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Annual Report

2015 -2016

PART A – A Year in Review


Contents Contents Message from the Mayor and General Manager 4-5 Our Community, Vision and Values 6 Community Profile 7 Councillors 8 The Organisation 9 An Extraordinary Year 10-11 2015-2016 Financial Overview 12-13 Delivery Program Key Performance Indicators 14-16 Funding Additional Works 17 Healthy 18-21 Wealthy 22-25 Safe 26-29 Sociable 30-33 Governance 34-35 Awards & Accolades 36 Key Projects in Progress 37


The Kempsey Shire Council 2015-2016 Annual Report provides a comprehensive account of Council’s performance from 1 July 2015 to 30 June 2016. This document is one of the key components of the Integrated Planning and Reporting Framework, legislated by the NSW Government. It is an integral part of Council being open and accountable in reporting to our community.

A year in review

A year in review Indigenous Acknowledgement In the spirit of reconciliation, Council acknowledges and pays respect to the Dunghutti people, traditional owners and custodians of the Macleay Valley. We acknowledge the culture of elders past, present and future and their unique contributions to the life of this Valley.

Reading this Report The 2015-2016 Annual Report is presented in four volumes: PART A A Year In Review, providing a community overview of the highlights, achievements and challenges of the financial year. PART B Statutory Information, legislated detail about Council’s operations and expenses. PART C Financial Statements. PART D End of Term Report. The full document suite is available to view at Council’s Offices and libraries or from Council’s website.

www.kempsey.nsw.gov.au


Message from the Mayor and General Manager The 2015/16 year has been one of consolidation and growth for Kempsey Shire Council. Key to this has been developing a sense of pride in our Shire as a vibrant and safe community, as we are no longer defined by a highway through our major town. The Pacific Highway Bypass of Kempsey provided Council and the region with an opportunity to reinvent itself, and we have leveraged this with a range of projects, developments and initiatives focused on our core values of creating a community that is Healthy, Wealthy, Safe and Sociable. The completion in March 2016 of the $3.6 million Smith Street upgrade the first major project of the Kempsey Corridor Master Plan - designed to stimulate the local economy while creating an appealing ‘village-feel’, has transformed our CBD into a flourishing and inviting business hub. Results of a survey to measure business confidence and success have been positive. In October 2015, 37% of businesses reported their revenue had increased since 2014, with 67% stating their business confidence was good or very good.

Council achieved a budget surplus of just over $2 million in the general fund for 2015-2016, which will be reinvested into ongoing operations and asset renewal. 4

There are significant challenges in managing a finite budget against a growing list of services and more than $1 billion of assets that need maintaining and upgrading. Council has achieved strong operational and financial performance in delivering on the objectives set out in our Operational and Delivery Plans. Our Auditor’s Report confirmed that we achieved improved results in most key financial performance areas, the outcome of sound financial short-term and

long-term strategies put in place over the past four years. Council achieved a budget surplus of just over $2 million in the general fund for 2015-2016, which will be reinvested into ongoing operations and asset renewal. The funds for water and sewer have shown a deficit which were expected, and strategies are in place to resolve these issues. Our overall financial results have been achieved by a strategy of reducing costs through efficiency savings, increasing income with the special rate variation, and reducing Council’s level of debt, so that more can be spent on maintaining our assets, such as roads and bridges. The benefits of an increased investment in our roads, around $9 million for 2015-16, continues to strengthen our aged and extensive road network, while striving to deliver on community expectations. A number of significant transport network improvements, in both rural and urban areas, were completed around the Shire. These were funded through a combination of Black Spot and Roads to Recovery Programs, Federal and State Government funding, and Council’s funds. This includes nearly 12 kilometres of regional rural access roads, with major projects being sections of Armidale Road and South West Rocks Road. To improve driving conditions within rural areas, Council replenished 24 kilometres of gravel surfaces, a 25% increase on the previous year at a cost of nearly $1 million. Over the past year, Council invested around $400,000 in a program to replace, refurbish and repair bridges around the Shire to prolong the life


“We understand the responsibility we hold in delivering the essential services and facilities we provide to the Macleay Valley community now and for the years ahead”

of assets critical to an agricultural community. Major projects included McCudden’s Bridge, Gills Gully Bridge, Pee Dee Road and Yellow Gully. In May 2016, the installation of a $1 million upgrade to the telemetry control system that assists Council monitor and control its water and sewerage infrastructure has delivered substantial improvements in response times and system efficiency. Council’s Mobile Community Recycling Centre was a first for NSW and a finalist in the 2015 Green Globe Awards, and one of many initiatives Council has introduced to help the environment and reduce waste management costs. Completed during the year were infrastructure improvement projects that have increased the access and enjoyment in some of our best-loved locations. In South West Rocks, the 130-metre elevated walkway around Point Briner has created a pedestrian link along the picturesque and historic headland. The transformation of Riverside Park showed what can be achieved when our whole community gets behind a worthwhile cause. Through the generosity and hard work of businesses, contractors, community groups and residents who volunteered their time and services, the $284,000 project refreshed one of the Macleay’s most beautiful and important social hubs. In April, Council’s Customer Satisfaction Survey results showed we scored well in delivering community services and how we manage our facilities, but our performance in handling customer enquiries has slipped. Public safety and the condition of our roads topped the list of concerns

for those surveyed. We used the data captured in the survey to target areas that need improvement across the organisation. Along with inclusive opportunities such as workshops, art installations and community events, Council worked collaboratively with government agencies, community groups, businesses and residents in helping building a safe, sociable and supportive community. An active library service, including the home lending service supported by Kempsey West Rotary, is a practical and ongoing service to promote literacy and community connection for people of all ages in our Shire. Made possible by NSW Government grant funding, in June 2016 the Voluntary House Raising Scheme commenced which enables eligible homeowners in flood-prone areas to raise their property to safe heights. Council worked collaboratively with Emergency Service crews to provide a swift response to damage caused by a major storm surge in June, including repairs completed within four days to Killick Creek footbridge washed away in the storm. Initiatives such as the installation of CCTV cameras in the Kempsey CBD, attending Police Community Meetings, and a proactive Community Resilience Program to prepare for flood and natural disasters, helped promote safety and security in our local area. With Council’s ongoing drive to improve productivity and a safe working environment, staff participated in 7,440 hours of training and conferences, including tertiary

sponsored studies. A special focus over the past year has been on increasing the skills of supervisory staff in managing a safe workplace. Complementing this, Council’s proactive injury management programs have seen a reduction of 15.6% for the Delivery Plan period 2012-16 on the previous period. To grow and strengthen our economy, Council looked for new ways to generate development and jobs growth within the Macleay Valley. In February, as part Council’s strategy to highlight the Macleay as a top tourism destination, Council hosted the NSW Country Surf Life Saving Championships at South West Rocks, bringing around 4,000 visitors and injecting $3 million into the local economy. In June, Council signed a Memorandum of Understanding with the Australian International Aviation College, paving the way for a $7 million investment in a flight training school at Kempsey Airport. Council’s Macleay Valley Food Bowl strategy continues to successfully promote the Macleay’s agribusiness opportunities and has contributed to an additional 180 jobs in the agricultural sector. We are pleased to present this year’s Annual Report, and the strong results demonstrate the commitment by Council’s management team, staff and Councillors to deliver quality facilities and services to our local communities. We are confident Council has built a solid foundation for the challenges we face. We understand the responsibility we hold in delivering the essential services and facilities we provide to the Macleay Valley community now and for the years ahead.

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Our Community, Vision and Values OUR COMMUNITY’S VISION 2036 Community Strategic Plan We live in a community that provides opportunity to all, to prosper in an environment that supports wellbeing, connectedness and access to the resources the community wants and needs.

OUR VALUES BEING HEALTHY BEING WEALTHY

BEING SAFE

BEING SOCIABLE

COUNCIL’S MISSION Council’s role is to take a leading position in partnering with other levels of government, business and community groups, and individuals to make the community’s vision a reality. To achieve this we rely on our commitment to being a professional, friendly and ethical Council that consults with and listens to the community. This commitment requires Council operating with strong leadership; keeping the community informed and engaged; demonstrating respect for all and working together in partnership. 6


Community Profile

Kempsey Shire, located approximately 400 kilometres between Sydney and Brisbane on the NSW Mid North Coast, covers an area of 337,874 hectares between the Pacific Ocean in the east; Five Day Creek in the west; and from Grassy Head in the north; to Kundabung in the south. The Kempsey Shire population forecast for 2016 is 29,262, and is forecast to grow to 33,457 by 2036. The number of dwellings in Kempsey Shire is forecast to grow from 13,556 in 2011 to 14,965 in 2026, with the average household size falling from 2.43 to 2.30 by 2026. Parents and homebuilders (aged 35–49) make up the largest single age bracket in the Shire, 18% at 2011. Kempsey Shire’s Gross Regional Product is estimated at $1.26 billion, which represents 0.3% of the state’s GSP (Gross State Product). There were 11,314 jobs located in the Kempsey Shire in the year ending June 2015, an increase of 2.8% on 2014. The value of building approvals in 2015-2016 was $45,277 million, with $29,972 being residential.

Source: .Id (www.kempsey.nsw.gov.au/econodev/ksc-profile)

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Councillors Mayor Liz Campbell “Kempsey Shire is in a transition stage, we are now in a position where we are starting to think more long term and strategically. We now have a clearer picture of what we are facing, what needs to be done and what we would like to see done in the future.�

Deputy Mayor Lou Kesby

Councillor Sue McGinn OAM

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Councillor Anna Shields

Councillor Dean Saul

Councillor Ashley Williams

Councillor Anthony Patterson

Councillor Bruce Morris

Councillor Betty Green


Our Organisation and Workforce COUNCIL

Sustainable Environment Robert Pitt

Infrastructure Services Robert Scott

General Manager David Rawlings

Human Resources

Corporate Governance

Communications

The workforce is 31.0% female and 69.0 % male

• • • •

Planning & Natural Resources Economic Sustainability Regulatory Compliance Council Owned Businesses, saleyards, airport, caravan parks

• • • • • •

Assets & Design Water Process Water Strategy Transport Infrastructure Open Space & Recreation Facilities Waste Management

Corporate Management Daryl Hagger

• Service Reviews

Community Engagement Kathy Oliver

• • • • •

61.7% of Council’s workforce is over 45 years of age and of this 30.3% are over 55 years of age.

Customer Services Community Relations Information Management Finance Library

Staff participated in 7440 hours of training courses and conferences across the year, including tertiary sponsored studies. focusEquivalent was on increasing Council had a head count of 303 employees with 288.5 FullThe Time jobsskills of supervisory staff over in managing 61.7% of Council’s workforce is over 45 years of age and of this 30.3% are 55 years a safe workplace.

The average length of service of our employees as at 30 June 2016 was 10.1 years, with service by gender of females 8.27 years and males 10.94 years.

• • of age. • At June The workforce is 31.0% female and 69.0 % male. 30 • The average length of service of our employees as at 30 June 2016 was 10.1 years, with service by gender of females Council had a 8.27 years and males 10.94 years. head count of 303 • Staff participated in 7440 hours of training courses and conferences across the year, including tertiary sponsored employees with was on increasing skills of supervisory staff in managing a safe workplace. studies. The focus 288.5 Full Time • Council’s proactive injury management strategies have resulted in a reduction of the Workers Compensation proactive injury to the last period by 15.6%. Equivalent premium overjobs the Delivery PlanCouncil’s period 2012-2016 compared

management strategies have resulted in a reduction of the Workers Compensation premium over the Delivery Plan period 2012-2016 compared to the last period by 15.6%.

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An Extraordinary Year PLANNING FOR CHANGE Implementing the Bypass Strategy The Pacific Highway Bypass of Kempsey presented Council and the community with a unique opportunity to reshape our identity and economy, and therefore create a renewed sense of pride in the Kempsey Shire. The Kempsey Corridor Master Plan; Our Story, Our Place, Our Future establishes an urban design model for the corridor from South Kempsey to Frederickton. It was developed in conjunction with the community and has enabled 2015-2016 to be a year of unprecedented achievement in delivering major improvement projects including: • Rebuilding an entirely reclaimed CBD and Smith Street, taking the focus off traffic on to people • The Smith Street Experience, a marketing campaign to support business and community confidence • Commencement of significant gateway roadworks on Lord Street and Macleay Valley Way • Riverside Park upgrade

Riverside Park community build

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SMITH STREET UPGRADE The $3.6 million project, contracted to a local company included improved pedestrian access and raised crossings, replacement of the footpath, new pavers, new street furniture and public pergolas, upgraded utility services, innovative and energy efficient lighting system, new bus shelter and significant landscaping. The primary objective was to refurbish the streetscape and provide an appealing safe and usable space to stimulate renewed economic activity. To support the physical works the project also involved free heritage consultations to encourage building enhancements, a moratorium on outdoor dinging fees and implementation of the “Smith Street Experience” marketing campaign.


RIVERSIDE PARK UPGRADE No longer located beside a busy highway, the park alongside the Macleay River presented Council with the opportunity to create an inviting, centrally located recreation and meeting space.

RIVERSIDE IN NUMBERS • 25-metre flying fox, water play area, three swing sets and junior play zone • 675 new plants

A partnership with generous community groups, local businesses and contractors saw the upgrade completed in November 2015 at a cost of $284,000 with an estimated value of $400,000.

• 78,000 two litre plastic milk bottles saved from landfill by using Replas seats and tables

The upgrade used recycled and repurposed products and focussed on open accessibility through the installation of a natural adventure playground designed in collaboration with landscape architects and early childhood professionals. The design also featured updated picnic facilities, timber bench seating designed and built by a local business, widening existing paths and a perimeter bike/scooter trail.

• 50 recycled tyres • Help from 18 local business and contractors and 65 residents who donated their time

CONTINUING BYPASS PROJECTS A 3.2 km stretch of the old highway between Frederickton and Kempsey will be transformed into a gateway as 210 Lipstick Maples, planted in 2015, grow and mature. Frederickton will no longer be a highway thoroughfare upon completion of $1.4 million in works to improve the road surface, drainage, kerb access, footpaths and streetscape. On the southern end, improved property access, drainage and footpaths will be some of the lasting benefits of the $3.4 million reconstruction of Lord Street due for completion late 2016.

• 1,624 voluntary working hours

Smith Street, Kempsey

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PART A: 2015 - 2016 Financial Overview Council’s audited financial position for 2015-2016 demonstrated an improved position and a budget surplus of $2.2 million, which will be reinvested into ongoing services. This result has been achieved through a strategy of reducing costs through efficiency savings, increasing income with the special rate variation and reducing Council’s level of debt, so that more can be spent on maintaining our assets, such as roads and bridges. This long term sustainable approach to financial management will continue to be a focus of Council’s practices.

Council’s 2015-2016 income was $69.13 million

Statement of Financial Position Representing Council’s net financial worth at the end of the financial year.

FINANCIAL POSITION SNAPSHOT ASSETS (A) What Council owns

LIABILITIES (L) What Council owes

EQUITY (A-L) What Council is worth in $ terms

2016

2015

2014

2013

$’000

$’000

$’000

$’000

$1,098,365

$1,068,531 $1,200,083

$61,131

$1,037,234

$64,593

$1,182,774

$65,484

$1,003,938 $1,134,599

$60,114

$1,122,660

Operating Expenses

Sources of Income

Council’s expenditure for the year was $66.900 million

0%

8%

27%

33%

47%

31%

2%

24%

12

RATES & ANNUAL CHARGES

INTEREST & INVESTMENT REVENUE

USER CHARGES & FEES

GRANTS & CONTRIBUTIONS

24% OTHER INCOME

4%

EMPLOYEE BENEFITS & ON-COSTS

MATERIALS & CONTRACTS

BORROWING COSTS

DEPRECIATION & AMORTISATION

OTHER EXPENSES


Purchased & Constructed Assets

Council’s Liabilities Borrowings account for $46.176 million representing 75.53% of Council’s liabilities Council’s loan liability decreased by $5.173 million in the financial year.

12,000 10,055

10,000 8,000

Council’s Assets Infrastructure, property, plant and equipment accounts for more than 95% of Council assets. As at 30 June 2016, the value of Council’s total assets was $1,098,365 million, an increase of $33 million from the previous year.

7,072

6,000 4,000

3,223

3,075

2,302

2,000

Council’s loan liability decreased by $5.173 million in the financial year.

356

0

In 2015-2016 Council purchased or constructed $26,083 million in assets, as shown to the right.

LAND & BUILDINGS

PLANT & EQUIPMENT

WATER SUPPLY NETWORK

ROADS, BRIDGES & DRAINAGE NETWORKS

SEWERAGE NETWORK

OTHER ASSETS

Operational Cost of Services ADMINISTRATION

A breakdown of operating expenditure by activity

ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT & BUSINESS SERVICES COMMUNITY SERVICES

8%

18%

DRAINAGE

5%

EMERGENCY SERVICES

6% 3%

7%

ENVIRONMENTAL SERVICES

1%

6%

11% 8%

26%

GOVERNANCE PLANNING

1% 0%

RECREATION ROADS, BRIDGES & FOOTPATHS SEWER WASTE SERVICES WATER

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Delivery Program Key Performance Indicators

RESIDENTS # residents

RESULT 29,684

% people reporting feeling safe in their homes and public spaces

68%

# rating of overall satisfaction

2.81

% projects completed on time and on budget

65%

% requests above current service levels % residents above satisfied with Council’s communications # community projects undertaken by groups in the community

ON TARGET

No Data

No Data

2.82 16

% customer enquiries solved before second contact made

82%

# mean satisfaction rating with customer service

2.81

% of instances where service levels met

85%

Council has implemented a number of long term strategies such as a moratorium on development costs, strengthening the agriculture sector and lobbying the State Government for greater effort in reducing crime, which are aimed supporting population increases, safety and satisfaction. Challenges in staff recruitment, overruns of major projects like Smith Street and South Kempsey as well as additional grant funded projects, all impacted on the percentage of projects completed. New software to automate forms and processes, training in plain English writing and the recruitment of specialist staff are innovations that have occurred since the customer satisfaction survey in February and will assist in reaching targets for communications and customer service.

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BUSINESS

RESULT

# people employed in Shire

11,071

$ farm output ($mill)

$139.2

$ gross regional product ($mill) $ investment into the local government area ($mill)

$1,261.00 $47.80

% satisfaction of businesses with Council infrastructure

52%

# break and enter, malicious damage crimes (reducing)

876

% key development stakeholders expressing satisfaction

No Data

% positive rating of brand awareness and recognition by businesses

ON TARGET

No Data

24%

Strategies to achieve population and employment growth, and drive higher value use of agricultural land will continue to have an effect over the longer term. Council’s Smith Street marketing campaign, Food Bowl initiative and process improvement to support investment in the region will all continue to impact more positively on unmet targets. Council commenced measuring business satisfaction and brand rating in this financial year and will now implement the Small Business Friendly Council program as one of the actions to achieve this target.

VISITORS $ total visitor spend ($mill) % satisfaction of visitors with quality of facilities

RESULT

ON TARGET

$128 No Data

No Data

Resources in this area have been focussed on development of agribusiness, compounding with a lag in relevant data to impact achievement of these indicators. Economy.id data shows employment in tourism hospitality and sales has grown faster than the overall NSW tourism sector in the last 12 months.

EMPLOYEES

RESULT

$ saved through innovation

$97,600

% of staff undertaking discretionary training

66.90%

% staff expressing satisfaction with employment

86%

% unplanned leave hours per employee per annum on average

4.6%

# of lost time Injuries per million hours worked

16.22

ON TARGET

The Service Review project has consumed considerable resources and staff time to evaluate processes and efficiency opportunities. This has impacted on capacity to develop cost saving innovations but the Service Review will deliver efficiency savings in future years. A management focus to address unplanned leave will continue, with a positive trend being recorded mid-way in the 2016-2017 financial year. While reductions in insurance premiums reflect positive change in lost time injuries efforts to review injury sources, length and mitigation strategies will continue.

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Delivery Program Key Performance Indicators (cont.) GOVERNMENT % variable grants received from applications made $ variable grant funding received ($mill) Agencies and members expressing positive view of activities of council organisation

RESULT

ON TARGET

29,684 68% No Data

No Data

Grants have been attracted for a wide range of purposes including ecological, cinema infrastructure and road funding. Our organisation has a positive reputation for achieving quantifiable outcomes for all levels of Government through grant funded work.

FINANCIAL (GENERAL FUND)

RESULT

Operating performance ratio

2.05%

Own source revenue ratio

66.19%

Building and infrastructure asset renewal ratio

123.03%

Infrastructure backlog ratio

0.27

Asset maintenance ratio

0.99

Debt service ratio

5.11%

Real operating expenditure per capita

$1,838.34

Actual V budget position Operating Statement

$1,358,547

Basis points return on investments against benchmark Outstanding debtors ratio

ON TARGET

1.43 5.48%

The general fund performed well with continued long term focus remaining on addressing the infrastructure backlog by directing funds achieved through special rate variation funding, lower loan repayments and efficiency savings back into infrastructure works.

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Funding Additional Works Council has approval from the Independent Pricing and Regulatory Tribunal (IPART) to fund an ongoing program of maintenance on roads and bridges through a special rate variation. The four year variation applies from 2014-2015 through to 2017-2018. For 2015-2016 this rate variation resulted in an additional $2.5 million being invested into the infrastructure program. In addition to the rate variation funds an additional $3.4 million has also been generated each year since 2010 through Councils efficiency savings, along with ongoing reductions in loan repayments, as part of Council’s long term approach to increasing investment in the infrastructure backlog.

Road and bridge repairs that received contributions from the SRV funding in 2105-2016 include: $1.17 million on works to unsealed roads: • • • • •

Collombatti Road Willi Willi Road Pipers Creek Road Edinbrough Lane Plummers Lane

$787,000 towards work on sealed roads: • • • •

Crescent Head Road Robert Gardem Place John Street Smithtown Peter Mouatt Street

$290,000 on bridge repairs including: • Nagles falls Bridge • Yellow Gully Bridge • McIntyres Bridge 17


COMMUNITY GOAL

We Value Being Healthy

Contributing to a healthy community

8

2094

sewerage treatment plants

18

4

Section 149 Planning Certificates were issued

waste transfer stations

11,773

water connections throughout the Shire

18

water supply reservoirs

623km of water pipes

12

sporting facilities

21

water pump stations


What does Council aim to deliver? > Minimise impacts of waste and safe disposal of waste products

> Provide safe, reliable water supply to serviced areas > Implement fluoridation to Kempsey and Crescent Head water supplies > Regulate food risks to the public

> Ensure animals don’t create a nuisance or safety risk > Manage and regulate impacts of development

> Ensure development is undertaken to safe and reasonable standards

> Plan for a sustainable environment

> Ensure sustainability of infrastructure to meet expected future growth

> Provide services to cater for an ageing population > Provide sporting fields, play facilities and public spaces

> Manage and remediate the estuary eco-system > Minimise the impact of noxious weeds on the environment and the economy

> Regulate public health risks

> Operate public pools > Maintain footpaths

> Ensure future burial needs are catered for

> Support education for healthy eating programs

> Removal of wastewater products from serviced areas

79

sewerage pump stations

11

cemeteries

> Maintain the stormwater drainage system

11,708 719 weekly waste collections to households

28

playgrounds

1,726

Ranger related requests received

65km of footpath and cycle ways

on site sewerage management systems inspected

4

Council owned swimming pools

288km

of sewer mains and reticulation

19


2015 - 2016 Highlights

Healthy

More than 1,300 properties were inspected for weed infestation, and a proactive education campaign increased community awareness of noxious weeds.

Council hosted the NSW Country Surf Life Saving Championships, at South West Rocks in February 2016 involving more than 1,500 competitors.

Construction for fluoridation equipment at Steuart McIntyre Dam commenced.

A $1 million upgrade to the telemetry control system that assists Council with monitoring and controlling the water and sewerage infrastructure throughout the Shire, completed in May 2016, has delivered significant improvements in system operation and efficiency. The SCADA system provides timely alarms for any system anomalies which are sent via SMS to Council operational staff and enable immediate response, therefore minimising negative impacts on providing supply of quality drinking water.

Implementation of the rural residential component of the Kempsey Local Growth Management Strategy continued.

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A NSW first, the Mobile Community Recycling Centre is a purpose built trailer that provides a free drop off centre for problem household wastes that can move throughout the Shire. Funded by the EPA’s Waste Less, Recycle More initiative, the trailer was selected as a finalist for the 2015 Green Globe Awards. Throughout the year, the trailer was used to deposit 2,500 paint tins, 3,000 batteries and 3,000 litres of motor oil and other oils.

Council developed and adopted a new Pedestrian Access and Mobility Plan (PAMP) which will guide policies and grant applications for how to build and maintain pedestrian facilities, including the existing 65km of footpath across the Shire.

The 130-metre elevated walkway around Point Briner, South West Rocks was officially opened in June 2016. Set on 27 piers and built from recycled composite plastic, the walkway creates an accessible pedestrian link while being sympathetic to the natural beauty and historical significance of the location.

