Page 1

&c. issue 1

BUCKNELL’S MAGAZINE FOR ARTS, CULTURE, & EVERYTHING ELSE


&c. issue 1

PUBLISHED THE SEVENTH OF APRIL IN TWO THOUSAND SIXTEEEN


&c. issue 1

PUBLISHED THE SEVENTH OF APRIL IN TWO THOUSAND SIXTEEEN


OPENINGS

5

Letter from the Editors

7 Past Personas 8 Table for One CULTURE GUIDE

10 Fashion: Not Your Grandma’s Wardrobe

11 Film: La Notte 12 Artist: Ai Weiwei: Art & Activism

13 Playlist: The Story in the Name

14 Food: Crème Brûlée 15 Literature: Characters Who Love Too Much

16 Health: Why

Mindfulness is Better Than Kale

ARTICLES

17 Local Artist

Highlight: Stephen Althouse

19 Introspection,

Interpersonality, & Innovation

21 Q & A 23 How to Live & Laugh Like a Pro FEATURES

27 A Factory Setting 33 Portraits without Face

41 Women, Politics, and What’s Up

45 A New Stage 49 Peripheral 55 A Renaissance Man 59 On The Road CLOSING

65 Staff List 66 Colophon 67 Overheard


the realization that each random passerby is living a life as vivid and complex as your own


It’s happening. Or it happened, we guess. What you are holding in your hands is the manifestation of anything but a conventional amalgamation of stories, places, and coincidences. Pulling together a magazine from scratch is no small feat--we know. Even before we began work, we understood what we were getting ourselves into, although maybe not to the full extent. The idea for Et Cetera began to bud during our first semester freshman year in 2013. We were fresh out of high school, essentially friendless in college, and had both managed to force our way into the same 200-level graphic design course without having taken any of the pre-requisites. We spent the first half of the semester without exchanging a word, sitting in opposite corners of the room and remaining at our desks, eyes glued to our respective InDesign screens, long after class ended. It wasn’t until a fateful, notably cold October night, during which we were both in the Art Building, making a delirious attempt to finish and print our assignments, that we began to talk. And in the most cliche way possible, “the rest is history.” In the following couple of years, ideas of a magazine frequently cropped up in conversation. We collected inspiration anywhere we could find, rose in the leadership ranks on other on-campus publications, and both ended up studying graphic design while abroad in Copenhagen during the Fall 2015 semester.


The timing was perfect – where better to start a magazine than a place that is synonymous with functionality and design? We had hyggeligt kaffebars, copious design museums, and endless grød all at our disposal. The international origins of it all, however, pervaded our newfound home of Denmark. In Amsterdam, we spent countless hours hopping from magazine shop to magazine shop, thumbing through what stood out to us and making our way back to Denmark with an extra 25-pounds of magazine-induced paperweight. Our Dutch escapades almost went as far as to inspire the name of our magazine, although we scrapped the title “Whim”--inspired primarily by Dutch designer Wim Crouwel--just before settling in with the now established “Et Cetera.” In Lithuania, we wandered around the city of Kaunas, throwing potential article topic ideas back and forth, discussing who our ideal staff would be composed of, beginning to create a to-do list of action items in order to attain the Arts and Creativity & BIG Grants, and screaming at the TV during a FIBA quarter-final game with a hoard of locals. It’s amazing how much you can get done in a 30-hour trip to Lithuania. We quickly settled back into cafe stints between intermittent Scandinavian rain, however, upon our return. By the time we were notified that we had received our first grant, we were packing our bags, readying ourselves for departure from our Danish homes. The following weeks saw us writing our organization’s constitution in our cozy hostel room in the Swiss Alps, sending out staff applications from our cramped room in Reykjavik, Iceland after yet another failed night of chasing the Northern Lights, and beginning to piece together article ladders and a final staff list from our homes in

Los Angeles, California and Berkeley Heights, New Jersey respectively. Today, half of our dynamic duo pairing is continuing the streak of wanderlust, contributing layouts and locking down a style guide from deep within the Australian jungle. What can we say-we’ve pulled inspiration from nearly every corner of the world, and the publication you’re holding is a culmination of it all. But Et Cetera’s history at Bucknell goes beyond the beginning of our friendship. When we returned to campus in January this year, we found out about Et Cetera’s predecessor: an earlier Et Cetera magazine founded by Philip Roth ‘54. Roth, now a prominent author, modeled Et Cetera after The New Yorker, and the publication functioned as a fusion of both a literature and satire magazine. Et Cetera’s legacy on campus was shortlived but impactful, pushing boundaries and presenting uncensored perspectives of the University and the social life surrounding it. Since our discovery of the original Et Cetera, unfathomable coincidences have risen. Our logo, having undergone a rigorous set of drafts, critiques, and revisions, was designed before we found the cover of the original Et Cetera publication. The moment we found the old logo, however, the similarities were flooring; the two logos appear to be a historic and contemporary take on the same contour. There’s an undeniable connection between these two magazines, although the original has never served as a direct influence on the issue that you’re holding. This inexplicable intertwining ties almost too perfectly into issue one’s theme: sonder. Sonder will only appear in one dictionary: The Dictionary of Obscure Sorrows, a lexicon of words created by John Koening, a graphic designer and filmmaker. Koening defines the word

