

$5,480,533

$6,383,357

$5,708,380

60

51

52

52

51

Actual FY 2007

Actual FY 2008

Actual FY2009

Estimated FY2010

Budget FY2011

$1,141,118

$838,689

$885,080

$704,860

$811,613

Operations and Maintenance

$475,689

$390,362

$372,493

$400,987

$527,301

Capital Outlay

$379,897

$12,125

$0

$17,325

$0

$1,996,704

$1,241,176

$1,257,573

$1,123,172

$1,338,914

34

19

15

15

15

Activity

Capital Outlay Total Authorized FTE's

ACTIVITY HISTORY: Recycling Fund Number: 10-7026 Activity Personnel Services

Total Authorized FTE's

SIGNIFICANT BUDGET AND SERVICE LEVEL CHANGES BEYOND CURRENT LEVELS â&#x20AC;˘

One Solid Waste Equipment Operator position was held vacant during FY10 and is being removed from the FY11 staffing document.


TOWN OF CARY UTILITY FUND REVENUES AND EXPENSES PER CAPITA

$450 $400 Dollars Per Capita

$350 $300 $250 $200 $150 $100 Per Capita Revenues

$50

Per Capita Expenses

$0 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Fiscal Year

Estimated Budget

Fiscal Year 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011

Per Capita Revenues $271 $325 $276 $266 $309 $364 $404 $411 $372 $394 $396

Per Capita Expenses $216 $365 $396 $276 $287 $306 $324 $416 $352 $366 $367

The Utility Fund encompasses activities associated with providing water and sewer services to Town residents and other customers of the system. Over the eleven-year period from FY 2001 through FY 2011, per capita revenues have fluctuated moderately while per capita expenses increased more, mainly due to capital project funding. In FY 2011, per capita revenues are budgeted at 46.3% above FY 2001 levels, and per capita expenses are budgeted 70.3% higher than in FY 2001. During this same period, the Town's population grew from approximately 95,949 at the beginning of FY 2001 to an estimated 141,271 as of FY 2011. This represents a 47.2% increase in population over the eleven-year period.


TOWN OF CARY UTILITY FUND REVENUES BY SOURCE Actual FY 2007 $21,319,448 $21,310,253 $1,903,884 $2,324,650

Actual FY 2008 $22,762,524 $22,901,217 $1,711,347 $3,005,646

Actual

Estimated

Budget

REVENUE TYPE Charges for Services - Water Charges for Services - Sewer Other Operating Revenue Non-Operating Revenue

FY 2009 $20,660,623 $24,642,401 $1,219,154 $2,045,475

FY 2010 $22,898,019 $28,633,364 $1,094,121 $975,290

FY 2011 $23,141,480 $30,853,390 $1,315,931 $624,659

TOTAL

$46,858,235

$50,380,734

$48,567,653

$53,600,794

$55,935,460

% Change 2010 / 2011 1.1% 7.8% 20.3% -36.0% 4.4%

FY 2011 Utility Fund Revenue Sources

Charges for Services Water 41.5%

Charges for Services Sewer 53.6%

Non-Operating Revenue 2.2%

Other Operating Revenue 2.4%


TOWN OF CARY UTILITY FUND EXPENDITURES BY FUNCTION Actual FY 2007 $1,689,399 $899,936 $4,839,519 $7,926,626 $312,051 $5,577,817 $2,423,281 $0 $0 $12,017,047 $1,000,000 $849,254

Actual FY 2008 $1,794,282 $988,644 $5,318,193 $8,626,042 $435,100 $6,526,864 $3,056,451 $3,031,794 $281,360 $12,434,761 $7,091,499 $1,461,510

Actual

Estimated

Budget

EXPENDITURE TYPE Customer Accounting PWUT - Administration Cary/Apex Water Treatment Plant Water Reclamation Facilities Water Conservation PWUT - Field Operations Systems Maint. & Pretreatment Transfer to Sewer Capital Projects Transfer to Water Capital Projects Debt Service Transfers to Capital Projects Other Indirect & Other Costs

FY 2009 $2,007,948 $1,698,917 $5,801,225 $9,221,740 $476,638 $7,439,182 $2,946,382 $0 $0 $12,209,830 $2,973,555 $1,292,523

FY 2010 $2,261,449 $1,232,536 $6,142,573 $10,770,252 $664,804 $8,189,233 $2,945,667 $0 $0 $13,500,000 $500,000 $3,574,653

FY 2011 $2,546,017 $1,367,666 $6,566,260 $11,702,836 $493,066 $8,394,108 $3,138,108 $0 $0 $13,342,916 $576,417 $3,663,837

TOTAL

$37,534,930

$51,046,500

$46,067,940

$49,781,167

$51,791,231

% Change 2010 / 2011 12.6% 11.0% 6.9% 8.7% -25.8% 2.5% 6.5% N/A N/A -1.2% 15.3% 2.5% 4.0%

FY FY 20112011 Utility Fund Expenditures Utility Fund Expenditures

Wa ter Reclama tion Water Recla mation Fa cilities Fa cilities 21.7%

21.7%

Ca pita l Projects Tra nsfer Capital Projects Transfer 1.1%

1.1%

PWUT - Field Operations PWUT 16.2% - Field Opera tions

16.2%

All Other Functions 34.3%

All Other Functions 34.3%

Debt Service 25.8%

Debt Service 25.8%


0 0

TOWN OF CARY REVENUE SOURCES AND TRENDS - UTILITY FUND

Total projected utility fund revenues for FY 2011 are $55,925,460, an increase of 4.36% from estimated FY 2010 revenues. Retail water and sewer charges comprise the majority (95.4%) of all utility fund revenues. The Town uses a tiered rate structure for residential customers that results in progressively higher rates as the consumption level increases. Irrigation customers are charged at the third tier rate to maintain consistency with the rate charged other residential customers for discretionary usage. A fourth tier was implemented in FY 2001 as a water conservation incentive to curtail excessive discretionary usage. The FY 2011 utility fund budget assumes a rate increase that will, on average, increase the typical 7,000 gallon per month customer’s utility bill by 7.4%. Rate increases are in the base rates for tier 1-4 accounts, as well as the volume charge for sewer usage. These rate increases are a function of increased costs related to capital infrastructure improvements. Revenue sources in the utility fund are discussed below. There are also graphs showing nine years of actual data, estimated FY 2010 revenues, and budgeted FY 2011 revenues for the two major revenue sources - water and sewer retail fees. •

Water Retail Fees = $22,522,572 $24,000,000 $21,000,000 $18,000,000

Amount

$15,000,000 $12,000,000 $9,000,000 $6,000,000 $3,000,000

2011

2010

2009

2008

2007

2006

2005

2004

2003

2002

2001

$0

Fiscal Year

The Town uses a four-tier, consumption-based rate structure to charge for retail water use. In FY 2011, revenues are budgeted to increase 1.11% over FY 2010 estimates. An increase in water base rate charges and a slight projected increase in overall water consumption both contribute to expected revenue growth. Though overall water consumption is projected to increase slightly, the average consumption per single family customer is projected to remain flat due to water conservation practices and weather conditions. The primary drivers of this revenue source are the rate structure, forecasted water use, projected meter growth, and weather conditions. •

Water Wholesale Sales = $138,442 This revenue source is for the sale of water to Durham and the Raleigh-Durham Airport Authority. Water wholesale sales are driven by contracts with customers and revenues forecasted based on historical experience. This revenue is budgeted to decrease 3.43% over the FY 2010 estimate.

Bulk Water/Hydrants = $58,606 This revenue source is from the sale of water taken directly from the Town’s fire hydrants. These sales are usually to developers to hose down sites when construction is complete. This revenue is budgeted to remain flat from the FY 2010 estimate.


Water Capacity Charges = $269,642 This revenue source is based on the charges to the Town’s wholesale water customers which includes the RaleighDurham (RDU) Airport Authority and Chatham County. This charge covers the wholesale water customers’ share of capital costs for the Town of Cary’s water treatment facility.

Raw Water Sales = $152,218 This revenue source is from raw water sales to Chatham County. Raw water sales are driven by costs at the Town’s water treatment plant and the volume of raw water pumped. This revenue is budgeted to increase 6.38% over the FY 2010 estimate.

Sewer Retail Fees = $30,853,390

2011

2010

2009

2008

2007

2006

2005

2004

2003

2002

$33,000,000 $30,000,000 $27,000,000 $24,000,000 $21,000,000 $18,000,000 $15,000,000 $12,000,000 $9,000,000 $6,000,000 $3,000,000 $0

2001

Amount

Fiscal Year

Sewer retail fees are composed of a fixed charge based on meter size and a variable charge based on water consumption. In FY 2011, revenues are budgeted to increase 7.75% over FY 2010 estimates. This trend is mainly a result of an increase to the volume charge from $6.54 to $7.04 per thousand gallons in FY 2011. This rate increase will help cover debt service costs related to sewer system capital improvements. The primary drivers of this revenue source are the rate structure, forecasted water use, projected meter growth, and weather conditions. •

Sewer Wholesale Service = $0 This revenue source was charged to the Town of Morrisville for wholesale sewer service and was based on costs at the Town of Cary’s North Cary Water Reclamation Facility. In 2007, the Town no longer collected wholesale sewer revenue from the Town of Morrisville due to the merger of our utilities; instead retail sewer revenue is now collected from Morrisville customers.

Morrisville Wastewater Capacity Charges = $0 This revenue source was charged to the Town of Morrisville for its use of the Town’s North Cary Water Reclamation Facility. In 2007, the Town no longer collected wastewater capacity revenue from the Town of Morrisville due to the merger of our utilities; instead retail sewer revenue is now collected from Morrisville customers.

Connection Fees = $476,269 This revenue source is collected when the Town completes a sewer tap, water tap or installs a water meter. This charge is intended to cover the costs of the installation or connection. Fees are based on the size of the connection and paid at the time building permits are issued. This fee is paid only on in-fill construction and not for subdivision development. This revenue is budgeted to increase 103% from the FY 2010 estimate based on the increased fees associated with new meters.

New Account Service Charge = $182,316 This fee is charged to new utility customers to partially defray the administrative costs of new account setup. This revenue is budgeted to decrease 4.0% below the FY 2010 estimate.

