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Chapter 3: Southern Dayton View Neighborhood (East)

I. II.

Introduction Project Background

III.

Neighborhood Background

IV.

Walking Audit

V.

Abandoned Lot Description

VI.

Possible Alternatives

VII.

Selected Alternative

VIII.

Discussion

IX. i. ii. iii.

Chapter Appendix

Appendix A – Walking Audit Documentation Appendix B – Poster Appendix C – Works Cited

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I. Introduction South Dayton View has many positives that confound the problems that it is currently beset by. The neighborhood was a thriving, diverse place just twenty years ago, full of beautiful old homes that had a lot to offer. After all of the troubles in the interim, it is time to set aside these difficulties and move forward to rebuild the neighborhood, and at the same time, remember what was before. What we hope to do is frame our argument, that the area is historically rich and not a vast sea of abandoned residences and empty lots. We believe the first step is providing the neighborhood with a space with an identity, a place that welcomes the resident’s home, and gives them somewhere that they can be as a community. A place that they can see in the distance and tell someone, “That’s where I live”. A place where they can say, “Come visit our neighborhood.” Our chapter highlights some of the details of the neighborhood, focus upon what are it has to offer, and who lives there. It was our goal to provide a lot intervention which could be implemented cheaply, easily, and provide the neighborhood something they have been lacking. II. Project Management Upon understanding the expected content for the project, the group chose individuals who filled roles with multiple skill sets instead of specialization. The tasks assigned were completed in a complementary manner in every task, to maximize the amount of actual learning from the experience. A communication plan was formulated between group members as follows: 1) Team Member Skills  Brent – research/creativity/gis  Beth – Posters/presentations/research/gis 2) 

3)

4)

Progress Reports Weekly update o Hold meeting once a week to discuss progress of each members weekly task  Meetings Monday or Friday, Upham 67 11:00am

Problems Encountered  Open ended email communication for problems encountered during research  Contact information has been exchanged for team member assistance Problems completing work on time

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 Issues with team member participation will be openly discussed, as a team, during our weekly update meeting After gaining an understanding of the goals the project and an initial investigation of the Dayton area, the group completed the project as follows:          

Research 3 Neighborhoods in 3 priority boards Narrow selection to 1 neighborhood Research 3 concentrations of delinquent/vacant properties Narrow Selection to 1 Lot area Walking Audit Brainstorm Intervention Ideas (20) Narrow Intervention Ideas to 5 Creatively organized the ideas on the lot Designed poster Constructed Chapter

III. Neighborhood Background Neighborhood Settlement History Similar to most early settlements, Dayton’s location was selected based on the presence of water by Isreal Ludlow in 1795. Ludlow selected a location where three tributaries (a stream or river flowing into a larger river or into a lake; an affluent) feed into the Great Miami River; Wolf Creek, Mad River, and Stillwater River. Although this area was prone to flooding, development continued at the dismay of local Native Americans. The connection between Dayton and Dayton View begins long before it was settled in the modern era – “the old ford”, located west of First St. and Robert St. was the crossing point for buffalo, deer, bear and smaller game, and Native Americans long before a bridge was built. This portion of the river was known for a “solid gravel bottom, and was unchangeable by floods.”(Dayton Daily News, October 22, 1933) “The floods would often change the fords, but this old ford was known to the buffalo, deer, bear and smaller game, and the Indians after them could always rely upon a crossing here.” The importance of the area was known to the military, as they used it for the same reason and it later became a central point of conflict between the whites and the Indians, as two battles were fought on the site of Dayton were a settlement was made in 1796. Settlement of the area continued and when farmers looked to come to town traveling from Greenville to Dayton, if the river was flooded, they would camp out up in what is today Dayton View and graze their horses while they waited for the water to become more manageable. With continued difficulties crossing the river and visitors to Dayton, there would be regular traffic back and forth and intelligence would make it up to Greenville about how conditions were at the crossing. Southern Dayton View