as “the realization that each random passerby is living a life as vivid and complex as your own.” To put this into context, we can apply a Truman Showesque line of thought: everyone sees their lives as a film, starring him or herself. There’s a cast of consistent supporting actors--family and friends. Other characters walk in and out, some never to be seen again, some to return later on. Then there are the extras, individuals who are in the background of your life but are essentially faceless and nameless. Sonder is the moment of realization that your extras, the menial, irrelevant entities in your peripheral, are the stars of their own movie. In their narrative, you are no longer the lead, but just an extra, perhaps walking by, or sipping coffee in the background of a bustling cafe at a pivotal moment in their life. Sonder has a different meaning for everyone – in German, it means “special”; in French, “to probe.” Issue one reflects the results of these differences – a culture guide that examines the characters you might meet during a moment of sonder, a photo essay that highlights the people on the outskirts of your vision, a human interest story that gives you a glimpse of the life of a freshman who our mouse landed on when scrolling through Facebook. We’ve found our moment of sonder. Neither of us have met Philip Roth or any of his Et Cetera cohorts, or even held a copy of the magazine in our hands. But both of us can confirm that there’s a strange feeling of understanding that lingers when we think about the former Et Cetera magazine – both a realization that others have ventured down this path and an appreciation for the intricacies involved in getting a new publication off the ground. We hope you read this and find your moment of sonder.


On Campus

8

One such carving stands out: “Christopher Mathewson,” engraved on a well-polished white headstone. Behind it stands a small American flag.

PAST PERSONAS

WORDS Delaney Worth PHOTO Kayla Javaheri

ewisburg was founded in 1785, and for sixty-three years thereafter her dead were buried in graveyards on Market, Third, and Fifth streets.” There is no sign of those graves now. Although I hardly venture down Fifth Street, Market has been filled in with quaint shops and old-fashioned streetlights, while Third is the essence of a picturesque small town street, with tall stately homes and elegant churches. History reads that the bodies were transferred to the new cemetery just at the edge of campus. I pass it everyday, as do many students, on the way from one hectic commitment to another. It’s strange that no sign of the old cemeteries exist, and I can’t help but wonder about the task of relocating sixty-three years worth of lost lives from one plot to the next. My imagination drifts to a macabre picture of graveyards beneath streets, but, wandering through the cemetery as it stands, the crumbling headstones deem themselves too old for that superstition. Cemeteries are strangely nostalgic. Lewisburg’s is particularly beautiful, and the knowledge that many of these people are connected to the University somehow, perhaps have walked down the same streets, leaves me carefully studying each name and date carved into the rows of headstones.

TABLE FOR ONE

The year is 1899. Out on the fields of central Pennsylvania, a football soars through the air in a graceful arc, hitting the grass with a soft thud. A young man jogs after it. He’s tall and well-proportioned, with the easy stride and focused, relaxed gaze of an athlete with something to prove. It’s still chilly out this early in the morning, not quite on the warmer end of spring, though baseball season has been in full throttle for a while now. A couple other early risers watch him as they walk by, shaking their heads and smiling. Leave it to Christy Mathewson to practice his dropkick long after football season is over. Mathewson waves, unconcerned. Rumor has it he might make the 1900 All-American football team, but, if he doesn’t, he wants to be sure he’ll make it the next year. Bucknell has had a huge impact on him. When he received the notice of his scholarship two years before, he almost couldn’t imagine leaving Factoryville— his brother, his parents. But college life embraced him. He had played a second outstanding football season, and people outside of the baseball minor league were beginning to notice his pitching talents. He had also picked up basketball, and checkers to relieve some scholarly stress. He loved literature, like some of his fraternity brothers, but had taken to forestry lately. He knew he was just a sophomore, but if professional athletics didn’t work out, he could see himself remaining in Pennsylvania—maybe even Lewisburg—and making a profit in forest management. But this summer he would be pitching for the Virginia League, which would hopefully turn out better than his time with the Taunton Baseball team up in the New England League the year before. Jane was always telling him to pursue his dreams. He would marry Jane, he decided, should his athletic career take off. The line he was kicking from came into view again, a chalky white stripe across the damp grass. He bent down and held the rough football by the tip of his finger then swung his leg in a powerful kick, watching the ball soar in yet another arc as he jogged after it.