Utility Inspection Fees = $23,381 This revenue source includes sewer inspection fees, water inspection fees, water and sewer tap inspection fees, and water extension fees. Water and sewer inspection fees are paid by developers for water and sewer inspections carried out on all construction for conformity with the Town’s zoning and code regulations. Residential inspections are conducted prior to the fee being paid, as infrastructure is laid before lots are recorded. The revenue is received when the residential plat is submitted for review by the Town. For commercial development, water and sewer inspection


fees are paid when the building permit is issued on a site plan. This revenue is budgeted to decrease 4.0% below the FY 2010 estimate. •

Reconnection Fees = $84,156 This revenue source is for fees collected by the Town for the reconnection of water service after a customer has defaulted on water service charges. This revenue is budgeted to increase 3.0% from the FY 2010 estimate.

Pretreatment Program Fees = $54,554 This revenue source is for charges to sewer service users who exceed the Town’s discharge limits. This revenue is budgeted to decrease 4.0% from the FY 2010 estimate.

Fats, Oils, and Greases (FOG) Program Fees = $59,830 This revenue source is an annual fee that all food services establishments in Cary must pay. This fee recovers the Town’s cost for sampling, site evaluation, compliance determination, and documentation associated with the program. This revenue is budgeted to decrease 4.0% from the FY 2010 estimate.

Sewer Extension Permits = $1,536 This revenue source represents residual payments from sewer permits issued in previous years. This revenue is budgeted to decrease 4.0% under the FY 2010 estimate.

Late Payment Charge = $230,000 This revenue source is for charges collected on overdue utility bills. This revenue is budgeted to decrease 2.95% under the FY 2010 estimate.

Returned Check Charge = $6,494 This revenue source is paid by utility customers who issue bad checks to the Town. This revenue source has slowly declined as more citizens pay their utility bills with credit and debit cards. This revenue is budgeted to decrease 7.0% from the FY 2010 estimate.

Re-installment Fees = $8,145 This revenue source is a fee levied when a Town employee must make more than one trip to set a water meter. This revenue is budgeted to decrease 4.0% from the FY 2010 estimate.

Cross-Connection Program Fees = $189,250 This revenue source, approved in FY 2008, is part of the Town’s revised cross connection control program where the Town of Cary contracts for the inspection of backflow devices and charges residential customers a flat $50.00 fee. This revenue is budgeted to remain flat in comparison to the FY 2010 estimate.

Interest Earned = $593,292 This revenue source is interest earned on the portion of Town investments attributable to the utility fund. This revenue is budgeted to decrease 37.09% from the FY 2010 estimate due to lower expected returns on the Town’s investments.

Proceeds from Sale of Assets = $10,000 This revenue source is generated by the sale of surplus vehicles and equipment that are no longer needed for utility fund operations. The money generated from these sales can vary dramatically based on which assets reach the end of their useful life in a given year. This revenue is budgeted to remain unchanged from the FY 2010 estimate.

Miscellaneous Revenue = $21,367 This revenue source is for revenues that do not meet the definition of any other revenue category. Examples of miscellaneous revenues include citation charges, sale of rain barrels, and equipment and labor charges. This revenue is budgeted to decrease 4.0% from the FY 2010 estimate.


TOWN OF CARY UTILITY FUND SUMMARY Actual FY 2007 REVENUES Water Fees - Retail Water Wholesale Service Bulk Water/Hydrants

Actual FY 2008

Actual FY 2009

Estimated FY 2010

Budget FY 2011

20,618,645 96,823 200,733

21,257,880 1,103,864 174,648

20,148,396 106,504 125,615

22,274,578 143,361 58,606

REVENUES 22,522,572 Water Fees - Retail 138,442 Water Wholesale Service 58,606 Bulk Water/Hydrants

301,477 101,769 (6,523) (235,245) 21,319,448

289,100 102,129 (15,839) (149,258) 22,762,524

282,146 118,582 12,711 (133,331) 20,660,623

278,379 143,095 ----22,898,019

269,642 Water Capacity-RDU/Morris./Chatham 152,218 Raw Water Sales --- Reclaimed Water --- Irrigation 23,141,480 Subtotal Charges for Services-Water

Sewer Fees - Retail Sewer Wholesale Service Morrisville WW Capacity Charges Subtotal Charges for Services-Sewer

21,310,253 ----21,310,253

22,901,217 ----22,901,217

24,642,401 ----24,642,401

28,633,364 ----28,633,364

30,853,390 ----30,853,390

Sewer Fees - Retail Sewer Wholesale Service Morrisville WW Capacity Charges Subtotal Charges for Services-Sewer

Connection Fees New Account Service Charge Utility Inspection Fees Reconnection Fees Pretreatment Program Fees Fats, Oils, Grease Fees Sewer Extension Permits Late Payment Charge Returned Check Charge Re-installment Fees Cross Connection Program Fees Total Other Operating Revenues Subtotal Operating Revenues

399,498 210,199 891,928 47,103 85,484 52,280 15,000 169,062 7,348 25,983 --1,903,884 44,533,585

531,940 194,965 460,479 57,887 91,632 59,960 14,750 206,786 6,425 86,523 --1,711,347 47,375,088

301,783 195,484 92,474 72,235 116,971 60,360 5,200 237,519 7,530 129,598 --1,219,154 46,522,178

235,696 189,913 24,355 81,704 56,827 62,323 1,600 236,986 6,983 8,484 189,250 1,094,121 52,625,504

476,269 182,316 23,381 84,156 54,554 59,830 1,536 230,000 6,494 8,145 189,250 1,315,931 55,310,801

Connection Fees New Account Service Charge Utility Inspection Fees Reconnection Fees Pretreatment Program Fees Fats, Oils, Grease Fees Sewer Extension Permits Late Payment Charge Returned Check Charge Re-installment Fees Cross Connection Program Fees Subtotal Other Operating Revenues Subtotal Operating Revenues

Interest Earnings Gain on Investments Proceeds from Sale of Assets Miscellaneous Revenues Subtotal Non-Operating Revenues

1,948,527 296,027 52,949 27,147 2,324,650

2,289,913 543,060 33,214 139,459 3,005,646

1,801,845 71,148 64,942 107,540 2,045,475

943,033 --10,000 22,257 975,290

593,292 --10,000 21,367 624,659

TOTAL REVENUES

46,858,235

50,380,734

48,567,653

53,600,794

Water Capacity-RDU/Morris./Chatham Raw Water Sales Reclaimed Water Irrigation Subtotal Charges for Services-Water

Interest Earnings Gain on Investments Proceeds from Sale of Assets Miscellaneous Revenues Subtotal Non-Operating Revenues

55,935,460 TOTAL REVENUES


Actual FY 2007

Actual FY 2008

Actual FY 2009

Estimated FY 2010

EXPENDITURES Finance - Customer Accounting Public Works & Utilities Administration Admin. Costs Paid to General Fund (GF) Engineering Costs Paid to General Fund Water Conservation Pretreatment

1,689,399 899,936 1,758,778 --312,051 335,277

1,794,282 988,644 2,353,681 --435,100 345,338

2,007,948 1,698,917 2,354,556 --476,638 325,225

2,261,449 1,232,536 2,027,331 1,917,850 664,804 274,169

2,546,017 1,367,666 2,253,067 2,004,561 493,066 295,511

Field Operations Utility Systems Management North Cary WRF South Cary WRF Cary/Apex Water Treatment Plant Western Wake WRF Reimbursement from Apex Subtotal Departmental Expenditures

5,577,817 2,088,004 4,910,783 3,015,843 4,839,519 --(909,524) 24,517,883

6,526,864 2,711,113 5,380,058 3,245,984 5,318,193 --(852,731) 28,246,526

7,439,182 2,621,157 5,789,984 3,431,756 5,801,225 --(1,062,033) 30,884,555

8,189,233 2,671,498 7,004,776 3,765,476 6,142,573 --(1,148,827) 35,002,868

8,394,108 2,842,597 7,945,037 3,757,799 6,566,260 --(1,266,546) 37,199,143

Field Operations Utility Systems Management North Cary WRF South Cary WRF Cary/Apex Water Treatment Plant Western Wake WRF Reimbursement from Apex Subtotal Departmental Expenditures

NON-DEPARTMENTAL Department Allocation Accounts Long-term Debt Principal Payment Interest Expense Bond Issuance Costs & Expenses Bond Proceeds Subtotal Non-Departmental Expenditures

--6,647,064 4,732,116 525,820 (258,903) 11,646,097

--6,919,698 5,275,528 7,219 --12,202,445

--6,862,583 5,000,132 319,292 (30,320,980) (18,138,973)

--6,898,860 5,571,965 700,000 --13,170,825

--6,914,100 5,307,741 680,000 --12,901,841

NON-DEPARTMENTAL Department Allocation Accounts Long-term Debt Principal Payment Interest Expense Bond Issuance Costs & Expenses Bond Proceeds Subtotal Non-Departmental Expenditures

TOTAL EXPENDITURES

36,163,980

40,448,971

12,745,582

48,173,693

50,100,984 TOTAL EXPENDITURES

Transfer to GF (Open Space Debt Svc) Transfer to Sewer Projects Transfer to Water Projects Transfer to Open Space Transfer to Utility Capital Reserve Fund Other Payments Transfer to Ins., Sm Claims, & Work Comp Total Other Revenues (Expenditures)

------1,000,000 ------1,370,950

(39,440) 3,031,794 281,360 6,000,000 1,091,499 ----10,597,529

------1,000,000 1,973,555 30,006,378 --33,322,358

500,000 ----500,000 ----278,299 1,607,474

TOTAL EXPENDITURES & TRANSFERS

37,534,930

51,046,500

46,067,940

49,781,167

51,791,231 TOTAL EXPENDITURES & TRANSFERS

BALANCES Beginning Fund Balance

35,970,367

45,293,673

44,627,907

47,127,620

BALANCES 50,947,247 Beginning Fund Balance

Total Revenues

46,858,235

50,380,734

48,567,653

53,600,794

55,935,460 Total Revenues

Beg. Fund Balance plus Revenues

82,828,603

95,674,407

93,195,560

100,728,414

106,882,707 Beg. Fund Balance plus Revenues

51,791,231 Total Expenditures & Transfers

Total Expenditures & Transfers

37,534,930

51,046,500

46,067,940

49,781,167

Morrisville Fund Balance Addition Related to Merger

---

---

---

---

ENDING FUND BALANCE

45,293,673

44,627,907

47,127,620

50,947,247

Appropriation to (from) Fund Balance

9,323,305

2,499,713

3,819,627

(665,766)

Budget FY 2011

423,583 ----576,417 ----249,172 1,690,247

---

EXPENDITURES Finance - Customer Accounting Public Works & Utilities Administration Admin. Costs Paid to General Fund (GF) Engineering Costs Paid to General Fund Water Conservation Pretreatment

Transfer to GF (Open Space Debt Svc) Transfer to Sewer Projects Transfer to Water Projects Transfer to Open Space Transfer to Utility Capital Reserve Fund Other Payments Transfer to Ins., Sm Claims, & Work Comp Total Other Revenues (Expenditures)

Morrisville Fund Balance Addition Related to Merger

55,091,476 ENDING FUND BALANCE 4,144,229 Appropriation to (from ) Fund Balance


10

3 12 9 8 4

1 5 6 7

Department Goals and Initiatives

11 2

Improve Environment & Quality of Life

Meet Or Exceed All Regulatory Requirements

Deliver Efficient & Effective Services

Provide Understandable & Convenient Services

Deliver Services Promptly & Consistently

Achieve a stable and strong financial position by accurately estimating, prudently allocating, and managing financial resources.