The community has become involved in initiatives to educate and change behaviours around waste management. As part of Council’s Clean up the Macleay Valley Grant program the Crescent Head Surf Riders organised a public clean-up in September 2015. The program also saw multiple public waste and recycling bins installed in the area, including a pet waste bag dispenser and cigarette butt bin. 21


COMMUNITY GOAL

We Value Being Wealthy

Contributing to the community’s wealth

82% 103

timber bridges

47 concrete bridges 9 foot bridges 22

1

airport

of economic sustainability projects completed on time

193km of kerb and gutter

1

regional saleyard

12.9%

of the population is enrolled in tertiary education


What does Council aim to deliver? > Promote literacy through the provision of library services

> Maximise opportunities from the bypass

> Encourage tourist visitation

> Support increased levels of educational attainment

> Ensure suitable infrastructure exists for business owners > Support services to increase value in local business

1

mobile library

125,951 visitors to our four libraries

> Build returns from agriculture > Provide transport network > Timber bridge replacement program

19,098

visitors to our Information Centres

$139.2 million attributed to farm output

5

holiday parks

181,696

items borrowed from our libraries

1,183km of road network

613 sealed / 570 gravel 23


2015 - 2016 Highlights

Wealthy The handover of the Old Pacific Highway has resulted in development of a 10 year Maintenance Plan and RMS funding agreement to address areas that are now urban and residential roads. In 2015-2016 this included the resurfacing of several roads in Frederickton, the Southern Highway Interchange and roads in Crescent Head as well as footpath and kerb and gutter works.

Advocacy of Macleay Vocational College helped secure a $500,000 Federal grant to build a hospitality learning centre, announced in late June 2016.

An $850,000 upgrade to South West Rocks Road, as part of the residential roads program, was completed in three stages with two being funded through the Federal Roads to Recovery Program.

An active and responsive library service continues to be a critical part of promoting literacy in the Kempsey Shire. Monthly storytime sessions, access to a toy library and a Story Box library full of teaching resources are ongoing services. In partnership with Kempsey West Rotary, residents of East and West Kempsey who are not able to physically attend the library are provided with a range of materials through the home lending service.

Gravel surfaces have been replenished and driving conditions improved on 24km of gravel road across the Shire. This investment of almost $1 million represents an increase of 25% on previous years, funded through the special rate variation.

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During NAIDOC week in July 2015, Kempsey Library hosted the Dhanggati Language Group’s book publishing project. The project produced three dreamtime stories which are written in Dhanggati language with English translations, colour images and a pronunciation guide aimed at assisting the revival of the Dhanggati language and culture.

Investments in supporting the local tourism industry include production and distribution of the tourist guide, Explore, Experience, Discover 2016-2017 and adoption of a Business Management Plan for the Council-owned holiday parks.

Council signed a Memorandum of Understanding with the Australian International Aviation College, paving the way for a $7 million investment in a flight training school at Kempsey Airport.

The Macleay Valley Food Bowl strategy and marketing campaign aims to stimulate economic growth and increase agriculture sales and productivity using a destination brand for the region. Research to identify and promote high value horticulture crops, launch of a website, marketing materials and industry targeted workshop series has contributed to an additional 180 jobs in the agricultural sector.

The reconstruction of 11.7km of regional rural access roads included the 4.5km stretch of Armidale Road that was widened, realigned and resurfaced road between September 2015 and April 2016 at a cost of $1.2 million, obtained through the Federal Government Black Spot funding program.

A survey of over 250 Macleay Valley businesses in October 2015 helped to define a measure of local business confidence and identify public infrastructure and local government services that were of the most value. Initiatives implemented as a result of this feedback included the Doing Better Business workshops helping participants to prepare a five year plan and subscribing to Profile ID, a data portal that provides economic, demographic and business statistics to the community. 25


COMMUNITY GOAL

We Value Being Safe

Contributing to a safe community

Lifeguard

92%

of community survey respondents feel safe in public places during the day

services in spring, summer and autumn school holidays at 26

5

beaches

Break and enter, malicious damage crime has reduced on previous year

13%


What does Council aim to deliver? > Programs to support youth education on positive behaviour benefits

> Increase awareness of the need for disaster plans > Build networks for community support after disasters

> Support national domestic violence awareness campaigns

> Emergency preparation and response

> Increase beach safety through lifeguard services

> Revitalise Kempsey CBD to instill community pride and ownership

177

flood control structures

> Road safety improvements

> Education programs on road safety

> Assist in crime prevention through environmental design (CPTED) and communication

> Activities to reduce alcohol related issues > Provide street lighting to urban areas and the road network

> Swift removal of graffiti in our urban areas

> Provide flood mitigation infrastructure to reduce flood impacts

> Revitalise Horseshoe Bay Reserve

33

measuring stations reporting flood and rainfall data

35km

of flood levees

10 CCTV cameras

55km of rockwalls 27


2015 - 2016 Highlights

Safe

A proactive Community Resilience Program was created and delivered to assist the community and other organisations prepare for times of flooding and natural disaster. The program included Flood Resilience Workshops, the result of a collaboration between Kempsey Shire Council, NSW SES, NSW Department of Primary Industries Rural Resilience Program and North Coast Local Land Services, as well as subscription to the MyRoadInfo app.

Council has played a vital role in community advocacy and strategic development to work alongside other community and government agencies to reduce the level of crime.

An innovative flood camera system that integrates with the river level monitoring station has been installed at Sherwood Bridge. The camera takes images of the bridge and river every 15 minutes during a flood event, which are automatically uploaded to Council’s website, updating residents on the progress and severity of floods and bridge access.

tage from Flood camera foo 2016 d Saturday 2n May

28


In April 2016, work commenced on a 1.7km footpath extension along Gowings Hill Road in South Kempsey with the aim of providing a safe path for residents, linking communities. The project was funded through the RMS Aboriginal Road Safety Infrastructure Program at a cost of $220,000, with Council contributing project management and design components. The footpath extension received support from all levels of Government with the labour work largely undertaken by participants in the Work for the Dole scheme through the Kempsey Showground Trust.

Council’s response to the damage caused by a major storm surge in June 2016 was swift and cost effective. A quarter of the 50-year old Killick Creek footbridge was washed away, but a $10,000 emergency repair using salvaged and excess materials was competed in four days and restored beach access ahead of a full bridge replacement later in the year.

As a founding agent of the Breaking the Cycle Interagency Group, Kempsey Shire Council has worked collaboratively to increase services and improve safety in the community. Initiatives include installation in December 2015 of 10 CCTV cameras throughout the Kempsey CBD; supporting Police Community Meetings which gives residents the opportunity to meet new Police officers, discuss current issues and to access information on safe practices in home security and; participating in quarterly Police Aboriginal Consultative Committee meetings to address Aboriginal issues associated with community safety and crime.

In June 2016, Council commenced a voluntary House Raising Scheme, made possible with funding from the State Government Floodplain Risk Management Grant Program. Six houses have been approved as suitable to receive a grant for twothirds of the cost required to raise the property above the 1 in 100 year flood level. 29


COMMUNITY GOAL

We Value Being Sociable

Contributing to a sociable community

2

art galleries

17

public amenities 30

High profile public toilets cleaned daily

1

Kempsey Family Community Centre


What does Council aim to deliver? > Provide and maintain public areas and recreational facilities for use by the community

> Work with community groups

> Provide and maintain public toilet facilities

> Provide access to transport and infrastructure services

> Provide suitable parking

4

skate parks

23

community groups actively involved in projects

22

> Support community events and activities

77ha of park

Council coordinated events for community participation 31


2015 - 2016 Highlights

Sociable

Council partnered with Melville High and FACS to support the Dunghutti people to protect their cultural stories. Uncle Bob Smith and Emily King led the project, collecting stories from 84 elders and creating a DVD box set. The stories were shared with 480 local students who painted their interpretation, resulting in 13 murals forming a map of the Macleay Valley. The Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies (AIATSIS) have profiled the innovative project.

Community Development staff coordinated a community building project to make over the Kempsey Skate Park, showcasing the skills of local artists and students.

Public spaces in Federickton including the cenotaph and boat ramp have been upgraded to encourage community use now that they are no longer affected by highway traffic.

In April 2016, Council supported a range of activities and events for Seniors Week. These included a concert, iPad workshops and a Digital Life Memories workshop which taught participants how to produce digital slideshows of photos and music. The ‘As I Age’ mobile chalkboard moved through busy streets of the Shire and provided residents with an opportunity to celebrate ageing and reflect on their hopes and dreams for the future.

Council supported funding and coordination for more than 50 community events, with an upward trend of increasing the number of community groups involved in events.

32


Council has worked with community groups to design and implement the creative communities program which aims to increase community involvement and a sense of pride in the region. Sponsorship of the creative industries forum, The Business of Being Creative, at the Slim Dusty Centre in May 2016, provided participants with connections and facts to support turning creative ideas into profitable business. Other initiatives under the $50,000 program include commissioned artists to design and paint murals on key infrastructure and buildings such as toilet blocks at South West Rocks and Riverside Park and a large street art mural in Savages Lane. This was extended to painting the electricity boxes in the Kempsey CBD with artworks based on the environment.

Council staff operate the Kempsey Family Community Centre (KFCC), located in South Kempsey. In June the KFCC partnered with Macleay Valley Drug Action Team to host information stalls and provide resources on Alcohol and Other Drugs. The stalls in the Kempsey Library, Clyde Street Mall and Burrun Dulai Family Fun Day resulted in completion of 100 surveys providing vital insight into drug related issues.

The Mayoral Community Fund is a small community grants program aimed at financially supporting local community projects that benefit the wellbeing of Macleay residents. The funds are generated by savings made from Councillors waiving many of the entitlements allocated to the elected Officials Expense budget, including a Mayoral car. In 2015-16, over $25,000 was donated back to 16 community projects across the Macleay Valley including gardens, markets, festivals, education programs and sporting groups.

One of the highlights of Council’s Local Government Week activities for 2015 was the ‘Cemetery Tales’ tour of West Kempsey Cemetery. Almost 60 participants attended the theatrical presentation on the tales of past residents and their burial sites. 33


Governance

Contributing to good governance

14.2

average number of hours after Council meetings that minutes are available

34

85%

of Customer enquiries resolved at first contact

2

Council meetings held in villages

7

Community workshops held

37,220 Customer Service telephone enquiries


What does Council aim to deliver? > Community engagement support for Council’s decision making

> Efficiency investment

> Customer Service Centre

> Financial services and reporting

> Corporate administration including policies, procedures and Council meetings

> Fleet management

2015 - 2016 Highlights Council has undertaken a strategic review of operations, financial management and service delivery expectations to respond to community feedback and industry reform. The review program has found $3.2 million in annual savings over five years, with a commitment adopted in July 2016 to save a further $500,000 in cash based efficiencies.

> Corporate information services

> Human resources

Governance A restructure was implemented in order to resource a dedicated service review, with Kempsey Council leading the project on behalf of neighbouring Councils.

With the goal of improving customer satisfaction, Council initiated a review and audit of correspondence and direct communication that had gone to ratepayers and stakeholders, in order to develop a systems-based approach. One off funding of $270,000 was invested in improved processes, skills and systems including an overhaul of correspondence and training in plain English writing. Implementation of a customer management system to automate processes and improve tracking of customer enquiries and responses has been commenced. 35


Awards and Accolades

Green Globe Awards 2015 Waste & Recycling Award Mobile Community Recycling Centre Named as one of five finalists in the NSW Government’s Green Globe Awards, the leading environmental recognition program celebrating the work of organisations and individuals who are leading the way in making NSW a place where people and nature thrive.

2015 IPWEA NSW Division Excellence Awards - Winner Excellence in WH&S Sherwood Bridge Flood Camera

Master Builders Association 2016 Regional Award for Best Civil Project Smith Street revitalisation Joint award won by Council and building contractor O’Donnell and Hanlon for the rebuilding of Smith Street.

2015 IPWEA NSW Division Excellence Awards – Highly Commended Innovation in Water Supply and Wastewater Bloomfield Water Supply Pump Station

36

IPWEA Foundation Scholarship Lalji Rathod – Kempsey Shire Council Water Services Project Engineer Lalji received sponsorship to the annual conference and young engineers development seminar, following a submission in the Young Engineers category.

2015 IPWEA NSW Division Excellence Awards - Winner Excellence in the Three R’s Recovering, Recycling and Reusing Mobile Community Recycling Centre Trailer


Key Projects in Progress NAME OF PROJECT

% COMPLETED AT JUNE 2016

TOTAL COST

% COUNCIL FUNDS (INC. S94)

Killick Creek footbridge replacement, Crescent Head

15%

$315,000

100%

Oil Terminal footbridge, South West Rocks

10%

$250,000

100%

Gowings Hill footpath extension, Gowings Hill

65%

$220,000

40%

Kempsey Cinema project, Kempsey

5%

$6.2M

30%

Service Review

30%

$700,000

100%

New wastewater treatment plant, West Kempsey

15%

$50M

100%

Smith Street (north) streetscape, Kempsey

25%

$100,000

98%

Streetscape, South Kempsey village Lachlan Street upgrade, Kempsey

5%

$1.2M

100%

Frederickton village streetscape upgrade, Frederickton

20%

$1.4M

100%

Jetty and floating pontoon at Riverside Park, Kempsey

20%

$380,000

0%

Upgrade Horseshoe Bay playground, South West Rocks

30%

$250,000

100%

Replace toilet amenities block, Crescent Head

5%

$484,000

100%

South Street extension – heavy vehicle bypass, Kempsey

5%

$3M

25%

37


KEMPSEY SHIRE COUNCIL 22 Tozer Street PO Box 3078 West Kempsey NSW 2440 P. 02 6566 3200 F. 02 6566 3205 E. ksc@kempsey.nsw.gov.au www.kempsey.nsw.gov.au


Annual Report

2015 -2016

PART B – Statutory and Additional Information


Table of Contents 1. Achievements in implementing the Delivery Program 2. Rates and charges written off 3. Register of overseas travel 4. Payment of expenses to Councillors 5. Contracts awarded greater than $150,000 6. Legal Proceedings Summary 7. Resolutions made under section 67 work carried out on private land 8. Total amount granted under section 356 9. Statement of external bodies delegated function by Council 10.Statement of corporations, partnerships, trusts, joint ventures, syndicates and other bodies in which Council held a controlling interest 11.Statement of corporations, partnerships, trusts, joint ventures, syndicates and other bodies in which Council participated 12.Human Resources data including; a. Organisational Overview b. Statement of activities to implement EEO management plan c. General Manager Remuneration d. Senior Staff Remuneration e. Learning and Development f. Work Health and Safety 13.Statement of coastal protection services 14.State of the Environment Report 2016 15.Particulars of any environment upgrade agreement entered into 16.Expenditure of Special Variation of Rating income 17.Companion Animals Act and Regulation 18.Government Information (Public Access) Act – GIPA Report 19.Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 20.Carers Recognition Act 21.Fisheries Management Act

2


1.

Achievements in implementing the 2013-2017 Delivery Program In accordance with the Local Government Act s428(1)

The 2013-2017 Delivery Program outlines the Councillors commitments to the Macleay Valley community during the four year term of office. It is the blueprint for Council in delivering the services that meet community expectations. The objectives and resulting strategies within the four year Delivery Program represent what the Council aim to deliver and serves as a guide for Council executive and staff when developing the annual Operating Plan. The Operating Plan sets out the actions and activities that will be undertaken each financial year to deliver the overall objectives in the Delivery Program and ultimately contribute to achieving the vision and goals outlined in the long term Community Strategic Plan. There are four central themes that guide all of Council’s strategic corporate planning and program delivery. There themes were agreed with the community in context of developing the Community Strategic Plan and are; • • • •

The The The The

community community community community

values values values values

being being being being

Healthy wealthy safe sociable

Additional corporate management services are coordinated by Council under the value of Governance. See Part A – A Year in Review for an overview of the third year of the Delivery Program implementation. Key Performance Indicators for each Division of Council are reported in the tables following.

3


INFRASTRUCTURE SERVICES Indicator Number of water main failures per year Number of sewer surcharges per year Percentage of water and sewer supply failures responded to within two (2) hours of being reported.

Target <40

Y.T.D. 33

<90

30

90%

100% Water Accum Average 99.53% Sewer Accum average 98.1%

Percentage of water quality analyses complying with Australian Drinking Water Guidelines (ADWG) Number of incidents resulting in illness due to Councilâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s potable water supply system Annual frequency of unplanned water supply service interruptions per 1000 customers

98%

<40

71

Annual rate of economic return for water supply services Reduce operating costs per Kl of water produced

>0.6

1.3

Percentage of routine fluoride monitoring tests within the range provided by the regulation

<1

>10% (Over 4yrs) >99%

Proportion of public spaces receiving an improved level of service Proportion of public spaces made redundant and disposed of to fund improvements in other facilities

20% (over 4yrs) 15% (over 4yrs)

Annual level of usage of the swimming pools (including aquatic centre related activities) Number of people using footpaths daily Percentage of effluent analyses complying with EPA licences Volume of treated wastewater reused or recycled

70,000pa

0.3

5% (Over 3 Yrs) 86% Accum Average 22% Nil

74,068p a

3,000

5,071

95%

95%

>10%

Comment

Benchmarking indicates <70 to be the average. Improved reporting in this area has resulted in an increase of incidents recorded. Performance marginally below target Equipment failure is resulting in under dosing over extended periods whist repairs are completed.

Poor market values and a decision to create new facilities before the sale of other land has not put Council in a position to sell redundant land.

17% Accum

4


Indicator Volume of sludge reused/recycled Reduce the costs of management, treatment and pumping (electricity) costs Annual average unplanned service disruptions Annual rate of return for sewer Reduction in number of road condition complaints Vehicle accidents attributed to poor road condition Number of bridges below adequate condition Number of bridges replaced with concrete or composite structures Percentage of bridges with load limits implemented Drains and floodgate structures maintained to ensure flood mitigation system is available for operation Number of accidents at lighted intersections Percentage increase in annual street lighting charges Reduce the level of road accidents Days of lifeguard service provided Number of annual visitors to patrolled beaches Annual number of preventative actions undertaken Annual number of serious rescues

Target >95% >10% (Over 4yrs) <102 Minutes 20.6

Y.T.D. average 100%

Comment

6%

Delay between implementation of initiatives and savings being recorded not factored into target Recording and capturing data is impacting target KPI not met

132 Minutes 0.4

20%

38%

<20

13

<30% 2 <10%

2% 9 0%

95%

97%

<20

4

<5%

3%

Decreasing

186 >200,000 >7,500 <40

259 222,601 10,352 45

Annual number of first aid cases

<300

263

Percentage of blockages to Councilâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s drainage system likely to cause property damage cleared within 24 hours of being safe to do so Waste â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Quantity of domestic waste material disposed of to landfill per year Waste â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Quantity of domestic waste material per year diverted from landfill

90%

78%

<4,400

6055t

>6,600t

4847t

Rescues and preventative actions in Surf Life Saving season reflect growth in visitor numbers and popular surf conditions Incidences where high water levels have made it unsafe to enter into the mains has resulted in the target not being met. Waste targets are more ambitious than state benchmarks Revised Waste Strategy, including changes to collection service will be implemented in 2017

5


Indicator Waste – Quantity of domestic waste materials recycled/reused as a percentage of the material going to landfill Waste – Percentage improvement in the quantity of materials diverted from landfill compared to previous years Maintenance of public areas within levels of service

Target 60%

Y.T.D. 45% Accum Average

5%

Comment Revised Waste Strategy, including changes to collection service will be implemented in 2017

6.5%

>90%

80%

Service levels being reviewed following budget reduction in 2013

SUSTAINABLE ENVIRONMENT Target

Y.T.D.

Percentage of all Development Applications approved within 30 days.

85%

81%

Percentage of Construction Certificates approved within 30 days.

90%

98%

42

36

95%

97%

Total average days to process Development Applications Number of compliant development application audits

Comment The initial results were expected due the effect of vacancies. Temporary resources were deployed and resources reallocated from other functions that saw an improvement, albeit falling below the annual target.

This KPI measures the percentage of DAs issued without error that could potentially: result in a DA being invalid, or result in financial loss to Council, or • result in environmental risk by omission. 98 requests received with 85 responded to within 7 days for the year. This result was impacted upon by vacancies. • •

Percentage of requests relating to environmental quality that may cause preventable harm to the environment responded to within 7 days.

90%

87%

6


Target

Y.T.D.

Comment

Percentage of requests for Ranger Services responded to within 5 days

95%

97%

1726 Ranger related requests received with 1667 completed within 5 days for the year. This represents 7 responses per day with a continued high level of service being achieved.

Collection of contained stray dogs/cats within 6 hours

90%

90%

342 requests were received with 332 collected within 6 hours for the year.

Complaints relating to stray dogs responded to within 2 working days

95%

98%

440 requests were received with 403 responded to within two working days for the year.

1.1

0.5

2094 certificates were issued for the year.

27%

26.8%

12,000

12,593

Percentage of strategic planning project tasks completed on time

80%

99%

Percentage of environmental project tasks completed on time

80%

98%

Percentage of economic sustainability project tasks completed on time

80%

82%

Average number of days to issue Section 149 Planning Certificates Percentage of properties with infestations

Number of people employed in the Kempsey Shire area

1322 inspections undertaken with 354 properties with infestation found for the year. This result reflects the additional resources provided by grant funding for an officer to target Tropical Soda Apple.

7


Indicator â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Annually

Target

Y.T.D.

Nil

0

Number of compliance audits per annum

120

186

Number of onsite sewerage management systems inspected each annum.

840

719

Percentage of food premises inspected per annum.

85%

100%

500

475

85%

76.2%

Percentage of caravan parks inspected per annum

100%

100%

Required Annual Fire Safety Certificates are provided

100%

99.5%

Number of education programs on weeds per annum

2

10

Area of residential land made available for development

50 ha

> 50ha

8 ha

31ha

12

24

5%

12.9%

Number of developments unreasonably held up by the lack of foreseeable council responsible infrastructure requirements

Number of environmental health inspections per annum Percentage of compliant food inspections

Area of land rezoned for industrial development Number of environmental education projects per annum Percentage of people enrolled in tertiary education

Comment

719 inspections undertaken for the year. This was not met due to staff shortages. This KPI was met by employing the services of a contract inspector for 8 weeks.

This KPI seeks to measure the effectiveness of Councilâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s inspections and systems in improving food hygiene.

414 out of the required 416 certificates received for the year. There are 2 outstanding properties which Council is taking action on to comply with the requirements of the Act.

Council has an excess of land zoned and available for residential development.

8


Indicator – Annually

Target

Y.T.D.

Level of farm output

$124m

$139.2M

10%

8%

51

51

+5%

10%

Number of visitor night stays has increased Water quality monitoring of the Shire’s creeks, rivers and beaches is undertaken on a weekly basis Income from Council’s Caravan Parks has increased

Comment

COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT Indicator

Target

Y.T.D

Customer service enquires (telephone) per annum

˃33,000

37,220

Customer service enquiries at Customer Service Centre per annum

˃12,000

8,986

˂5%

8.49%

Customer enquiries resolved at first contact

˃75%

84.99%

Percentage of customer calls returned within 2 business days

˃85%

86.37%

Number of Customer Surveys Completed per annum

˃960

834

Customer abandoned calls per month Less than

Percentage of correspondence received needing a reply that is responded to within 10 working days

>90%

This result indicates Customer enquiries being addressed via other means.

Staff availability impacted on this result. Data currently not available

Number of meals provided

800

859

Number of hours of social participation provided

30,000

29,317

2,500

2,989

Number of hours of assistance at home provided

Comment

9


Indicator Number of people provided with transport Number of hours of home care services provided under Government CDC Packages Provide venues for arts to be sold and promoted (other than the Macleay Valley Art Gallery) Hold literacy workshops

Target

Y.T.D

3,300

3,833

11,200

11,778

10 pa

3

10

48

Increase in literacy skills in younger people

80%

Provide access to literacy resources (digital and online)

80%

100%

Number of participants participating in road safety education programs

1,000

463

Number of community groups actively engaged in community projects

20 pa

23

Number of community projects completed

10 pa

2

Number of volunteers increased

2,000 active volunteers

Comment

Local markets, Sculpture in the Gaol, Artisan market at South West Rocks provide additional venues

Target to be measured through Dept. Education. Resources available at the library and online.

Target is for the community, February 2015 survey 48% volunteered.