WORDS Katie Sidlowski PHOTO Sean Gilchrist

ho are you waiting for?” “Come sit with us!” “You okay?” These were the reactions friends had when they saw me sitting alone in The Bison during lunchtime, arguably the busiest time of the day. “Totally fine,” I replied. “Not waiting for anyone! Just enjoying my own company.” And I was. As friends and classmates filtered in and out around me, I was sitting still, observing the dynamic I usually take part in. Attending college is a social experience. We tend to structure our days around windows of time: time to study, time to eat, time to sleep. In turn, we structure our time around our friends, our professors, and the events we’d like to attend. We are constantly going. I wanted to know what would happen if I stopped going, if I disengaged from my calendar and the structure it provides, if only for a moment. So, I sat in The Bison by myself for two hours. Being alone on this campus isn’t easy. In fact, it’s incredibly difficult to be alone in a space where everyone comes together, like The Bison, a space that is meant for conversation. I felt uncomfortable almost immediately. I was convinced people were looking and judging me for taking up a four top table when I was clearly only one person. They were probably secretly making fun of my spinach wrap. I fought

the urge to open my laptop and hide behind the relative security of a screen. That way, I would appear busy to others rather than alone. It took me a moment to remember that I wasn’t being shunned, that my friends hadn’t abandoned me on an island in the middle of The Bison, and that I was creating anxiety that wasn’t really there. No one was looking at me, they were too busy enjoying their own spinach wraps.

It was becoming apparent that I wasn’t very good at being alone. I had been sitting by myself for an hour and had managed to create both social anxiety and academic pressure. This was not the distance I had been craving. There is inherent pressure in our society to socialize, something I only realized when I stepped away from the system. This pressure is driven in part by

WE ARE CONSTANTLY GOING. I WANTED TO KNOW WHAT WOULD HAPPEN IF I STOPPED GOING, IF I DISENGAGED FROM MY CALENDAR AND THE STRUCTURE IT PROVIDES, IF ONLY FOR A MOMENT.

Once I sat down, it was as if I suddenly had a million things to do. I was thinking about emails, office hours, French homework that was due the next night. I began to plan out the rest of my day. I could block out two hours for International Relations readings, take a half an hour to catch up on sorority emails, and then have time to grab food with friends before going to work in the Writing Center. Once I had taken care of my immediate schedule, I looked to the rest of the week. Then, I mentally counted the days until Spring break. In the absence of structure, I was creating one. I thought about the courses I needed for my major. Then, I thought about whether or not my major was right for the field I want to enter. One thought lead to another before I could stop it.

the negative stigma attached to being alone. “Where are your friends?” “Don’t you have any?” are the automatic implications. On the contrary, being alone doesn’t mean that I am an unsuccessful human. It means that I’m exhausted of buying into a society where I am conditioned to worry about the perceptions of others, a society where I am too busy worrying about my grades, my resume, and my eventual job to step back and reflect upon the experience of it all. Yes, I’m sitting alone, but only because I want to admire the beauty of the mundane interactions that take place in plain sight, everyday.


On Campus

8

One such carving stands out: “Christopher Mathewson,” engraved on a well-polished white headstone. Behind it stands a small American flag.

PAST PERSONAS

WORDS Delaney Worth PHOTO Kayla Javaheri

ewisburg was founded in 1785, and for sixty-three years thereafter her dead were buried in graveyards on Market, Third, and Fifth streets.” There is no sign of those graves now. Although I hardly venture down Fifth Street, Market has been filled in with quaint shops and old-fashioned streetlights, while Third is the essence of a picturesque small town street, with tall stately homes and elegant churches. History reads that the bodies were transferred to the new cemetery just at the edge of campus. I pass it everyday, as do many students, on the way from one hectic commitment to another. It’s strange that no sign of the old cemeteries exist, and I can’t help but wonder about the task of relocating sixty-three years worth of lost lives from one plot to the next. My imagination drifts to a macabre picture of graveyards beneath streets, but, wandering through the cemetery as it stands, the crumbling headstones deem themselves too old for that superstition. Cemeteries are strangely nostalgic. Lewisburg’s is particularly beautiful, and the knowledge that many of these people are connected to the University somehow, perhaps have walked down the same streets, leaves me carefully studying each name and date carved into the rows of headstones.