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Dayton View might have remained as a mainly wooded territory if it had not been connected to the east bank of the Great Miami with a bridge. The first bridge was built around 1817 and was a toll structure, was covered, and consisted of two spans. In 1852 it was washed away and in 1856 another wooden bridge took its place. Soon after the bridge was completed, a road was laid out to the southwest, crossing Wolf creek and continuing to the old Eaton road in the neighborhood of Germantown St. Thus it served as an outlet for travel from the west and south as well as the north. The Great Dayton Flood of 1913 greatly reshaped the Dayton Neighborhoods. Waters from the Great Miami River overflowed its banks on March 25th 1913 and continued through March 26th resulting in the death of at least 428 people and more than 20,000 homes unsalvageable (Ohio Historical Society, 1999). With the population shocked and dismayed by the high waters and structural damages, they began to seek higher ground in an attempt to reduce the likelihood of suffering through another flood. It was the Dayton View Neighborhoods that eventually would attract redevelopment at that time. Slowly, Dayton residents moved from the east side of the city to “Lower Dayton View” (Montgomery County Historical Society, n.d.) Predominantly, Jewish business men and professionals were drawn to the neighborhood, however those with more economic means settled just North in Upper Dayton View. After a few decades of developing communities and neighborhoods, the Dayton View area took notice of the importance of diverse living. The 1960s and 1970s were a time where “white flight” was taking place across the country and locally in Dayton. In an attempt to embrace diversity and attract a larger population to the Dayton View Neighborhood area, the Dayton View Neighborhood Council openly welcomed African American residents during the 1960s-70s. While encouraging African American’s to populate the Dayton View area, at that time the Council also aimed to deter residents from “white flight”, thereby creating a diversely populated community. Dayton’s Archives states Dayton View “…made successful transitions, taking great pride in the diversity of age, ethnicity, religion, educational background and economic level, which characterized their neighborhoods.” (Montgomery County Historical Society, n.d.) Neighborhood Background Southern Dayton View is directly northwest of downtown Dayton, Ohio with the Dayton View Park in the north area of the neighborhood. The neighborhood is of high density, having 4,710 people per square mile, compared to Dayton’s average of 2,979 people per square mile.

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Figure 3-1: Map of Dayton, Ohio highlighting major travel-ways.

As a neighborhood with high vacancy, tax delinquency and city “take-over property� rates, Southern Dayton View provides a great opportunity for the transformation of vacant lots. The neighborhood is definitely in need of change, which is evident through a diminishing housing market and the relatively poor local community. Connectivity Southern Dayton View is directly west of 75 and is connected by Salem Ave and W. Riverview Ave. A major railroad (CSXT lines) also runs through the southern part of the neighborhood. It is also connected by Wolf Creek, which runs directly south of the neighborhood. Parks Dayton View Park, also referred to as Broadway Park, has lots of green space, a basketball court, and a playground for the kids.

Figure 3-2 Dayton View Park, Southeastern Corner of Broadway Avenue and Superior Avenue

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Boundaries, Priority Board and Adjacent Neighborhoods Southern Dayton View is located in the Northwest Priority Board. It's adjacent neighborhoods include: Cornell Heights and Westwood to the West, Roosevelt and Wolf Creek to the South, Old Dayton View to the East, and University Row and Princeton Heights to the North as shown in figure 2. Their slogan is “Where you live, we live. Northwest Priority Board, We’re working for you!”.

Figure 3-3: Map of Dayton, Ohio priority boards and neighborhoods

Dayton's Department of Planning and Community Development supports neighborhood priority boards, which serve to "give citizens a voice in shaping City policy...by working closely with elected officials and citizens on the following boards: City Commission, City Plan Board, Board of Zoning Appeals, Landmarks Commission, and the Priority Boards" (City of Dayton, 2011). The Southern Dayton View neighborhood is well represented by 5 council members and actively involved in the Northwest Priority Board, highlighted green in figure 3. This particular neighborhood priority board meets every 4th Wednesday of the month at 7pm. Non-profits/Community Organizations Dayton Christian Center is operated by the American Baptist Church and assists local residents in many ways. Specifically the DCC provides support services and daycare, along with meals and tax preparation assistance. Additionally, the Southern

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Dayton View Community Development Corporation is an organization that aids in local efforts.

Schools Dayton View Academy. Grades K-8. 954 students

The neighborhood is served by three schools and one district, Dayton City Schools. The schools have student/teacher ratios above the national average, , the population served is majority African-American with between 77.2 to 99.4% qualified for Free or Reduced Lunch (neighborhoodscout.com, 2012), and district-wide proficiency scores lag behind the state averages. Educational Environment demographics for the community and Educational Expenditures listed by the District, State, and National levels are detailed in the Education section of the Appendix. SCHOOLS IN THIS NEIGHBORHOOD * RICHARD ALLEN PREPARATORY 627 SALEM AVE, DAYTON, OH 45406 (937) 278-4201 DAYTON LEADERSHIP ACADEMIES-DAYTON VIEW CAMPUS 1416 WEST RIVERVIEW AVE, DAYTON, OH 45402 (937) 567-9426 WESTWOOD PREK-8 SCHOOL 2805 OAKRIDGE DR, DAYTON, OH 45417 (937) 542-4990

GRADES KG-01 KG-08 PK-08

Table 3-1 Schools located near, or serving the South Dayton View area

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Figure 3-4: Facts about Dayton City School District and how their No Child Left Behind test scores compare to the state averages (source: neighborhoodscout.com)

Crime Property crime rate for South Dayton View is ranked lower at 25.05/1000 persons compared to Dayton at 63.13(neighborhoodscout.com, 2012). Finally, Southern Dayton View is ranked lower in violent crime at 8.01 crimes/1000 persons compared to Dayton at 10.66 and, overall crimes per square mile, South Dayton View is comparatively higher at 281 compared to that of the City of Dayton at 69, according to neighborhoodscout.com.