Operationalize Service Levels & Measure Success

Town Focus Areas Focus Area III: Financial Condition

Engage Citizens To Determine Levels Of Service

Comply With All Laws & Regulations

Proactively Manage Risk

Bill & Collect Revenues Accurately & Timely

Prudently Manage Debt, Cash, & Investments

Manage Fund Balance To Aid Financial Position

Forecast Operational & Fiscal Impacts

Estimate Revenues Conservatively

Provide Accountability Through Internal Controls

Promote Efficient & Effective Resource Allocation

Allocate Funding To Execute Priorities

Ensure that roads, water and wastewater facilities, parks, and other infrastructure exists for the existing citizens and for the future needs identified in the comprehensive plan.

Maintain Organization Credibility

Focus Area II: Infrastructure

Maintain AAA Bond Rating

Match Public Facilities With Community Expectations

Manage Infrastructure Plans To Schedule & Budget

Develop Alternative Financing Plans

Achieve a well-planned community using innovative and proactive planning approaches and techniques.

Prioritize Capital Project Construction

Focus Area I: Community Planning

Update Infrastructure Plans

Understand Forces Affecting the Built Community

Resolve Conflict Between Ordinances & Community Response

Identify Development Trends & Related Policy Changes

Respond To & Include Those Impacted by Development

Create Developer and Affected Citizen Connections

Administer Ordinances & Guidelines as Adopted

CUSTOMER ACCOUNTING DIVISION

Additional information about the Customer Accounting Division of the Finance Department may be obtained by calling Cindy Nicolaisen, Utility Accounts Manager, at (919) 469-4054, through e-mail at cindy.nicolaisen@townofcary.org, or by visiting the Townâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s website at www.townofcary.org.

TOWN OF CARY GOALS AND INITIATIVES Focus Area IV: Municipal Services

Town Goals Achieve a high level of service to the citizens in a prompt, reliable, responsive, and cost-effective manner.

Town Initiatives


DIVISION GOALS AND INITIATIVES Customer Service and Utility Billing 1. Process customer requests and respond to inquiries regarding new accounts, utility billing, online services, payments and change in services for approximately 52,400 customers. 2. Maintain accurate and complete customer records to support accurate, timely collection and data analysis. 3. Bill approximately 52,400 customer accounts per month for water, sewer, solid waste and other miscellaneous Town services. 4. Compile meaningful consumption data for routine and ad hoc consumption analysis. Meter Reading and Field Services 5. Read approximately 59,700 water meters per month for all residential, commercial and industrial locations that receive water, irrigation and sewer services from the Town. 6. Fulfill service orders to initiate or terminate water service. 7. Perform check for leaks and other miscellaneous requests for customer usage analysis. 8. Complete service disconnections and reconnections for delinquent accounts. Payment Collections 9. Receive and post payments for utility bills via mail, in person and on-line, property taxes and other miscellaneous revenues. 10. Prepare daily bank deposits. 11. Encourage and initiate customer bank draft authorizations. 12. Manage delinquencies and related service disconnections/reconnections. 13. Provide bank with files for automatic bank draft and ebox/lockbox processing. FY 2010 ACCOMPLISHMENTS • Implemented new FY 2010 utility rates accurately and on schedule. • Maintained monthly billing and reading schedules on consistent 28-30 day reading cycles. • Planned for acquisition and implementation of advanced meter infrastructure. • Maintained monthly consumption reporting and analysis. • Supported Public Works/Utilities Department large meter replacement program in Morrisville. • Streamlined mail payment processing by implementing lock box and e box. • Implemented Online Utility Credit Scoring to determine deposit amounts. • Updated Finance Utility policy. • Continued promoting the OASIS program KEY PERFORMANCE OBJECTIVES • Ensure that 100% of all meters are read on a 28-30 day cycle. • Ensure that 100% of all customers are billed within one day of the scheduled bill date. • Process payments on day received. • Maintain weekly disconnection of delinquent accounts to maximize collections. KEY PERFORMANCE MEASURES Actual FY 2009

Estimated FY 2010

Projected FY 2011

% meter reading completed no later than two days before scheduled bill date

100%

98.6% *

100%

% billing schedules met

99.9%

99.9%

99.9%

% payments processed on day received

99.9%

99.9%

99.9%

Performance Measure

* 9,881 meters were estimated in February due to snow.


KEY WORKLOAD INDICATORS Actual FY 2009

Estimated FY 2010

Projected FY 2011

Average no. of meters read per month

56,300

58,000

59,700

Average no. of customers billed per month

48,950

50,400

52,000

No. service orders processed per year

27,608

29,600

31,500

Average no. of payments processed per month

44,400

46,000

47,300

1,253

1,300

1,350

Workload Indicators

No. of Wake County Property Tax payments processed per month ACTIVITY HISTORY Fund Number: 030-4440 Actual FY 2007

Actual FY 2008

Actual FY2009

Estimated FY2010

Budget FY2011

$1,252,528

$1,301,129

$1,469,257

$1,593,888

$1,715,010

$436,871

$459,955

$475,913

$667,561

$816,007

Capital Outlay

$0

$22,106

$49,954

$0

$0

Other

$0

$11,090

$12,823

$0

$15,000

Total

$1,689,399

$1,794,280

$2,007,947

$2,261,449

$2,546,017

28.125

28.000

29.125

29.125

29.125

Activity Personnel Services Operations and Maintenance

Authorized FTEs

SIGNIFICANT BUDGET AND SERVICE LEVEL CHANGES BEYOND CURRENT LEVELS

There are no significant budget or service level changes in the FY2011 budget.


Department Goals and Initiatives 6 7 10 5 6 7 2 3

Improve Environment & Quality of Life

Achieve a stable and strong financial position by accurately estimating, prudently allocating, and managing financial resources.

Meet Or Exceed All Regulatory Requirements

Ensure that roads, water and wastewater facilities, parks, and other infrastructure exists for the existing citizens and for the future needs identified in the comprehensive plan.

Deliver Efficient & Effective Services

Achieve a well-planned community using innovative and proactive planning approaches and techniques.

Provide Understandable & Convenient Services

Focus Area III: Financial Condition

Deliver Services Promptly & Consistently

Focus Area II: Infrastructure

Operationalize Service Levels & Measure Success

Comply With All Laws & Regulations

Proactively Manage Risk

Bill & Collect Revenues Accurately & Timely

Prudently Manage Debt, Cash, & Investments

Manage Fund Balance To Aid Financial Position

Forecast Operational & Fiscal Impacts

Estimate Revenues Conservatively

Provide Accountability Through Internal Controls

Promote Efficient & Effective Resource Allocation

Allocate Funding To Execute Priorities

Maintain Organization Credibility

Maintain AAA Bond Rating

Identification of Financial Strategy

Match Public Facilities With Community Expectations

Manage Infrastructure Plans To Schedule & Budget

Develop Alternative Financing Plans

Prioritize Capital Project Construction

Update Infrastructure Plans

Understand Forces Affecting the Built Community

Resolve Conflict Between Ordinances & Community Response

Identify Development Trends & Related Policy Changes

Respond To & Include Those Impacted by Development

Focus Area I: Community Planning

Engage Citizens To Determine Levels Of Service

2 Create Developer and Affected Citizen Connections

Administer Ordinances & Guidelines as Adopted

WATER CONSERVATION DIVISION

Additional information about the Water Conservation division may be obtained by contacting Leila Goodwin, Water Resources Manager at (919) 462-3846, through e-mail at leila.goodwin@townofcary.org, or by visiting the Townâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s website at www.townofcary.org.

TOWN OF CARY GOALS AND INITIATIVES Town Focus Areas Focus Area IV: Municipal Services

Town Goals Achieve a high level of service to the citizens in a prompt, reliable, responsive, and costeffective manner.

Town Initiatives

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 10


DIVISION GOALS AND INITIATIVES 1. Maintain a comprehensive approach to water conservation through regulations, educational programs, and incentives. 2. Ensure that all customers receive information regarding water conservation ordinances, requirements, and incentives. 3. In times of water shortage, meet water use reduction goals as identified in the water shortage response plan. 4. Manage peak demand through education, technology and regulations to help delay future water treatment facility expansions. 5. Continue water conservation programs that aid in maintaining compliance with Cary’s state interbasin transfer certificate. 6. Promote conservation as an approach for management of Cary’s commitment to the State to incorporate water conservation as part of water supply planning. 7. Evaluate water conservation programs for cost-efficiency and effectiveness, and adjust programs and priorities as needed.

8. Ensure compliance with all State requirements relative to water conservation issues. 9. Implement water conservation initiatives as identified by the Integrated Water Resources Management Plan in order to meet the long term water supply needs of our community. 10. Engage citizens in volunteer initiatives, through Spruce, to reduce litter and beautify the Town in support of the Town’s Goal of improving the environment and quality of life for our citizens. FY 2010 ACCOMPLISHMENTS

• • • • • • •

Reduced potable water use by an estimated 5.25 million of gallons of water per year through the High Efficiency Toilet Rebate and Turf Buy Back Programs. Received approval from the State for our 2009 Water Shortage Response Plan. Redesigned Let’s be Water Conscious brochure to reflect new programs. Taught conservation lessons to 2000 students. Enhanced Spruce program offerings with Adopt a Spot, a program in which volunteers take long–term responsibility to beautify and reduce litter at particular locations within our community. Through volunteer efforts, collected 4 tons of litter through Spruce events. Engaged 520 volunteers in Spruce events, during the first full year of the program.