TABLE FOR ONE

The year is 1899. Out on the fields of central Pennsylvania, a football soars through the air in a graceful arc, hitting the grass with a soft thud. A young man jogs after it. He’s tall and well-proportioned, with the easy stride and focused, relaxed gaze of an athlete with something to prove. It’s still chilly out this early in the morning, not quite on the warmer end of spring, though baseball season has been in full throttle for a while now. A couple other early risers watch him as they walk by, shaking their heads and smiling. Leave it to Christy Mathewson to practice his dropkick long after football season is over. Mathewson waves, unconcerned. Rumor has it he might make the 1900 All-American football team, but, if he doesn’t, he wants to be sure he’ll make it the next year. Bucknell has had a huge impact on him. When he received the notice of his scholarship two years before, he almost couldn’t imagine leaving Factoryville— his brother, his parents. But college life embraced him. He had played a second outstanding football season, and people outside of the baseball minor league were beginning to notice his pitching talents. He had also picked up basketball, and checkers to relieve some scholarly stress. He loved literature, like some of his fraternity brothers, but had taken to forestry lately. He knew he was just a sophomore, but if professional athletics didn’t work out, he could see himself remaining in Pennsylvania—maybe even Lewisburg—and making a profit in forest management. But this summer he would be pitching for the Virginia League, which would hopefully turn out better than his time with the Taunton Baseball team up in the New England League the year before. Jane was always telling him to pursue his dreams. He would marry Jane, he decided, should his athletic career take off. The line he was kicking from came into view again, a chalky white stripe across the damp grass. He bent down and held the rough football by the tip of his finger then swung his leg in a powerful kick, watching the ball soar in yet another arc as he jogged after it.

WORDS Katie Sidlowski PHOTO Sean Gilchrist

ho are you waiting for?” “Come sit with us!” “You okay?” These were the reactions friends had when they saw me sitting alone in The Bison during lunchtime, arguably the busiest time of the day. “Totally fine,” I replied. “Not waiting for anyone! Just enjoying my own company.” And I was. As friends and classmates filtered in and out around me, I was sitting still, observing the dynamic I usually take part in. Attending college is a social experience. We tend to structure our days around windows of time: time to study, time to eat, time to sleep. In turn, we structure our time around our friends, our professors, and the events we’d like to attend. We are constantly going. I wanted to know what would happen if I stopped going, if I disengaged from my calendar and the structure it provides, if only for a moment. So, I sat in The Bison by myself for two hours. Being alone on this campus isn’t easy. In fact, it’s incredibly difficult to be alone in a space where everyone comes together, like The Bison, a space that is meant for conversation. I felt uncomfortable almost immediately. I was convinced people were looking and judging me for taking up a four top table when I was clearly only one person. They were probably secretly making fun of my spinach wrap. I fought

the urge to open my laptop and hide behind the relative security of a screen. That way, I would appear busy to others rather than alone. It took me a moment to remember that I wasn’t being shunned, that my friends hadn’t abandoned me on an island in the middle of The Bison, and that I was creating anxiety that wasn’t really there. No one was looking at me, they were too busy enjoying their own spinach wraps.

It was becoming apparent that I wasn’t very good at being alone. I had been sitting by myself for an hour and had managed to create both social anxiety and academic pressure. This was not the distance I had been craving. There is inherent pressure in our society to socialize, something I only realized when I stepped away from the system. This pressure is driven in part by

WE ARE CONSTANTLY GOING. I WANTED TO KNOW WHAT WOULD HAPPEN IF I STOPPED GOING, IF I DISENGAGED FROM MY CALENDAR AND THE STRUCTURE IT PROVIDES, IF ONLY FOR A MOMENT.

Once I sat down, it was as if I suddenly had a million things to do. I was thinking about emails, office hours, French homework that was due the next night. I began to plan out the rest of my day. I could block out two hours for International Relations readings, take a half an hour to catch up on sorority emails, and then have time to grab food with friends before going to work in the Writing Center. Once I had taken care of my immediate schedule, I looked to the rest of the week. Then, I mentally counted the days until Spring break. In the absence of structure, I was creating one. I thought about the courses I needed for my major. Then, I thought about whether or not my major was right for the field I want to enter. One thought lead to another before I could stop it.

the negative stigma attached to being alone. “Where are your friends?” “Don’t you have any?” are the automatic implications. On the contrary, being alone doesn’t mean that I am an unsuccessful human. It means that I’m exhausted of buying into a society where I am conditioned to worry about the perceptions of others, a society where I am too busy worrying about my grades, my resume, and my eventual job to step back and reflect upon the experience of it all. Yes, I’m sitting alone, but only because I want to admire the beauty of the mundane interactions that take place in plain sight, everyday.


Culture Guide: Fashion

10

Not Your Grandma’s Wardrobe WORDS Joanna Harrold PHOTO Kempner NYC nless your grandmother is Nan Kempner that is. Kempner, dubbed the only chic woman in America by Diana Vreeland, was a New York City philanthropist and socialite, as well as being one of the first street style icons of the 1970s, ‘80s, and ‘90s. One of Yves Saint Laurent’s muses and best customers, Kempner had a wardrobe, and Park Avenue apartment, worthy of a 2006 display in the Metropolitan Museum of Art, titled: “Nan Kempner: American Chic”.

THEME: CHARACTER In the movie of our lives, people play an important role. They walk in and out. Some are the supporting actors, providing an integral part of our story. Others show up with a meaningful line that stays with us forever before fading away themselves. Many pass by quickly, without a second glance. These characters stay with us, permeating beyond our thoughts and entering popular culture via books, music, fashion, etc.