Figure 3-5: Property Crime Rate Comparison per 1,000 residents for Riverview Ave/Rosedale Dr (source: neighborhoodscout.com, 2012)

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Demographics

Figure 3-6: Population Density on a Census Block basis for the area near South Dayton View. The Black line signifies the border of South Dayton View and the star represents the location of the property chosen. (source: US Census Bureau, 2010)

Housing Southern View is an older neighborhood with an ageing infrastructure. It is made up of mostly medium sized to small single-family homes and small apartments. The majority of the houses were built in 1939 or earlier as demonstrated in figure 3-7. Additionally, most of the housing is owner occupied according to city data shown in figure 3-8.

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Figure 3-7: Construction year for houses within Southern Dayton View (source: City-Data.com)

Figure 3-8: Owners and renters distribution by unit type for Dayton View (source: City-Data.com)

According to city data, which bases its information on census data, a large percentage of Southern Dayton View residents, approximately 34%, are below poverty levels. This finding is interesting because on average, rent in 2009 was higher when compared to the rest of Dayton, shown in figure 3-9. From both historical research and population data, the neighborhood appears to have been settled earlier than most neighborhoods in Dayton, both in renter and owner occupied homes (Figure 3-10).

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Figure 3-9: Dayton View housing statistics (source: City-Data.com)

Figure 3-10: Dayton View population statistics (source: City-Data.com)

The housing value for the neighborhood is dominated by the greater proportion of the same value of homes (59% homes between $114,000 to 57.01, and 39% below $57,000) limiting the variability of values to below $114,000 (neighborhoodscout.com, 2012).

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Figure 3-11: This figure represents the amount of activity in the immediate area surrounding the area chosen for improvement. The red circle represents the area that this group has chosen to suggest an alternative option for.

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IV. Walking Audit Upon arrival in the neighborhood, we did a preliminary drive through to get our bearings on the map/satellite imagery we collected prior to going into the field. Initially we were saddened by the condition of the neighborhood because we could imagine how beautiful the houses once were. Many of the houses were condemned by the city and were separated by either vacant lots or lots of disrepair (photos below are from the walking audit photo log).

Figure 3-12: Lower left: "Keep out" sign at1007 Ferguson Ave.; Upper right: Houses at northeast corner of Lexington at Bryn Mawr, Lower right: Park bench along bus line, Lexington at Broadway.

We decided to park at a church on the most western side of Old Dayton View, just east of Broadway. Following the bus route which travels North up Broadway (as shown below and recorded in the walking audit photo log), we began walking the neighborhood in search of several lots in a row that could be used for an alternative purpose (see in-field sketch of neighborhood). Broadway is a heavily traveled road and also has amenities located at its intersection with W. Riverview Ave. Features within walking distance of the park at this intersection include: Church's Chicken, Riverview Cellular, A Cup of Dreams, and Broadway Market (shown below). Broadway provides this area Southern Dayton View

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of the Southern Dayton View neighborhood with great connectivity by walking paths and public transit, and therefore proves itself useful when attempting to attract a population.

Figure 3-13: Intersection of Riverview and Broadway: Upper right, Church's Chicken; Lower right, Ice Cream shop; Left edge, Broadway Market.

Although the sidewalks were generally in poor condition, many kids and parents made their way to the park to enjoy the basketball courts and playground equipment (as shown below and recorded in the walking audit documentation).

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Figure 3-14 Left, Sidewalk along Broadway south of the community park; Right, Playground equipment at the community park.

Directly across from the park was a string of vacant lots we found interesting, and selected as our primary area for revamping (see images in Section VI below, walking audit map, lot sketch, lot description, and photo log for more details). We decided to choose this area for several reasons, but largely contributing to this decision were the interviews conducted in the field during the walking audit. From conversation with a local that grew up in the neighborhood, we discovered that the park has been for public use for over 25 years. We also uncovered that many of the vacant houses near the park were the result of police closure on drug dens about 15 years ago. The resident mentioned that there are some owners still trying to salvage houses by replacing roofs, however the majority of the abandoned homes are an eye sore for the community.

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V. Abandoned Lot Description On the Northwestern corner of Broadway Avenue at Superior Avenue resides two adjacent lots, which currently lay empty. The lots are the site of a demolished house since they were sold to The City of Dayton for $200.00 on January 25, 1994. The only activity is the mowing of the grass and the growing of the trees that were already there. Lot Features  The property is dimensioned at 160’ east to west and 90’ north to south.  3’ wide sidewalks run along the southern and eastern boundaries of the property.  The lot has been leveled off post-demolition.  It is currently being mowed and maintained by the City of Dayton.  There are thirteen mature trees currently on the lot.  The site is located on the bus line; there is a stop 900’ to the north and 600’ to the south. Lot Visualization

Figure 3-15: Northwestern corner of Broadway Avenue and Superior Avenue: upper left, looking south towards Dayton View Park; upper right, looking west along Superior; bottom left, looking northwest across Superior from Dayton View Park; bottom right, the Dayton owned duplex directly to the north of the proposed lot development.