Number of events for the community to participate in

15 pa

22pa

Increased number of community groups engaged in hosting events

10 groups pa

5

Increased participation of youth in community activities

20%

270

Cater for future burial and internment requirements

100%

100%

Level of graffiti needing removal

Ë&#x201A;10%

116

Percentage calculation unavailable

10


Indicator

Target

Y.T.D

Reduced crime levels break & enter, malicious damage

˂1010 pa

876

Number of reported assaults

˂40

439

˂150

232

Reduce domestic violence incidences

Comment

Reduction in domestic violence assaults

15% reduction annually

Data not available

Reduced number of accidents responsible from alcohol consumption

10% reduction annually

Data not available

Community consultations held per annum

˃30

13

Number of participants in community consultations per annum

˃1,500

939

Percentage of population engaging in sporting activity

30%

67%

Survey Results Jan / Feb 2015

Average frequency that sports related exercise is undertaken

3 pw

79%

Survey results Jan / Feb 2015

Percentage of population reporting taking children to a playground in the last three months

20%

43%

% of properties likely to be affected by flooding or bushfire with an emergency plan

50%

47%

% of businesses likely to be affected by flooding or bushfire with an emergency response/business continuity plan

65%

Number of people volunteering

20%

Survey result April 2016

Survey result April 2016

Survey to be undertaken

48%

Survey results Jan / Feb 2015

11


Indicator

Target

Y.T.D

Comment

People feel safe in their homes

85%

84% Average

People feel safe in public spaces

85%

91% during the day

92% day 76% night Survey results April 2016 91% day 75% night 92% day 12% night Survey results April 2016 90% day 15% night

Average 13.5% night

Additional Data Community Engagement Indicator Number of Visitors to our Visitor Information Centres

Y.T.D. 19,098

Number of phone calls to our Visitor Information Centres Number of emails to our Visitor Information Centre

2,552

Exhibitions held at the Macleay Community Gallery

21

Number of Visitors to Art/Cultural Exhibitions

Target 22,000

6,454

6,939

Hours of internet usage by the community at Council libraries Library Wi-Fi Users/Devices

10,235

Library Wi-Fi Hours/Log-ins

12,295

Number of items borrowed from Councilâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s libraries

Comment

9,500

E-books: 33,853 Hard Copy: 181,696

Number of visitors to the libraries Number of functions including holiday activities at libraries Increase in the number of community gardens (Currently 10 community gardens in the Shire) Young people aware of healthy eating

125,951 105 0

Fresh Tastes @ School program Live Life Well @ School

12


Indicator

Y.T.D.

People have access to healthy foods

Number of community workshops held

7

Number of Voluntary Groups on Council database (Currently 32 groups on Councilâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s database)

0

Facebook Followers

Comment Fresh Tastes @ School program Live Life Well @ School Community Gardens HUB selling vegetables

3,379

Twitter Followers

188

CORPORATE MANAGEMENT Indicator

Target

Y.T.D.

Percentage of staff expressing satisfaction with management leadership

> 60%

61.7%

Percentage of staff indicating satisfaction with their employment

> 85%

91.9%

Average number of hours before Ordinary Council meetings that the Agenda is available to the public

> 90

138.6

Average number of hours after ordinary Council meetings that the minutes are available to the public

< 24

14.2

Number of public liability claims for property damage received per annum

< 40

34

Number of public liability claims for personal injury received per annum

< 10

4.75

Percentage of formal GIPA requests resolved within legislated timeframe

100%

98.9%

The total number of lost time injuries per annum

<12 claims

9.5

Staff turnover (excluding retirement)

<10%

5.9%

Yes / No

Yes

Yes/No

Yes

Annual financial reports have been audited by 31 October each year Rating Structure reviewed to ensure a fair and reasonable impost by 28 February each year

13


2.

Rates and Charges Written Off In accordance with the Local Government (General) regulation Clause 132

Pensioner Rates Postponed Rates (section 585 LG Act)

1,404,101.73 6,536.35

Total rates and charges written off 2015-2016

1,397,565.38

3.

Register of Overseas Travel by Councillors, Council Staff and other Council Representatives Clause 217(1)(a1)

There were no overseas visits by Councillors, Council staff or other persons representing Council during 2015-2016.

4.

Councillor Fees and Expenses

Councillors are required to attend meetings of Council and its committees, to represent Council at public functions, to attend training and professional development sessions and to attend conferences that relate to the business of Council. These meetings are not only held in Kempsey Shire but are often held in Sydney or in regional New South Wales. The attendance at meetings can involve expenses relating to travel, accommodation and sustenance. Under these circumstances Council pays these expenses up to the limits outlined in the Policy. Each councillor receives an annual fee within a range set by the Local Government Remuneration Tribunal. The mayor in addition receives a mayoral fee within a range also set by the Local Government Remuneration Tribunal. The total mayoral and councillor fees paid in the 2015-2016 year were: Mayor Councillors (9)

$ 40,248 $165,457

Council’s policy on the provision of facilities for use by Councillors and the payment of Councillors’ expenses can be found on the website at http://www.kempsey.nsw.gov.au/corporate/policies/procedure-5-01-05payment-expenses-provision-facilities-councillors.html Councillors’ expenses and provision of facilities Council has adopted a procedure covering the payment of expenses and provision of facilities to the mayor and councillors. Council’s procedure was developed in accordance with the Division of Local Government’s guidelines. The procedure provides for reimbursement of reasonable expenses incurred up to a limit per month set by the procedure.

14


The mayor is provided with a vehicle and a mobile telephone, if required, for Council business use. For the 2015-2016 year the mayor elected not to have a vehicle or mobile phone provided. The mayorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s travel expenses and telephone expenses were reimbursed in accordance with the procedure. All councillors are provided with an iPad with internet connection to receive meeting agendas electronically and for use on Council business. A corporate wardrobe is provided for councillors and meals are provided on Council meeting days when required. Councillors may claim reimbursement for travel when using their private vehicles for council business such as attending meetings, at a per kilometre rate adopted as part of the procedure. Details Mayor and Councillor Expenses

Cost

Mayorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s travelling expenses

Nil

Councillor's travelling expenses

$6,624

Telephone calls made by councilors 217(1)(a1)(i)(ii)

$1,139

Attendance of councillors at conferences and seminars 217(1)(a1)(iii)

$8,448

Interstate visits by councillors, including transport, accommodation and other out of pocket travelling expenses 217(1)(a1)(v)

Nil

Meals and refreshments for council and committee meetings

$6,171

Training of councillors and provision of skill development 217(1)(a1)(iv)

Nil

Overseas visits by councillors, including transport, accommodation and other out of pocket travelling expenses 217(1)(a1)(vi)

Nil

Expenses of any spouse, partner or other person who accompanied a councillor 217(1)(a1)(vii)

Nil

Expenses involved in the provision of care for a child or an immediate family member of a councillor 217(1)(a1)(viii)

Nil

Provision of dedicated office equipment allocated to councillors 217(1)(a1)(i)

Nil

Total Expenses

$22,382

15


5.

Contracts Awarded Greater than $150,000 In accordance with the Local Government (General) Regulation Clause 217(1)(a2)

The following is a list of contracts awarded by the Council during the 2015-2016 year other than employment contracts or contracts less than $150,000 Name of Contractor(s)

Nature of Goods and Services Supplied

Wagners CFT Manufacturing Pty Ltd

Design, supply and delivery of materials for a boardwalk and footbridge at Point Briner, South West Rocks

$234,904

Castlereagh Construction Group Pty Ltd

Building Alterations and Additions to the NSW Rural Fire Service Fire Control Centre, West Kempsey

$592,750 (11.7% contribution by Council)

Mid Coast Telemetry

Panel for Electrical and Electrical Engineering Services

Schedule of Rates*

Ballâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Earthmoving

Supply and delivery of uncrushed gravel

Schedule of Rates*

Pacific Blue Metal Pty Ltd

The supply and delivery of DGB20, DGS20 and DGS40 Gravel

Schedule of Rates*

GHD

Total Amount Payable under the Contract

Safe Group GH Variety Mid Coast Switchboards IS Services

Arnway Pty Ltd Hurd Haulage Pty Ltd T/as Hytec Concrete and Aggregates Interflow Pty Ltd FITT Resources

Sewer Investigation Rehabilitation and Relining services as well as providing the coating components for all manholes within that schedule of work.

$250,000+ per annum

* This contract has been awarded via a procurement process for the provision of services which may or may not exceed the tendering threshold of $150,000 over the period of the contract based upon the contract being awarded based upon the supplier providing a schedule of rates for products and/or services to be procured under the contract. 16


6.

Legal Proceedings In accordance with the Local Government (General) Regulation Clause 217 (1) (a3)

Particulars Kempsey Shire Council ats Maher – public liability claim for injury Kempsey Shire Council ats Five Star Medical Centre – public liability claim for property damage Kempsey Shire Council v Misty Mountain Health Retreat Kempsey Shire Council and USU - Industrial dispute Recovery of unpaid rates with costs recovered from ratepayers and debtors.

7.

Expenses $6,414

Receipts

Status Insurance settlement

$3,854

Ongoing Matter

$10,119

Ongoing Matter Finalised

$40,907.12 $97,418

$97,411

Summary of resolutions made under section 67 concerning work carried out on private land.

No resolutions were made in relation to Section 67

8.

Grants, Financial Assistance and Contributions Total amount granted under section 356 in accordance with the Local Government (General) Regulation Clause 217(1)(a5)

Council recognises the importance of assisting Not-For-Profit community groups and organisations that are interested in and working towards, the enhancement of facilities and improve community well-being of its residents. Each year, Council provide financial assistance to a broad range of groups to boost their ability to make a difference in our local community. The following community groups/organisations were assisted in 2015-2016, Mayoral Community Fund 2015-2016 recipients Group / Organisation Kempsey Riverside Markets

Amount $1,000

About You Medical & Allied Health Clinic

$1,000

Gladstone Quality Markets

$2,574

Kempsey Macleay Men’s Shed

$3,000

Macleay Campdraft Club Incorporated

$1,500

Kempsey Macleay Photographic Club

$1,000

Riding for the Disabled Association

$500

17


Kempsey High School

$2,019

Kempsey Domestic Violence Monitoring Committee

$1,500

Kinchela Village Residents

$800

Upper Macleay Sports Club

$2,000

The HUB

$1,725

Macleay Valley Education Fund Incorporated

$3,000

South West Rocks Euchre Club

$640

South West Rocks Croquet Club

$900

Yarrahapinni Festival at Stuarts Point Inc.

$1,500

Macleay Valley ClubGRANTS ClubGRANTS support local communities by providing funding for community welfare, social services, community development, community health services and employment assistance activities. The Macleay Valley ClubGRANTS Local Committee has representatives from Council, Kempsey Macleay RSL Club, Kempsey Heights Bowling Club, South West Rocks Country Club and Crescent Head Country Club who meet annually to determine the allocation of a proportion of their poker machine revenue to local community groups. The following programs were funded in 2015-2016 Group / Organisation

Alzhiemerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Australia NSW - towards the Dementia Awareness Day Expo St Vincent de Paul Society NSW - towards improving living standards for people experiencing, or at risk of, homelessness

Amount

$3,500 $4,375

Wesley Community Services - towards providing suicide prevention training to youth, teachers, staff and parents through local schools

$5,000

Kempsey Family Support Services Inc. - towards the safe supportive environment for children 5-8 years who have been impacted by domestic violence

$4,475

NSW Rural Fire Service, Lower North Coast Zone Aviation Support Unit - towards the purchase of UHF radios for the RFS Aviation Support Unit

$890

18


9.

Statement of external bodies exercising functions delegated by Council In accordance with the Local Government (General) Regulation Clause 217(1)(a6) External Body Kempsey District Silver Band Macleay Valley Community Art Gallery Friends of WIGAY

10.

Function Provide a Town Band Public Facility Management – Community Gallery Oversee the maintenance of Wigay Park

Bellbrook School of Arts Hall Committee Crescent Head Community Hall Committee Frederickton Hall Committee Gladstone Youth and Community Hall Committee Millbank Hall Committee Sherwood Hall Committee Smithtown Hall Committee Stuarts Point Community Hall Committee South West Rocks School of Arts Hall Committee Willawarrin Hall Committee

Public Facility Management – Public Halls

Kalateenee Recreational Reserve Committee

Public Facility Management – Public reserve

Bellbrook Tennis Club Gladstone Tennis Club South Kempsey Tennis Club

Public Facility Management – Tennis Courts

Statement of corporations, partnerships, trusts, joint ventures, syndicates and other bodies in which Council held a controlling interest

There are no companies with which Council held a controlling interest during 2015-2016.

11.

Statement of corporations, partnerships, trusts, joint ventures, syndicates and other bodies in which Council participated

Council did not participate in corporations, partnerships, trusts, joint ventures, syndicates during 2015-2016.

19


12.

Human Resources Data

a)

Organisational Overview

Total number of employees To deliver the services of Council we had a head count of 303 employees with 288.52 FTE. Department Community Engagement Corporate Management General Managers Infrastructure Services Sustainable Environment

Head Count 53.0 41.0 5.0 173.0 31.0

FTE 43.6 39.9 4.6 171.8 28.6

The numbers below are based on actual head count and include permanent fulltime and part-time staff. The figures exclude temporary and casual appointments engaged through Labour Hire, and apprentices and trainees who are employed by external training providers. Position Breakdown No. of Full-Time positions No. of Part-Time Positions No. of Temporary Part-Time Positions No. of Temporary Full-Time Positions Total

201516

201415

2013-14

2012-13

2011-12

254

244

241

256

263

40

32

38

31

33

4

2

2

4

4

21

4

8

4

299

285

299

300

5 303

The unplanned turnover rates and employees numbers indicates a fairly stable workforce. % Staff turnover rates 2010/2011 2011/2012 2012/2013 2013/2014 2014/2015 2015/2016

15 13 15 19 18 19

5.34% 4.26% 4.97% 6.67% 5.92% 6.17%

Age and Gender Demographics of employees The age demographics across Councilâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s workforce indicate that 61.7% of the workforce is over 45 years of age and of this 30.3% are over 55 years of age. (See figure below). Based on FTE staff numbers Councilâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s workforce is 28.2%

20


female / 71.8% male and on actual head count the workforce is 31.0% female / 69.0 % male.

Age Demographics by gender as at 30 June 2016 40 35

35

34

29

30 25

24

23

20

19

17

15

17

17 14

12

11

10

10

11

10

7 4

5 1

3

1

4

0 15 to 19 20 to 24 25 to 29 30 to 34 35 to 39 40 to 44 45 to 49 50 to 54 55 to 59 60 to 64 Female

>65

Male

Length of Service Associated to the concept of an ageing workforce is the length of service with Council. The average length of service of our employees as at 30 June 2016 was 10.1 years, with service by gender of females 8.27 years and males 10.94 years. The below chart illustrates that in most departments of Council there is a balanced range of experience. A workforce with employees who have longer than average length of service can be seen as a plus for the Council in terms of capitalising on the investment in training and development and reduced recruitment costs

21


Length of Service by Department as at 30 June 2016 14.0

12.5

12.0

11.4

11.2

10.0 7.9

8.0

9.2 9.1

8.3

9.9

9.1

8.3 6.1

6.0 4.3

4.0

4.0

5.4

3.1

2.0 0.0 Community Engagement

Corporate Management

General Manager

Average Total

60

Infrastructure

Female

Sustainable Environment

male

57

Length of Service by Gender as at 30 June 2016

50

45

40 Female 30

20

25

27 27 23

21

17 13 9

10

1 0 0-1 yrs

b)

2-5 yrs

6-10 yrs

11-15 yrs

16-20 yrs

21-25 yrs

13

11

10

0 26-30yrs

2 31-35 yrs

2 >40 yrs

Statement of activities to implement EEO management plan

We continued our ongoing focus on fostering a culture that values and responds to the diversity of our staff and community. The aim is to achieve fair practices and behaviours in the workplace to be free from all forms of unlawful activity, harassment and discrimination by having open and competitive recruitment;

22


providing access to training and development; and providing flexible working arrangements. All vacant positions during the year were advertised and filled in accordance with the merit principle, the Local Government Act 1993, the Local Government (State) Award and the EEO Management Plan. Number Number Number Number Number Number

of of of of of of

positions advertised 47 positions filled positions being filled 2016/2017 12 applications received positions where females applied 27 positions where females were successful

31 965 10

Council employed 81.36 full time equivalent (FTE) women during the year, taking the FTE level of women in the workplace to 28.2%. The number of women in management roles increased to 5 representing 29.4% of our Management team with 7 women represented in our leadership team representing 41.1%. Employment of people with Disabilities Council employed 3 full time equivalent staff (FTE) with a disability, taking the level of people with a disability within Council to 1.03%. Employment of people of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Descent Council employed 10 full time equivalent staff who identify as being of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Descent, taking the level of Indigenous employment within Council to 3.46%. Employment of people from Culturally and Linguistically Diverse (CALD) backgrounds Council employed 5 full time equivalent staff from a culturally and linguistically diverse communities, taking the level of people from CALD within Council to 1.73% Flexibility for Work and Family Arrangements Staff are informed of the opportunities for flexible working arrangements, including parental leave, working from home, varied working hours for family responsibilities and phrased retirement. During 2015-2016 employees accessed flexible working arrangements of: • • • • • •

paid maternity leave unpaid parental leave supporting parents leave phrased retirement working from home varied working hours

5 6 5 8 4 11

Our Workforce Management Strategy aims to ensure there are sufficient numbers of appropriately trained employees to carry out the organisation's purpose. That is, the right people are in the right place at the right time to build a strong, interconnected and sustainable organisation.

23


The principles of this plan are built on attraction and retention, employee safety and wellness, work/life balance, skill development, organizational culture, employee satisfaction and promoting local government as a career prospects to local schools. To meet these principles we have adopted procedures and practices that will assist us in becoming an attractive employer with: • • • • • •

• • • c)

variable work arrangements, flexible working arrangements for parents/carers, providing access to phased retirement plans for matured aged worker appointed 3 full time trainees, 4 apprentices within the areas of Customer Service, Fleet/Workshop (Mechanic & Boilermaker), Technicians (Electrical & Mechanical) hosting work placements from local schools/TAFE and universities hosting 10 full time trainees and 2 school based trainees from a Group Training organisation within the areas of Water/Sewer services, Civil Construction, participating in engineering scholarships with Newcastle University and a Urban and Regional Planning scholarship with University of New England gauging the satisfaction of our employees by conducting an annual employee opinion survey, continuing to review and update our Work Health and Safety management system in line with best practices, maintaining staff health and wellbeing programs. General Manager Remuneration Clause 217(1)(b)

Consistent with Section 332 of the Local Government Act 1993, Council designates the Senior Staff positions within Council. The General Manager is the only designated Senior Staff member within Council’s structure. The total remuneration package for the General Manager in the reporting year was $278,400. Detail Salary component Total amount of any bonus payments, performance or other payments that do not form part of salary component Total employer’s contribution to superannuation (salary sacrifice or employers contribution) Total value non-cash benefits Total fringe benefits tax for non-cash benefits Total remuneration package

d)

Amount $235,925 Nil $33,975 $8,500 Nil $278,400

Senior Staff Remuneration

Consistent with Section 332 of the Local Government Act 1993, Council designates the Senior Staff positions within Council. The General Manager is the only designated Senior Staff member within Council’s structure.

24


e)

Learning & Development

In 2015/2016 a total of 7443.68 hours was spent on Training Courses and Conference/Seminar attendance, including tertiary sponsored studies. During the year 15 employees were undertaking tertiary sponsored studies with 4 completing their qualifications, the remaining 11 employees are still completing studies. The participation rate of employees undertaking training was 91.75%. A focus this year was placed on strengthening the skills of supervisory staff in their responsibilities for managing a safe workplace. Other training programs undertaken to develop our staff and to improve how we deliver our services included: • • • • • • • • • • •

asset/infrastructure management, customer service, communications, environmental water industry, aged/disability care, community development, corporate systems, business improvement, computer, regulatory/governance/WHS.

Course Category - % of total Training Hours Aged/Disability/Community Development

5.15 4.54

Asset/Infrastructure Management

10.2

Conference/Seminar

9.71 36.78

Corporate Systems/Business Improvement Customer Service

5.78 Environment

4.57 Leadership Management

2.89 20.38

Regulatory/Governance Tertiary

25


f)

Work Health and Safety

Kempsey Shire Council is committed to providing a safe and healthy environment for employees, students, contractors and the public. This is achieved by fully integrating health and safety into all its operations and activities, continual improvement and requiring leadership in safety. To improve and maintain the standard of Work Health and Safety (WHS) within Council, our safety management system is implemented based on systematic identification, assessment and control of hazards. To ensure the ongoing development and improvement of WHS systems, policies and procedures that foster effective communication and consultation forms a fundamental part of this management process, encouraging innovative means of reducing risk on the work environment. Health and Safety Committee The main medium for consultation on health and safety in through the Health and Safety Committee, the membership of the committee comprises of Health and Safety Representatives (HSR) and Management representatives. The HSRs represent the employees within their work groups and provide a forum to discuss health and safety issues with management and to bring about a culture in the workplace to think and work safely. During 2015-2016 the committee held 6 ordinary meetings. WHS Training This year 2738 hours was sent by staff attending WHS training. The training was varied with programs being delivered in the statutory WHS tickets/ licences. In addition, as part of Leadership development 1487 hours of training was provided to supervisory staff on their WHS responsibilities under the WHS legislation and Councilâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s WHS management system in providing a safe workplace. Our ongoing commitment to workplace health and safety, is to provide all staff with the skills and knowledge to manage health, safety and welfare in their work areas. Lost Time Injury Frequency Rate (LTIFR) The number of workers compensation claims for this year increased by 5, taking the total to 16. Of these claims 9 resulted in a lost time injury. Councilâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s proactive injury management strategies has resulted in a reduction of the Workers Compensation premium over the Delivery Plan period 2012-2016 compared to the last period by 15.6%. The premium costs have been reduced by $447,597 from the period of 2008-2012 Delivery plan. We are committed to support injured workers to recover from their injuries at work by having then return to work as early as possible to meaningful employment within their physical capacities determined by treating medical practitioners. Employee Assistance Program (EAP) As part of our commitment to health and well-being, Council offers access to an Employee Assistance Program (EAP) to staff and their immediate family members. The program offers confidential and professional advice, support and

26


counselling on a wide range of issues that can be either personal or work related, including serious problems such as depression, drug and alcohol dependence, anxiety, etc. The program also provides critical incident counselling if required. The program is promoted initially at employee induction training and posters are on display in work areas. Staff accessed 28 hours of EAP services this reporting year.

13.

Statement detailing the Coastal Protection Services provided In accordance with the Local Government (General) Regulation Clause 217 (1)(e1)

Council did not levy services for coastal protection during 2015-2016.

14.

State of the Environment Report

A Regional State of the Environment Report has been prepared with collaboration between the 12 general purpose councils along the Regionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s coast, (from Port Macquarie-Hastings Council in the south to Tweed Shire Council in the north and including Lismore and Kyogle councils), three county councils, and the North Coast Local Land Services (formerly the Northern Rivers Catchment Management Authority). It aims to report on environmental condition at both a regional and local level primarily for the 2012 to 2016 reporting period, but including information from the 2012 RSOE where relevant. The Regional SoE utilises national, state and local data which is broken down by local government area where possible to provide local trends but is also used to provide regional trends. The reporting region for the 2016 report has changed since the 2012 report due to the transition of the Northern Rivers Catchment Management Authority to the North Coast Local Land Services in 2014. This change resulted in the reporting region changing to match the boundaries of the twelve participating Local Government Areas (LGA). Initiated by the Department of Premier and Cabinet and brokered by the former Northern Rivers CMA, the Regional SoE Report Project commenced in 2009, with a project working group developing a set of indicators specifically for the reporting region. The first Regioanl SoE report was produced in 2012, with this being the second for the twelve involved LGAs and three County Councils. The report is funded by the 15 participating councils and North Coast Local Land Services (LLS). By working together, the councils in partnership with LLS hope the report informs not only communities, but also local and state government and provides a regional perspective on the current environmental state while also providing locally-relevant information. The project collaboration and reporting process continues to develop, with lessons learned from the 2016 report ideally informing future reporting in the North Coast Region. The SOE report is available at Councilâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Customer Service Centre, the Kempsey Library and on Councilâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s website www.kempsey.nsw.gov.au

27


15.

Particulars of any Environmental Upgrade Agreement entered into In accordance with any requirements imposed under s406. s54P Council did not enter into any arrangements during 2015-2016.

16.

Expenditure of Special Variation of Rating income

Kempsey Shire Council applied for a multi-year special variation from 20142015, under section 508A. The council requested annual cumulative increases ranging from 10.0% to 4.0% over the four years, or a cumulative increase of 37.54% by 2017-2018. After the last year of the special variation (2017/18), the increase will remain permanently in the councilâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s rate base. In 2015-2016 the 10% Special Rate Variation generated significant additional income that was directed at the infrastructure backlog, primarily in maintenance and renewals for roads and bridges.