Kempner was the it-girl of her generation, traveling from Paris to Vail to London for parties, couture shows, and any other occasion where she could get dressed up. She managed to be an ever-gracious hostess at dinner parties while never missing a night out at Studio 54. Never one to shy away from the camera, Kempner used her sense of style to lead an entire generation of women from dresses and hosiery to pantsuits, crop tops, or no pants at all. When denied entry to a restaurant due to her pantsuit, Kempner simply removed her pants and walked in wearing only her tunic. Acts like this were commonplace for the socialite as she inspired other women to break the social rules of their generation and join her quasi-feminist revolution. This appreciation for pushing boundaries runs deep in the Kempner family. In 2014, eight years after Kempner’s death, two of her grandchildren, Meggie and Chris Kempner, launched their own collection, immortalizing their grandmother’s revolutionary style and aptly naming it Kempner. Meggie, who started out in public relations at Full Picture before moving into a styling position at Ralph Lauren, is the creative force behind the line. Chris, her brother, graduated from Yale and

worked in finance for a few years at some of the top firms, before graduating from Harvard with his M.B.A. Together, the duo are a perfect mesh of creative and analytical talent. Casting aside their grandmother’s many ball gowns and avant-garde pieces, the two have focused more on Kempner’s love for combining separates to make a unique and unexpected sartorial combiSHE INSPIRED OTHER WOMEN nations for today’s metropolitan TO BREAK THE SOCIAL RULES OF 20’s-something.

THEIR GENERATION AND JOIN HER REVOLUTION.

The result is a vibe that’s sexy QUASI-FEMINIST and laid-back, with a touch of menswear woven throughout. From slim textured pantsuits paired with longline bralettes to red-hot 70’s inspired jumpsuits, lace-trimmed culottes, and metallic leather jackets, the pieces in the Spring 2016 collection are shockingly easy to mix and match, while also embodying an effortless, cool-girl attitude. The line speaks to confident and powerful women who like to have fun with their wardrobes and aren’t afraid of a little experimentation – just like Nan Kempner herself.


Culture Guide: Fashion

10

Not Your Grandma’s Wardrobe WORDS Joanna Harrold PHOTO Kempner NYC nless your grandmother is Nan Kempner that is. Kempner, dubbed the only chic woman in America by Diana Vreeland, was a New York City philanthropist and socialite, as well as being one of the first street style icons of the 1970s, ‘80s, and ‘90s. One of Yves Saint Laurent’s muses and best customers, Kempner had a wardrobe, and Park Avenue apartment, worthy of a 2006 display in the Metropolitan Museum of Art, titled: “Nan Kempner: American Chic”.

THEME: CHARACTER In the movie of our lives, people play an important role. They walk in and out. Some are the supporting actors, providing an integral part of our story. Others show up with a meaningful line that stays with us forever before fading away themselves. Many pass by quickly, without a second glance. These characters stay with us, permeating beyond our thoughts and entering popular culture via books, music, fashion, etc.

Kempner was the it-girl of her generation, traveling from Paris to Vail to London for parties, couture shows, and any other occasion where she could get dressed up. She managed to be an ever-gracious hostess at dinner parties while never missing a night out at Studio 54. Never one to shy away from the camera, Kempner used her sense of style to lead an entire generation of women from dresses and hosiery to pantsuits, crop tops, or no pants at all. When denied entry to a restaurant due to her pantsuit, Kempner simply removed her pants and walked in wearing only her tunic. Acts like this were commonplace for the socialite as she inspired other women to break the social rules of their generation and join her quasi-feminist revolution. This appreciation for pushing boundaries runs deep in the Kempner family. In 2014, eight years after Kempner’s death, two of her grandchildren, Meggie and Chris Kempner, launched their own collection, immortalizing their grandmother’s revolutionary style and aptly naming it Kempner. Meggie, who started out in public relations at Full Picture before moving into a styling position at Ralph Lauren, is the creative force behind the line. Chris, her brother, graduated from Yale and

worked in finance for a few years at some of the top firms, before graduating from Harvard with his M.B.A. Together, the duo are a perfect mesh of creative and analytical talent. Casting aside their grandmother’s many ball gowns and avant-garde pieces, the two have focused more on Kempner’s love for combining separates to make a unique and unexpected sartorial combiSHE INSPIRED OTHER WOMEN nations for today’s metropolitan TO BREAK THE SOCIAL RULES OF 20’s-something.

THEIR GENERATION AND JOIN HER REVOLUTION.

The result is a vibe that’s sexy QUASI-FEMINIST and laid-back, with a touch of menswear woven throughout. From slim textured pantsuits paired with longline bralettes to red-hot 70’s inspired jumpsuits, lace-trimmed culottes, and metallic leather jackets, the pieces in the Spring 2016 collection are shockingly easy to mix and match, while also embodying an effortless, cool-girl attitude. The line speaks to confident and powerful women who like to have fun with their wardrobes and aren’t afraid of a little experimentation – just like Nan Kempner herself.