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Field Sketch of Lot

Figure 3-16: Field sketch of the lots on the northwestern corner of Superior Avenue and Broadway Avenue during the walking audit, February 29, 2012

Description of adjacent lot use (past and current land use) The property is surrounded on two sides by an adjacent lot that is a duplex that was sold from Citywide Development Company to The City of Dayton on February 26, 2010 for an unknown amount. The property is valued at $65,760 since the last Southern Dayton View

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appraisal last year. Two properties to the immediate west have been foreclosed on and the structures have been demolished. Further to the west along Superior, the north side of the street alone has ten additional lots that have been demolished and an additional thirteen delinquent lots within the next three blocks. To the north along Broadway, four of the six lots are delinquent in the next block. Explanation of how lot is connected to neighborhood The lot is connected to the neighborhood as it fronts along the eastern limit of South Dayton View (Broadway Street) at the intersection with Superior Avenue along the south side of the lot. The bus route runs along the eastern edge of the property and has a stop roughly 450’ to the north and 600’ to the south. The lot is also located directly across the street from Dayton View Park, a community park in the neighborhood. There are no paths cutting across the lot and it has no signs of activity on the lot; however, the lot has an extensive tree-line bordering the property on the north side, adjacent to the duplex. VI. Possible Alternatives We wanted to maintain as many of the trees as possible and provide a sense of place to the neighborhood that would welcome residents to the area. We strived to do something positive for the community – something that would provide residents with a place to gather, and be able to come together as a community. Twenty ideas were developed during the design phase and made into a series of images. These ideas were reviewed by one of the Miami University architecture professors and two graduate students during one class period. The ideas that received the most amount of traction were a parking lot with recycle containers lined with butterfly gardens and having artistic bird feeders in the trees, a sculpture park, combining the a bus stops into a central bus stop with a bell tower, shelter, and a community center, a fountain/mosaic park, and a dog park. We were also concerned whether doing one idea would limit the amount of interest from the city planning commission or members of the neighborhood, so multiple items were combined. At the same time, project costs were of concern and the final choices were limited to constrain the budget for any suggestions.

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Figure 3-17: A couple of alternative solutions discussed during the design phase of the project.

VII. Selected Alternative The alternative that our group proposes is creating a place that the people of the South Dayton View area can embrace as part of their neighborhood. This would be comprised of the following items: 1) There are two bus stops in the immediate area surrounding the intersection of Superior and Broadway (one roughly 500’ to the north and 800’ to the south); we suggest the combination of those two stops into one stop. 2) As part of combining these stops, a new facility would be built to give the residents a place to sit down and get out of the weather while they wait on the bus, and a place that welcomes them as they arrive home. This facility would have a bell tower at the south end, closest to the intersection; this would give the neighborhood a sense of place and that would be visible from anywhere in the Dayton downtown area. There would be a small community center, but enough room for a set of bathrooms, to have a group meeting, or to meet for a job interview. The center would have a parking area, to serve both the community center and Dayton View park (a park that has no parking), and a plaza connecting the bus stop to the community center. There would be the need for a volunteer organization to run the community center; the suggestion that we have is to create a multi-denominational Southern Dayton View

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church volunteer group to rotate staffing of the counter when there is someone needed. Also as a bonus, solar panels would be situated on the top of the tower to power the lighting for the area surrounding the bus stop, a fountain, and a community center. 3) The tower, community center, parking area, and the plaza would all be constructed of recycled materials from Dayton area demolition sites. This would communicate to the community that our changing world is not left in the past but incorporated into the future, to build a better way tomorrow. 4) In the parking lot adjacent to the community center, there would be bins to collect for Goodwill, and recycling of paper, glass, plastic, and clothing. This would create an aspect of the community supporting one another and not depending upon someone else. 5) As part of creating a space for the community, there would also be the aspect of other parts of Dayton reaching out to the neighborhood to make the park more livable. As a part of this initiative, we suggest a sculpture park be a part of this development. As a city with a vibrant art scene, Dayton has many possible sources for sculptures to be displayed in the park, and this would allow sculptors widespread exposure to the public. Also, there would be a charity auction to sell off the sculptures on a yearly basis to the private or public owner to display on their property, with new sculptures being chosen to display in the park, and with the proceeds going to support the next round of developing artists (or perhaps neighborhood groups such as little league, girl scouts or a homeless shelter). Funding Possibilities One of our main concerns was bang for your buck: doing the most that we could for the cheapest amount of funding. The plan that we propose could be performed in stages, and might be able to be funded by cobbling together smaller grants, from such places as the City of Dayton Neighborhood MiniGrants, The Kroger Co. Foundation, The Dayton Foundation, or any number of local sources. At the beginning of the project, the costs could be lowered by finding an architect or engineer willing to donate one eight hour day to hammer out the details and make the project function properly. For the construction phase, the parking lot might be excavated, and graded off and graveled as the first phase, and be utilized as the staging area for some of the larger pieces. The community center could be built next, to act as the storage for goods and tools. The remainder of the project would have to depend upon the specialty crews, because their needs are unique to the work. Perhaps personnel from Habitat for Humanity can help out getting the public engaged in the construction process, and provide an impetus to move the project towards completion. Separate from identifying a donor, or a state or federal funding source, these piecemeal efforts may be the best way to get the job done.