KEY PERFORMANCE OBJECTIVES

• • • • • • •

Maintain 99% compliance with Rain Sensor Ordinance. Displace the annual consumption of at least five million gallons of potable water with incentive programs such as Turf Buy Back and HET rebates. Conduct educational programs for at least 50% of second and eight grade students in Cary area schools annually. Conduct educational workshops for at least 100 customers per year. Ensure that less then 1% of customers receive a second Notice of Violation for violating the Alternate Day Watering Ordinance annually. Ensure that less than 1% customers receive a second Notice of Violation for violating the Water Waste Ordinance annually. Have 33% of single family residential households assigned to a block leader by 2015.


KEY PERFORMANCE MEASURES Actual FY 2009

Estimated FY 2010

Projected FY 2011

4,499,754

5.5 million

5.5 million

765,916

810,000

900,000

Compliance rate with rain sensor ordinance

95%

98%

99%

% of residential customers receiving educational outreach materials annually

12%

98%

98%

113

120

125

% of 2nd grade classes in Cary reached

50%

50%

50%

% of 8th grade classes Cary reached

25%

50%

50%

% of customers receiving 2nd NOV for ADW

<1%

<1%

<1%

% of customers receiving 2nd NOV for WW

<1%

<1%

<1%

% single family residential customers with Block Leaders

15%

16%

17%

Tons of litter collected through Spruce initiatives

2.5

4.0

5.0

Number of volunteers engaged in Spruce initiatives

249

520

600

Number of volunteer hours given in support of Spruce

709

1,500

1,800

Actual FY 2009

Estimated FY 2010

Projected FY 2011

Number of students participating in elementary education program

1,476

1,400

1400

Number of students in other targeted lessons and festivals (Scouts, Earth Day, etc.)

1,250

1,000

1,000

480

900

900

Number of Block Leaders recruited and trained

84

94

100

Number of residential water audits

48

55

60

Number of workshops conducted

7

10

10

% of residential customers reached with water conservation targeted mailings--postcard

0%

100%

100%

Number of rain barrels sold

186

150

180

Site-specific water budgets developed (cumulative)

3,400

3,800

3,880

Notices of Violation issued

1,164

1,100

1,200

7

12

15

Performance Measure HET Rebate Program â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Gallons Saved Per Year Turf Buy Back â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Gallons Saved Per Year

Customers attending workshops

*New program in Fiscal Year 2009.

KEY WORKLOAD INDICATORS Workload Indicator

Number of students in middle school education program

Number of Spruce events held


ACTIVITY HISTORY Fund Number: 030-7011 Activity

Actual FY 2007

Actual FY 2008

Actual FY2009

Estimated FY2010

Budget FY2011

Personnel Services

$234,678

$244,428

$301,725

$355,922

$263,952

$77,375

$178,547

$174,912

$308,882

$229,114

$0

$12,125

$0

$0

$0

$312,053

$435,100

$476,637

$664,804

$493,066

4

5

6

6

3.5

Operations and Maintenance Capital Outlay Total Authorized FTEs

SIGNIFICANT BUDGET AND SERVICE LEVEL CHANGES FROM CURRENT LEVELS • In FY2011, the two Water Conservation Technicians focused on enforcement and field education will begin reporting to the Water Distribution Operations group in the Public Works Division. Expenses associated with these two employees are still considered part of the water conservation program but will be budgeted in the Operations Division of Public Works. This will increase efficiency and coordination with managing water waste in both the Town’s and the customers’ water systems. • One Conservation Specialist position was held vacant during FY10 and is being removed from the FY11 staffing document.


UTILITY PRETREATMENT DIVISION Additional information about the Utility Pretreatment Division may be obtained by contacting Donald Smith, Utility Pretreatment Manager, at (919) 319-4564, through e-mail at donald.smith@townofcary.org, or by visiting the Townâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s website at www.townofcary.org.

TOWN OF CARY GOALS AND INITIATIVES Town Focus Areas Focus Area I: Community Planning

Focus Area II: Infrastructure

Focus Area III: Financial Condition

Focus Area IV: Municipal Services

Achieve a well-planned community using innovative and proactive planning approaches and techniques.

Ensure that roads, water and wastewater facilities, parks, and other infrastructure exists for the existing citizens and for the future needs identified in the comprehensive plan.

Achieve a stable and strong financial position by accurately estimating, prudently allocating, and managing financial resources.

Town Goals Achieve a high level of service to the citizens in a prompt, reliable, responsive, and costeffective manner.

Improve Environment & Quality of Life

Meet Or Exceed All Regulatory Requirements

Deliver Efficient & Effective Services

1 1

Provide Understandable & Convenient Services

5

Deliver Services Promptly & Consistently

1 2 3 5

Operationalize Service Levels & Measure Success

Comply With All Laws & Regulations

1 3 5 10

Engage Citizens To Determine Levels Of Service

Proactively Manage Risk

Bill & Collect Revenues Accurately & Timely

Prudently Manage Debt, Cash, & Investments

Manage Fund Balance To Aid Financial Position

Forecast Operational & Fiscal Impacts

Estimate Revenues Conservatively

Provide Accountability Through Internal Controls

Promote Efficient & Effective Resource Allocation

Allocate Funding To Execute Priorities

Maintain Organization Credibility

Maintain AAA Bond Rating

Identification of Financial Strategy

Match Public Facilities With Community Expectations

Manage Infrastructure Plans To Schedule & Budget

Develop Alternative Financing Plans

Prioritize Capital Project Construction

Update Infrastructure Plans

Understand Forces Affecting the Built Community

Resolve Conflict Between Ordinances & Community Response

Identify Development Trends & Related Policy Changes

Respond To & Include Those Impacted by Development

Create Developer and Affected Citizen Connections

Administer Ordinances & Guidelines as Adopted

Town Initiatives

Department Goals and Initiatives 1 2 3 7 9 10

11

4 5 6

5

DIVISION GOALS AND INITIATIVES 1. Enforce all utility related ordinances including the Sewer Use Ordinance, Industrial Pretreatment Program, Fats, Oils, and Greases (FOG) Control Ordinance, Inflow and Infiltration Ordinance, and Storm Water Ordinance. 2. Control, manage and oversee permitting, compliance monitoring, and enforcement as required by federal and state regulations for discharge activity from industrial and commercial users of the sanitary sewer treatment system. 3. Enforce the Grease Control Ordinance mandated by the State of North Carolina, covering approximately 800 food service establishments (FSE), which targets sanitary sewer overflows by controlling the release of fats and grease into the sanitary sewer system. 4. Monitor waste discharge activity for all identified Significant and Non-Significant industrial users.

4 5 6 8 11

1 2 3

4 6 7 8


5. Perform “Sewer Use Education” sessions with individuals and groups. 6. Conduct and oversee special projects for the department; inter-jurisdictional agreements, nutrients, modeling, utilities merger and associated FSE identification and mapping. 7. Continue construction plan review and installation inspection of pretreatment devices to ensure compliance with ordinance and that ensure adequate protection measures are in place for wastewater discharges to sanitary sewer. 8. Established methods with Durham County to assure rational and representative pollutant characterization. 9. Apply enforcement response plan in consistent manner to noncompliant industrial and other users of sewer system. 10. Review site and construction plans for pretreatment program adequacy. 11. Maintain databases relative to pretreatment, and fats, oils, and grease control program for the purpose of protecting sanitary sewer collection and treatment systems.

FY 2010 ACCOMPLISHMENTS • Continued providing monitoring, inspections, compliance reviews and enforcement related to the fats, oil, and grease control program (FOG), result from which supports reductions in sanitary sewer overflows and restoration of sewer infrastructure capacity. • Integrated with Town of Morrisville Inspections and Permits department for proper sizing and installation of grease interceptors and other pretreatment devices. • Continue to collaborate with North Carolina State University and the Water Environment Research Foundation on a research project studying the effects of fats, roots, oil, and grease on municipal sanitary sewer collection systems. • Collaborated with North Carolina State University and the Consortium of Grease Interceptor Biological Additive Companies for use and evaluation of biological additive effectiveness for grease consumption and reduction in interceptor cleaning frequencies. • Through monitoring programs continue to detect and alleviate illegal disposal of liquid wastes into sanitary sewer system. • Continue to receive requests for the Illegal Disposal of Liquid Wastes into Sanitary Sewer video from many cities around the nation. • Implementing sewer service agreement with Durham County to accept industrial-based wastewater from Town customers. Durham County Significant Industrial User permitting strategy was placed instituted. • Conducted all wastewater industrial user permit monitoring in accordance with Town issued wastewater discharge permits. • Continue to model nutrient loading from major industrial users for master plan development. • Conducted wastewater treatment plant analysis for loading capabilities. • Conducted comprehensive survey of commercial users in order to identify potential significant wastewater contributions. • Modification and new sections added to the Sewer Use Ordinance. • Updated Sewer Use Ordinance Enforcement Response Plan • FOG program continues to be recognized by Water Environment Federation and Environmental Protection Agency as an innovator in the country. • Developed and installed real time phosphorus monitoring system for Durham County sewer service agreement and permit. • Developed and implemented, in conjunction with the Solid Waste Division, a Residential Waste Cooking Oil Collection System Program for the beneficial reuse of waste cooking oils and to reduce the amount of oil that is disposed in the sanitary sewer. KEY PERFORMANCE OBJECTIVES 1. Inspect 100% of significant industrial wastewater discharge users annually. 2. Achieve 100% compliance with State and Federal Industrial Pretreatment program requirements annually. 3. Ensure that 95% of all food preparation/service organizations have adequate grease interceptor and management controls in place. 4. Ensure that there are no reoccurring sanitary sewer overflows within six months due to fat, oil or grease accumulation in commercial lines.