11

Culture Guide: Film

Culture Guide: Artist

12

La Notte WORDS Dante Fresse ILLUSTRATION Kelsey O’Donnell s a tour de force of postmodern cinema, Michelangelo Antonioni’s La Notte presents the perverted vision of a loveless romance, featuring the union of a libertine and a fantasist. Naturalism and Italian neorealism combine in a symphony where setting and psychology feed off one another within a world of “actuality,” where the idealist grows weary from its miseries. The psychological and romantic distance of the film’s central characters is captured via camera movement, set design, and staging. Our protagonist, Lidia (Jeanne Moreau), remains aloof from her contemporaries as the camera pans with her point of view, which often separates her husband, Giovanni (Marcello Mastroianni), from the frame, as we are left with her alone and muted. We catch her wistfully gazing out of hospital windows and escaping off into solitude, walking aimlessly for hours across her former beloved city. Lidia is associated with the natural world, distancing herself from the urban realm by dressing in floral pattern skirts and finding solace in foliage and forest. After escaping from one of her husband’s book signings, Lidia ventures off to the open country, mingling with commoners and oak trees – her seraphim presence radiating goodness onto the poor and restless living on the outskirts of the city. She hides away in fantasy, returning to a small green pasture from her days of romance, until Giovanni’s spousal search leads him back to this spot. The gated Eden is completely devoid of modern influence, barren of buildings and industry – with shock, even Giovanni remarks, “How strange it hasn’t changed at all.” With a sad smile, his wingless sprite responds, “It will… very soon.” Lidia becomes the goddess Ceres, associated with growth and the natural, yet even her pasture of paradise stands as a marginalized point of refuge under the crushing spread of the “industrial wave.” She lives in a “Babylon,” entertaining encounters with Giovanni at sensual social gatherings and licentious dance clubs. The poor soul

faces the insurmountable wrath of modern life, the unfortunate fate of Romanticism’s bastard offspring.

subtle line between the intervention of fate and the exercise of free will, all of which these individuals fail in the face of petty temptations. The characters’ relatable traits are belittled by the deceit and hedonism that result from societal influence.

The film begins, and ends, in the clouds, as our introductory shot captures a long take, scaling down the outer wall of a skyscraper to the street level of industrialized Milan. The seemingly isolated recount of this Through the reflections of windowpanes, couple’s wretched relationship provides a we cast an omnipotent gaze over post- perspective much larger in theoretical scope war Italy. The metropolis teems with the than literal presentation. La Notte captures toils of modern industry while remaining the turn of an epoch, the final stronghold of absent of human life. From the cityscape, idealism and romance against the cold wave we descend to a room of ruins – the hospice of psychosis associated with the modern bed of a dying idealist and the dilapidated age. In classic Italian neorealist fashion, remains of a married couple, Giovanni and Antonioni takes the story of the everyday Lidia. Antonioni’s frame encloses these human affair and creates a universal three damned souls in a “love triangle” representation of emotional instability, of impossibility, showing the affections moral decline, and societal decadence within between a sickly Tomaso and a caged Lidia, prohibited by her LA NOTTE CAPTURES THE TURN marital bonds, his decay, and AN EPOCH—THE FINAL tenacious time. These romantics OF are weakened birds, crippled by STRONGHOLD OF IDEALISM AND the cruelties of Fate and Nature, as ROMANCE AGAINST THE COLD the era of the motorized “machine” has overtaken the place of the WAVE OF PSYCHOSIS ASSOCIATED human sentimentalist. Giovanni WITH THE MODERN AGE. encapsulates the modern man: pragmatic, successful, egotistic, vain, and the post-World War II era. As a canon of decadent. Opulence, lust, and fame have Golden Age Italian cinema, this film uses worked as the Furies, rebirthing Molina’s heavily stylized cinematographic framing Don Juan, an apathetic “humanoid machine” and structure for the purpose of developing a driven by production and pleasure. The film’s poetic text, unique in composition. The sets set seems to completely overwhelm Lidia’s speak like those of Zola, while the characters delicate frame with modern skyscrapers are portrayed with the complexity of a and large, lavish parties dominating her Dickens. From the realms of reality emerges surroundings and trapping the beautiful a complex study of human nature and decay canary. As a famous novelist who seems to within the lives of two lost souls seeking selfwrite for the sake of retaining infamy and discovery in a world of hedonist temptation prosperity, Giovanni thrives in the “era of and self-deprecation. This task, which many materialist” while Tomaso, a passionate of our contemporaries struggle with in the author himself, never quite grasps the reins post-modern age, questions the nature of of success. These poor devils are but the the metropolitan future. Antonioni leaves sad physical manifestations of Antonioni’s us with a final shot of the grayed skyline as vision regarding the suppression of idealist Giovanni attempts to project his loveless Romanticism and the overwhelmingly libido drive onto Lidia; meanwhile, the masculine force of industrialist Modernity crushed sprite remains compressed under the in “antebellum” Italy. Antonioni places his pressure of her spouse and the environment creations in testing situations, drawing a that has enveloped her very soul.