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VIII. Discussion Overall, this project was an enjoyable adventure for the group. As two people who were unfamiliar with the area, Dayton was a new and exciting city to explore. Brainstorming and creative thinking was one of the most enjoyable parts of this project. As a group, we worked well together to develop lot interventions that we felt were 'green', low maintenance and applicable to the neighborhood. Additionally, the group was able to generate quality work as individuals, allowing for the division and revision of each other's work for efficiency purposes. Efficiency was key to this group, therefore we worked hard to be as prepared for class presentations and the walking audit. Although there were many aspects of the project that went smoothly, there were a few limitations to the research. One of the greatest limitations to this project was the distance between the group members and Dayton. If Dayton were closer to the Oxford/Hamilton area, then multiple site visits could have been conducted to provide the group with a better sense of the community. By learning more from personal contact with local residents, the resulting lot intervention could have been more appropriate for the resident’s needs and wants. Another limitation to this project could be that there are only two people in the group. With more minds, comes more ideas; therefore other options could have been suggested or explored if additional people were included in brainstorming sessions.

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IX. Appendices i.

Appendix A - Walking Audit Documentation Neighborhood Walking Audit Path

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Photo Log PHOTO TIME # 1 3:55p

DESCRIPTION

2

3:56p

3

3:58p

4

3:58p

5

4:00p

6

4:15p

7

4:20p

8

4:25p

9

4:28p

10

4:32p

11

4:35p

Northwestern view of the playground available at the local community park walking up Broadway. Southern facing view of location option on the corner of Broad and Superior. Southern facing view of location option on the corner of Broad and Superior. Western facing view of location option on the corner of Broad and Superior. Northwestern facing view of location option on the corner of Grand and Ferguson. Posting on white house; location option on the corner of Grand and Ferguson. Southwestern view of location option on the corner of Grand and Ferguson. Southwestern view of location option on the corner of Grand and Ferguson. Southwestern view of location option on the corner of Grand and Ferguson from across Lexington. Brent Graham conducting a walking audit of Ferguson.

12

4:38p

13

4:43p

14

4:45p

15

4:46p

16

4:50p

17

4:51p

18

4:53p

19

4:54p

20

4:54p

21

4:54p

22

4:55p

Southeastern corner of the local community park walking up Broadway.

Southwestern view of location option on the corner of Grand and Ferguson from across Lexington. Southwestern view of location option on the corner of Grand and Ferguson. Southeastern view of location option on the corner of Grand and Ferguson, from across Ferguson. Southern view of sidewalk conditions at the location option on the corner of Grand and Ferguson. Northern view of the location option on the corner of Bryn Mawr Dr. and Lexington, across Lexington. NW view of the location option on the corner of Bryn Mawr Dr. and Lexington, across Lexington. NE view of the location option on the corner of Bryn Mawr Dr. and Lexington, across Lexington. Eastern view of the location option on the corner of Bryn Mawr Dr. and Lexington. Postings on the buildings for the location option on the corner of Bryn Mawr Dr. and Lexington. Brent Graham conducting a walking audit on the corner of Bryn Mawr Dr. and Lexington. Bus stop and bench along Lexington Ave. near the corner of Bryn Mawr Dr. and Lexington.

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23

5:00p

24

5:00p

25

5:00p

26

5:00p

Amenities available at the corner of N. Broadway St. and W. Riverview Ave. Amenities available at the corner of N. Broadway St. and W. Riverview Ave. Amenities available at the corner of N. Broadway St. and W. Riverview Ave. Amenities available at the corner of N. Broadway St. and W. Riverview Ave.

Broadway and Superior FEATURE Street Lights

YES

NO

CONDITION (1-5) 3

COMMENTS sporadic and older

Crosswalks

3

only at busy intersections

Sidewalks

2

broken sidewalks with broken glass

Park Benches

across the street in the park

Playgrounds

4

across the street (south)

Automobiles

4

SUV's, sedans; appear to be well maintained empty lot with no houses, sparse large trees, grasses limited to grass

Overall Cleanliness Overall Safety

3

limited litter

3

havent seen a police vehicle pass by

Connectivity

4

off of a well traveled road with sidewalks, crosswalks and close to park

Gardening Lawn Care Signs Missing Graffiti Broken Windows For Sale Sign Foreclosure Sign Pets (Cat/Dog)

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Bryn Mawr and Lexington FEATURE

YES

NO

CONDITION (1-5) 4

COMMENTS

Sidewalks

4

Park Benches

3

broken glass, and new crosswalk ramps w/ rubber grips benches provided at bus stops

Street Lights

older

Crosswalks

Playgrounds

within walking distance of the near by park

Automobiles

3

sparactic, sedans

Gardening

grass/lawn

Lawn Care

minimal

Signs Missing Graffiti Broken Windows For Sale Sign Foreclosure Sign Pets (Cat/Dog) Overall Cleanliness Overall Safety