KEY PERFORMANCE MEASURES Actual FY 2009

Estimated FY 2010

Projected FY 2011

% of significant industrial users (SIU)inspected

100%

100%

100%

% SIU compliance with industrial pre-treatment requirements

100%

100%

100%

% of FSE sites with compliant grease control devices

80%

85%

85%

% of FSE sites with required management records

74%

75%

75%

Actual FY 2009

Estimated FY 2010

Projected FY 2011

383

587

600

Number of potential FSE sites needing initial and follow-up inspection

75

176

150

Number of notices of noncompliance, deficiency, or violation

25

75

100

796

785

780

35

40

40

Performance Measure

KEY WORKLOAD INDICATORS Workload Indicator Number of food service facilities inspected

Number of food service facilities Number of Industrial User Surveys qualifying for mailing Industrial Wastewater Survey forms ACTIVITY HISTORY Fund Number: 030-7012 Activity

Actual FY 2007

Actual FY 2008

Actual FY2009

Estimated FY2010

Budget FY2011

Personnel Services

$307,232

$321,358

$301,304

$236,246

$253,379

Operations and Maintenance

$28,044

$23,980

$23,921

$37,926

$42,132

Capital Outlay

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$335,276

$345,338

$325,225

$274,172

$295,511

4

4

4

4

3

Total Authorized FTEs

SIGNIFICANT BUDGET AND SERVICE LEVEL CHANGES BEYOND CURRENT LEVELS

â&#x20AC;˘

One Utility Pretreatment Technician II position was held vacant during FY10 and is being removed from the FY11 staffing document.


UTILITY SYSTEMS MANAGEMENT DIVISION Additional information about the Utility Systems Management division can be obtained by contacting Ken Schuster, Utility Systems Management Manager, at (919) 469-4095, through email at ken.schuster@townofcary.org or by visiting the Townâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s website at www.townofcary.org. TOWN OF CARY GOALS AND INITIATIVES Town Focus Areas Focus Area I: Community Planning

Focus Area II: Infrastructure

Focus Area III: Financial Condition

Focus Area IV: Municipal Services

Town Goals Achieve a well-planned community using innovative and proactive planning approaches and techniques.

Ensure that roads, water and wastewater facilities, parks, and other infrastructure exists for the existing citizens and for the future needs identified in the comprehensive plan.

Achieve a stable and strong financial position by accurately estimating, prudently allocating, and managing financial resources.

Achieve a high level of service to the citizens in a prompt, reliable, responsive, and cost-effective manner.

1 2 4 6

Improve Environment & Quality of Life

Deliver Efficient & Effective Services

2 4 6 7

Meet Or Exceed All Regulatory Requirements

Provide Understandable & Convenient Services

Deliver Services Promptly & Consistently

1 2

Operationalize Service Levels & Measure Success

Comply With All Laws & Regulations

1 2

Engage Citizens To Determine Levels Of Service

Proactively Manage Risk

Bill & Collect Revenues Accurately & Timely

Prudently Manage Debt, Cash, & Investments

Manage Fund Balance To Aid Financial Position

Forecast Operational & Fiscal Impacts

Estimate Revenues Conservatively

Provide Accountability Through Internal Controls

Promote Efficient & Effective Resource Allocation

Allocate Funding To Execute Priorities

Maintain Organization Credibility

Maintain AAA Bond Rating

Identification of Financial Strategy

Match Public Facilities With Community Expectations

1 2 4

Manage Infrastructure Plans To Schedule & Budget

Prioritize Capital Project Construction

1 2 4

Develop Alternative Financing Plans

Update Infrastructure Plans

1 2 4

Understand Forces Affecting the Built Community

Identify Development Trends & Related Policy Changes

1 2 4

Resolve Conflict Between Ordinances & Community Response

Respond To & Include Those Impacted by Development

Create Developer and Affected Citizen Connections

Administer Ordinances & Guidelines as Adopted

Town Initiatives

Department Goals and Initiatives 5

2 4

2 4

3

1 2 3 4

1 2 4

1 2 4

3 4

2 3 4

3 4

2 3 4

7

2

6 7

DIVISION GOALS AND INITIATIVES Operations & Maintenance 1. Provide uninterrupted water and wastewater operations by maintaining forty-six wastewater pumping facilities, seventeen odor control facilities, four drinking water booster stations, six elevated water storage tanks and one potable ground storage tank. 2. Provide reclaimed water by operating and maintaining two reclaimed water distribution systems. 3. Maintain, track, and document condition of the wastewater collection system through visual inspections, video assessment, flow monitoring and smoke testing. 4. Prevent off-site aesthetic nuisances.

1 2 4

1 2 4 6


Customer Service 5. Respond to and resolve collection system odor complaints through the use of technology and other mitigation techniques throughout the Town of Cary. 6. Train all new reclaimed water customers in the proper use of this resource. Meter Reading and Field Services 7. Oversee monthly master water meter and industrial wastewater user data used in billing information.

FY 2010 ACCOMPLISHMENTS • Removed two pump stations from active operation and replaced them with gravity sewer, minimizing the number of pump stations on the system. • Successfully completed the Reclaimed Water Holiday to ensure system reliability with no customer or commercial business service concerns. • Diverted partial flow from the Durham plant to the NCWRF through the use of a pump station that is normally off-line, in order to minimize treatment costs. • Continue to make significant improvements to customer access, regulatory compliance, and awareness of the reclaimed water program. KEY PERFORMANCE OBJECTIVES • Respond to 100% of trouble alarm warnings at the pump stations within 45 minutes. • Ensure that there are fewer than .06 odor complaints per mile of sewer line annually. • Minimize customer related issues related to new or existing reclaimed water service. KEY PERFORMANCE MEASURES Actual FY 2009

Estimated FY 2010

Projected FY 2011

% of response to “trouble alarms” within 45 minutes or less

100%

100%

100%

% of odor complaints responded to within 24 hours

100%

100%

100%

116

80

80

Performance Measure

Number of after hour responses

KEY WORKLOAD INDICATORS Actual FY 2009

Estimated FY 2010

Projected FY 2011

82

82

81

7,444

6,500

7,500

Reclaimed water total number of work orders completed

441

410

450

Reclaimed water customer service related calls annually

230

245

300

Number of reclaimed meters

649

655

720

0

0

0

Workload Indicators Facilities operated and maintained Completed maintenance related work orders

Number of citizen complaints during Reclaimed Holiday


ACTIVITY HISTORY Fund Number: 30-7030 Activity Personnel Services Operations and Maintenance Capital Outlay Total Authorized FTEs

Actual FY 2007

Actual FY 2008

Actual FY2009

Estimated FY2010

Budget FY2011

$1,096,179

$1,250,742

$1,349,325

$1,218,326

$1,323,239

$991,825

$1,173,358

$1,102,197

$1,365,972

$1,406,430

$0

$287,013

$169,634

$87,200

$112,928

$2,088,004

$2,711,113

$2,621,156

$2,671,498

$2,842,597

20

22

19

19

18

SIGNIFICANT BUDGET AND SERVICE LEVEL CHANGES BEYOND CURRENT LEVELS • One Utility Systems Maintenance Worker position was held vacant during FY10 and is being removed from the FY11 staffing document. •

One Utility System Maintenance Mechanic is being upgraded to a Lead Utility System Maintenance Mechanic to allow for a third USM team to focus on PMs and repairs.


1 4 Maintain Organization Credibility

3 6 7

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 6 7

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

Improve Environment & Quality of Life

Department Goals and Initiatives Meet Or Exceed All Regulatory Requirements

Deliver Efficient & Effective Services

Provide Understandable & Convenient Services

Deliver Services Promptly & Consistently

Achieve a stable and strong financial position by accurately estimating, prudently allocating, and managing financial resources.

Operationalize Service Levels & Measure Success

Town Focus Areas Focus Area III: Financial Condition

Engage Citizens To Determine Levels Of Service

Comply With All Laws & Regulations

Proactively Manage Risk

Bill & Collect Revenues Accurately & Timely

Prudently Manage Debt, Cash, & Investments

Manage Fund Balance To Aid Financial Position

Forecast Operational & Fiscal Impacts

Estimate Revenues Conservatively

Provide Accountability Through Internal Controls

Promote Efficient & Effective Resource Allocation

Ensure that roads, water and wastewater facilities, parks, and other infrastructure exists for the existing citizens and for the future needs identified in the comprehensive plan.

Allocate Funding To Execute Priorities

Focus Area II: Infrastructure

Maintain AAA Bond Rating

Match Public Facilities With Community Expectations

Manage Infrastructure Plans To Schedule & Budget

Develop Alternative Financing Plans

Achieve a well-planned community using innovative and proactive planning approaches and techniques.

Prioritize Capital Project Construction

Focus Area I: Community Planning

Update Infrastructure Plans

Understand Forces Affecting the Built Community

Resolve Conflict Between Ordinances & Community Response

Identify Development Trends & Related Policy Changes

Respond To & Include Those Impacted by Development

Create Developer and Affected Citizen Connections

Administer Ordinances & Guidelines as Adopted

NORTH CARY WATER RECLAMATION FACILITY

Additional information about North Cary Water Reclamation Facility may be obtained by contacting Chris Parisher, Superintendent, at (919) 677-0850, or through e-mail chris.parisher@townofcary.org, or by visiting the Townâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s website at www.townofcary.org.

TOWN OF CARY GOALS AND INITIATIVES Focus Area IV: Municipal Services

Town Goals Achieve a high level of service to the citizens in a prompt, reliable, responsive, and cost-effective manner.

Town Initiatives

1 3 1 3


FACILITY GOALS AND INITIATIVES Wastewater Treatment 1. Treat up to 12 million gallons of wastewater per day from the collection system in the north side of Cary. 2. Provide preventive and corrective maintenance for the main plant site, one regional pump station, a biosolids processing and biosolids digester facility, a biosolids gravity belt thickener system, and a new reclaimed water system. 3. Meet or exceed all regulatory requirements in the treatment and discharge of wastewater. 4. Proactively minimize public nuisances from the facility such as odor, noise, lighting or traffic issues. 5. Ensure the safety and availability of Cary’s reclaimed water system in the north service area. Biosolids Management 6. Maintain less than 3% solids in digesters to minimize odor risks. Operate the biosolids facility in a mode where less than 1 million gallons is in inventory at a given time. 7. Transport thickened biosolids to South Cary Water Reclamation Facility biosolids dryer for processing. Reclaimed Water 8. Provide high quality treated effluent for reuse in residential neighborhoods and commercial markets in the northern service area. 9. Supply commercial contractors and the Town of Cary Public Works /Utilities Dept. with a viable bulk water source for irrigation, street sweeping, compaction, and sewer flushing.