Ai Weiwei: Art & Activism WORDS & PHOTO KELSEY O’DONNELL

erusing the exhibits of the National Gallery of Victoria while on Spring Break in Melbourne, Australia, I scale the seemingly boundless rooms. Eventually, I find myself stalling in front of a massive, three-dimensional mural entirely in gray scale. As I approach the piece, the strokes of the sub-components, small black and white Lego bricks pieced together, become more and more clear. This sense of whimsy is nothing novel when it comes to Chinese contemporary artist Ai Weiwei’s breadth of work, which boasts the likes of a large-scale installation of 1500 interlocking silver bicycles and a carpet of intricately constructed porcelain flowers. There is an undeniably playful character derived from the material Ai chooses and the compositions he creates. Yet when paired with context, his work transforms from an offbeat sensory experience to a masterpiece of social activism. Growing up in a labor-camp situated at the edge of the Gobi Desert during China’s Cultural Revolution has

marked his work with a distinct anti-authority attitude. Perhaps the best representation of this is his series “Study of Perspective” – a group of photographs taken between the years 1995 and 2011 from locations across the globe. The Eiffel Tower, Sydney Opera House, White House, and other sites symbolic of cultural and state power compose the background of different shots, each with Ai’s middle finger raised in the foreground. The finger, simultaneously rejecting the notion of power held by cultural and political authorities, provides an illusion back to an image of Tiananmen Square in 1989 in which a lone demonstrator obstructs a military tank’s path. A several month stint in jail in 2011 did little to waiver Ai’s activism. Today, the artist’s Twitter is strewn with articles and photos of his most recent cause of choice – the refugee crisis. For much of his past work, social media has served as a platform for his protests. Beginning in

late November 2013, after the Chinese government confiscated his passport, Ai tweeted a new photo each day of a bicycle outside his studio, its basket filled with fresh flowers. The gesture was both elegant and mournful, and lasted almost two years until Ai’s passport was returned in Summer 2015. His social media profiles reflect the nature of his work – activist in nature with a flair for the mischievous. This fusion of styles is perhaps best embodied by a sound bite from one of Ai’s earlier interviews: “There are no outdoor sports as graceful as throwing stones at a dictatorship.” The accessibility of Ai’s art helps to bring social justice issues from the fringes to the forefront. His work is both performance and protest, and his often far-fetched ideas amplify the visual magnitude of his work, eliciting a visceral response from all who see it. His latest installation? A piece composed of 14,000 life vests collected from refugees wrapped around the five columns of the Berlin Concert Hall, yet another testament to his voice and style.


11

Culture Guide: Film

Culture Guide: Artist

12

La Notte WORDS Dante Fresse ILLUSTRATION Kelsey O’Donnell s a tour de force of postmodern cinema, Michelangelo Antonioni’s La Notte presents the perverted vision of a loveless romance, featuring the union of a libertine and a fantasist. Naturalism and Italian neorealism combine in a symphony where setting and psychology feed off one another within a world of “actuality,” where the idealist grows weary from its miseries. The psychological and romantic distance of the film’s central characters is captured via camera movement, set design, and staging. Our protagonist, Lidia (Jeanne Moreau), remains aloof from her contemporaries as the camera pans with her point of view, which often separates her husband, Giovanni (Marcello Mastroianni), from the frame, as we are left with her alone and muted. We catch her wistfully gazing out of hospital windows and escaping off into solitude, walking aimlessly for hours across her former beloved city. Lidia is associated with the natural world, distancing herself from the urban realm by dressing in floral pattern skirts and finding solace in foliage and forest. After escaping from one of her husband’s book signings, Lidia ventures off to the open country, mingling with commoners and oak trees – her seraphim presence radiating goodness onto the poor and restless living on the outskirts of the city. She hides away in fantasy, returning to a small green pasture from her days of romance, until Giovanni’s spousal search leads him back to this spot. The gated Eden is completely devoid of modern influence, barren of buildings and industry – with shock, even Giovanni remarks, “How strange it hasn’t changed at all.” With a sad smile, his wingless sprite responds, “It will… very soon.” Lidia becomes the goddess Ceres, associated with growth and the natural, yet even her pasture of paradise stands as a marginalized point of refuge under the crushing spread of the “industrial wave.” She lives in a “Babylon,” entertaining encounters with Giovanni at sensual social gatherings and licentious dance clubs. The poor soul

faces the insurmountable wrath of modern life, the unfortunate fate of Romanticism’s bastard offspring.

subtle line between the intervention of fate and the exercise of free will, all of which these individuals fail in the face of petty temptations. The characters’ relatable traits are belittled by the deceit and hedonism that result from societal influence.