3

trash, litter, broken glass

3

havent seen a police vehicle pass by

Connectivity

3

bus routes and sidewalks along Lexington

Grand and Ferguson FEATURE Street Lights

YES

NO

CONDITION (1-5) 4

COMMENTS older but still in working order

3

broken and very weedy

Crosswalks Sidewalks Southern Dayton View

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Park Benches Playgrounds Automobiles

3

sporadic sedans

3

upkeep of grasses (mowed lawns)

2

broken glass, trash

3

havent seen a police vehicle pass by

3

near bus route and along a well traveled road (Grand)

Gardening Lawn Care Signs Missing Graffiti Broken Windows For Sale Sign Foreclosure Sign Pets (Cat/Dog) Overall Cleanliness Overall Safety Connectivity

Census Demographic Data, Tract 7 (Entirety of South Dayton View), Montgomery County, Ohio 2010 Subject SEX AND AGE Total population Under 5 years 5 to 9 years 10 to 14 years 15 to 19 years 20 to 24 years 25 to 29 years 30 to 34 years 35 to 39 years 40 to 44 years 45 to 49 years 50 to 54 years 55 to 59 years

Southern Dayton View

Number Percent 2,615 181 195 214 270 135 123 135 171 163 156 191 168

100.0 6.9 7.5 8.2 10.3 5.2 4.7 5.2 6.5 6.2 6.0 7.3 6.4

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Subject 60 to 64 years 65 to 69 years 70 to 74 years 75 to 79 years 80 to 84 years 85 years and over

Number Percent 143 5.5 94 3.6 103 3.9 65 2.5 76 2.9 32 1.2

Median age (years)

36.7

(X)

16 years and over 18 years and over 21 years and over 62 years and over 65 years and over

1,974 1,853 1,731 445 370

75.5 70.9 66.2 17.0 14.1

Male population Under 5 years 5 to 9 years 10 to 14 years 15 to 19 years 20 to 24 years 25 to 29 years 30 to 34 years 35 to 39 years 40 to 44 years 45 to 49 years 50 to 54 years 55 to 59 years 60 to 64 years 65 to 69 years 70 to 74 years 75 to 79 years 80 to 84 years 85 years and over

1,242 82 100 117 145 74 54 56 72 79 81 85 88 65 42 40 23 27 12

47.5 3.1 3.8 4.5 5.5 2.8 2.1 2.1 2.8 3.0 3.1 3.3 3.4 2.5 1.6 1.5 0.9 1.0 0.5

Median age (years)

34.4

(X)

16 years and over 18 years and over 21 years and over 62 years and over 65 years and over

917 857 787 178 144

35.1 32.8 30.1 6.8 5.5

1,373 99 95

52.5 3.8 3.6

Female population Under 5 years 5 to 9 years

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Subject 10 to 14 years 15 to 19 years 20 to 24 years 25 to 29 years 30 to 34 years 35 to 39 years 40 to 44 years 45 to 49 years 50 to 54 years 55 to 59 years 60 to 64 years 65 to 69 years 70 to 74 years 75 to 79 years 80 to 84 years 85 years and over

Number Percent 97 3.7 125 4.8 61 2.3 69 2.6 79 3.0 99 3.8 84 3.2 75 2.9 106 4.1 80 3.1 78 3.0 52 2.0 63 2.4 42 1.6 49 1.9 20 0.8

Median age (years)

37.9

(X)

16 years and over 18 years and over 21 years and over 62 years and over 65 years and over

1,057 996 944 267 226

40.4 38.1 36.1 10.2 8.6

2,615 2,539 77 2,440 9 6 0 0 1 1 0 0 4 0 0 0 0 0 7 76

100.0 97.1 2.9 93.3 0.3 0.2 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.2 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.3 2.9

RACE Total population One Race White Black or African American American Indian and Alaska Native Asian Asian Indian Chinese Filipino Japanese Korean Vietnamese Other Asian [1] Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander Native Hawaiian Guamanian or Chamorro Samoan Other Pacific Islander [2] Some Other Race Two or More Races

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Subject White; American Indian and Alaska Native [3] White; Asian [3] White; Black or African American [3] White; Some Other Race [3] Race alone or in combination with one or more other races: [4] White Black or African American American Indian and Alaska Native Asian Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander Some Other Race

Number Percent 2 0.1 2 0.1 40 1.5 0 0.0

130 2,510 37 8 2 15

5.0 96.0 1.4 0.3 0.1 0.6

HISPANIC OR LATINO Total population Hispanic or Latino (of any race) Mexican Puerto Rican Cuban Other Hispanic or Latino [5] Not Hispanic or Latino