Activity

Scheduled SRV Budget

Unsealed Roads Chain-o-ponds Rd - Jacks Crossing To Collombatti Rd Collombatti Rd - Chain-o-ponds To Cedar Crossing Rd Mighells Rd Willi Willi Rd - Sherwood To Turners Flat Rd Pipers Creek Rd - End Seal To Wirrang Drive Edinburgh Lane - Tozer To Kemp Street Plummers Lane - Summer Island Rd To Rainbow Reach Rd Mr 75 Mungay Flat To Mungay Creek

139,408 151,000 126,798 200,076 145,542 242,946 140,280 26,180

Sealed Roads Nance Rd - South St To Queen St North St - River St To Forest Ave Queen St - South St To Causeway Robert Gardem Place Short St - Dudley St To Sea St Parkins Place Frederickton John St Smithtown Peter Mouatt St - Hill St To Pacific St Crescent Head Rd - Seale Rd To Beranghi Rd South West Rocks Rd - Kinchela Left Bank Rd Marsh St - Tozer St To Sea St

10,000 5,449 10,000 80,419 150,000 77,213 80,000 91,518 266,570 5,000 11,000

Bridges Nagles Falls Bridge (Nagles Falls Rd)

160,000

28


Yellow Gully Bridge (Nulla Nulla Creekk Rd) Mcintyres Bridge (Nulla Nulla Creek Rd) Schmidts bridge Total SRV Budget Allocated

80,000 25,000 25,000 2,249,399.00

Council pursuance to section 508(2) of the Local Government Act 1993 received a variation to its general purpose income of 7.7% for a ten year period commencing from 1 July 2008 to enable identified environmental works to be undertaken. The income for the environmental Levy in 2015-2016 was $668,650.00 The following expenditures on identified environmental works was undertaken during the 2015-2016 year: Project Macleay River Catchment Ecosystem Health Monitoring Program - Ecohealth

Expenditure $ 47,619.00

Boyters Lane Wetlands Plan

73,608.00

Macleay River Management Plan Implementation

19,995.00

Korogora Crk Emp Implementation - South Bank Project

5,057.00

Killick Emp Implementation

2,542.00

Gills Creek Rehabilitation 08/09

137.00

Implementation Of Strategy U Saltwater Creek & Lagoon Emp Implementation Of Management Issue 4 - Korogoro Ck Emp Frederickton Master Plan Implementation Population .Id Subscription

Loan Repayments Total Expenditure

2,645.00

1,517.00

Council Initiated LEP Amendments

Koala Plan

19,795.00

31,500.00

Land Release Strategy

Noxious weeds Implementation Of Management Grassy Head Implementation Of Management Hat Head Implementation Of Management Estuary Coastal Zone Mgmt Pla Implementation Of Management Estuary Coastal Zone Mg

3,986.00

Action 12 - Kempsey Czmp Action 8 - Kempsey Czmp Strategy 21 - Macleay Strategies 8 & 11 - Macleay

657.00 100,000.00 15,784.00 1,375.00 10,256.00 32,918.00 22.00 30,520.00 $399,933.00

29


Environmental Levy Reserve A summary of Income and Expenditure for the year ended 30 June 2016 is as follows; Balance as at 30 June 2015 Environmental Reserve Cash Assets Environmental Reserve Loan Funds Environmental levy Income 2015/16

$1,067,786.00 $13,452.00 $668,650.00

Expenditure 2015/16: Works and Studies (Reserve Funded) Loan Repayment

$369,413.00 $30,520.00

Loan Expenditure

-

Balance 30 June 2016 Environmental Reserve Cash Assets Environmental Reserve Loan Funds

17.

$1,336,503.00 $13,452.00

Companion Animals Act and Regulation Statement regarding activities relating to enforcing and ensuring compliance with Clause 217(1)(f)

Rangers are responsible for enforcing companion animal laws, as well as educating the community about responsible pet ownership. Council spent $16,434.45 (excluding Rangers Salaries) on direct companion animal management and activities, including the operation and maintenance of the pound, and associated management costs. Council continues to promote responsible companion animal ownership through information on our website, brochures, media releases and through communication with the public on a regular basis. The focus areas of the companion animal information on Councilâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s website includes promotion of desexing and registration. There are also a number of fact sheets regarding responsible pet ownership and a direct link to the Offics of Local Government companion animal site where people can obtain additional information. Council has designated leash free areas within most of the shires towns and villages. Kempsey Shire Council in partnership with Port Macquarie Hastings Council and the RSPCA made application for a grant to vaccinate, de-sex and micro-chip

30


animals. To date Council has not received notification if the grant has been awarded or denied. During 2015-2016 there have been 19 dog attacks in the Shire. Kempsey Shire Council works closely with six (6) rehoming organisations. Councilâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s priority is to rehouse animals from its facility. In the last six (6) months of the reporting period there were no dogs or cats euthanised.

18.

Government Information (Public Access) Act â&#x20AC;&#x201C; GIPA Report

The Government Information (Public Access) Act 2009 (GIPA) commenced from 1 July 2010. This replaced the Freedom of Information Act. The GIPA Act objective is to open government information to the public by: a) authorising and encouraging the proactive public release of government information by agencies, and b) giving members of the public an enforceable right of access to government information, and c) providing that access to government information is restricted only when there is an overriding public interest against disclosure. Currently Council makes much of its information publicly available on its website. Council is currently satisfied with the level of government information currently available. Council will endeavour to proactively release any newly created documents that should be made available in the public interest. Council will only require formal GIPA applications as a last resort where there would appear an overriding public interest against disclosure. During the reporting period, our agency received a total of 10 formal access applications (including withdrawn applications but not invalid applications). During the reporting period, our agency did not refuse any formal access applications. The following table sets out information relating to the access applications made to Council during the 2015-2016 year. The information is provided in the format required by the Government Information (Public Access) Regulation.

31


32


33


34


19.

Environmental Planning and Assessment Act

Nil to report

20.

Public Interest Disclosure Act s31

No public officials made a Public Interest Disclosure, no Public Interest Disclosures were received and no Public Interest Disclosures were finalised during the 2015-2016 reporting period.

21.

Carers Recognition Statement

Council continues to provide a small range of community care services for people who are frail aged, younger people with disabilities and their carers funded by the Commonwealth and State Governments using funding under the Home and Community Care (HACC) and National Respite for Carers Program (NRCP). Significant reform is occurring in Aged and Disability Services and Council has been keeping abreast of these changes and what it will mean for the future.

35


Council has taken all reasonable steps to ensure that staff have an awareness of the NSW Carers Charter. Training and induction of Care workers ensures that staff always take action to reflect the principles of the NSW Carers Charter. When planning care services, the role of the carer is respected and effort is made to assist the carer in their caring role as well as recognising the needs of the carer. When developing policies that impact on Carers any relevant carers groups are consulted and the needs of carers are considered in that policy.

22.

Fisheries Management Act

Nil to report

36


KEMPSEY SHIRE COUNCIL 22 Tozer Street PO Box 3078 West Kempsey NSW 2440 P. 02 6566 3200 F. 02 6566 3205 E. ksc@kempsey.nsw.gov.au www.kempsey.nsw.gov.au


Annual Report

2015 -2016

PART C â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Financial Statements


KEMPSEY SHIRE COUNCIL 22 Tozer Street PO Box 3078 West Kempsey NSW 2440 P. 02 6566 3200 F. 02 6566 3205 E. ksc@kempsey.nsw.gov.au www.kempsey.nsw.gov.au


Annual Report

2015-2016

PART D â&#x20AC;&#x201C; End of Term Report


Kempsey Shire Council End of Term Report 2012- 2016


1|Page


Contents Introduction ........................................................................................................................................... 8 Macleay Valley 2012-2016 ..................................................................................................................... 10 Special Rate Variation ........................................................................................................................... 16 Data Sources ....................................................................................................................................... 19 Reading this document .......................................................................................................................... 20 Summary of outcomes .......................................................................................................................... 20 Detailed Delivery Programs .................................................................................................................... 21 The community values being healthy ....................................................................................................... 21 Primary Strategy: - Providing access to healthy diets ............................................................................... 21 Program:

Provision of potable water supplies to serviced areas ............................................................. 21

Program:

Implement fluoridation - Kempsey & Crescent Head water supplies ......................................... 23

Program:

Regulate food risks to the public ......................................................................................... 24

Primary Strategy: Plan for and provide infrastructure that encourages and allows for healthy lifestyles ........... 25 Program:

Provide services to cater to an ageing population .................................................................. 25

Program:

Provide sporting fields and facilities ..................................................................................... 26

Program:

Provide play facilities ......................................................................................................... 27

Program:

How best to provide public spaces ....................................................................................... 28

Program:

Operate public pools .......................................................................................................... 29

Program:

Maintain existing footpath areas .......................................................................................... 32 2|Page


Primary Strategy: Provide education around healthy lifestyle activities ...................................................... 34 Program:

Undertake healthy eating and lifestyles program .................................................................. 34

Primary Strategy: Restore damaged environments and removal of environmental threats ............................ 36 Program:

Ensure animals do not create a nuisance or safety risk ........................................................... 36

Program:

Manage and regulate impacts of development and human activity ........................................... 38

Program:

Planning for a sustainable environment ................................................................................ 41

Program:

Manage and remediate the estuary eco-system ..................................................................... 44

Program:

Minimise the impact of noxious weeds on the environment and economy ................................. 47

Program:

Maintain stormwater drainage system .................................................................................. 49

Program:

Minimise impacts of waste and safely dispose of waste products ............................................. 51

Primary Strategy: Use planning controls to ensure that environmental impacts do not negatively affect lifestyle .......................................................................................................................................................... 54 Program:

Ensure development undertaken to safe and reasonable standard ........................................... 54

Program:

Ensure sustainability of infrastructure to meet expected future growth ..................................... 55

Primary Strategy: Minimise risk to communityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s health .............................................................................. 57 Program:

Regulating public health risks.............................................................................................. 57

Program:

Ensure future burial needs cater for ................................................................................... 60

Program:

Removal of wastewater products from serviced areas ............................................................ 61

The community values being wealthy.............................................................................................................. 65 Primary Strategy: Build a positive and strong community culture .............................................................. 65 Program:

Promote literacy ................................................................................................................ 65 3|Page


Primary Strategy: Encouraging cultural development within the community ................................................. 67 Program: Encourage tourist visitation ................................................................................................... 67 Primary Strategy: Improve employment opportunities ............................................................................... 69 Program:

Ensure suitable infrastructure for business owners exists ....................................................... 69

Program:

Increasing value in local business ........................................................................................ 71

Program:

Maximise opportunities from the bypass ............................................................................... 73

Primary Strategy: Program:

Increased formal education levels within the community ................................................ 75

Support increased levels of educational attainment................................................................ 75

Primary Strategy: Increasing value of production ...................................................................................... 76 Program:

Encourage tourist visitation ................................................................................................ 76

Program:

Build returns from agriculture ............................................................................................. 78

Program:

Provide transport network .................................................................................................. 80

Program:

Timber bridge replacement program .................................................................................... 83

The community values being safe ........................................................................................................... 85 Primary Strategy: Build community resilience for during and following emergencies ...................................... 85 Program:

Build awareness of the need for disaster plans ...................................................................... 85

Program:

Build networks within the community to support others after disasters .................................... 87

Primary Strategy: Implement systems to minimise and mitigate the impact of disasters .............................. 88 Program:

Emergency preparation and response .................................................................................. 88

Program:

Provide flood mitigation infrastructure to reduce flood impacts ................................................ 90

Primary Strategy:

Increase education levels within the community in crime

prevention through environmental 4|Page


design ................................................................................................................................................. 92 Program: Undertake activities to minimise crime prevention through environmental design (CPTED), and communication .................................................................................................................................. 92 Primary Strategy: Promote a sense of community and no tolerance of crime or anti-social behaviour ............. 94 Program:

Educate youth on benefits of positive behaviour .................................................................... 94

Program: Raise awareness of the effect of domestic violence in the community by supporting national awareness programs/campaigns .......................................................................................................... 96 Program:

Swift removal of graffiti in our urban areas ........................................................................... 97

Primary Strategy: Program:

Provide education on accident minimisation ................................................................. 98

Undertake education programs around road safety ................................................................ 98

Primary Strategy: Provide vibrant public spaces owned by the community ................................................. 100 Program:

Revitalised Kempsey CBD area .......................................................................................... 100

Program:

Revitalised Horseshoe Bay reserve .................................................................................... 101

Primary Strategy: Work with various agencies to reduce incidents of crime .............................................. 103 Program:

Undertake activities to reduce alcohol related issues ............................................................ 103

Primary Strategy:

Through infrastructure and public services reduce the chance of accidents occurring ...... 106

Program:

Provide street lighting to urban areas and the road network ................................................. 106

Program:

Road safety improvements ............................................................................................... 108

Program:

Increase beach safety ...................................................................................................... 109

The community values being sociable .................................................................................................... 112 Primary Strategy: Creating a range of meeting places for the community ................................................. 112 5|Page


Program:

Maintain public areas for use by the community .................................................................. 112

Program:

Provide recreational facilities............................................................................................. 114

Program:

Provide public toilet facilities ............................................................................................. 116

Program:

Provide suitable parking ................................................................................................... 117

Primary Strategy: Creating a shared social view .................................................................................... 119 Program:

Work with community groups............................................................................................ 119

Primary Strategy: Include social behaviour as part of education .............................................................. 121 Primary Strategy: Providing opportunities for people to be involved in the community ............................... 121 Program:

Support community events and activities ........................................................................... 121

Program: Provide access ................................................................................................................. 123 Organisational Services ....................................................................................................................... 125 Service Area: Internal facilitation and support ...................................................................................... 125 Program:

Community engagement .................................................................................................. 125

Program:

Customer service ............................................................................................................ 127

Program:

Governance .................................................................................................................... 129

Program:

Technical engineering management ................................................................................... 131

Program:

Efficiency investment ....................................................................................................... 132

Program:

Planning and environment management and support ........................................................... 133

Program:

Community services and engagement management and support ........................................... 133

Service Area: Program:

Centralised service provision .......................................................................................... 134 Corporate information services .......................................................................................... 134 6|Page


Program:

Finance .......................................................................................................................... 135

Program:

Fleet management........................................................................................................... 137

Program:

Human Resources............................................................................................................ 138

Macleay Valley 2036 Community Strategic Plan ...................................................................................... 142

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Introduction In 2009 the NSW State Parliament introduced Integrated Planning and Reporting (IP&R) reforms within the Local Government Act. These reforms made it compulsory for councils to adopt long term Community Strategic Plans (CSPs). These plans serve to express the communityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s aspirations for the future not just the role of which council may play in achieving these aspirations. Achieving the common vision of the community requires all levels of government working together along with business and community members. In June 2013 Kempsey Shire Council adopted the Macleay Valley 2036 Community Strategic Plan. This is a long term plan for the Macleay Valley and illustrates the communityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s vision and aspirations. Vision â&#x20AC;&#x201C; We live in a community that provides opportunity to all, to prosper in an environment that supports well-being, connectedness and access to resources that the community wants and needs. In order to achieve that vision our community values are: We value being healthy -

Having health that allows people to do the things they enjoy Having health that does not limit people from earning a living Not suffering from ill health Living a long and fulfilling life Living in a healthy environment The environment being in a healthy state

We value being wealthy -

Earning enough money to afford the lifestyle that makes us happy Being able to afford the basics that improve our lives 8|Page


-

To have a rich and valuable culture To have a wealth of experience

We value being safe -

People feel safe in their homes People feel safe in public areas People are not unduly affected by anti-social behaviour and crime The risk of accidents are minimised Our community is prepared and resilient to emergency events such as floods and fires

We value being sociable -

People are involved in their community People treat others with courtesy and respect People support and assist others in the community People have a range of options to become involved in community activities.

Under legislation each elected council is required to adopt a four year Delivery Program which details strategies and actions that will be undertaken towards achieving the aspirations of the community contained within the CSP during the term of the council. At the end of councilâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s elected term an End of Term Report is required to provide information on the outcomes of the Delivery Program and the progress towards the aspirations of the CSP.

This report outlines the actions and services delivered in relation to Kempsey Shire Councilâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Delivery Program 2013-2017 and for the term of the current Councillors.

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Macleay Valley 2012-2016 Achieving the vision for the Macleay Valley is boarder than the role Council provides, the State and Federal governments and the private sector all contribute to our way of life and the services we have access to. Over the last four years there has been significant achievements in the Macleay Valley from Council, Federal and State Governments and the commercial sector including: Akubra Muster Guinness World Record The Macleay Valley created world history on the banks of the Macleay River with 1,912 people wearing Akubra Hats setting a Guinness World Record in front of a national TV audience. Kempsey bypass A historic moment in the history of Kempsey Shire was the opening of the Kempsey Bypass in March 2013. In order to prepare the community, Council adopted the Kempsey Bypass Strategy, which represented an integrated approach involving 12 key environmental, social, economic and infrastructure lead adaptation actions. Corridor Master Plan A key action of the Bypass Strategy included development of the Corridor Master Plan â&#x20AC;&#x153;Our story, Our place, Our futureâ&#x20AC;? which identifies 30 projects along the bypassed corridor to take advantage of the improved amenity aimed at stimulating social and economic activity, most notably streetscape upgrades in Smith Street, Lachlan Street, Kempsey North and Frederickton.

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Water extension South Kempsey â&#x20AC;&#x201C; industrial precinct A $1.8 million extension to water services in South Kempsey facilitated the development of the service centre following the bypass of Kempsey. These new water services will promote business development in this precinct. Kempsey Rail Bridge Water Main Since the 1956 floods a means to secure a second water main to the southern and eastern side of the Macleay River had been sought. A project to drill below the river bed to install a 550 metre pipeline and secure water supply to south and east Kempsey was completed. Reserve Rd Crescent Head upgrade The heavily utilised road was upgraded taking into considerations community concerns regarding traffic and pedestrian usage. The upgrade design needed to accommodate relocation of sewer infrastructure and stormwater augmentation. Kempsey Mall Refurbishment Refurbishment of Clyde Street Mall was completed which involved reopening of the area to traffic, new paving, seating, lighting and landscaping. Flagstaff Restoration South West Rocks An award winning project, Council undertook the restoration of the Point Briner flagstaff and flag locker built in 1902. Council aided by the Mid North Coast Maritime Museum restored the original pilot station complex. The project also included extension of footpaths and interpretive signage. Healthy Communities The government funded program created community gardens, street sharing initiatives, installed public fitness equipment in four localities, a walking trail in Kempsey and supported the inaugural Head to Head Walk Run event at Crescent Head.

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Mattys Flat Upgrade A new floating pontoon and public wharf at New Entrance South West Rocks was constructed with significant upgrades to the car parking area including additional parking bays providing residents and visitors with upgraded facilities. Kempsey Rail Footbridge The foot bridge adjacent to the Kempsey rail line over the Macleay River was upgraded by Road and Maritime Services following the removal of the water main improving access between South and West Kempsey. South West Rocks Central Business District street scape works As part of the Master Plan for South West Rocks central business district works were undertaken in Paragon Avenue with new kerb and gutter and footpaths including a shared pedestrian and vehicle zone at the intersection of Paragon and Prince of Wales Avenues. Horseshoe Bay Shelter Shed Following an act of vandalism that saw the much used shelter shed on Horseshoe Bay burnt down Council reconstructed the shelter shed with a new structure ahead of the peak holiday period. South Kempsey Oval Upgrade A collaborative effort between Council, the Macleay Valley Eagles AFL Club, the Macleay Cricket Association and Thiess Pty Ltd saw the establishment of demountable buildings for club amenities enhancing the facilities at the park. New SES building in Gladstone Gladstone SES took possession of their new building providing enhanced facilities to respond to emergencies. This building replaced their previous home in the garage next to the police station. 12 | P a g e


South West Rocks Skate Park With funds raised by South West Rocks Rotary and with the support of Council a double bowl skate park was installed at South West Rocks providing a much needed recreation space for youth. Kempsey Airport Upgrade With a $2 million grant Council extended internal roads, water supply and on site sewerage management to provide access to new potential lease areas. The works also included extension of internal taxiways to maximise potential use of the airport. River Festival The Macleay River festival bought the community together to celebrate the amazing talent and vibrant spirit of the Macleay Valley featuring art, culture and giant lantern sculptures as well as a herd of knitted and crocheted whimsical colourful cows. Macleay Valley Food Bowl In pursuit of the goal of profiling agriculture the Macleay Valley Food Bowl brand was launched and the www.macleayvalleyfoodbowl.com.au website was created. Co-branding agreements reached with Green Leaf Farm and Burrawong Galan pasture raised poultry raising the profile of the Macleay Valley as a food producing region. Rural Residential Land Release Strategy The high priority strategic planning strategy with approval from NSW Planning and Environment was prepared to boost the existing supply of land for hobby farms throughout the valley adding an estimate of 1225 lots across 12 localities. NSW Country Surf Life Saving Championships Council secured one of the largest surf lifesaving events in NSW attracting over 1500 competitors from every non metropolitan Surf Lifesaving club throughout the state including hundreds of officials, volunteers and families. The Macleay Valley hosted 2016 championships and will host the 2017 event. 13 | P a g e


Smith Street Upgrade The Kempsey Bypass presented the community a once in a lifetime opportunity to reclaim the CBD and lay the foundations for future prosperity. The revitalisation brought to life a vibrant and welcoming place transforming the look and feel of central Kempsey. Riverside Park Upgrade A one of a kind playground was installed and the park landscaped with the support of community members. BBQ facilities were upgraded with the toilet amenities refurbished. Closed Circuit TV (CCTV) implementation Kempsey 10 cameras have been installed in Clyde Street as the initial roll out of CCTV in the Macleay Valley, with further plans to install cameras in Riverside Park, Elbow Street, South West Rocks and Crescent Head. Public Art Embracing the creative side of the Macleay, public art works have been created in Kempsey, Gladstone and South West Rocks. These include painting of amenity blocks, buildings, electricity boxes and the Kempsey Skate Park. A sculpture of a skater was also installed at the park. Point Briner Boardwalk Construction was a challenge with each concrete footing needing to be hand poured due to the rocky terrain however an elevated 130 metre long boardwalk was completed between Horseshoe Bay and Back Creek providing a new attraction for South West Rocks. Flying School An exciting new era of aviation history for the Macleay Valley with the signing of a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) between Council and the Australian International Aviation College the pilot training arm of Chinaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Hainan 14 | P a g e


Airlines. The company plans to build a $7 million flight training school for an estimated 200 students. Nestle factory expansion Nestle invested $53 million in the expansion of the Smithtown factory, building new facilities to house state of the art technology the first of its kind in Australia and created a permanent home for Nestle CafĂŠ Menu. South Kempsey Service Centre The highway service centre in South Kempsey opened creating 185 jobs offsetting the approximately 74 positions lost following the Kempsey bypass. Construction was enabled through Council providing an extension to the water services in South Kempsey. Kempsey District Hospital Redevelopment The State and Federal Governments contributed to the $80 million redevelopment of Kempsey District Hospital providing increased service capacity and new ways services are delivered including a new emergency department and medical unit and new operating theatres. New Crescent Head Surf Club Awarded a $2.2million grant the Crescent Head Surf Club now boasts not only a premier location it provides the Macleay Valley with another venue to attract residents and visitors with function spaces and its unique design. Slim Dusty Centre The long awaited Slim Dusty Centre opened providing the Macleay Valley with a multi-purpose venue including a museum, travelling exhibition gallery, cafĂŠ and function centre. Frederickton to Eungai dual carriage way The $675 million 26.5 km new stretch of the Pacific Highway opened ahead of schedule improving safety and transport linkages across the region. 15 | P a g e


Special Rate Variation In the 2013-2014 financial year council was successful in securing a four year Special Rate Variation to address the maintenance requirements for the road network. Works completed with funds raised include: Sealed Roads Cedar Crossing Road Collombatti Chain-o-ponds Rd - Jacks Crossing To Collombatti Rd Collombatti Rd Chain-o-ponds To Cedar Crossing Rd Inches Rd End of Seal to Bend Mighells Rd Willi Rd - Sherwood To Turners Flat Rd Pipers Creek Rd End Seal To Wirrang Drive Armidale Rd Rehab (Spooners Ave To Sherwood Rd) Gordon Young Drive South West Rocks Rehab (Gregory St To Gilbert Cory) Washington St East Kempsey Rehab (Bissett St To Stanley St) Edinburgh Lane (Tozer To Kemp Street) South West Rocks Road (Lord St To Old Station Rd) - Project Development South West Rocks Road ( Lord St To Old Station Rd) Middleton Street (West To Vernon) - Project Development Plummers Lane (Summer Island Rd To Rainbow Reach Rd) South West Rocks Road (Polar Creek Bridge to Pola Creek Rd) Great North Road (Pacific Hwy To Collombatti Road) Nance Rd (South St To Queen St) North St (River St To Forest Ave) Queen St (South St To Causeway) 16 | P a g e


Robert Gardem Place Short St (Dudley St To Sea St Parkins Place Frederickton John St Smithtown Peter Mouatt St South West Rocks (Hill St To Pacific St) Edinburgh Lane South West Rocks Rd Kinchela Left Bank Rd Grassy Head Rd (Stuarts Point Rd To 400M North) Marsh St (Tozer St To Sea St) Lukes Lane Pipers Creek Rd End Seal To Wirrang Drive East St crescent head Plummers Lane Cochrane St Thurgood Lane Barraganyatti Upgrade Unsealed roads Sandy Creek Road (South Kempsey) West End Road (South Kempsey) Verges Creek Road (Verges Creek) Old Station Road (Old Station) Fishermans Reach Road (Fishermans Reach) Battles Outlet Road (Dongdingalong) Dungay Creek Road (Wittitrin)

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Bridges Gills Gully Bridge (Wittitrin) Lovelocks Bridge (Turners Flat) McCuddens Bridge (Belmore River) Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Sullivans Bridge (Pee Dee) Home Gully Bridge (Moparrabah) Hat Head Road Korogoro Creek Williams Bridge (Grassy Head) Black Cookatoo Bridge (Yarrahapinni) Nagles Fall Bridge (Nagles Falls Road) Yellow Gully Bridge (Nulla Creek Road) Bridge Refurbishment Program Clarks Bridge, Yessabah Road Mighells Bridge, Mighells Road Smiths Creek Bridge, Smiths Creek Road Powicks Bridge, Secombs Lane Bocoka Bridge, Mines Road Bridge No. 2, Mines Road Bridge No. 1, Toms Gully Road

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Data Sources Value Healthy

Wealthy

Safe

Social

Sources NSW Office of Water Annual Benchmark Report NSW Health Water Quality Database Council records North Coast Area Health Service (NCAHS) Kempsey Shire Council Community Survey (KSCCS) Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) Id Solutions Department of Education Council Records Department of Employment , Education and Workplace Relations Roads and Maritime Services Crash Statistics Bureau of Crime Statistics and Research (BOSCAR) KSCCS Council records NSW Police Mid North Coast Area Command Australian Lifeguard Services Council records KSCCS

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Reading this document There are 319 Service / Actions contained within the Delivery Program 2013-2017 with 135 Measures of Success. These measures reflect the four year average performance. Service / Actions where the service or action has been met or completed the following icon

has been used.