FY 2010 ACCOMPLISHMENTS • • • • • • • • •

• • • •

Made vast improvements to headworks infrastructure in terms of lowering odor impacts to community. Majority of work performed in house by staff. Installation of new biofilter to minimize odor impacts on one of preliminary treatment structures. Design and construction spearheaded by NCWRF staff, in turn saving the Town of Cary approximately $50,000. Awarded consultant contract to Diehl & Phillips for engineering assistance for installing new barscreens at influent pump station. Hired new laboratory supervisor to replace retiree. An odor control practice manual was developed to assist PWUT in proactive and corrective measures to address those issues. Maintained all staff certification and associated continuing education units. Successfully operated a reclaimed water distribution facility to provide alternative resources for residential and industrial application. Continued with career ladder program for the staff. Comprehensive effort to lower biosolids inventory, which related directly to odor reduction at facility. The facility is maintaining less than one million gallons of biosolids at any given time. Biosolids are removed weekly and trucked to the South Cary Water Reclamation Facility dryer. No odor complaints were registered during the previous fiscal year. NCWRF met and exceeded permit limits for FY 2009. Lowered the overall cost to treat wastewater per 1000 gallons. Successfully shutdown reclaimed water system to perform maintenance at facility and for distribution system checks – February 15 – 25, 2010. Purchased and installed new atomic absorption equipment to meet the changing needs in the laboratory environment. It has been successfully installed and state certified for use.

KEY PERFORMANCE OBJECTIVES • • •

Meet or exceed National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) percentage limits for Coliform, Biological Oxygen Demand (BOD), Ammonia, Suspended Solids, Total Nitrogen and Total Phosphorus. Maintain direct operational budgeted costs at less than $1.25/1,000 gallons of treated wastewater. Provide a safe and beneficially reusable product (reclaimed water) for the residents and businesses in Cary to use for irrigation.


KEY PERFORMANCE MEASURES Performance Measure

Actual FY 2009

Estimated FY 2010

Projected FY 2011

*Compliance Levels w/State Pollutant Regs. Fecal Coliform Carbonaceous BOD (summer) Carbonaceous BOD (winter) Ammonia-N (summer) Ammonia-N (winter) Total Nitrogen (pounds per year) Phosphorous Total Suspended Solids

1/100 ml .59 mg/l .70 mg/l .045 mg/l .05 mg/l 79,900 # .625 mg/l .97 mg/l

200/100 ml 4.1 mg/l 8.2 mg/l .5 mg/l 1.0 mg/l <144,136 <2.0 mg/l <30 mg/l

200/100 ml 4.1 mg/l 8.2 mg/l .5 mg/l 1.0 mg/l <144,136 <2.0 mg/l <30 mg/l

Operational costs per 1,000 gallons treated

$1.23

$1.20

$1.20

Biosolids Disposal costs/dry ton

$220

$220

$220

*Actual column represents annual average reported. Projected numbers represent minimum limits required by NC regulations.

KEY WORKLOAD INDICATORS Workload Indicators

Actual FY 2009

Estimated FY 2010

Projected FY 2011

Biosolids produced (lbs.)

3,300,000

3,500,000

3,500,000

Number of equipment malfunction reports

125

150

150

Number of pollutant compliance violations

0

0

0

Million gallons of wastewater treated/year

2,400

2,700

2,555

ACTIVITY HISTORY Fund Number: 030-7051

Actual FY 2007

Actual FY 2008

Actual FY 2009

Estimated FY2010

Budget FY2011

Personnel Services

$1,126,976

$1,156,600

$1,225,591

$1,343,438

$1,410,614

Operations and Maintenance

$3,775,555

$4,204,111

$4,548,364

$5,644,738

$6,485,823

$8,250

$19,346

$16,029

$16,600

$48,600

$4,910,781

$5,380,057

$5,789,984

$7,004,776

$7,945,037

16.75

16.75

16.75

16.75

16.75

Activity

Capital Outlay Total Authorized FTEs

SIGNIFICANT BUDGET AND/OR SERVICE LEVEL CHANGES BEYOND CURRENT LEVELS • Install online nutrient monitoring equipment to optimize process in terms of lower nitrogen discharge and consequently decrease utility operating costs. • Design and construction of redundant barscreen at influent pump station to protect downstream structures and equipment.


SOUTH CARY WATER RECLAMATION FACILITY Additional information about the South Cary Water Reclamation Facility may be obtained by contacting Cecil Martin, Superintendent at (919) 779-0697, through e-mail at cecil.martin@townofcary.org, or by visiting the Townâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s website at www.townofcary.org.

TOWN OF CARY GOALS AND INITIATIVES Town Focus Areas Focus Area I: Community Planning

Focus Area II: Infrastructure

Focus Area III: Financial Condition

Focus Area IV: Municipal Services

Town Goals Achieve a wellplanned community using innovative and proactive planning approaches and techniques.

Ensure that roads, water and wastewater facilities, parks, and other infrastructure exists for the existing citizens and for the future needs identified in the comprehensive plan.

Achieve a stable and strong financial position by accurately estimating, prudently allocating, and managing financial resources.

Achieve a high level of service to the citizens in a prompt, reliable, responsive, and costeffective manner.

Meet Or Exceed All Regulatory Requirements

1 2 4 5

1 3 4 5

Improve Environment & Quality of Life

Deliver Efficient & Effective Services

Provide Understandable & Convenient Services

Deliver Services Promptly & Consistently

Operationalize Service Levels & Measure Success

Engage Citizens To Determine Levels Of Service

Comply With All Laws & Regulations

Proactively Manage Risk

Bill & Collect Revenues Accurately & Timely

Prudently Manage Debt, Cash, & Investments

Manage Fund Balance To Aid Financial Position

Forecast Operational & Fiscal Impacts

Estimate Revenues Conservatively

Provide Accountability Through Internal Controls

Promote Efficient & Effective Resource Allocation

Allocate Funding To Execute Priorities

Maintain Organization Credibility

Maintain AAA Bond Rating

Identification of Financial Strategy

Match Public Facilities With Community Expectations

Manage Infrastructure Plans To Schedule & Budget

Develop Alternative Financing Plans

Prioritize Capital Project Construction

Update Infrastructure Plans

Understand Forces Affecting the Built Community

Resolve Conflict Between Ordinances & Community Response

Identify Development Trends & Related Policy Changes

Respond To & Include Those Impacted by Development

Create Developer and Affected Citizen Connections

Administer Ordinances & Guidelines as Adopted

Town Initiatives

Department Goals and Initiatives 5

1 2 4

4

FACILITY GOALS AND INITIATIVES Wastewater Treatment 1. Treat up to 12.8 million gallons of wastewater per day from the collection system in the south side of Cary. 2. Provide preventive and corrective maintenance for the main plant, a biosolids processing facility, and related facilities and grounds. 3. Ensure the safety and availability of Caryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s reclaimed water system. Biosolids Management 4. Manage the operation of the biosolids dryer in order to produce a quality product that is cost-effective and environmentally friendly.

1 3 5


FY 2010 ACCOMPLISHMENTS • Refined the Plant Biological Nutrient System, with the addition of North Plant Biosolids drying. • Optimized the thermal biosolids dryer operations in order to achieve greater efficiency. • Maintained all staff certifications and associated continuing education units. • Successfully operated a reclaimed water distribution facility to provide alternative resources for residential and industrial application. • Continued with the use of a career ladder program for staff development. • Successfully shutdown the reclaimed water system to perform maintenance at the facility and conduct distribution system checks from February 15 – 28, 2010. KEY PERFORMANCE OBJECTIVES • Meet or perform better than National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) limits for coliform, biological oxygen demand (BOD), ammonia, suspended solids, total nitrogen, and total phosphorous. • Maintain operational direct budgeted costs at less than $2.00/1,000 gallons of treated liquid. • Provide reliable and consistent reclaimed water for residents and businesses in Cary to use for irrigation. KEY PERFORMANCE MEASURES Actual FY 2009

Estimated FY 2010

Projected FY 2011

Fecal Coliform

<2/100 ml

<2/100 ml

<2/100ml

BOD (summer)

<2.0 mg/l

<2.0 mg/l

<2.0 mg/l

BOD (winter)

<2.0 mg/l

<2.0 mg/l

<2.0 mg/l

Ammonia-N (summer)

<.5 mg/l

<.5 mg/l

<.5 mg/l

Ammonia-N (winter)

<.5 mg/l

<.5 mg/l

<.5 mg/l

Total Nitrogen (annual)

2.2 mg/l .70 mg/l

2.4 mg/l .75 mg/l

2.6 mg/l .75 mg/l

0

0

0

Performance Measure Compliance levels with State Pollutant Regulations:

Phosphorous No. pollutant compliance violations

KEY WORKLOAD INDICATORS Actual FY 2009

Estimated FY 2010

Projected FY 2011

Maintenance work orders completed

4,550

4,600

4,650

Million gallons of wastewater treated per year

1,800

1,850

1,860

Operational costs per 1,000 gallons treated

$1.94

$1.96

$1.98

Biosolids Dryer pellets, in tons

3,000

3,050

3,050

Workload Indicator


ACTIVITY HISTORY Fund Number: 30-7052

Actual FY 2007

Actual FY 2008

Actual FY2009

Estimated FY2010

Budget FY2011

Personnel Services

$1,307,346

$1,372,794

$1,434,833

$1,554,556

$1,582,335

Operations and Maintenance

$1,708,496

$1,873,190

$1,986,051

$2,169,117

$2,162,589

$0

$0

$10,873

$41,803

$12,875

$3,015,842

$3,245,984

$3,431,757

$3,765,476

$3,757,799

20

20

20

20

19

Activity

Capital Outlay Total Authorized FTEs

SIGNIFICANT BUDGET AND SERVICE LEVEL CHANGES • Began implementation of odor control recommendations in FY 2010; continue improvements in odor, noise and light issues in FY 2011. • One Administrative Assistant position was held vacant during FY10 and is being removed from the FY11 staffing document.


WESTERN WAKE REGIONAL WATER RECLAMATION FACILITY Additional information about the Western Wake Regional Water Reclamation Facility may be obtained by contacting Steve Brown, Director of Public Works/Utilities at (919) 469-4361, through e-mail at steve.brown@townofcary.org, or by visiting the Town’s website at www.townofcary.org. The Western Wake Regional Water Reclamation Facility is expected to be completed and online in 2013. In preparation for an effective implementation of the facility at start-up, the hiring of a Plant Manager was initially approved in FY 2008; however, this has been postponed until closer to the estimated completion date of 2013. ACTIVITY HISTORY Fund Number: 30-7055 Actual FY 2007

Actual FY 2008

Actual FY2009

Estimated FY2010

Budget FY2011

Personnel Services

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0

Operations and Maintenance

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0

Capital Outlay

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$ 0

$0

$ 0

$ 0

$ 0

0

1

1

1

1

Activity

Total Authorized FTEs

SIGNIFICANT BUDGET AND SERVICE LEVEL CHANGES • See above.