2,615 32 13 8 3 8 2,583

100.0 1.2 0.5 0.3 0.1 0.3 98.8

HISPANIC OR LATINO AND RACE Total population Hispanic or Latino White alone Black or African American alone American Indian and Alaska Native alone Asian alone Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander alone Some Other Race alone Two or More Races Not Hispanic or Latino White alone Black or African American alone American Indian and Alaska Native alone Asian alone Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander alone Some Other Race alone Two or More Races

2,615 32 3 15 0 1 0 5 8 2,583 74 2,425 9 5 0 2 68

100.0 1.2 0.1 0.6 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.2 0.3 98.8 2.8 92.7 0.3 0.2 0.0 0.1 2.6

RELATIONSHIP Total population In households Householder Spouse [6]

2,615 2,600 1,008 189

100.0 99.4 38.5 7.2

Southern Dayton View

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Subject Child Own child under 18 years Other relatives Under 18 years 65 years and over Nonrelatives Under 18 years 65 years and over Unmarried partner In group quarters Institutionalized population Male Female Noninstitutionalized population Male Female

Number Percent 882 33.7 573 21.9 355 13.6 173 6.6 25 1.0 166 6.3 16 0.6 12 0.5 83 15 0 0 0 15 5 10

3.2 0.6 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.6 0.2 0.4

1,008 627 266

100.0 62.2 26.4

Husband-wife family With own children under 18 years Male householder, no wife present With own children under 18 years Female householder, no husband present With own children under 18 years Nonfamily households [7] Householder living alone Male 65 years and over Female 65 years and over

189 55 84 29 354 182 381 332 160 44 172 70

18.8 5.5 8.3 2.9 35.1 18.1 37.8 32.9 15.9 4.4 17.1 6.9

Households with individuals under 18 years Households with individuals 65 years and over

351 302

34.8 30.0

Average household size Average family size [7]

2.58 3.27

(X) (X)

HOUSING OCCUPANCY Total housing units Occupied housing units Vacant housing units

1,787 1,008 779

100.0 56.4 43.6

HOUSEHOLDS BY TYPE Total households Family households (families) [7] With own children under 18 years

Southern Dayton View

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Subject For rent Rented, not occupied For sale only Sold, not occupied For seasonal, recreational, or occasional use All other vacants Homeowner vacancy rate (percent) [8] Rental vacancy rate (percent) [9] HOUSING TENURE Occupied housing units Owner-occupied housing units Population in owner-occupied housing units Average household size of owner-occupied units Renter-occupied housing units Population in renter-occupied housing units Average household size of renter-occupied units

Number Percent 94 5.3 2 0.1 54 3.0 11 0.6 0 0.0 618 34.6 9.7 15.4

(X) (X)

1,008 494 1,224 2.48 514 1,376 2.68

100.0 49.0 (X) (X) 51.0 (X) (X)

X Not applicable. [1] Other Asian alone, or two or more Asian categories. [2] Other Pacific Islander alone, or two or more Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander categories. [3] One of the four most commonly reported multiple-race combinations nationwide in Census 2000. [4] In combination with one or more of the other races listed. The six numbers may add to more than the total population, and the six percentages may add to more than 100 percent because individuals may report more than one race. [5] This category is composed of people whose origins are from the Dominican Republic, Spain, and Spanishspeaking Central or South American countries. It also includes general origin responses such as "Latino" or "Hispanic." [6] "Spouse" represents spouse of the householder. It does not reflect all spouses in a household. Responses of "same-sex spouse" were edited during processing to "unmarried partner." [7] "Family households" consist of a householder and one or more other people related to the householder by birth, marriage, or adoption. They do not include same-sex married couples even if the marriage was performed in a state issuing marriage certificates for same-sex couples. Same-sex couple households are included in the family households category if there is at least one additional person related to the householder by birth or adoption. Same-sex couple households with no relatives of the householder present are tabulated in nonfamily households. "Nonfamily households" consist of people living alone and households which do not have any members related to the householder. [8] The homeowner vacancy rate is the proportion of the homeowner inventory that is vacant "for sale." It is computed by dividing the total number of vacant units "for sale only" by the sum of owner-occupied units, vacant units that are "for sale only," and vacant units that have been sold but not yet occupied; and then multiplying by 100. [9] The rental vacancy rate is the proportion of the rental inventory that is vacant "for rent." It is computed by dividing the total number of vacant units "for rent" by the sum of the renter-occupied units, vacant units that are "for rent," and vacant units that have been rented but not yet occupied; and then multiplying by 100. Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2010 Census.

Southern Dayton View

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ii.

Appendix B – Poster

Southern Dayton View Neighborhood Lot Revitalization Miami University Geography Department:Advanced Urban & Regional Planning Spring 2012; Dr. Jacqueline Housel B. Downs & B. Graham Lot Description & Background •Fronts the eastern limit of South Dayton View (Broadway Street) at the intersection with Superior Avenue along the southern side. •Bus route runs along the eastern edge of the property and has a stop roughly 450’ to the north and 600’ to the south.