Accordingly where the service and or action has not been completed the following icon has been used brief explaination on why the service has not been met below the table.

with a

Summary of outcomes 350 300

294

250 200 150

94

100 50

6

41

16

0

To be done

Achieved

Measures of success

To achieve within plan life

Not achieved 20 | P a g e


Detailed Delivery Programs The community values being healthy Primary Strategy: - Providing access to healthy diets Program:

Provision of potable water supplies to serviced areas

What we planned to do: Code Service/Action

Completed

HD-01-01 Provide potable water supply to urban areas HD-01-01 Replace/Renew water supply infrastructure to ensure continued operation of the system HD-01-01 Upgrade water supply network and treatment systems to meet future demand HD-01-01 Upgrade instrumentation, telemetry and SCADA systems to allow increased monitoring & automation HD-01-01 Manage factors which affect the water quality of raw water entering the Kempsey supply system through the Sherwood bore field â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Source Water Protection HD-01-01 Manage factors which affect the water quality and quantity available for the schemes supplied from coastal aquifers

What we have achieved: That a healthy and safe water supply is reliably provided.

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Measures of Success: Outcome/Output Number of incidents resulting in illness due to Councilâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s potable water supply system per year Percentage of water quality analysis complying with Australian Drinking Water Guidelines Number of water main failures/breaks per year Annual frequency of unplanned water supply service interruptions per 1000 customers

Target Result <1 0.3

Comment Target met

>98%

98.1%

Target met

<40

33

Target met

<40

71

Percentage of water supply service failures responded to within 2hrs Annual rate of economic return Reduce operating costs per Kl of water produced

>90%

100%

Target incorrectly copied from KPI above. Benchmarking indicates <70 to be the average. Improved reporting in this KPI is resulting in an increase. Target met

>1 >10

1.3 5%

Delays in implementation of automation and the time taken for savings to be realised after those changes have been put in place mean the planned savings have not yet been realised

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Major Projects and siginifcant outcomes - Kempsey rail bridge water main – under boring of the Macleay River - Extensive water main renewals - SCADA systems upgrade to Clear SCADA - Extension of water main to South Kempsey - Development and Implementation of Drinking Water Quality Management Plan - Revision of Asset Management Plan and Asset Replacement Strategies

Program:

Implement fluoridation - Kempsey & Crescent Head water supplies

What we planned to do: Code Service/Action

Completed

HD-01-02 Install and commission fluoridation equipment at Stueart McIntyre Dam to supply the Kempsey and linked Lower Macleay areas HD-01-02 Install and commission fluoridation equipment at Crescent Head to supply the linked areas Reasons for not meeting service / action  Stueart McIntrye Dam commenced, project delayed by the regulatory approval process, currently awaiting approval of revised application. Completion scheduled for June 2017  Crescent Head project suspended by NSW Health

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Measures of Success: Outcome/Output % of routine fluoride monitoring tests within the range provided by the regulation

Program:

Target Result >99% 86%

Comment Lack of equipment redundancy is resulting in under dosing over extended periods whilst repairs are completed

Regulate food risks to the public

What we planned to do: Code Service/Action

Completed

HD-01-03 Carry out inspections and regulatory compliance checks in compliance with the agreement with NSW Food Authority HD-01-03 Undertake education and information programs HD-01-03 Respond to complaints related to hygiene HD-01-03 Ensure food labelling requirements are met HD-01-03 Ensure all food hawkers are licensed

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Measures of Success: Outcome/Output Percentage food premises inspected per annum Percentage of compliant food inspections

Target Result >85% 88%

Comment Target met

>85%

Changes in food inspection guidelines have led to a higher failure rate. Additional education is being undertaken to improve awareness of the changes.

77%

Primary Strategy: Plan for and provide infrastructure that encourages and allows for healthy lifestyles

Program:

Provide services to cater to an ageing population

What we planned to do: Code Service/Action HD-02-01

Secure funding streams for in home care services

HD-02-01

Advocate for older people in the community for health services

HD-02-01

Attract investment in supported accommodation facilities

HD-02-01

Arrange and promote Seniors week celebrations

Completed

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Code

Service/Action

Completed

HD-02-01

Ensure our library services accommodate for older persons with technologies to provide maximum service

HD-02-01

Advocate to ensure appropriate community transport available

HD-02-01

Encourage volunteers to participate in older persons needs and events

HD-02-01

Engage with the older persons in the community to encourage volunteering

HD-02-01

Promote good neighbour actions in supporting older persons

Measures of Success: Goal Number of people being supported to stay in their own homes each year

Program:

Target Result 550 550

Comment Target met

Provide sporting fields and facilities

What we planned to do: Code Service/Action

Completed

HD-02-02 Provide and maintain sporting fields and sporting facilities

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Measures of Success: There is no ready way of measuring the effectiveness of the provision of sporting facilities. Goals will have to be based on the overall level of sports participation. Goal Percentage of population engaging in sporting activity Average frequency that sports related exercise is undertaken Sporting fields maintained within adopted levels of service

Target Result 30% 67% 3 times per week >90

3.5

Comment Target met Target met

89%

Major projects and significant outcomes  Exercise equipment installed in public spaces at South West Rocks, Crescent Head, Kundabung and Kempsey  South West Rocks Skate Park  South Kempsey Oval improvements and amenities  South West Rocks Netball Court resurfacing  Kempsey Netball courts lighting upgrade  Eden Street Amenities upgrade

Program:

Provide play facilities

What we plan to do: Code Service/Action

Completed

HD-02-03 Provide & maintain play facilities throughout the shire 27 | P a g e


Measures of Success: There is no ready way of measuring the effectiveness of the provision of play facilities. Goals will have to be based on the overall level of participation Goal Percentage of population reporting taking children to a playground in the last three months Count of children actively using identified playgrounds at a particular time

Target Result 20% 42% 100

>100

Comment Target met Target met

Major projects and significant outcomes ď&#x192;&#x2DC; Riverside Park Upgrade

Program:

How best to provide public spaces

What we planned to do: Code Service/Action

Completed

HD-02-04 Develop a strategy to provide less but better quality play areas HD-02-04 Develop a strategy for sharing sporting grounds to improve facilities Reasons for not meeting service / action Early in the period resources were committed to undertaking a Service Level Review following a budget review in 28 | P a g e


2013. This reallocated resources from progressing the larger strategy delaying completion of these actions. The development of an overall strategy for managing play areas and an infrastructure strategy for the sporting fields are in progress. Measures of Success: Goal Proportion of public spaces receiving an improved level of service Proportion of public spaces made redundant and disposed of to fund improvements in other facilities

Program:

Target Result 20% 22% 15%

Nil

Comment Target met Poor market values and a decision to create new facilities before the sale of other land meant Council was not in a position to sell redundant land.

Operate public pools

What we planned to do: Code Service/Action

Completed

HD-02-05 Operate public swimming pools in Kempsey, Crescent Head, South West Rocks & Gladstone

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Measures of Success: Goal Target Result Annual level of usage of the swimming pools 70,000 74,068 (including aquatic centre related activities) 0.3 Number of water accidents resulting in death <1 or serious injury to local residents

Comment Target met Target met

Community Strategic Goals Affected by the Program: Code HG-1

HG-2

HG-3 HG-4

Goal Low number of people reporting that health issues prevent them from living the lifestyle that they want Rate of potentially preventable hospital admissions at NSW state averages Average age expectancy at birth equals NSW state average Level of people on a disability pension is at Australian average

How Impact Improved health through increased exercise will assist in reducing the levels of illness preventing people living as they choose. Swimming pools provide a venue for residents with low mobility to exercise resulting in significant health improvements Exercise will assist in reducing overall illness. This in turn will reduce preventable admissions Ongoing exercise increases lifespan Exercise will assist in the prevention and impact of degenerative and other health impacts that can lead to disabilities if untreated

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Code WG-9 SAG-4

SOG-1 SOG-8

Goal The community experiences a positive feeling of wellbeing The number of accidents resulting in death or permanent disability is equal to or lower than the state average 60% of population are active members of community groups 50% of people have attended community event in the last six months

How Impact This is seen as an important facility for adding to the communities feeling of well-being Lower water safety skills will result in increased accidents

Swimming clubs are community groups. Having the pools provides another opportunity for people to be involved The pools are a venue that community events such as swimming carnivals are currently held

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Program:

Maintain existing footpath areas

What we have achieved: A usable footpath and cycleway network encourages people to use alternatives to the car and to exercise more regularly, leading to improved health outcomes within the community. To provide a low cost transport option. What we planned to do: Code Service/Action

Completed

HD-02-06 Maintain existing footpaths and cycleway network HD-02-06 Develop a master plan for Crescent Head Central Business District HD-02-06 Develop A master plan for Horseshoe Bay Reserve HD-02-06 Revise pedestrian access and mobility plan HD-02-06 Revise bicycle strategy

Reasons for not meeting service / actions  The initial project was for landscaping for the CBD. As work progressed and due to other pressures that occurred it became evident there was the need for a broader community strategy. Crescent Head Master Plan is to consider CBD, residential development and the Crescent Head Reserve scheduled for completion August 2017.  Bicycle Strategy – grant funding was not received to undertake this action until June 2016. Will be completed by April 2017.

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Measures of Success: Outcome/Output Number of people using footpaths daily

Target Result 3,000 5,071

Comment Target met

Community Strategic Goals Affected by the Program: Code Goal How Program Impacts HG-1

HG-2

HG-3

HG-4 WG-9

Low number of people reporting that health issues prevent them from living the lifestyle that they want Rate of potentially preventable hospital admissions at NSW state averages Average age expectancy at birth equals NSW state average Level of people on disability pensions is at Australian average The community experiences a positive feeling of well-being

Improved health through increased exercise will assist in reducing the levels of illness preventing people living as they choose

Exercise will assist in reducing overall illness. This in turn will reduce preventable admissions Ongoing exercise increases lifespan

Exercise will assist in the prevention and impact of degenerative and other health impacts that can lead to disabilities if untreated Being able to get out and about on the footpaths and cycle ways is seen as a factor that has a positive impact on many peopleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s feeling of wellbeing

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Primary Strategy: Provide education around healthy lifestyle activities Program:

Undertake healthy eating and lifestyles program

What we have achieved: Reduce the number of people who have negative health outcomes. What we planned to do: Code Goal

Completed

HD-03-01 Provide educational and training courses that provide skills for living healthy lifestyles

Measures of Success: Outcome/Output Increase in the number of community gardens Decrease in diet related diseases ( diabetes) Young people aware of healthy eating People have access to healthy foods

Target Result 5 23

Comment Target met Increasing Yes, programs run in schools, healthy choices in school canteens Yes, however healthy foods are more expensive. Increase in community gardens to compensate for this. 34 | P a g e


Major projects and significant outcomes Healthy Communities Program  Conducted 6 food growing workshops attended by 116 people  Provided Street Share gardens to 21 homes  Installed fixed outdoor fitness equipment in four communities  Installed a 2,750 meter marked walking trail in Kempsey  Provided compression only resuscitation training to 129 residents  Published a collection of participant stories into a book called My Story of Change – 2000 books distributed Community Strategic Goals Affected by the Program: Code Goal How Program Impacts HG-1

Low number of people reporting that health issues prevent them from living the lifestyle they want

Program both has preventative value and assists those currently with an issue to overcome it

HG-2

Rate of potentially preventable hospital admissions at NSW State Average Average age expectancy at birth equals NSW state average That the community experiences a positive feeling of well-being

Improved health will reduce preventable admissions

HG-3 WG-9

Improved health leads to longer lives Participants will have increased well-being through improvements to their lifestyles

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Code

Goal

How Program Impacts

WG-11

Most people see the communities culture as important and valuable 60% of people reporting a neighbour providing a favour in last six months Most people feel that they are empowered to make changes to improve their lives

Program has sociable aspect that focuses on bringing the community together. This improves awareness of the value of culture Aspects of the program link people together

SOG-3 SOG-7

The skills provided are focused on allowing people to change their lives

Primary Strategy: Restore damaged environments and removal of environmental threats

Program:

Ensure animals do not create a nuisance or safety risk

What we have achieved: Reduce the number of people who have negative health outcomes and/or suffer nuisance from domestic animals. What we planned to do: Code Goal

Completed

HD-04-01 Provide regulatory control for companion animals including registration, ranger services and impounding HD-04-01 Work with animal owners to ensure responsible ownership HD-04-01 Undertake animal impounding as required 36 | P a g e


Code

Goal

Completed

HD-04-01 Provide and manage leash-free exercise areas HD-04-01 Control livestock on roads HD-04-01 Remove dead animals from public waterways HD-04-01 Review companion animals management plan Measures of Success: Outcome/Output Stray dog complaints are responded to < 2 working days Stray contained dog/cats collected within 6 hours

Target Result 95% 98% 90%

90%

Comment Target met Target met

Community Strategic Goals Affected by the Program: Code Goal How Program Impacts HG-1

HG-2

Low number of people reporting that health issues prevent them from living the lifestyle they want Rate of potentially preventable hospital admissions at NSW State Average

Control of dogs promotes exercise

Reduces injuries relating to animals

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Code

Goal

How Program Impacts

HG-5

Biodiversity health of land above average 85% of people feel safe in their homes

Reduces the impact of companion animals on flora and fauna

85% of people access and feel safe in public areas Level of negative social incidents equivalent to state average

People are not threatened by uncontrolled dogs

SAG-1

SAG-2 SOG-5

Program:

Reduces peopleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s feeling of risk by control of nuisance and potentially dangerous companion animals

Reduces negative incidents relating to animals

Manage and regulate impacts of development and human activity

What we have achieved: Reduced community conflict caused by inappropriate development and behaviour What we planned to do: Code Service/Action

Completed

HD-04-02 Assess development to ensure that the impacts are reasonable and that the impacts are fully assessed HD-04-02 Provide people with information to ensure they are aware of the requirements for development HD-04-02 Regulate building so that buildings are safe and suitable for the intended use HD-04-02 Provide ranger services to manage parking availability

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Code

Service/Action

Completed

HD-04-02 Enforce restrictions on beach driving HD-04-02 Minimise impacts from overgrown lots HD-04-02 Control illegal camping HD-04-02 Impound abandoned vehicles HD-04-02 Investigate rubbish dumping and littering HD-04-02 Enforce restrictions on heavy vehicle parking HD-04-02 Investigate minor pollution matters Measures of Success: Outcome/Output Percentage of Development Applications approved within 30 days Percentage of Construction Certificates approved within 30 days Total average days to process Development Applications Percentage of Ranger Services complaints responded to within 5 days

Target Result 85% 81% 90%

98%

Comment Result was affected by vacancies Target met

42

36

Target met

95%

97%

Target met

Major projects and significant outcomes ď&#x192;&#x2DC; $129,942,778 value of development applications 39 | P a g e


Community Strategic Goals Affected by the Program: Code Goal How Program Impacts HG-1

HG-2

HG-7 HG-5 HG-6 WG-9 SAG-1 SAG-2 SAG-3

Low number of people reporting that health issues prevent them from living the lifestyle that they want Rate of potentially preventable hospital admissions at NSW State average Beaches/Estuaries rated as good or very good under NSW Beachwatch Program Biodiversity health of land above intermediate status Macleay water quality meets benchmarks That the community experiences a positive feeling of well-being 85% of people feel safe in their homes 85% of people access and feel safe in public areas Number of crime incidents is equal to or lower than state average

Stress caused by conflict is reduced

Neighbourhood conflicts leading to violence is reduced

Regulatory activities often involve minimising the impact on the environment.

Control over inappropriate behaviour leads to people feeling more positive about their community. Residents are separated from potentially harmful land uses and buildings meet safety standards Council can control aspects such as where alcohol is permitted to reduce inappropriate behaviour. Building design incorporates crime reduction measures

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Code

Goal

How Program Impacts

SAG-4

Number of accidents resulting in death or permanent disability is equal to or lower than the state average Level of negative social incidents equivalent to state average

Regulating behaviour on council property can reduce the risk of accidents.

SOG-5

Program:

Council can control aspects such as where alcohol is permitted to reduce inappropriate behaviour.

Planning for a sustainable environment

What we have achieved: Maintain and remediate the existing natural environment. What we planned to do: Code Service/Action

Completed

HD-04-03 Issue Section 149 planning certificates HD-04-03 Prepare minor LEPs HD-04-03 Complete Rural Residential Component of the Kempsey Local Growth Management Strategy HD-04-03 Implement the Kempsey Local Growth Management Strategy HD-04-03 Review the Industrial Land Strategy to consider land at Frederickton HD-04-03 Carry out investigations to release industrial land

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Code

Service/Action

Completed

HD-04-03 Review the South West Rocks Structure Plan HD-04-03 Prepare a Master Plan, LEP and DCP for Frederickton HD-04-03 Prepare a Master Plan, LEP and DCP for South Kempsey Enterprise Corridor HD-04-03 Review the Kempsey CBD DCP HD-04-03 Review of the Mid North Coast Regional Strategy HD-04-03 Implement measures to adapt to the effect of Climate Change HD-04-03 Review the Koala Plan of Management HD-04-03 Review Section 94 developer contributions plans HD-04-03 Prepare a Rural Lands Strategy HD-04-03 Commence Habitat Assessment Project HD-04-03 Review Council’s Flood Risk Management Strategy Reasons for not meeting service / action.  Review industrial land strategy for Frederickton - This action has commenced as part of the implementation of the Frederickton Master Plan through the preparation of a Planning Proposal that is likely to include rezoning of industrial land to residential. Having regard to Council’s decision to undertake the design for Smith Street using in-house resources, Council resolved to defer the preparation of a master plan for Frederickton (now completed) with implementation, including this action, in turn delayed (now commenced).

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 Review the South West Rocks Structure Plan – This action was discontinued as the major urban release areas within South West Rocks were the subject of applications under Part 3A of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act (now repealed) that overrode local provisions, with the existing structure, as it relates to the remainder of the township, considered to be adequate.  Rural Lands Strategy – A key action of the 2013/17 Delivery Plan was to review the 10 year Strategic Planning Program, which was completed on schedule in November 2015, whereby Council resolved to reschedule the Rural Land Strategy commensurate with its importance relative to 62 other competing strategic planning projects to commence September 2016 with a completion date of November 2018.

 Review Council’s Flood Risk Management Strategy - Commenced with a draft Flood Study and Strategy completed for consultation in accordance with the NSW Floodplain Development Manual by September 2016. This project was delayed due to a longer term vacancy in Council’s Development Engineering section. Measures of Success: Outcome/Output Percentage of strategic planning project tasks completed on time Area of residential land made available for development Area of land rezoned for industrial development.

Target 80%

Result 99%

50 hectares 8 hectares

50 hectares 31 hectares

Comment Target met Target met Target met

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Community Strategic Goals Affected by the Program: Code Goal How Program Impacts HG-5 HG-7 WG-6 WG-9 SAG-02

Extent of land where biodiversity land status is above intermediate Beaches/Estuaries rated as good or very good under NSW Beachwatch Program Value of production increases above State average That the community experiences a positive feeling of well-being 85% of people access public areas and feel safe there

Program:

By protecting high biodiversity land and providing corridors and restored linkages between habitat Strategies will ensure adequate provision is made to control and treat runoff from new release areas By protection prime agricultural land and sterilization of industrial land by residential encroachment Will support retaining in the environment that is relied on heavily by the community as one of the positive aspects of life in this area By ensuring public spaces are located with maximum public surveillance

Manage and remediate the estuary eco-system

What we have achieved: Improved environments in the estuaries by remediating current damage. What we planned to do: Code Service/Action

Completed

HD-04-04 Implement measures to improve the health of the Killick Creek estuary system HD-04-04 Reinstate degraded ecosystems to increase commercial and recreational uses of Macleay River HD-04-04 Implement the Korogora Creek Estuary Management Plan

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Code

Service/Action

Completed

HD-04-04 Implement measures to improve the water quality of the Saltwater Creek and Lagoon HD-04-04 Rehabilitate the Boyters Lane wetland HD-04-04 Rehabilitate the Gills Bridge Creek riparian zone HD-04-04 Develop Coastal Zone Management Plan Measures of Success: Outcome/Output Percentage of environmental project tasks completed on time Number of environmental education projects per annum

Target Result 80% 98% 12

18

Comment Target met Target met

Major projects and significant outcomes  49,136 native trees planted in rehabilitation projects  Kempsey Coastal Zone management Study and Plan  Regional State of the Environment Report

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Community Strategic Goals Affected by the Program: Code Goal How Program Impacts HG-7 HG-5 HG-6 WG-6 WG-9 WG-10 WG-11 SOG-1 SOG-2 SOG-3

Beaches/Estuaries rated as good or very good under NSW Beachwatch Program Biodiversity health of land above intermediate status Macleay River water quality meets benchmarks Value of production increases above State average That the community experiences a positive feeling of well-being High involvement in community through volunteering Most people see the communities culture as important and valuable Population are active members of community groups Percentage of population volunteering is at State level average 60% of people reporting a neighbor providing a favour in the last 6 months

Program remediated areas, leading to better water quality and surrounding environment

The long term sustainability of agricultural land relies on the health of natural systems The estuary environment plays a key role in many peopleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s lives. Improving the ecosystem improves their feelings of wellbeing Many projects include the use of volunteer labour The programs are heavily community based and will expose people to the importance of a good culture Several community environmental groups are involved in rehabilitation projects The programs are heavily community based and provide valuable volunteering opportunities Projects often include works on private property with the assistance of neighbours

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Code

Goal

How Program Impacts

SOG-7

Most people feel that they are empowered to make changes to improve their lives 50% of people have attended a community event in the last 6 months

As the programs allows people to be involved in making positive change it will make them feel empowered to make other changes Field days and working bees are often promoted as community events

SOG-8

Program:

Minimise the impact of noxious weeds on the environment and economy

What we have achieved: Reduce the impact of noxious weeds on the environment and productive farmland What we planned to do: Code Service/Action

Completed

HD-04-05 Undertake inspections of private property to identify weed infestations HD-04-05 Work with landowners to minimise the levels of infestation of noxious weeds and their spread HD-04-05 Educate the community about noxious weeds and their impacts

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Measures of Success: Outcome/Output Percentage of properties with infestations Number of education programs undertaken per annum

Target Result 25% 29% 2 7

Comment Target met Target met

Major projects and significant outcomes ď&#x192;&#x2DC; 4,293 properties inspected for weed infestations ď&#x192;&#x2DC; Tropical Soda Apple project

Community Strategic Goals Affected by the Program: Code Goal How Program Impacts HG-5

Biodiversity health of land above intermediate status

Reduces the amount of land that is degraded through weed infestations

HG-6

Macleay River water quality meets benchmarks Average business earnings at non-Sydney average for NSW

Weed infestations of riparian and wetland vegetation inhibits the ability of the natural environment to filter runoff More productive farms will increase earnings through increased productive capacity

WG-1 WG-6

Value of production increases above state average

WG-8

Average wealth increases to non-Sydney average for NSW

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Code

Goal

How Program Impacts

WG-9

The community experiences a positive feeling of wellbeing High involvement in community through volunteering 60% of population active members of community groups Percentage of population is at State level average Level of people reporting a neighbor providing a favour in the last six months 50% people have attended a community event in the last six months

Weed infestations are often unsightly and a visual indicator of poor environmental health

WG-10 SOG-1 SOG-2 SOG-3 SOG-8

Program:

Weed control programs often involve volunteers Community groups often participate in weed control programs Projects often utilise volunteer labour Projects on private land often involved working bees involving neighbours Projects often involve field days and working bees that are promoted as community events

Maintain stormwater drainage system

What we have achieved: Stormwater is removed to minimise the impact and prevents people from being impacted by the water. To prevent litter and pollution from enter the natural systems and causing damage. To ensure that stormwater systems do not create a health risk.