1 4 6

1 4 6 8

1 4 5 7 8

1 2 3 4 5 7 8

1 2 3 4 5 6

DIVISION GOALS AND INITIATIVES Water Treatment 1. Manage, operate, and maintain the Cary/Apex Water Treatment Plant and associated facilities which are capable of producing water to meet peak day use of 40 million gallons per day (MGD).

1 2 3 4 5 6

1 2 3 4 5 7 8

Improve Environment & Quality of Life

Meet Or Exceed All Regulatory Requirements

Deliver Efficient & Effective Services

Provide Understandable & Convenient Services

Deliver Services Promptly & Consistently

Achieve a stable and strong financial position by accurately estimating, prudently allocating, and managing financial resources.

Operationalize Service Levels & Measure Success

Focus Area III: Financial Condition

Engage Citizens To Determine Levels Of Service

Comply With All Laws & Regulations

Proactively Manage Risk

Bill & Collect Revenues Accurately & Timely

Prudently Manage Debt, Cash, & Investments

Manage Fund Balance To Aid Financial Position

Forecast Operational & Fiscal Impacts

Estimate Revenues Conservatively

Provide Accountability Through Internal Controls

Promote Efficient & Effective Resource Allocation

Ensure that roads, water and wastewater facilities, parks, and other infrastructure exists for the existing citizens and for the future needs identified in the comprehensive plan.

Allocate Funding To Execute Priorities

Achieve a well-planned community using innovative and proactive planning approaches and techniques.

Maintain Organization Credibility

Focus Area II: Infrastructure

Maintain AAA Bond Rating

Focus Area I: Community Planning

Identification of Financial Strategy

Match Public Facilities With Community Expectations

Manage Infrastructure Plans To Schedule & Budget

Develop Alternative Financing Plans

Prioritize Capital Project Construction

Update Infrastructure Plans

Understand Forces Affecting the Built Community

Resolve Conflict Between Ordinances & Community Response

Identify Development Trends & Related Policy Changes

Respond To & Include Those Impacted by Development

Create Developer and Affected Citizen Connections

Administer Ordinances & Guidelines as Adopted

CARY/APEX WATER TREATMENT PLANT

Additional information about the Cary/Apex Water Treatment Plant may be obtained by contacting Kelvin Creech, Manager, at (919) 362-5502, via e-mail at kelvin.creech@townofcary.org, or by visiting the Townâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Web site at www.townofcary.org. TOWN OF CARY GOALS AND INITIATIVES Town Focus Areas Focus Area IV: Municipal Services

Town Goals Achieve a high level of service to the citizens in a prompt, reliable, responsive, and cost-effective manner.

Town Initiatives

Department Goals and Initiatives

7


2. Maintain compliance with all state and Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) drinking water regulations. 3. Perform laboratory analyses of treated water for Cary, Apex, and other bulk water customers. 4. Perform preventive and corrective maintenance for the Cary/Apex Water Treatment Plant, Jordan Lake raw water pump station, and two Town of Apex diversion vaults. 5. Operate a water treatment pilot plant program, a scaled down version of the plant to allow for process control optimization, treatment strategy development and testing of various system configurations. 6. Begin preparations and planning for next capital facilities expansion of the Cary/Apex Water Treatment Plant. Residuals Management 7. Manage the processing and recycling of water treatment residuals, a type of sludge or waste product currently being recycled with a local composting facility. 8. Develop and manage alternative residual handling methods as appropriate. Increase efficiency and effectiveness of residuals handling through execution of WTP Phase II Residuals & Chemical Improvements project.

FY 2010 ACCOMPLISHMENTS • Achieved compliance with all state and EPA drinking water standards. • Certified for the sixth consecutive year as a Partnership for Safe Water Director’s Award plant. • Continued construction of facilities as part of the Phase II Residuals and Chemical Improvements project to enhance the plant’s ability to handle and process residuals and meet new regulatory requirements with chemical feed systems improvements. • Continued a study of drought induced poor source water quality and completed development of plant operational contingency plans for implementation during severe drought conditions and associated poor source water quality conditions. • Completed a preliminary engineering study for the next capital facilities expansion at the plant. • Completed a capital project to replace the four original 450 hp finished water pump motors in the High Service Pump Station. All installation work was performed in-house by CAWTF staff. • Implemented new monitoring programs and standard procedures in order to comply with new N.C. Drinking Water Rules effective October 1, 2009. • Received nomination and invitation to apply for the 2009 EPA Excellence in Drinking Water Award from the NCDENR Public Water Supply Section – Raleigh Regional Office. Submitted application. • Placed 1st in the annual Best Tasting Water Contest conducted as part of the joint annual conference of the N.C. chapters of the American Waterworks Association and Water Environment Association. KEY PERFORMANCE OBJECTIVES • Achieve 100% compliance rating with all state and EPA standards for drinking water. • Achieve a turbidity removal percentage of 99% or greater. • Adequately meet Town of Cary and Town of Apex water system demands and daily needs of system customers. • Achieve a $300 or less treatment chemical cost per million gallons of water treated. • Achieve a cost of $45 or less for residuals processing per million gallons of water treated. KEY PERFORMANCE MEASURES Performance Measure Turbidity removal percentage Percentage of state and EPA Regulatory Compliance Chemical cost/million gallons Residuals processing cost/million gallons

Actual FY 2009

Estimated FY 2010

Projected FY 2011

99.4 %

99%

99%

100%

100%

100%

$304.90

$306

$300

$45.18

$45

$45


KEY WORKLOAD INDICATORS Actual FY 2009

Estimated FY 2010

Projected FY 2011

Number of in-house laboratory analyses performed

69,232

65,000

65,000

Number of in-house laboratory analytical quality control tests performed

16,900

16,900

16,900

Number of contracted lab samples processed

512

500

500

Total Average Daily Demand (million gallons per day)

16.3

16.9

17.5

Cary Average Daily Demand

13.4

13.9

14.4

Apex Average Daily Demand

2.9

3.0

3.1

166,440

166,440

166,440

Hourly plant inspection rounds

8,760

8,760

8,760

Number of preventative maintenance work orders completed

1768

1931

2300

Workload Indicator

Hourly operations process control tests

ACTIVITY HISTORY Fund Number: 30-7053

Actual FY 2007

Actual FY 2008

Actual FY2009

Estimated FY2010

Budget FY2011

Personnel Services

$1,498,619

$1,541,120

$1,624,654

$1,729,651

$1,827,410

Operations and Maintenance

$3,340,901

$3,724,728

$4,173,872

$4,383,619

$4,738,850

$0

$52,345

$2,700

$29,303

$0

-$909,524

-$852,731

-$1,062,033

-$1,148,827

-$1,266,546

$4,465,462

$4,739,193

$4,993,746

$5,299,714

23

23

23

23

Activity

Capital Outlay Reimbursement from Apex Total Authorized FTEs

$3,929,996 23

SIGNIFICANT BUDGET AND SERVICE LEVEL CHANGES BEYOND CURRENT LEVELS • Increase in total treatment costs due to economic impacts affecting critical supplies and professional service costs. • Significant increases in treatment chemical costs per million gallons treated due to rapidly escalating raw chemical prices and fuel surcharges leading to higher overall treatment costs. • Increased electric power costs leading to higher overall treatment costs. • Increase in annual maintenance tasks expected due to new processes and equipment being installed as part of the Phase II Residuals & Chemical Improvements Project currently underway.


TOWN OF CARY FLEET MANAGEMENT FUND

Fleet Management is responsible for setting labor, parts, and fuel rates that are charged to user departments for vehicle repair and maintenance. This provides Fleet Management with a stable revenue stream that can be adjusted to mirror public and private market trends. Prior to FY 1999, fuel and maintenance/repair services were charged back to departments through the maintenance and repair-vehicles account without a mark-up. However, this process made the billable labor rate the primary revenue source, thus pushing the labor rate out of the market range while parts and fuel prices were considerably below the market average. Now parts and fuel are ordered through Fleet Management and then sold back to departments with a mark-up that is comparable to the average mark-up in the private sector. Because of the Town’s cost structure, Fleet Management can add the mark-up and still maintain market competitiveness (markup is reviewed annually to ensure competitiveness). In FY 2011, Fleet Management is planning to hold the labor rate, markups on parts and fuel, and the outsourcing fee flat.

DESCRIPTION OF REVENUE SOURCES •

Parts = $115,272 Accounts for the 19% mark-up on parts billed to user departments.

Fuel - Cary = $247,803 Accounts for the 14% mark-up on fuel billed to user departments.

Labor = $580,020 Accounts for the total labor charges billed to user departments for vehicle repairs. In FY 2011, the labor rate is $60.00 per hour.

Outsourcing Fee = $27,324 Accounts for the $19.00 per transaction fee billed to user departments to cover the oversight costs associated with sending repair work to a private vendor.

Interest Earned = $15,895 Income derived from investments attributable to the fleet management internal service fund.

Fuel - Morrisville = $120,562 Per an agreement entered into between the Town of Cary and the Town of Morrisville in FY 2007, Morrisville purchases fuel for their municipal fleet from Cary and pays the Town an administrative fee of $0.10 per gallon. The FY 2011 revenue estimate includes the $0.10 per gallon fee and has an offsetting cost of ($115,845) for fuel in the fleet operating budget, leaving a net of $4,717 to cover administrative costs.


TOWN OF CARY FLEET MANAGEMENT FUND SUMMARY

Fleet Management is responsible for setting labor, parts, and fuel rates that are charged to user departments for vehicle repair and maintenance. This provides Fleet Management with a stable revenue stream that can be adjusted to mirror public and private market trends. Prior to FY 1999, fuel and maintenance/repair services were charged back to departments through the maintenance and repair-vehicles account without a mark-up. However, this process made the billable labor rate the primary revenue source, thus pushing the labor rate out of the market range while parts and fuel prices were considerably below the market average. Now parts and fuel are ordered through Fleet Management and then sold back to departments with a mark-up that is comparable to the average mark-up in the private sector. Because of the Townâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s cost structure, Fleet Management can add the mark-up and still maintain market competitiveness (mark-up is reviewed annually to ensure competitiveness). In FY 2011, Fleet Management is planning to hold the labor rate, markups on parts and fuel, and the outsourcing fee flat.