Population Density on a Census Block basis for the area near South Dayton View. The Red line signifies the border of South Dayton View and the star represents the property chosen. (source: US Census Bureau, 2010)

Introduction to Southern Dayton View (S.D.V.) Southern Dayton View is located in the Dayton neighborhood Northwest Priority Board, who’s slogan is, “Where you live, we live. Northwest Priority Board, We’re working for you!”. High vacancy, tax delinquency and city “take-over property” rates in S.D.V. makes the neighborhood a viable candidate for the transformation of vacant lots. Evident through a diminishing housing market and relatively poor local community, Southern Dayton View demonstrates the need for lot revitalization.

•Located directly across the street from Dayton View Park, a community park in the neighborhood •The lots are the site of a demolished house since they were sold to the city of Dayton for $200.00 on January 25, 1994. The only activity on the lot is the •Lot activities currently include mowing •Adjacent lot is a duplex, sold by Citywide Development Company to The City of Dayton on February 26, 2010 •Western two properties are foreclosed and the structures have been demolished

Suggested Use of the Abandoned Lot With an emphasis on ‘green’ construction, low maintenance services, and improving connectivity in an attractive manor, we propose that the lot be reconstructed to comprised the following:

①Shelter/Facility & Solar Powered, Recycled Bell Tower: A shelter/facility for the would be greatly beneficial to the residents that use public transit to travel to/from work or to/from the park. Incorporating a bell tower at the south end, closest to the intersection, would give the neighborhood a sense of place which can be visible from anywhere in the Dayton downtown area. There would be a small community center, but enough room for a set of bathrooms, to have a group meeting, or to meet for a job interview. Solar panels would be situated on the top of the tower to power the lighting for the area surrounding the bus stop, a fountain, and a community center. ②Central Bus Stop: combining the bus stops at intersection of Superior and Broadway (one roughly 500’ to the north and 800’ to the south)

Photo Descriptions (2/29/12; 3:56pm) Northwestern view of the playground available at the local community park walking up Broadway. (2/29/12; 4:00pm) Western facing view of location option on the corner of Broad and Superior. (2/29/12; 3:58pm) Southern facing view of location option on the corner of Broad and Superior. (2/29/12; 4:55pm) Bus stop and bench along Lexington Ave. near the location option on the corner of Bryn Mawr Dr. and Lexington.

Southern Dayton View

Suggested Use of the Abandoned Lot (Continued)

③Recycled Materials: The tower, community center, parking area, and the plaza would all be constructed of recycled materials from Dayton area demolition sites. ④Sculpture Park/Art Display: sculpture park that exhibits local art from schools, and other community groups, which will be auctioned and replaced with new art to fund projects and park maintenance. ⑤Parking Lot: Permeable pavement ⑥Donation & Recycling Depot: bins to collect for Goodwill, and recycling of paper, glass, plastic, and clothing

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iii.

Appendix C - Works Cited

City of Dayton. (2011). Planning & Community Development. Departments. Retrieved February 22, 2012, from http://www.daytonohio.gov/departments/pcd/Pages/default.aspx City of Dayton. (2011). Priority Board Map. Planning and Community Development. Retrieved February 22, 2012, from http://www.daytonohio.gov/departments/pcd/Planning%20Docs/Priority %20Board%20Map.pdf. Montgomery County Historical Society, (n.d.). University Row and Dayton View Triangle. Dayton History at The Archive Center. Retrieved February 20, 2012, from http://www.daytonhistory.org/archives/who_univrow.htm. Ohio Historical Society. (1999).1913 Ohio Statewide Flood. Ohio History Central. Retrieved February 20, 2012, from http://www.ohiohistorycentral.org/entry.php?rec=497. Spangler. (1999). Priority Board Map. Home Site Realtors. Retrieved February 22, 2012, from http://www.dayton-realestate.com/Priority%20Board%20Map.html Tobin. (2012). Home. A Chocolate Celebration. Retrieved February 23, 2012, from http://www.achocolatecelebration.com/ Tributary. (2012). In Merriam-Webster.com. Retrieved February 20, 2012, from http://dictionary.webster.us/tributary (2010). Southern Dayton View Shopping, Coupons, and Restaurants in Dayton. Merchant Circle. Retrieved February 23, 2012, from http://www.merchantcircle.com/directory/OHDayton/neighborhood/Southern-Dayton- View. (2012). Community. Rally's Hamburgers. Retrieved on February 23, 2012, from http://rallyburger.com/community.php (2006). Church's Chicken. Franchise-Hit. Retrieved February 23, 2012, from http://www.franchise-hit.com/franchisors-business-guide/ChurchsChicken-1555.htm Howard Burba, THE STORY OF “DAYTON VIEW�, Dayton Daily News, October 22, 1933 EPA, Review of Two Significant Removal Actions in Region 5, Audit Report Number E1SHD9-05-0019-9100493, September 29, 1989(Dayton Tire site) http://nepis.epa.gov/Adobe/PDF/900H0U00.PDF Southern Dayton View

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CASE D3:Greening Dayton's Vacant Lots--Chapter 3  

Chapter 3 is about Southern Dayton View Neighborhood (East).

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