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What we planned to do: Code Goal

Completed

HD-04-06 Maintain the existing drainage network to minimise the disruption on the community with priorities being safety of people, minimising the impact on homes, environmental impacts and then other impacts HD-04-06 Review stormwater system capacities and identify future augmentation works likely to be required for future urban growth HD-04-06 Review the treatment of stormwater throughout the shire to identify the program of work required to effectively treat stormwater prior to discharge so that the risk to human health and the environment are minimised Reasons for not meeting service / action  Review stormwater system – Crescent Head and Kempsey complete. South West Rocks in progress.  Treatment of stormwater – draft complete expecting to be finalised in October 2016. Measures of Success: Over the next four years success will be measured by: Outcome/Output Percentage of blockages to drainage systems cleared within 24hrs of being safe to do so

Target Result 90% 78%

Undertaking water quality analysis on a regular basis in key urban drainage systems

52

51

Comment There have been times when it is not safe to enter into the mains due to water levels. This meant that this target could not be met. Target not possible to be met as the laboratory that does testing close for Christmas. 50 | P a g e


Community Strategic Goals Affected by the Program: Code Goal How Program Impacts HG-2 HG-7 HG-5 HG-6 SAG-1 SAG-2

Rate of potentially preventable hospital admissions at NSW State Average Beaches/Estuaries rated as good or very good under NSW Beachwatch Program Biodiversity health of land above intermediate status Macleay water quality meets benchmarks 85% of people feel safe in their homes 85% of people access and feel safe in public areas

Program:

Poorly managed stormwater and drainage systems can generate conditions where the community is exposed to increased risk of infections and disease Reduces litter and other pollutants that end up in the waterways

Reduces the risk of houses being inundated during high rainfall Safely, and in a controlled way, remove the water that urban areas create, which otherwise would impact many areas

Minimise impacts of waste and safely dispose of waste products

What we have achieved: Waste is disposed of in a healthy manner that has minimal impact on the environment. What we planned to do: Code Goal

Completed

HD-04-07 Provide a collection service to defined areas

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Code

Goal

Completed

HD-04-07 Provide and operate facilities for disposal of waste HD-04-07 Educate the community on the advantages of waste minimisation HD-04-07 Provide improved ways to minimise waste impacts HD-04-07 Review operation of transfer stations to reduce the cost Measures of Success: Outcome/Output Quantity of domestic waste material per year disposed to landfill Quantity of domestic waste material per year diverted from landfill Quantity of material reused/recycled as a proportion of the quantity of material disposed in the landfill each year

Target Result <4,400t 6055

Percentage improvement in the quantity of materials diverted from the landfill per month

>6,600t

4847

60%

45%

5%

6.5%

Comment Waste KPI’s below target and State benchmarks. Waste Strategy adopted including changes to collection service which are being implemented. Target met.

Major projects and significant outcomes  Mobile muster  Mobile Community Recycling Centre (Recycling trailer)  Kitchen Handy Bin – implementation of food and organic waste recycling  Waste Transfer station improvements including a new area for resale of goods  Wastewise event guide 52 | P a g e


Community Strategic Goals Affected by the Program: Code Goal How Program Impacts HG-1

HG-2 HG-3 HG-7 HG-5 HG-6 WG-9

SOG-7

Low number of people reporting that health issues prevent them from living the lifestyle they want Rate of potentially preventable hospital admissions at NSW State Average Average age expectancy at birth equals NSW state average Beaches/Estuaries rated as good or very good under NSW Beachwatch Program Biodiversity health of land above intermediate status Macleay water quality meets benchmarks That the community experiences a positive feeling of well-being

Proper waste disposal minimises chances of infection and bacteria

Most people feel that they are empowered to make changes to improve their lives

Education programs focus on making people aware that they can take action

Improved health leads to longer life Disposal of waste in proper facilities reduces the impacts on the environment

Removal of waste from public areas gives people a more positive feeling about their area

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Primary Strategy:

Use planning controls to ensure that environmental impacts do not negatively affect lifestyle

Program:

Ensure development undertaken to safe and reasonable standard

What we have achieved: Well-designed development that leads to a quality lifestyle with reasonable impacts on the environment. What we planned to do: Code Service/Action

Completed

HD-05-01 Ensure development meets minimum statutory standards HD-05-01 Consider the impacts of proposals for development to ensure they will not result in any unacceptable impacts on the amenity of residents or the environment HD-05-01 Implement Councilâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s plans and policies to ensure development meets community expectations HD-05-01 Identify and deal with unauthorised development HD-05-01 Ensure Councilâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s statutory obligations relating to regulation of development are met Measures of Success: Outcome/Output Number of compliant development application audits Number of compliance audits per annum Required Annual Fire Safety Certificates are provided

Target Result 95% 97%

Comment Target met

120 100%

Target met

186 99%

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Outcome/Output Percentage of caravan parks inspected per annum

Target Result 100% 100%

Comment Target met

Community Strategic Goals Affected by the Program: Code Goal How Program Impacts HG-01

HG-5 HG-06 HG-07 WG-9

Program:

Low number of people reporting that health issues prevent them from living the lifestyle they want Biodiversity health of land above intermediate status

Compliance with environmental standards reduces stress caused by conflict

Macleay River water quality meets benchmarks Beaches/Estuaries rated as good or very good under NSW Beachwatch Program That the community experiences a positive feeling of well-being

Compliance program may include clearing, earthworks or other development with the potential to affect water quality Compliance matters may relate to issues associated with water quality in the Shireâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s coastal villages

Compliance actions may include unauthorised clearing

Good development will improve peopleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s quality of life

Ensure sustainability of infrastructure to meet expected future growth

What we have achieved: Ensuring that development impacts are allowed for and that public infrastructure allows for needed growth.

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What we planned to do: Code Service/Action

Completed

HD-05-02 Develop rural land use policies that maximise the benefits to the community from the use of land HD-05-02 Review planning controls relating to use of flood affected areas HD-05-02 Review developer contributions plans to ensure that the cost of services required to meet future growth are not unreasonably borne by the existing population HD-05-02 Develop infrastructure strategies for each area with the potential to support increased population/industry growth

Community Strategic Goals Affected by the Program: Code Goal How Program Impacts WG-5 WG-9 SOG-7

Size of workforce continues to grow That the community experiences a positive feeling of well-being 50% people have attended a community event in the last six months

Provision being made for growth will allow growth to occur Having planned approach will mean that there are not negative impediments that people see Well a planned community will encourage people to get out and into the community

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Primary Strategy: Program:

Minimise risk to communityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s health

Regulating public health risks

What we have achieved: Ensure local business can provide a service without risk to public health. What we planned to do: Code Service/Action

Completed

HD-06-01 Regulate skin penetration facilities HD-06-01 Regulate private drinking water supplies HD-06-01 Undertake inspections of public swimming pools HD-06-01 Undertake inspection of cooling towers to control Legionella HD-06-01 Regulate water carters HD-06-01 Undertake inspections of private swimming pools HD-06-01 Enforcement of the POEO Act relating to noise, water and air quality HD-06-01 Implement Councilâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s On-site Sewage Management Systems Strategy

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Measures of Success: Outcome/Output Number of environmental health inspections per annum Percentage of complaints relating to matters with potential to cause environmental harm are responded to within 7 days Number of septic inspections per annum Water quality monitoring of the Shireâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s creeks, rivers and beaches is undertaken on a weekly basis

Target Result 500 521

Comment Target met

90%

87%

Not met due to vacancies

840 51

712 51

Not met due to vacancies Target revised by Council to 51 due to Christmas break

Community Strategic Goals Affected by the Program: Code Goal How Program Impacts HG-1

HG-2

HG-3 SAG-2

Low number of people reporting that health issues prevent them from living the lifestyle they want Rate of potentially preventable hospital admissions at NSW State Average Average age expectancy at birth equals NSW state average 85% of people access and feel safe in public areas

Reduces risk of infections

Public swimming pool and cooling tower inspections directly impact on the health of public spaces

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Code

Goal

How Program Impacts

SOG-8

50% of people have attended a community event in the last 6 months

Healthy public venues encourage use by the community

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Program:

Ensure future burial needs cater for

What we have achieved: Provide a facility that helps people respect those who have passed. Provide a facility that is environmentally sound. What we planned to do: Code Service/Action

Completed

HD-06-02 Provide a facility for burials HD-06-02 Maintain the cemetery area for families and other visitors

Measures of Success: Outcome/Output Cater for future burial and internment requirements

Target Result 100 100

Comment Target met

Community Strategic Goals Affected by the Program: Code Goal How Program Impacts HG-2

Rate of potentially preventable hospital admissions at NSW State Average

Burials need to be undertaken. Cemetery facilities allow for this to be done in controlled way

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Code

Goal

How Program Impacts

WG-9

That the community experiences a positive feeling of well-being Most people see the communities culture as important and valuable

Having these facilities assists people at the time they suffer a loss

WG-11

Program:

Dealing with the loss of family and friends is an important aspect of culture

Removal of wastewater products from serviced areas

What we have achieved: That people will have their waste products removed without odour and spillage. That we will collect, treat and dispose of the waste in an environmentally & socially responsible manner. That discharge of the treated wastewater will recognise the inherent value of the resource through optimising reuse and recycling opportunities. Our infrastructure will continue to operate with minimal disruptions and responses to failures will be swift. What we planned to do: Code Service/Action

Completed

HD-06-03 Remove wastewater from residential and business premises within the urban areas HD-06-03 Treat and responsibly dispose of wastewater HD-06-03 Construct a replacement wastewater treatment plant in West Kempsey HD-06-03 Complete an augmentation of Hat Head Wastewater Treatment Plant

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Code

Service/Action

Completed

HD-06-03 Design and plan for the extension of the wastewater system in South Kempsey to service new development HD-06-03 Investigate the construction of a wastewater collection and treatment system for Stuarts Point HD-06-03 Replace/Renew wastewater infrastructure to ensure continued operation of the system HD-06-03 Undertake improvement works necessary to meet new wastewater licensing requirements Provide a communal effluent collection and disposal system for the small urban allotments in the Sherwood Area Undertake investigation of infiltration into the West Kempsey wastewater system and completed repairs/remedial actions HD-06-03 Increase the rate of effluent reuse/recycling within the shire Provide for beneficial reuse of sludge resulting from treatment of wastewater

Reason for not meeting service / action.  West Kempsey waste water treatment plant – It was not envisaged that the construction would be fully completed within three years. Currently detailed design is in progress and construction will commence in 2016-2017.  Design and plan extension of the wastewater system in South Kempsey – development proceeded with an on-site wastewater treatment plant reducing the priority of this outcome.

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Measures of Success: Outcome/Output Number of sewerage surcharges per year Percentage of wastewater service failures responded to within 2hrs Percentage of treated wastewater analyses complying EPA licenses Volume of treated wastewater reused or recycled Volume of sludge reused/recycled Reduce the costs of management, treatment and pumping (electricity) costs

Target <90 95%

Result 30 100%

Comment Target met Target met

95%

95%

Target met

>10%

17%

Target met

>95% >10%

100% 6%

<102 Minutes >1

132

Target met Delay between implementation of initiatives and savings being recorded not factored into the target. Recording and capture of data is improving target Trend is increasing target will be met in future years.

Annual average unplanned service disruptions Annual real rate of return

0.4

Major projects and significant outcomes  SCADA upgrade to Clear SCADA  Hat Head waste water treatment process optimisation and License conditions compliance  Reduction in stormwater infiltration in West Kempsey and Hat Head  Disinfection of treated effluent at South West Rocks and South Kempsey  100% Sludge reuse  Commissioning of the South West Rocks Recycled Water Plant

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Community Strategic Goals Affected by the Program: Code Goal How Program Impacts HG-1

HG-2 HG-3 HG-5 HG-6 HG-7 WG-9

Low number of people reporting that health issues prevent them from living the lifestyle they want Rate of potentially preventable hospital admissions at NSW State Average Average age expectancy at birth equals NSW state average Biodiversity health of land above intermediate status Macleay water quality meets benchmarks Beaches/Estuaries rated as good or very good under NSW Beachwatch Program That the community experiences a positive feeling of well-being

Waste products from densely populated areas have a high likelihood of leading to disease unless properly treated

Removes risk of a large number of individuals treating waste and the potential for untreated waste to enter the environment By removal the community does not have to deal with it, which will improve their feeling of well-being

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The community values being wealthy Primary Strategy: Program:

Build a positive and strong community culture

Promote literacy

What we have achieved: Improved literacy will allow people to gain better employment outcomes, be involved in higher skilled production and give a sense of wellbeing. What we planned to do: Code Service/Action WD-01-01

Completed

Provision of library services including printed and electronic media

Measures of Success: Outcome/Output Description Increase in literacy skills in younger people Provide access to literacy resources (digital and online) Hold literacy workshops

Target Result 80% 80%

100%

10 per annum

15

Comment

Target met Target met

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Major projects and significant outcomes ď&#x192;&#x2DC; Kempsey library upgrade ď&#x192;&#x2DC; Increase online and digital resources Community Strategic Goals Affected by the Program: Code Goal How Impact WG-2 WG-3 WG-6 WG-9 SOG-6

Average wage and salary earnings at non-Sydney average for NSW Percentage of households earning less than $1,000 per week Value of production increases above state average That the community experiences a positive feeling of well being Most people feel that they are empowered to make changes to improve their lives

Literacy will increase the ability of people to gain higher levels of employment Access to higher level employment will allow for earnings Increased literacy will provide increased skills Literacy skill provide people with a more positive outlook Increased skills provide people with increased ability to make changes

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Primary Strategy: Encouraging cultural development within the community Program: Encourage tourist visitation What we have achieved: Allows people to undertake creative activity and develop a creative industry to increase production. What we planned to do: Code Service/Action WD-02-02

Completed

Provision of and support for art galleries and support in developing opportunities for display and sale of artistic and creative product

Measures of Success: Outcome/Output Provide venues for arts to be sold and promoted

Target Result 10 per 10 per annum annum

Comment Target met

Major projects and significant outcomes  Creative Industries Forum  River Festival  Gallery in Belgrave Street  Street art  Painting the Macleay  DLab program

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Community Strategic Goals Affected by the Program: Code Goal How Impact

WG-6 WG-9 WG-11 SOG-6

SOC-8

Value of production increases above state average That the community experiences a positive feeling of well-being Most people see the communities culture as important and valuable Most people feel that they are empowered to make changes to improve their lives 50% people have attended a community event in the last six months

Creating an artistic economy will add to the value of production from the area Arts and culture provide opportunities for people to be involved in activities that promote positive feelings Development of an industry and increasing the exposure to local creative product will increase the level of importance attached by the community Providing opportunity will increase the options for people to undertake changes involving arts and culture Community events will be undertaken around and involving local arts and craft

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Primary Strategy: Improve employment opportunities Program:

Ensure suitable infrastructure for business owners exists

What we have achieved: Ensuring that the town offers the facilities business owners want for business and lifestyle increases the number of investments that will be made in the area. What we planned to do: Code Service/Action WD-03-01

Identify the social and economic infrastructure that attracts investor

WD-03-01

Develop a strategy to position the local government area to be attractive to investors

WD-03-01

Identify future infrastructure bottlenecks for business expansion

Completed

Major projects and significant outcomes  Welcome pack updated  Water supply extension to South Kempsey  Smith Street upgrade  Agriculture strategy

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Community Strategic Goals Affected by the Program: Code Goal How Impact WG-1 Average business Business investment is at the core of creation of wealth. To achieve earnings at non-Sydney this there needs to be an environment that is conducive to average for NSW undertaking high value production of goods and services WG-2 Average wage and salary This includes not only what is needed for undertaking business, but earnings at non-Sydney also developing a community that business owners want to be a part average for NSW WG-3 Percentage of households of earning less than $1,000 per week WG-4 Have strong participation in the workforce WG-5 Size of workforce continues to grow WG-6 Value of production increases above state average WG-7 Unemployment rates at non-Sydney levels within NSW WG-8 Average wealth increases to non-Sydney average for NSW

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Program:

Increasing value in local business

What we have achieved: Increasing the value of production will increase the level of wealth available to the community. What we planned to do: Code Service/Action WD-03-02

Support services provided to assist business into expanding market share or moving into a higher value market

Wd-03-02

Undertake programs and activities to stimulate economic activity

WD-03-02

Provide strategic direction for economic sustainability programs throughout the shire

WD-03-02

Prepare business plans for Councilâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s income producing assets

Completed

Research factors affecting small to medium enterprises WD-03-02

Research potential new agricultural industries

WD-03-02

Promotion of business

WD-03-02

Research future job prospects

WD-03-02

Identify success factors for local businesses

WD-03-02

Develop business levy to fund development of economic base

Reasons for not meeting service / target ď&#x192;&#x2DC; Based on the impact of overall rate increases required and uncertainty over effect of the Kempsey bypass this was deferred. 71 | P a g e


Measures of Success: Outcome/Output Number of people in employment Percentage of project tasks completed on time

Target Result 12,000 12593 80% 82%

Comment Target met Target met

Major projects and significant outcomes  Discover Something New Campaign  Kempsey Corridor Master Plan  Macleay Valley Food Bowl  Micro Agribusiness workshops  Agribusiness development  Id Solutions software implementation  Airport development Community Strategic Goals Affected by the Program: Code Goal How Impact WG-1 WG-2 WG-3 WG-4

Average business earnings at non-Sydney average for NSW Average wage and salary earnings at non-Sydney average for NSW Percentage of households earning less than $1,000 per week Have strong participation in the workforce

Increasing the value of production will increase average earnings Businesses with increased value production will generally have higher paid staff

Higher value business will have a higher demand for labour 72 | P a g e


Code

Goal

How Impact

WG-6

Value of production increases above state average Average wealth increases to non-Sydney average for NSW

Will allow business to take opportunities to increase their business

WG-8

Program:

Will allow businesses to create more wealth

Maximise opportunities from the bypass

What we have achieved: Maximise the economic value that can come from the changes and build a range of community places that meet the communityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s needs. What we planned to do: Code Service/Action WD-03-03

Implement the Kempsey Bypass Strategy

WD-03-03

Shop Locally Campaign

WD-03-03

Identify Business Gaps

Completed

Measures of Success: Outcome/Output Number of people in employment

Target Result 12,000 12593

Comment Target met

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Major projects and significant outcomes ď&#x192;&#x2DC; Smith Street upgrade ď&#x192;&#x2DC; Smith Street Experience campaign Community Strategic Goals Affected by Code Goal WG-1 Average business earnings at non-Sydney average for NSW WG-2 Average wage and salary earnings at non-Sydney average for NSW WG-3 Percentage of households earning less than $1,000 per week WG-4 Have strong participation in the workforce WG-5 Size of workforce continues to grow WG-7 Unemployment rates at nonSydney levels within NSW WG-8 Average wealth increases to non-Sydney average for NSW WG-9 That the community experiences a positive feeling of well-being

the Program: How Impact By finding opportunities for business growth Business growth will flow onto wage earners

By ensuring that displaced workers can find alternative employment

By finding opportunities for business growth By having a vibrant retail hub

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Primary Strategy: Program:

Increased formal education levels within the community

Support increased levels of educational attainment

What we have achieved: Increased levels of education increase opportunities for employment and higher value employment. What we planned to do: Code Service/Action

Completed

WD-04-01

Lobbying and facilitation of employment options is provided

WD-04-01

Support and facilitation of the establishment of a tertiary facility

Measures of Success: Goal Percentage of people enrolled in tertiary education

Target Result 5% 12.9%

Comment Id solutions 2011 census people with tertiary qualifications

Community Strategic Goals Affected by the Program: Code Goal How Impact WG-2

Average wage and salary earnings at non-Sydney average for NSW

Education will result in better employment opportunities being able to be gained

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Code

Goal

WG-3

Percentage of households earning less than $1,000 per week Have strong participation in the workforce Unemployment rates at nonSydney levels within NSW Average wealth increases to non-Sydney average for NSW

WG-4 WG-7 WG-8

How Impact

Increased education will improve the employability of people. This should assist in increasing the level of workforce participation

Employment levels have been linked to the level of wealth

Primary Strategy: Increasing value of production Program:

Encourage tourist visitation

What we have achieved: Increased tourism brings value into the local economy through the tourist spend. What we planned to do: Code WD-05-01

Provision of tourism brochures, advertising, visitor information centre and support of tourist association

WD-05-01

Provide quality camping experience at Council caravan parks

WD-05-01

Upgrade caravan park facilities to improved standards

Completed

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Measures of Success: Goal Number of visitor night stays has increased Income from Council’s caravan parks has increased

Target Result 10% 8% >5% 10%

Comment Target met

Major projects and significant outcomes  Discover Something New Campaign  Macleay Valley Coast Destination Management Plan Community Strategic Goals Affected by the Program: Code Goal How Impact WG-1 WG-4 WG-5 WG-6 WG-7 WG-8

Average business earnings at non-Sydney average for NSW Have strong participation in the workforce Size of workforce continues to grow Value of production increases above state average Unemployment rates at nonSydney levels within NSW Average wealth increases to non-Sydney average for NSW

Increasing the tourists supporting the existing businesses would increase their business earnings Tourism provides job opportunities Workforce size can be grown by increasing tourism spend in the region Increasing the tourist spend in the area will increase the average production Tourism provides job opportunities Increasing the tourist spend increases the overall wealth in the region

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Program:

Build returns from agriculture

What we have achieved: Agriculture moving to higher levels of return. What we planned to do: Code Service/Action

Completed

WD-05-02

Research and development of more profitable farming models

WD-05-02

Development of model farm to test opportunities

WD-05-02

Lobby to have specialist agricultural tertiary training in the area

WD-05-02

Promote opportunities to recycle treated effluent/waste products for use in intensive farming enterprises

Reasons for not meeting service/ action  Model farm to be investigated as an option for implementing the Macleay Valley Food Bowl project plan 2016-2017 which is likely to be in the form of a model cooperative.  Specialist agricultural tertiary training – Expressions of Interest received from tertiary institutions to be considered with the Macleay Valley Food Bowl project. Measures of Success: Goal Level of farm output

Target Result $124m $139.21

Comment Target met

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Major projects and significant outcomes  Macleay Valley Food Bowl  Micro Agribusiness workshops  Agriculture workshops Community Strategic Goals Affected by the Program: Code Goal How Impact WG-1 WG-2 WG-3 WG-4 WG-5 WG-6 WG-7 WG-8 WG-9

Average business earnings at non-Sydney average for NSW Average wage and salary earnings at non-Sydney average for NSW Percentage of households earning less than $1,000 per week Have strong participation in the workforce Size of workforce continues to grow Value of production increases above state average Unemployment rates at nonSydney levels within NSW Average wealth increases to non-Sydney average for NSW That the community experiences a positive feeling of well-being

By finding opportunities for business growth Business growth will flow onto wage earners

There are a large number of farm operations without employees. Building these farms to the size they begin to employ will provide opportunity for employment Large portions of the current agricultural economy are in a low value market. Changing this will change production values Will provide opportunities for employment. Large portions of the current agricultural economy are in a low value market. Changing this will change production values. Increased profit can be converted to wealth Providing sound income will create feeling of improved wellbeing

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Code

Goal

How Impact

SOG-4

70% of people disagree that work and family life often interfere with each other

Relieving financial stress will improve work/life balance

Program:

Provide transport network

What we have achieved: Enables people to produce goods, earn a living, shop and socialise. People are able to go to school and sport. People will be able to access other services and connect with each other. What we planned to do: Code Service/Action

Completed

WD-05-03

Provide an effective network of public roads

WD-05-03

Undertake replenishment of the road network

WD-05-03

Provide an airport

Measures of Success: Goal Reduction in number of road condition complaints Vehicle accidents attributed to poor road conditions minimised

Target Result 20% 38%

Comment Target met

<20

Target met

13

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Major projects and significant outcomes  Stuarts Point Road  South West Rocks Road  Crescent Head Road  Armidale Road  Korogoro Creek Bridge Community Strategic Goals Affected by the Program: Code Goal How Impact HG-2 WG-1 WG-2 WG-3 WG-4 WG-5 WG-7 WG-8

Rate of potentially preventable hospital admissions at NSW State Average Average business earnings at non-Sydney average for NSW Average wage and salary earnings at non-Sydney average for NSW Percentage of households earning less than $1,000 per week Have strong participation in the workforce Size of workforce continues to grow Unemployment rates at nonSydney levels within NSW Average wealth increases to non-Sydney average for NSW

Road quality can contribute to reduced accident rates Manufacturing, agricultural production or tourism could not occur without a transport network. Without these occurring there will be limited earnings or employment

Production is required to create wealth at the levels needed to meet this target 81 | P a g e


Code

Goal

How Impact

WG-9

That the community experiences a positive feeling of well-being Number of accidents resulting in death or permanent disability is equal to or lower than the state average 60% of population active members of community groups Percentage of population volunteering is at State level average Most people feel that they are empowered to make changes to improve their lives 50% people have attended a community event in the last six months

Good road access provides the community with a positive feeling

SAG-4

SOG-1 SOG-2 SOG-6 SOG-7

Road quality can contribute to reduced accident rates

People need access to take part in more than limited community activity

Access limitations would limit the options available People need access to take part in more than limited community activity

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Program:

Timber bridge replacement program

What we have achieved: Good bridges that can handle todayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s heavy vehicles allow farmers to minimise their freight cost, maximising their profitability. Bridges also provide access allowing people and goods to be moved around the local government area. Unrestricted transport across bridges reduces travel times and maintains efficient levels of production. What we planned to do: Code Service/Action

Completed

WD-05-04

Maintain existing bridges within budget capacity

WD-05-04

Undertake major maintenance on timber bridges in order to extend their effective life

WD-05-04

Timber bridge replacement

WD-05-04

Implement load limits on low priority timber bridges where their structural capacity is no longer capable of carrying unrestricted loads

Measures of Success: Goal Number of bridges below adequate condition Number of timber bridges replaced with concrete or composite structures Percentage of bridges with load limits

Target Result <30% 2% 8

9

<10%

0%

Comment Target met Target met Target met

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Major projects and significant outcomes  Gills Gully Bridge (Wittitrin)  Lovelocks Bridge (Turners Flat)  McCuddens Bridge (Belmore River)  O’ Sullivans Bridge (Pee Dee)  Home Gully Bridge (Moparrabah

Community Strategic Goals Affected by the Program: Code Goal How Impact WG-1

Average business earnings at non-Sydney average for NSW

WG-2

Average wage and salary earnings at non-Sydney average for NSW Have strong participation in the workforce Size of workforce continues to grow Value of production increases above state average Unemployment rates at nonSydney levels within NSW

WG-4 WG-5 WG-6 WG-7 WG-8

Average wealth increases to non-Sydney average for NSW

Will allow farm land to continue to be in production. Shorter access routes using bridges reduces the cost of transport and improves the potential profit Boosting earning by making farming more profitable will boost the wages that can be paid in this industry Will support the continued employment in farming. Bridges allow easier more direct access for the community to participate in the workforce Bridge upgrades may allow better use of farm land Will support the continued employment in farming. Maintaining bridges access provides opportunities for residents to seek out employment opportunities in other areas Reduction in costs will result in increased profitability, which can be converted into wealth

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Code

Goal

How Impact

SAG-4

Number of accidents resulting in death or permanent disability is equal to or lower than the state average

Safe structures will minimise risk of accidents

The community values being safe Primary Strategy: Build community resilience for during and following emergencies Program:

Build awareness of the need for disaster plans

What we have achieved: People will be able to better prepare for the impact of disasters, reducing the cost of impacts and the stress that could otherwise be caused. It will also reduce the impact upon the health and safety of our community during these times. What we planned to do: Code Service/Action

Completed

SAD-01-01 Facilitation with community groups and lobbying for resources for the community to increase its resilience SAD-01-01 Work with business owners/groups to develop individual business continuity/recovery plans to respond to emergency/disaster situations

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Code

Service/Action

Completed

SAD-01-01 Facilitating workshops, information expos and presentations about disaster preparedness SAD-01-01 Develop materials for education of the community of the known impact of disaster events so that the community may be better informed of what will happen in particular events Measures of Success: Over the next four years success will be measured by: Goal % of properties likely to be affected by flooding or bushfire with an emergency plan % of businesses likely to be affected by flooding or bushfire with an emergency response/business continuity plan

Target Result 50% 47%

Comment

65%

Separate business survey to be undertaken.