Actual FY 2007

Actual FY 2008

Actual FY 2009

Estimated FY 2010

Budget FY 2011

98,443 169,650 93,869 602,034 21,160 47,258 6,788 1,039,202

96,645 243,045 114,991 606,923 27,588 60,555 2,945 1,152,692

113,220 210,052 96,722 576,358 25,441 59,039 9,027 1,089,859

112,328 308,365 138,650 600,000 27,944 25,230 --1,212,517

115,272 247,803 120,562 580,020 27,324 15,895 --1,106,876

Expenses Operating Expenses

820,364

836,558

848,957

930,017

956,063

Other Financing Uses (Sources) Workers' Comp & Small Claims Indirect Costs Gain on Investments Transfer from General Fund Total Expenses/Transfers

11,910 68,500 (7,413) --893,361

10,510 70,369 (17,709) (2,191) 897,537

10,200 205,542 ----1,064,699

11,474 199,835 ----1,141,326

11,554 215,589 ----1,183,206

Appropriation to (from) fund balance

145,841

255,155

25,160

71,191

(76,330)

1,150,044

1,405,199

1,430,359

1,501,550

1,425,220

Revenues Parts Fuel - Cary Fuel - Morrisville Labor Outsourcing Fee Interest Earned Proceeds from Sale of Assets Total Revenues

Ending Fund Balance


FLEET MANAGEMENT DIVISION Additional information about the Fleet Management Division may be obtained by calling Juan Vega, Jr., Fleet Management Division Manager, at (919) 469-4098, through e-mail at juan.vega@townofcary.org or by visiting the Town’s web site at www.townofcary.org. TOWN OF CARY GOALS AND INITIATIVES Town Focus Areas Focus Area I: Community Planning

Focus Area II: Infrastructure

Focus Area III: Financial Condition

Focus Area IV: Municipal Services

Achieve a well-planned community using innovative and proactive planning approaches and techniques.

Ensure that roads, water and wastewater facilities, parks, and other infrastructure exists for the existing citizens and for the future needs identified in the comprehensive plan.

Achieve a stable and strong financial position by accurately estimating, prudently allocating, and managing financial resources.

Town Goals Achieve a high level of service to the citizens in a prompt, reliable, responsive, and cost-effective manner.

Deliver Efficient & Effective Services

Meet Or Exceed All Regulatory Requirements

Improve Environment & Quality of Life

4

Provide Understandable & Convenient Services

Comply With All Laws & Regulations

4

Deliver Services Promptly & Consistently

Proactively Manage Risk

4

Operationalize Service Levels & Measure Success

Bill & Collect Revenues Accurately & Timely

3

Engage Citizens To Determine Levels Of Service

Prudently Manage Debt, Cash, & Investments

Manage Fund Balance To Aid Financial Position

Forecast Operational & Fiscal Impacts

Estimate Revenues Conservatively

Provide Accountability Through Internal Controls

Promote Efficient & Effective Resource Allocation

Allocate Funding To Execute Priorities

Maintain Organization Credibility

Maintain AAA Bond Rating

Identification of Financial Strategy

Match Public Facilities With Community Expectations

Manage Infrastructure Plans To Schedule & Budget

Develop Alternative Financing Plans

Prioritize Capital Project Construction

Update Infrastructure Plans

Understand Forces Affecting the Built Community

Resolve Conflict Between Ordinances & Community Response

Identify Development Trends & Related Policy Changes

Respond To & Include Those Impacted by Development

Create Developer and Affected Citizen Connections

Administer Ordinances & Guidelines as Adopted

Town Initiatives

4

4

4

3

4

4

Department Goals and Initiatives 4

4

4

4

1

2

2

2

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

DIVISION GOALS AND INITIATIVES Vehicle and Equipment Repair Objective: Service excellence, safety, and cost effectiveness 1. Provided two shifts covering the time period from 7:00 A.M. – 11:00 P.M., Monday – Friday. 2. Provide repair service for approximately 639 vehicles and 461 pieces of equipment. 3. Perform diagnostics on various equipment and vehicles. 4. Provide equipment and vehicle repair support during Town emergencies/inclement weather. Preventive Maintenance 5. Coordinate planned servicing of equipment and vehicles driving approximately 4.77 million miles a year. 6. Seasonal Equipment Prep (i.e. Leaf Machines, Dump Trucks, Sand/Salt Spreaders, Lawn Mowers, etc.). 7. Perform Preventive Maintenance Services (Oil Change, Transmission Service, Etc.) for light, medium, and heavy duty vehicles and equipment, which includes Town fire trucks.


8. Perform North Carolina State Inspections. 9. Strive for a “same day” turn around on scheduled preventive maintenance. Operational Support 10. Provide vehicle and equipment replacement planning for Town departments. 11. Coordinate motor pool vehicle support for Town departments when vehicles are in the shop for service. 12. Provide fuel for Town assets utilizing approximately 568,426 gallons of gasoline and diesel fuel a year. 13. Contract repair/warranty management. 14. Equipment/vehicle specification preparation. 15. Work measurement/maintenance management.

FY 2010 ACCOMPLISHMENTS • Updated the FY 2011 vehicle and equipment replacement plan, which included heavy equipment and seasonal equipment. • Updated ten-year vehicle and equipment replacement projections for the Capital Improvements Budget/Plan for Fiscal Years 2011 - 2021. • Service support and mechanic staff effectively maintained quality, customer-oriented focus. • Utilized the Faster Fleet Software Program and provided departments with necessary data to make informed decisions regarding their assets. KEY PERFORMANCE OBJECTIVES • Ensure a fleet availability rate of no less than 95% annually. • Ensure there is no more than (+/-) 5% difference between the estimated maintenance and repair budgets vs. actual expenditures Town wide. • Ensure that repeat repairs are less than 1% of total work orders annually. • Ensure that 97% of all (non-critical) repairs will be completed within 3 business days. • Maintain a preventive maintenance (PM) compliance rate of 90% annually. • Maintain a ratio of preventive maintenance to repairs of 45% annually. KEY PERFORMANCE MEASURES Actual FY 2009

Estimated FY 2010

Projected FY 2011

% fleet availability

99%

97%

97%

% of repeat repairs of total work orders

0.1%

0.5%

0.5%

% of all repairs performed within 3 working days

89%

90%

90%

% of preventive maintenance compliance

94%

91%

91%

Ratio preventive maintenance/repairs %

43%

45%

45%

% of same day repair for all scheduled PM work

92%

95%

95%

Performance Measure


KEY WORKLOAD INDICATORS Actual FY 2009

Estimated FY 2010

Projected FY 2011

Work orders processed

5,204

5,000

5,000

Unit to mechanic ratio

133/1

138/1

138/1

Vehicle Equivalents*

1,912

1,992

2,010

Vehicle Equivalents Per Technician

239

249

251

Labor Hours Charged Per Vehicle Equivalent

4.8

5.0

5.0

1,077

1,100

1,107

Fuel usage (gallons)

568,426

570,122

575,823

Miles driven by fleet

4,766,000

4,813,660

4,861,797

Workload Indicator

Vehicles/Equip. maintained

* Vehicle equivalents is a measure of the actual impact a vehicle has on maintenance and staffing needs, for example large trucks and fire apparatus have a greater impact than fleet sedans.

ACTIVITY HISTORY Fund Number: 39-5660 Activity

Actual FY 2007

Actual FY 2008

Actual FY2009

Estimated FY2010

Budget FY2011

Personnel Services

$613,582

$600,371

$639,615

$652,243

$704,175

Operations and Maintenance

$206,782

$221,438

$209,342

$277,774

$251,968

$80,410

$80,879

$215,742

$211,309

$227,063

$0

$14,751

$0

$0

$0

$900,774

$917,439

$1,064,699

$1,141,326

$1,183,206

11

10

10

10

10

Internal Services Capital Outlay Total Authorized FTEs

SIGNIFICANT BUDGET AND SERVICE LEVEL CHANGES BEYOND CURRENT LEVELS â&#x20AC;˘ No significant budget and service level changes for FY 2011.


TOWN OF CARY REVENUE SOURCES AND TRENDS – TRANSIT FUND

Total budgeted grant and fee related Transit Fund revenues for FY 2011 are $2,128,382, an increase of 3.8% above the respective estimated sources of FY 2010. The FY 2010 grant and fee related revenues are estimated at $1,925,970 a 6.5% increase over FY 2009. •

Vehicle License Fee = $499,000 The Town of Cary charges a vehicle license fee of $15 for each vehicle registered within Cary. Of this fee, $10 is used to help fund transportation related capital improvements and $5 is used to help fund the C-Tran program. The $5 portion was added to the Town’s vehicle license fee in FY 2002 when C-Tran was made available to the general public. This amount is included on the same personal property tax bill that the owner of the vehicle receives each year. FY 2011 revenue is budgeted at an increase of 1% over the FY 2010 estimate and the FY 2010 estimate is 1.2% over FY 2009. Transportation Tickets = $204,750 FY 2011 budget for tickets reflects an increase of 5% over FY 2010 which is estimated as a 19.9% increase over FY 2009. Until July 1, 2008, door to door fares were $2 for one-way trip in town and $4 for a one-way out-of-town trip. There was also a discounted fare at $1 for one-way in town trip from 9 a.m. – 3 p.m.. Council approved a new tiered fare structure for door to door service on June 12, 2008. This revenue source includes ticket revenues received from the various ridership categories as described below: DOOR TO DOOR FARES (Tier one and two are only $1 one-way from 10am to 3pm) Tier I Trips wholly within ¾ mile of the fixed route corridors $2 per one-way trip

Tier II Trips not wholly within the ¾ mile corridor of the fixed routes but within the town limit $4 per one-way trip

Tier III Out-of-town trips (Raleigh, Durham, Chapel Hill, Apex, and Morrisville) $6 per one-way trip

FIXED ROUTE FARES • Fixed route general public service: $1 per one-way trip. • Fixed route for senior citizens and disabled citizens: 50 cents between 9 a.m. and 3 p.m. per one-way trip. •

Federal Transit Grant = $1,239,632 This represents a Federal Transit Administration grant to help offset operating costs of the service. The Town applies for this grant funding on an annual basis.

State Maintenance Assistance Program (SMAP) = $185,000 The State provides public transportation funding to designated urban transit agencies in North Carolina. In FY 2003, the Town received its first $50,000 for transit start up from the North Carolina Department of Transportation.


TOWN OF CARY TRANSIT FUND SUMMARY

The Town of Cary beg