Major projects and significant outcomes  Flood workshops  SMS flood information group  CCTV Sherwood Bridge  Facebook and website updates

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Program:

Build networks within the community to support others after disasters

What we have achieved: People will have support systems in place when they are needed. Volunteers within the community will be able to provide support to others affected by the disaster to help them recover and leave them feeling a sense of being supported by the rest of the community. What we planned to do: Code Service/Action

Completed

SAD-01-02 Facilitation with community groups and lobbying for resources for the community to increase its resilience SAD-01-02 Investigate the replication of aid programs such as Blaze Aid and the ability to apply in our local context SAD-01-02 Establish partnerships with key community groups to respond to disasters.

Measures of Success: Outcome / Output Number of people volunteering Established partnerships for community engagement in response to disasters Increased community resources to respond to disasters Improved resilience and rapid deployment of volunteers to areas worst affected

Target Result 20% 48% 20% 50%

Comment Target met Target met

40%

50%

Target met

20%

20%

Target met

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Community Strategic Goals Affected by the Program: Code Goal How Impact SOG-2 SOG-3 SOG-6 SOG-7

Percentage of population volunteering is at State level average 60% of people reporting a neighbour providing a favour in last six months Number of people reporting that they could raise $2,000 in an emergency Most people feel that they are empowered to make changes to improve their lives

Primary Strategy:

Will provide an opportunity for volunteering that will appeal to a number of people Will encourage people to look at how they can help other

By establishing this scheme more people are expected to undertake other activities that they believe will be beneficial

Implement systems to minimise and mitigate the impact of

disasters

Program:

Emergency preparation and response

What we have achieved: Reduced impacts of flooding/bushfire or other disasters/emergencies than would otherwise have occurred naturally.

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What we planned to do: Code Goal

Completed

SAD-02-01 Work with disaster agencies to have plans in place for dealing with emergencies SAD-02-01 Have plans in place for dealing with emergencies SAD-02-01 Manage the road network during flood events to minimise risk SAD-02-01 Provide clear, concise and accurate information to the community prior to, during and following an emergency event in order to allow them to make good decisions in general and in accordance with their disaster management/response plans SAD-02-01 Provide clean-up of mud and damaged materials from affected urban areas SAD-02-01 Identify disaster damage and remedy highest priorities within funding constraints SAD-02-01 Revise and update emergency procedure reflecting the improvement opportunities identified through each successive emergency event Community Strategic Goals Affected by the Program: Code Goal How Program Impacts HG-2 WG-1 WG-6

Rate of potentially preventable hospital admissions at NSW State Average Average business earnings at non-Sydney average for NSW Value of production increases above state average

Reduces risk of contamination and infections which would lead to Planning reduces the impact of flooding on affected farms and Kempsey CBD businesses Reduced impact increases profitability

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Code

Goal

How Program Impacts

WG-9

That the community experiences a positive feeling of well-being 85% of people feel safe in their homes 85% of people access and feel safe in public areas Percentage of population volunteering is at State level average Most people feel that they are empowered to make changes to improve their lives

Knowing that plans are in place and response is provided gives a positive feeling

SAG-1 SAG-2 SOG-2 SOG-7

Program:

Knowing that plans are in place and response is provided gives a positive feeling By providing good advice on road and bridge conditions and likely flood impacts By working with emergency services and specific program to involve community in helping themselves Action to develop systems to empowering people to make changes

Provide flood mitigation infrastructure to reduce flood impacts

What we have achieved: Reduced impact of flooding than would occur naturally. What we planned to do: Code Goal

Completed

SAD-02-02 Maintain the existing flood mitigation network to minimise the disruption on the community with priorities being minimising the impact on homes, loss of income and then other impacts SAD-02-02 Maintain the flood warning system with a focus on the main indicators and provision of information in useful and timely ways

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Code

Goal

Completed

SAD-02-02 Review the flood mitigation in the lower Macleay to determine the level of flood protection provided and identify any deficiencies in the current conditions relative to the initial system design SAD-02-02 Identify options for improving the operations of the flood mitigation network Measures of Success: Outcome/Output Drains & floodgate structures maintained to ensure flood mitigation system is available for operation

Target Result 95% 97%

Comment Target met

Community Strategic Goals Affected by the Program: Code Goal How Program Impacts WG-1 WG-5 WG-6 WG-8 WG-9

Average business earnings at non-Sydney average for NSW Size of workforce continues to grow Value of production increases above state average Average wealth increases to non-Sydney average for NSW That the community experiences a positive feeling of well-being

Flood mitigation reduces impact of nuisance floods on lower Macleay farmers and moderate floods on Kempsey CBD businesses. This increases productivity for farmers and increases the time business can trade and reduces their costs

Increased certainty of flood impacts and reduced flood impacts increases feeling of wellbeing

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Code

Goal

How Program Impacts

SAG-1

85% of people feel safe in their homes 50% of households have emergency flood/fire plans in place

Increased certainty of flood impacts and reduced flood impacts increases feeling of wellbeing Having flood mitigation systems in place will increase the number of people that see having an emergency plan in place as a valuable thing

SAG-5

Primary Strategy:

Increase education levels within the community in crime prevention through environmental design

Program:

Undertake activities to minimise crime prevention through environmental design (CPTED), and communication

What we have achieved: Have a community that feels safe and informed. What we planned to do: Code Service/Action

Completed

SAD-03-01 Increase education on how to reduce crime through environmental design SAD-03-01 Work with the police in providing information to the community on how they can report crime SAD-03-01 Participate in ongoing education campaigns on security of assets SAD-03-01 With the police undertaken secure risk assessments 92 | P a g e


Code

Service/Action

Completed

SAD-03-01 Work with other state agencies and Not for Profit Groups (NGOâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s) to reduce the incidence of crime, through activities and programs SAD-03-01 Participate and support Community Drug Action Team (CDAT) Measures of Success: Outcome/Output Reduced crime levels â&#x20AC;&#x201C; break & enter, malicious damage

Target Result <400 880 pa.

People feel safe in their homes and public spaces

75%

90.5%

Comment Not the ideal outcome. Council and other agencies are developing strategies to address this. In most instances the public are reasonably safe. The exception is people out at night in public spaces. The indicator is considered met as the focus was on people in their homes feeling safe.

Community Strategic Goals Affected by the Program: Code Goal How Program Impacts SAG-1 SAG-2

85% of people feel safe in their homes 85% of people access and feel safe in public areas

Education campaign on how people can protect their property Work with NSW Police to increase awareness of reporting crime Council continues to implement CPTED principles 93 | P a g e


Code

Goal

How Program Impacts

SAG-3

Number of crime incidents is equal to or lower than state average Level of negative social incidents equivalent to state average

Community awareness and risk assessments to reduce opportunity for crime

SOG-5

Reducing opportunistic crime and increasing community ownership

Primary Strategy: Promote a sense of community and no tolerance of crime or antisocial behaviour

Program:

Educate youth on benefits of positive behaviour

What we have achieved: Provide youth with the knowledge and skills to be a positive and actively involved member of community. What we planned to do: Code Service/Action

Completed

SAD-04-01 Establish a Youth Advisory Council to provide advice and input into council decision making SAD-04-01 Participate in Youth Week activities SAD-04-01 Partner with services, government, non-government agencies and the community to deliver recreational, educational and vocational programs for young people aged 12-24 years

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Measures of Success: Outcome/Output Increased participation of youth in community activities.

Target Result 20% 30%

Comment Target met

Community Strategic Goals Affected by the Program: Code Goal How Program Impacts WG-4

Have a strong participation in the workforce

WG-7

Unemployment rate at nonSydney NSW levels 85% of people access and feel safe in public areas Percentage of people volunteering is at state average level

SAG-2 SOG-2

Engaging with young people and provide programs and activities aimed at promoting good behaviour and the benefits associated may lead to meaningful employment outcomes More younger people in employment Engaging younger people will improve social activities in public spaces. People will feel comfortable in these areas Having young people involved in volunteering promotes good behaviour and participation rates

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Program:

Raise awareness of the effect of domestic violence in the community by supporting national awareness programs/campaigns

What we have achieved: Reduce incidents of domestic violence What we planned to do: Code Service/Action

Completed

SAD-04-02 Work with community, Police, residents, local businesses and other stakeholders to implement community based strategies and initiatives to improve safety, prevent crime and antisocial behaviour

Measures of Success: Over the next four years success will be measured by: Outcome/Output Reduce domestic violence incidences

Target Result <150 181

Comment While the target has not been met it is considered that increased reporting is a positive result

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Community Strategic Goals Affected by the Program: Code Goal How Program Impacts HG-2

SAG-1 SAG-3 SOG-7

Rate of preventable admissions at Kempsey District Hospital at NSW State average 85% of people feel safe in their homes Number of crime incidents is equal to or lower than the state average Most people feel that they are empowered to make changes to improve their lives.

Program:

Increase awareness and working with sporting clubs and menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s services leads to lower incidents that result in hospitalisation Reduction in domestic violence will lead to increased numbers of people feeling safe Raising awareness will lead to lower levels of incidents Programs aimed at school students that DV is not acceptable will change perceptions about what options are available

Swift removal of graffiti in our urban areas

What we have achieved: Minimise the visual impact of graffiti. What we planned to do: Code Service/Action

Completed

SAD-04-03 Support volunteers to remove graffiti

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Measures of Success: Community Strategic Goals Affected by the Program: Code Goal How Program Impacts WG-9 SAG-1

SOG-3

That the community experiences a positive feeling of well-being 85% of people access and feel safe in public areas

Swift removal of graffiti illustrates pride in our community

60% of people reporting a neighbour providing a favour in the last six months

Positive community spirit and pride in the shire has positive ramifications across neighbourhoods and volunteer groups

Primary Strategy: Program:

Removal of graffiti improves image of public spaces and demonstrates a community that values this service and the removal of this type of litter.

Provide education on accident minimisation

Undertake education programs around road safety

What we have achieved: Reduce accidents on and around the road. What we planned to do: Code Service/Action

Completed

SAD-05-01 Partner with government and non-government on advertising programs and increase awareness

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Code

Service/Action

Completed

SAD-05-01 Identify area of high risk and seek funding to put in place programs to risky moderate behaviour. SAD-05-01 Implement bicycle, road, safer seniors driving and safe scootering workshops to provide education and advice Measures of Success: Outcome/Output Reduction on road related accidents

Target Result 10% 10.5% reduction

Comment Target met

Community Strategic Goals Affected by the Program: Code Goal How Program Impacts WG-4 WG-7 SAG-4

Have strong participation in the workforce Unemployment rates be at non Sydney levels within NSW Number of accidents resulting in death or permanent disability is equal to or lower that the state average

Loss of license often impacts on the ability to work given limited transport options

A reduction in accidents has both a social and economic benefit for the community

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Primary Strategy: Provide vibrant public spaces owned by the community Program:

Revitalised Kempsey CBD area

What we have achieved: Create a vibrant community and commercial/retail centre for the local government area. What we planned to do: Code Service/Action

Completed

SAD-06-01 Undertake streetscape improvement in Smith Street to stimulate economic activity Community Strategic Goals Affected by the Program: Code Goal How Program Impacts WG-1 WG-02 WG-05 WG-07 WG-08

Average business earnings at Works are expected to stimulate economic activity in the retail non-Sydney average for NSW sector Average wage and salary earnings at non-Sydney average for NSW Size of workforce continues to grow Unemployment rates are at non-Sydney levels within NSW Average wealth increases to non-Sydney average for NSW

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Code

Goal

How Program Impacts

WG-09

The community experiences a positive feeling of wellbeing 85% of people access and feel safe in public areas

A rejuvenated CBD is expected to lift community spirits

SAG-02

Program:

Safe well-lit environment with through traffic will deter crime

Revitalised Horseshoe Bay reserve

What we have achieved: A vibrant recreational and community place within Horseshoe Bay Reserve. What we planned to do: Code Service/Action

Completed

SAD-06-02 Commence implementation of master plan projects Major projects and significant outcomes ď&#x192;&#x2DC; Shelter Shed replaced and upgraded ď&#x192;&#x2DC; Design for new playground in progress

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Community Strategic Goals Affected by the Program: Code Goal How Program Impacts HG-1

HG-2 HG-3 WG-9 WG-10 SAG-2 SAG-3 SOC-1

Low number of people reporting that health issues prevent them from living the lifestyle that they want Rate of potentially preventable hospital admissions at NSW state averages Average age expectancy at birth equals NSW state average That the community experiences a positive feeling of well-being High involvement in community through volunteering 85% of people access and feel safe in public areas The number of crime incidents is equal to or lower than the state average 60% of population are active members of community groups

Revitalising the Horseshoe bay reserve will provide opportunities for all ages of the community to engage in passive and active recreation. This has the potential to improve the health and wellbeing of the community Improved passive recreation is seen as positively influencing our health and wellbeing, reducing the incidence of illness Having access to good value recreational facilities catering for activities in all ages will increase health and improve life expectancy in the longer term The ability to use high quality recreational assets will improve our sense of well-being Engagement of community groups to deliver improvements will increase the sense of ownership by the community and deliver increase pride in the area Well-designed open spaces will deter antisocial behaviour and make people feel safer when they are out in these areas

Providing communal areas allows community groups the space to socialize and hold activities

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Code

Goal

How Program Impacts

SOC-4

70% of people disagree that work and family life often interfere with each other 50% of people have attended a community event in the last six months

Providing passive recreation spaces with facilities is seen as a way of allowing people to undertake social activities that will support them in having a balanced life Providing a high value recreational space will encourage people to attend community events held there as it will be more enjoyable

SOC-8

Primary Strategy: Program:

Work with various agencies to reduce incidents of crime

Undertake activities to reduce alcohol related issues

What we have achieved: Improved awareness of the impacts of alcohol and its effects. What we planned to do: Code Service/Action

Completed

SAD-07-01 Liaise with NSW Government agencies to provide services that moderate the impacts of alcohol SAD-07-01 Manage existing Alcohol Free and Alcohol Prohibited Zones and requests for new areas SAD-07-01 Identify key projects to partner with the Macleay Valley Liquor Accord

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Measures of Success: Outcome/Output Reduced number of accidents responsible from alcohol consumption Reduction in domestic violence assaults

Target 10% reduction annually 15% reduction annually

Result nil +18%

Comment Average 16 accidents per annum. Attributed to increase reporting through information and education.

Community Strategic Goals Affected by the Program: Code Goal How Program Impacts HG-1

HG-2 HG-3 WG-1 WG-2

Low number of people reporting that health issues prevent them from living the lifestyle they want. Rate of potentially preventable hospital admissions at NSW State Average Average age expectancy at birth equals NSW state average Average wage and salary earnings at non Sydney average for NSW Percentage of households earning less than $1000 per week

Alcohol impacts on peopleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s health, an education program with partner services aims to increase those accessing services and embracing a healthy diet Alcohol impacts on health and is attributed to many preventable diseases. Awareness and a reduction in access to alcohol is a key target area

Poor health and possible loss of licenses impact on earnings Socially disadvantaged are at risk of alcohol abuse generally earning less than $1000 per week. Working with partner agencies to raise awareness of the issues and associated 104 | P a g e


Code

Goal

How Program Impacts

WG-4

Have strong participation in the workforce 85% of people feel safe in their homes

consequences

SAG-1 SAG-2

85% of people access and feel safe in public areas

SAG-4

Number of crime incidents is equal is equal to or lower than the state average Number of accidents resulting in death or permanent disability is equal to or lower that the state average Level of negative social incidents equivalent to the state average Number of people reporting they could raise $2000 in an emergency Most people feel that they are empowered to make changes to improve their lives

SAG-3

SOG-5 SOG-6 SOG-7

Alcohol and drug abuse significantly contribute to the domestic violence incidences. Raise awareness and provide support networks for people to report it and have safe places to stay Alcohol Free and Prohibited areas provide the mechanisms for law enforcement involvement. Ongoing monitoring of these areas and the currency of the signage is an requirement Alcohol is responsible for antisocial behaviour, assaults and general community disquiet. Raising awareness through partnerships with the Macleay Valley Liquor Accord and patrons of local establishments will increase education and responsible behaviour

Work with crime prevention, health and education service providers to inform and increase awareness of the impacts alcohol on The abuse of alcohol impacts of the individuals or families capacity to raise emergency funds or attract emergency funds from agencies and or families Education and access to resources will empower people to make a positive difference in their lives

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Primary Strategy:

Through infrastructure and public services reduce the chance

of accidents occurring

Program:

Provide street lighting to urban areas and the road network

What we have achieved: Improved safety around the footpaths and roads. Lighting to allow for natural surveillance and reduced crime. What we planned to do: Code Service/Action

Completed

SAD-08-01 Pay for street lighting in urban areas SAD-08-01 Pay for street lighting on major intersections SAD-08-01 Ensure street lighting is provided as part of development growth in residential and commercial/industrial developments SAD-08-01 Upgrade lighting to comply with the current standards and improved energy efficiency Reasons for not meeting service/ action: No upgrades funded.

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Measures of Success: Outcome/Output Number of accidents at lighted intersections Percentage increase in annual street lighting charges

Target Result <20 4 <5% 3%

Comment Target met Target met

Community Strategic Goals Affected by the Program: Code Goal How Program Impacts WG-9

That the community experiences a positive feeling of well-being 85% of people feel safe in their homes

Provision of street lighting in urban areas can make people feel better about where they live

SAG-2

85% of people access and feel safe in public areas

Street lights provides a minimum standard of lighting for the public road allowing people to feel safer when using the road as well as inside their houses and out in public areas

SAG-3

The number of crime incidents is equal to or lower than the state average The number of accidents resulting in death or permanent disability is equal to or lower than the state average Level of negative social incidents equivalent to state average (rate per 100,000)

SAG-1

SAG-4

SAC-5

The level of lighting is considered to correlate to the level of natural surveillance

The presence of natural surveillance is a deterrent to crime Street lighting is seen as providing road users in urban areas with a minimal ability to observe hazards and changes in road conditions prior to a collision allowing alternate action to be taken. Accidents are less likely to occur, particularly at intersections Street lighting is considered to improve natural surveillance and reduce the potential for negative social incidents to occur

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Program:

Road safety improvements

What we have achieved: Reduced levels of road accidents. What we planned to do: Code Service/Action

Completed

SAD-08-02 Review accidents and close calls to identify improvements that could be made to the road infrastructure network SAD-08-02 Undertake road safety related education campaigns in conjunction with other community education initiatives SAD-08-02 Review the road network to identify safety issues SAD-08-02 Prioritise road safety upgrades within available funds Measures of Success: Outcome/Output Level of road accidents

Target Result Decreasing

Number of community members participating in road safety education programs

1,000

>1000

Comment Target met â&#x20AC;&#x201C; decreasing trend Target met

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Community Strategic Goals Affected by the Program: Code Goal How Program Impacts HG-2 HG-3 SAG-4

Rate of potentially preventable hospital admissions at NSW state average Average age expectancy at birth equals NSW state average The number of accidents resulting in death or permanent disability is equal to or lower than the state average

Program:

Safer road infrastructure and user habits will reduce accidents, reducing preventable hospital admissions and over time increasing the life expectancy

Increasing road safety will decrease the frequency of accidents in the community

Increase beach safety

What we have achieved: Minimise the risk of people having an accident at the beach. Educate the community on water safety. What we planned to do: Code Service/Action

Completed

SAD-08-03 Provide lifesaving supervision.

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Measures of Success: Outcome/Output Days of lifeguard service provided Annual number of visitors to patrolled beaches Annual number of preventative actions undertaken Annual number of serious rescues

Target Result 186 259 >200,000 222,601

Comment Target met Target met

>7500

Target met

Annual number of first aid cases

<300

<40

10,352 45

263

Growth in visitation and due to surf conditions there has been an increase in the number of preventative actions and rescues by surf life savers Target met

Community Strategic Goals Affected by the Program: Code Goal How Program Impacts HG-1

HG-2 HG-3

Low number of people reporting that health issues prevent them from living the lifestyle they want Rate of potentially preventable hospital admissions at NSW state average Average age expectancy at birth equals NSW state average

Providing beach patrols is considered to encourage the community to attend the beach, leading to the promotion of healthier lifestyles Beach patrollers undertaking preventative actions is considered an to reduce the rate of preventable injuries which could result in hospital admissions

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Code

Goal

How Program Impacts

HG-7

Beaches/estuaries rated as Good or Very Good under NSW Beachwatch Program That the community experiences a positive feeling of well-being 85% of people access and feel safe in public areas

Higher levels of visitation will be encouraged by the quality of our beaches/estuaries

WG-9 SG-2 SG-4

The number of accidents resulting in death or permanent disability is equal to or lower than the state average

Beach visitation is seen to increase the communities sense of wellbeing positively Residents accessing the beach feel safer if they are able to swim between within a patrolled area as the lifeguards are looking out for their interests Beach patrol, reduce the number of accidents which occur as well as reducing the severity through immediate provision of first aid

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The community values being sociable Primary Strategy: Program:

Creating a range of meeting places for the community

Maintain public areas for use by the community

What we have achieved: Have a range of public places that are used and enjoyed by a wide range of people. What we planned to do: Code Service/Action

Completed

SOD-01-01

Maintain open space areas

SOD-01-01

Remove litter from main public use areas

SOD-01-01

Street sweep gutters in main public areas

SOD-01-01

Cleaning of footpaths in central business areas of Kempsey

Measures of Success: Outcome/Output Number of reported incidents of vandalism to public areas/facilities Number of reported assaults

Target Result <80 107 <40

98

Comment Average, peaked 2012/13 downward trend Trending downward

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Outcome/Output Maintenance of public areas within levels of service

Target Result >90% 80%

Comment Service levels being review following budget reduction in 2013

Community Strategic Goals Affected by the Program: Code Goal How Program Impacts HG-1

HG-2 HG-3 WG-9 SAG-2 SAG-3 SOG-4

Low number of people reporting that health issues prevent them from living the lifestyle that they want Rate of potentially preventable hospital admissions at NSW state averages Average age expectancy at birth equals NSW state average That the community experiences a positive feeling of well-being 85% of people access and feel safe in public areas The number of crime incidents is equal to or lower than the state average 70% of people disagree that work and family life often interfere with each other

The ability to use well maintained public areas has the potential to improve a range of health outcomes

Well maintained public areas assist in overall feelings of wellbeing for many people Providing well maintained public areas will encourage the community to feel safer when they are using these facilities Well maintained public areas will discourage crime Provide public areas which allow people to engage in social activity more easily. This availability is seen as assisting people to make time for non-work activity

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Code

Goal

How Program Impacts

SOG-5

Level of negative social incidents equivalent to state average (rate per 100,000) Most people feel that they are empowered to make changes to improve their lives

Well maintained public areas will discourage anti-social behaviour

SOG-7

Program:

Being surrounded by well-maintained public areas will encourage people to make positive changes to improve their lives through their improved sense of well-being

Provide recreational facilities

What we have achieved: Provide and maintain recreational facilities throughout the shire. What we planned to do: Code Service/Action SOD-01-02

Provide and maintain recreational facilities

SOD-01-02

Provide and maintain community land bank

Completed

Measures of Success: Outcome/Output Recreational facilities maintained within the adopted levels of service

Target Result >90% 91%

Comment Target met

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Community Strategic Goals Affected by the Program: Code Goal How Program Impacts HG-1

HG-2 HG-3 HG-4 WG-9 SAG-2 SOG-1

SOG-4 SOG-8

Low number of people reporting that health issues prevent them from living the lifestyle that they want Rate of potentially preventable hospital admissions at NSW state averages Average age expectancy at birth equals NSW state average Level of people on disability pension is at the Australian average That the community experiences a positive feeling of well-being 85% of people access and feel safe in public areas 60% of population active members of community groups 70% of people disagree that work and family life often interfere with each other Level of people attending a community event in the last six months

Regular healthy exercise through recreational activities improves a range of health outcomes

Recreational activities assist in overall feelings of well-being for many people Providing well maintained recreational facilities will encourage the community to feel safer when they are using these facilities Involvement in recreational activities and their related groups is a key outcome for social connectivity within the community Providing recreational facilities allows people to engage in social activity more easily. This availability is seen as assisting people to make time for non-work activity Providing well maintain recreational facilities will encourage community events to be attended by both participants and the broader community 115 | P a g e


Program:

Provide public toilet facilities

What we have achieved: Provide, clean and maintain public toilet facilities at strategic locations through the public areas of the shire to allow people the security of being able to access a toilet when they are out in public as needed. What we planned to do: Code Service/Action

Completed

SOD-01-03

Provide, clean and maintain public toilets

SOD-01-03

Review the potential use of automated self-cleaning toilets for upgrading of existing amenities

Reason for not meeting service / action Review was not completed and is in progress to be completed by June 2017. Measures of Success: Outcome/Output Number of complaints regarding the standard or location of amenities per year

Target Result <20 7

Comment Target met

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Community Strategic Goals Affected by the Program: Code Goal How Program Impacts HG-1

HG-2 WG-9 SAG-2 SOG-1 SOG-8

Low number of people reporting that health issues prevent them from living the lifestyle that they want Rate of potentially preventable hospital admissions at NSW state averages

Providing public toilets in strategic locations permits the community to be out an about knowing that access is available to go to the toilet should they need to. This is seen as encouraging the involvement/interaction of individual within the community Clean facilities reduce the potential spread of infection and provides for safe disposal of human wastes

That the community experiences a positive feeling of well-being 85% of people access and feel safe in public areas 60% of population are active members of community groups 50% of people have attended a community event in the last six months

The ability to access clean well designed public amenities increases the positive feeling of wellbeing Clean, well designed amenities deter antisocial behaviour and make people feel safer when they need to use them Providing amenities is seen as encouraging people to be active in the community outside of their own house/property

Program:

Provide suitable parking

What we have achieved: Provide adequate levels of car parking to support our business and community groups in retaining customers/active participation and ensure our other infrastructure is able to be fully utilised by the community. What we planned to do: Code Service/Action SOD-01-04

Completed

Provide and maintain car parking throughout the shire 117 | P a g e


Measures of Success: Outcome/Output Number of complaints about standard of car parking

Target Result <5 2

Comment Target met

Community Strategic Goals Affected by the Program: Code Goal How Program Impacts WG-1

Average Business Earnings at non-Sydney average for NSW

WG-9

That the community experiences a positive feeling of well-being 85% of people access and feel safe in public areas The number of crime incidents is equal to or lower than the state average 60% of population are active members of community groups

SAG-2 SAG-3 SOG-1

The availability and ease of parking is considered to be highly desirable in our retail and business sector. There is some correlation between parking, shoppers and hence sales The ability to easily park when accessing an area is seen to provide people with a positive outlook Well designed, maintained and utilised parking areas can improve the safety associated with accessing public areas/facilities and businesses

The ability to access and park at facilities will encourage more people to become involved

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Primary Strategy: Program:

Creating a shared social view

Work with community groups

What we have achieved: An engaged and active community contributing to the success and liveability of the Macleay Valley. What we planned to do: Code Service/Action SOD-02-01

Actively promote volunteering in the community

SOD-02-01

Work with state government agencies in promoting and supporting community groups apply for grant funding for projects

SOD-02-01

Provide education on grant programs and how to apply for grant workshops

SOD-02-01

Promote community group activities and celebrate successes

SOD-02-01

Identify opportunities for community groups to become engaged

SOD-02-01

Establish communities of interest working together to host events and cultural exhibitions

SOD-02-01

Implement Creative Communities program

SOD-02-01

Actively have community groups supporting disaster response

Completed

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Measures of Success: Outcome/Output Number of community groups actively engaged in community projects Number of community projects completed

Target 20 per annum 10 per annum

Number of volunteers increased

2000 active volunteers

Result 21 4 48%

Comment Target met Infrastructure projects does not included community events Target met Residents surveyed indicated they had volunteered

Community Strategic Goals Affected by the Program: Code Goal How Program Impacts WG-9 WG-10 WG-11 SAG-2 SOG-1

That the community experiences a positive feeling of well-being High involvement in community through volunteering Most people see the communityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s culture as important and valuable 85% of people access and feel safe in public areas 60% of population active members of community groups

An active and engaged community makes a positive contribution to the place they live Increased numbers of community members volunteering with community organisations and with council, including RFS, SES, NGOâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Through promotion of positive outcomes and projects members see the value in contributing Engagement and participation with community projects and positive outcomes people will take ownership of public spaces Promote the positive outcomes and social connectedness of being a part of positive change and activities 120 | P a g e


Code

Goal

How Program Impacts

SOG-2

Percentage of population volunteering is at State level average 60% of people reporting a neighbour providing a favour in last six months Most people feel that they are empowered to make changes to improve their lives 50% people have attended a community event in the last six months

Promote the value and opportunities of volunteering in the community. Engage young and older people to gain and use skills

SOG-3 SOG-7 SOG-8

Promote supporting each other looking out for ones neighbour Participation with community groups builds self-esteem Promotion of community activities and participation builds a sense of community and encourages more community events with the support of council

Primary Strategy:

Include social behaviour as part of education

Primary Strategy:

Providing opportunities for people to be involved in the

community

Program:

Support community events and activities

What we have achieved: Engaged and involved community that supports, creates and promotes events for community participation and growth.

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What we planned to do: Code Service/Action

Completed

SOD-04-01

Actively support and promote existing events

SOD-04-01

Encourage and develop new cultural events

SOD-04-01

Assist community groups in securing funding for new and existing events

SOD-04-01

Promote the Macleay Valley Community Art Gallery as a venue for local and visiting artists with a vision to facilitate growth of the arts community

SOD-04-01

Support and encourage youth to participate and contribute to the events calendar

Measures of Success: Outcome/Output Number of events for the community to participate in Increased number of community groups engaged in hosting events

Target Result 15 per 22 annum 10 11 groups per annum

Comment Target met Target met

Code

Goal

How Program Impacts

WG-9

That the community experiences a positive feeling of well-being

Participation and attendance at events provides for social harmony and pride

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Code

Goal

How Program Impacts

WG-10

High involvement in community through volunteering Most people see the communityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s culture as important and valuable 85% of people access and feel safe in public areas 60% of population active members of community groups 50% people have attended a community event in the last six months

Community groups assisted in hosting and attracting events to the shire

WG-11 SAG-2 SOG-1 SOG-7

Program:

Increased participation and attendance at community events People feel safe to utilise public spaces for events, council to work with event organisers to promote the event and participation Encourage community involvement, work with existing and encourage new community groups to form and hold events Increased community participation and involvement in existing and new events

Provide access

What we have achieved: Provide the ability for residents to access transport, infrastructure and services. Allow people with mobility impairments the ability to utilise public infrastructure, access open spaces and generally participate in community. What we planned to do: Code Service/Action SOD-04-02

Completed

Maintain the footpath network with provisions to assist mobility impaired residents to use this infrastructure 123 | P a g e


Code

Service/Action

Completed

SOD-04-02

Ensure public transport services are maintained at current levels

SOD-04-02

Support shared community transport services (i.e. buses, taxiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s etc.) through providing and maintaining suitable infrastructure

Community Strategic Goals Affected by the Program: Code Goal How Program Impacts HG-1

HG-2 HG-3 WG-9 SOG-2 SOG-1

Low number of people reporting that health issues prevent them from living the lifestyle that they want Rate of potentially preventable hospital admissions at NSW state averages Average age expectancy at birth equals NSW state average That the community experiences a positive feeling of well-being 85% of people access and feel safe in public areas 60% of population are active members of community groups

Providing access for all members of the community will improve the levels of people using public spaces and improve their health Improved access is seen as positively influencing our health and wellbeing, reducing the incidence of illness Having access to good infrastructure will increase health and improve life expectancy in the longer term The ability to access facilities, services and infrastructure will reduce the potential isolation and improve our sense of well-being Good levels of access deter antisocial behaviour through the concept of natural surveillance and makes people feel safer when they are out in these areas Providing good access allows people to become involved in community groups

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Code

Goal

How Program Impacts

SOG-8

50% of people have attended a community event in the last six months

Organisational Services Achieving the outcomes desired in the Delivery Programs has not been possible without a range of services that are required to underpin the operations of the Council. While these services do not provide direct services to the community they do undertake actions and activities that the community would be interested in.

Service Area: Program:

Internal facilitation and support

Community engagement

What we have achieved: Provision of access to information on Council services, activities and projects. Have ‘conversations’ with our community on Council’s future direction and the community’s requirements. Provision of media releases and corporate reports in a timely manner What we planned to do: Code

Service/Action

CAD-01-01

Promote and consult with the community on Council projects and strategies and provide multiple avenues for feedback

Completed

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Code

Service/Action

CAD-01-01

Provide Web accessibility and updates and ensure the website remains current and informative Issue community newsletters

CAD-01-01 CAD-01-01

Completed

CAD-01-01

Update and advertise Council notices, media releases and community service announcements Conduct community consultations on specific issues and informal conversations Support and coordinate other business units in consultation preparation

CAD-01-01

Liaise with media outlets

CAD-01-01

Preparation of the Statutory and Community Annual Report

CAD-01-01 CAD-01-01

Preparation of the Community Strategic Plan, Delivery Program and Operation Plan Place documents on public exhibition

CAD-01-01

Prepare and distribute the internal staff newsletter

CAD-01-01

Develop social media options for community engagement

CAD-01-01

Measures of Success: Outcome/Output Community consultations held per annum Participants in community consultations per annum

Target Result >30 57 >1,500 1,891

Comment Target met Target met

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Program:

Customer service

What we have achieved: Provision of first response information to enquiries that is accurate and timely. Provision of reception and front counter services to all visitors. Liaison with other Departments where more detailed information is required. What we planned to do: Code

Service/Action

CAD-01-02

Provide a customer service support call centre and after hours operation

CAD-01-02

Provide counter services for the community

CAD-01-02

Provide receipting, banking and mail delivery services

CAD-01-02

CAD-01-02

Ensure ongoing, timely and accurate capture and distribution of documents and information Minimise the risk to Council in terms of court actions and litigation by assisting the responsible officer with the retrieval of relevant records to support Councilâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s position as required by a court of law Utilise the State Records Authority of NSW General Retention and Disposal Authority for the retention and destruction of Council records and monitor ongoing storage requirements Provide social media development and updates

CAD-01-02

Manage applications and bookings processing

CAD-01-02

Develop organisational service standards

CAD-01-02 CAD-01-02

Completed

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Reason for not meeting service/action Reviews of services were delayed while attempts were made to do the service reviews regionally. Investigations indicated there were considerable benefits in working regionally and these were attempted to be captured. Measures of Success: Outcome/Output Number of telephone service enquiries per annum

Target Result >33,000 37,764

Comment Target met Consistent in telephone enquiries over the term. Target met A decreasing trend to attend council offices. Target met

Number of customer service enquiries at the front counter per annum

>12,000

12,243

Percentage of customer enquiries solved at first contact Percentage of abandoned customer calls per month

>75%

84.2%

<5%

7.6%

Percentage of customer calls returned within 2 working days Number of customer Surveys completed per annum

>85%

Impacted on with staff shortages and information available on the telephone message. 86.37% Target met.

>960

565.5

Staff shortages during this term impacted on this. Also changed frequency of surveys.

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Outcome/Output Percentage of correspondence received needing a reply that is responded to within 10 working days

Program:

Target >90%

Result Comment 78.91% Strategies to improve with KPI need to be implemented. More effective reporting tools to be implemented.

Governance

What we have achieved: Efficient and effective administrative practices are in place. Strategies are in place to manage and minimise Councilâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s exposure to public and internal risks. Councillors are able to meet their responsibilities, being mindful of and aware of resource constraints. What we planned to do: Code

Service/Action

CAD-01-03

Compile and distribute Council meeting agendas, minutes and action items

CAD-01-03

Monitor and maintain the corporate policy register

CAD-01-03

CAD-01-03

Update Code of Conduct and induction training in line with ICAC recommendations Manage compliance with the Government Information Public Access (GIPA) Act and Privacy and Personal Information Protection Act, including training of staff Manage Councilâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s insurance claims in a cost effective manner

CAD-01-03

Regular monitoring and reporting of outstanding legal matters

CAD-01-03

Completed

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Code

Service/Action

CAD-01-03 CAD-01-03 CAD-01-03

Completed

Provide professional development opportunities for support, knowledge and skills of Councillors Coordinate the completion of pecuniary interest forms on an annual basis by Councillors and designated staff Coordinate regular reviews of delegations in line with organisational restructures

Measures of Success: Outcome/Output Average number of hours before Ordinary Council meetings that the addenda is available to the public Average number of hours after ordinary Council meetings that the minutes are available to the public Percentage of formal GIPA requests resolved within legislated timeframe Number of public liability claims for property damage received per annum Number of public liability claims for personal injury received per annum

Target >90 hours <24 100%

Result 138.6

Comment Target met.

14.2

Target met.

98.9%

<40

34

Target met.

<10

4.75

Target met.

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Program:

Technical engineering management

What we have achieved: Support the provision of infrastructure and services to the community by managing Council civil assets, undertaking engineering investigation and analysis and preparing designs/strategies for future works. We also manage the statutory requirements associated with Council’s delegation as a road authority. What we planned to do: Code

Service/Action

CAD-01-04

Review and update asset management plans

CAD-01-04

Revaluation of assets completed in accordance with the OLG schedule

CAD-01-04

Provide administration, investigation and support for the Local Traffic Committee and for Council’s role as the road authority Undertake engineering survey, investigation and design for forward works and identified problems Provide engineering advice on matter which affect the communities infrastructure and services Prepare infrastructure strategies for the long term renewal, replacement and augmentation of council’s infrastructure Manage Council leases and execute property matters

CAD-01-04 CAD-01-04 CAD-01-04 CAD-01-04 CAD-01-04

Completed

Prepare infrastructure strategies for the long term renewal, replacement and augmentation of council’s infrastructure

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Measures of Success: Direct measurement of our success in this area is limited due to the broad range of activities undertaken in this area. Often the success in other areas of the Delivery Program will be dependent upon success in this area. Outcome/Output Number of Local Traffic Committee meetings convened per year

Program:

Target 4

Result 4

Comment Target met

Efficiency investment

What we have achieved: By reinvesting the improvement in the financial position from debt repayments into areas that will result in a long term reduction in costs to the organisation, the Council has significantly increased the efficiency of operations. What we planned to do: Code

Service/Action

Completed

CAD-01-05

Work in regional and industry partnerships

CAD-01-05

Identify investments where there is a positive return on the initial investment

Measures of Success: Outcome/Output Ratio of savings against investment

Target Result 1:2 8.8:1

Comment

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Program:

Planning and environment management and support

What we have achieved: This area shows the salaries that support a range of activities within the Delivery Programs, but which are not separately costed. The outcomes and measures are spread throughout the Delivery Plan. What we planned to do: Code

Service/Action

CAD-01-06

Manage and provide staff to undertake planning, regulatory and environmental functions

Program:

Completed

Community services and engagement management and support

What we have achieved: This area shows the salaries that support a range of activities within the Delivery Programs, but which are not separately costed. The outcomes and measures are spread throughout the Delivery Plan. What we planned to do: Code

Service/Action

CAD-01-07

Provide support and management staff for community service and engagement operations

Completed

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Service Area: Program:

Centralised service provision

Corporate information services

What we have achieved: Facilitation of access to information that is accountable, meets customer service requirements and community expectations. Provision of appropriate access to information technology and digital communication for all users. What we planned to do: Code

Service/Action

CAD-02-01 CAD-02-01

Provide education, training and support for Council’s Information, Communication and Technology (ICT) users including staff, councilors and contractors Provide geographical information services to Council and its customers

CAD-02-01

Plan, deliver and maintain Council’s ICT infrastructure

CAD-02-01

CAD-02-01

Plan, develop and deliver CivicView and TRIM module training materials each year Maintain all required hardware maintenance and software licensing in order to support Council’s ICT infrastructure Develop, implement and test an information technology Disaster Recovery Plan

CAD-02-01

Establish an operational ICT disaster recovery site at the Works Depot

CAD-02-01

Completed

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Measures of Success: Outcome/Output Percentage computer system performance is available during business hours Average hours to finalise requests for IT assistance through the help desk

Program:

Target Result >98% 99% <4

Comment Target met

4.32

Finance

What we have achieved: Long term financial sustainability through effective short term and long term financial management that is transparent and accountable. Rates are set at acceptable levels; rate income is capable of meeting the needs of the community as per the adopted long term strategic plan. An investment strategy that maximises the return on Councilâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s investment portfolio. What we planned to do: Code

Service/Action

CAD-02-02 CAD-02-02

Present annual and monthly Financial Reports in accordance with statutory timeframes and Office of Local Government Guidelines Annual financial reports have been audited by 31 October each year

CAD-02-02

Compliance with external regulatory and taxation requirements

Completed

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Code

Service/Action

CAD-02-02

Maintain and review Council’s ten year Financial Plan

CAD-02-02

Provide support for management of budgets

CAD-02-02

Investments comply with Council’s policy and Ministerial Guidelines

CAD-02-02

Sufficient cash resources are maintained to meet future commitments

CAD-02-02

Review of current cash holdings to identify whether opportunities exist to gain value for the community Accurate and timely payment processing of creditors in accordance with credit terms Accurate and timely processing of accounts receivable

CAD-02-02 CAD-02-02 CAD-02-02 CAD-02-02 CAD-02-02 CAD-02-02 CAD-02-02 CAD-02-02

Completed

Rating structure is reviewed to ensure consistency with the objectives contained within the Local Government Act Accurate and timely distribution of rate notices Minimise Council’s exposure to outstanding debts through effective debt recovery procedures To facilitate the procurement of goods and services that are suitable for the purpose and provides value for money on a whole of life basis through open and effective competition Maintain a manageable inventory stock level to meet operational requirements and cost Undertake a bi-annual review of slow moving stock and undertake an annual stocktake

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Measures of Success: Outcome/Output Average investment return meets/exceeds the average 90 day bank bill index. Percentage of rates outstanding as at 30 June each year Average stock turnover

Program:

Target >1.00

Result 1.37

<5% >2.5

Comment Target met. Target met.

5.0125% 3.31

Target met.

Fleet management

What we have achieved: Management of Councilâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fleet in a sustainable manner What we planned to do: Code

Service/Action

CAD-02-03

Source, maintain and repair mobile assets to effectively support Councilâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s operations Maintain all plant and vehicles in accordance with manufacturers specifications

CAD-02-03 CAD-02-03 CAD-02-03 CAD-02-03

Completed

Monitor plant utilisation to ensure usage in line with plant replacement guidelines and the plant replacement program to meet operational requirements Review the ten year plant replacement program Review optimal time to replace vehicles and plant items based on maintenance costs and down-time 137 | P a g e


Code

Service/Action

CAD-02-03

Review Fleet Business Plan

Completed

Measures of Success: Outcome/Output Percentage of unscheduled fleet maintenance Average plant utilisation rates

Program:

Target <20% >90%

Result 20.89% 100.30%

Comment Target met.

Human Resources

What we have achieved: Effective human resource and work health and safety strategies and policies that meet corporate objectives and legislative requirements for the benefit of the organisation, management and staff. A safe workplace environment the meets legislative requirements. What we planned to do: Code

Service/Action

CAD-02-04

Provide advice and fulfil operational requirements to meet all recruitment process requirements from advertising to induction of all approved appointments Review and implement the Workforce Management Strategy

CAD-02-04

Completed

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Code

Service/Action

CAD-02-04

CAD-02-04

Develop and implement a performance management framework focusing on outcomes and results and include the elements of recognition and reward Develop and implement a structured mentoring program so that older employees can share their knowledge and experience with younger workers Pursue secondment opportunities for professional development both internally and externally Develop and implement a succession plan for all key positions across the organisation that addresses external recruitment, professional development and mentoring of existing staff over a specific timeframe to meet anticipated retirements and future skill shortages Develop an award program for recognition of performance to promote the concept of “Look good, feel good, done right” into all activities and services Review the system of Probationary reviews for new employees to provide two way performance feedback and measure the success of recruitment exercises Ensure corporate and individual training needs are identified and met and maintain a Human Resources (HR) training calendar Manage scholarship, internship, work experience, trainee and apprenticeship programs The annual performance review for each employee is conducted

CAD-02-04

Conduct an employee opinion survey

CAD-02-04

Monitor Council’s work injury rehabilitation, workers compensation and return to work program Support and advice to Management and staff in relation to Award interpretation and industrial issues Accurate and timely payroll processing

CAD-02-04 CAD-02-04 CAD-02-04

CAD-02-04 CAD-02-04 CAD-02-04 CAD-02-04

CAD-02-04 CAD-02-04 CAD-02-04

Completed

Promote information gathering by staff to identify, report and record potential hazards and witness accounts of accidents 139 | P a g e


Code

Service/Action

CAD-02-04

Develop and conduct safety training programs as required

CAD-02-04

Monitor incident reports and workers compensation performance and provide monthly reports on claims made Ensure compliance with the Work Health Safety Act (WHS) and Regulations and promote continuous improvement of safe systems of work Develop and conduct training for employees on WHS accountabilities, responsibilities and authorities Assess the effectiveness of Councilâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s WHS system and corporate compliance

CAD-02-04 CAD-02-04 CAD-02-04 CAD-02-04

Completed

Enhance staff awareness of risk exposure and risk management techniques through appropriate education programs

Reason for not meeting service / code Due to the OOSoft system implementations 2015-2016 performance appraisals were not completed. Measures of Success: Outcome/Output Percentage of staff expressing satisfaction with management leadership Percentage of staff indicating satisfaction with their employment Number of lost time injuries per annum Staff turnover (excluding retirement) Average number of sick leave hours per annum

Target >60%

Result 61.7%

Comment Target met.

>85%

91.9%

Target met.

<12 <10% <11,000

9.5 5.9 26,461

Target met. Target met. An average of 10.8 days per annum per employee taken as unplanned leave 140 | P a g e


Outcome/Output Total hours of overtime worked annually Staff training as a percentage of total staff

Target <15,000 >25%

Result 18,035 40%

Comment Target met.

Major projects and significant outcomes  Proactive injury management strategies has resulted in a reduction of the Workers Compensation premium over the Delivery Plan period compared to the last period by 15.6%. The premium costs have been reduced by $447,597 during this term.  Delivery of supervisor training programs on WHS responsibilities, risk management and continuous improvement of safe systems of work.  Implementation of the online recruitment process reducing internal costs by approximately $10,000 per annum.  Implementation of Equip online training savings of approximately $9,000.

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Macleay Valley 2036 Community Strategic Plan The results of this End of Term indicate that we are moving towards the vision for the Macleay Valley. Achieving the vision will require continued collaboration at both a state and federal government level. The Breaking the Cycle group has increased coordination and focus on areas that address disadvantage, crime education and health. There has been positive outcomes gained through working together. School attendance has improved in both primary and secondary schools. Effective relations between agencies provides for better outcomes for the community. Councilâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s relationship with these agencies is pivotal in moving towards our vision. During this term the focus has been on road infrastructure, building community capacity and laying the foundations for future growth. The impacts of the bypass of Kempsey have been minimised through careful planning, execution and support for our businesses. The support of the community in volunteering, being engaged and participating moves us closer to realising the vision. There are always services to provide and projects to do in support the desired outcomes for the Macleay Valley. The opportunity is to continue to strengthen our relationships and share the Valleyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s aspirations so that are considered in all tiers of government planning. The continued work on the Pacific Highway duplication brings even more prospects moving us closer to regional and capital cities, education and employment opportunities, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s also our chance to grow and be an even more appealing place to live.

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KEMPSEY SHIRE COUNCIL 22 Tozer Street PO Box 3078 West Kempsey NSW 2440 P. 02 6566 3200 F. 02 6566 3205 E. ksc@kempsey.nsw.gov.au www.kempsey.nsw.gov.au

Kempsey Shire Council 2015-2016 Annual Report  
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