The film begins, and ends, in the clouds, as our introductory shot captures a long take, scaling down the outer wall of a skyscraper to the street level of industrialized Milan. The seemingly isolated recount of this Through the reflections of windowpanes, couple’s wretched relationship provides a we cast an omnipotent gaze over post- perspective much larger in theoretical scope war Italy. The metropolis teems with the than literal presentation. La Notte captures toils of modern industry while remaining the turn of an epoch, the final stronghold of absent of human life. From the cityscape, idealism and romance against the cold wave we descend to a room of ruins – the hospice of psychosis associated with the modern bed of a dying idealist and the dilapidated age. In classic Italian neorealist fashion, remains of a married couple, Giovanni and Antonioni takes the story of the everyday Lidia. Antonioni’s frame encloses these human affair and creates a universal three damned souls in a “love triangle” representation of emotional instability, of impossibility, showing the affections moral decline, and societal decadence within between a sickly Tomaso and a caged Lidia, prohibited by her LA NOTTE CAPTURES THE TURN marital bonds, his decay, and AN EPOCH—THE FINAL tenacious time. These romantics OF are weakened birds, crippled by STRONGHOLD OF IDEALISM AND the cruelties of Fate and Nature, as ROMANCE AGAINST THE COLD the era of the motorized “machine” has overtaken the place of the WAVE OF PSYCHOSIS ASSOCIATED human sentimentalist. Giovanni WITH THE MODERN AGE. encapsulates the modern man: pragmatic, successful, egotistic, vain, and the post-World War II era. As a canon of decadent. Opulence, lust, and fame have Golden Age Italian cinema, this film uses worked as the Furies, rebirthing Molina’s heavily stylized cinematographic framing Don Juan, an apathetic “humanoid machine” and structure for the purpose of developing a driven by production and pleasure. The film’s poetic text, unique in composition. The sets set seems to completely overwhelm Lidia’s speak like those of Zola, while the characters delicate frame with modern skyscrapers are portrayed with the complexity of a and large, lavish parties dominating her Dickens. From the realms of reality emerges surroundings and trapping the beautiful a complex study of human nature and decay canary. As a famous novelist who seems to within the lives of two lost souls seeking selfwrite for the sake of retaining infamy and discovery in a world of hedonist temptation prosperity, Giovanni thrives in the “era of and self-deprecation. This task, which many materialist” while Tomaso, a passionate of our contemporaries struggle with in the author himself, never quite grasps the reins post-modern age, questions the nature of of success. These poor devils are but the the metropolitan future. Antonioni leaves sad physical manifestations of Antonioni’s us with a final shot of the grayed skyline as vision regarding the suppression of idealist Giovanni attempts to project his loveless Romanticism and the overwhelmingly libido drive onto Lidia; meanwhile, the masculine force of industrialist Modernity crushed sprite remains compressed under the in “antebellum” Italy. Antonioni places his pressure of her spouse and the environment creations in testing situations, drawing a that has enveloped her very soul.

Ai Weiwei: Art & Activism WORDS & PHOTO KELSEY O’DONNELL

erusing the exhibits of the National Gallery of Victoria while on Spring Break in Melbourne, Australia, I scale the seemingly boundless rooms. Eventually, I find myself stalling in front of a massive, three-dimensional mural entirely in gray scale. As I approach the piece, the strokes of the sub-components, small black and white Lego bricks pieced together, become more and more clear. This sense of whimsy is nothing novel when it comes to Chinese contemporary artist Ai Weiwei’s breadth of work, which boasts the likes of a large-scale installation of 1500 interlocking silver bicycles and a carpet of intricately constructed porcelain flowers. There is an undeniably playful character derived from the material Ai chooses and the compositions he creates. Yet when paired with context, his work transforms from an offbeat sensory experience to a masterpiece of social activism. Growing up in a labor-camp situated at the edge of the Gobi Desert during China’s Cultural Revolution has

marked his work with a distinct anti-authority attitude. Perhaps the best representation of this is his series “Study of Perspective” – a group of photographs taken between the years 1995 and 2011 from locations across the globe. The Eiffel Tower, Sydney Opera House, White House, and other sites symbolic of cultural and state power compose the background of different shots, each with Ai’s middle finger raised in the foreground. The finger, simultaneously rejecting the notion of power held by cultural and political authorities, provides an illusion back to an image of Tiananmen Square in 1989 in which a lone demonstrator obstructs a military tank’s path. A several month stint in jail in 2011 did little to waiver Ai’s activism. Today, the artist’s Twitter is strewn with articles and photos of his most recent cause of choice – the refugee crisis. For much of his past work, social media has served as a platform for his protests. Beginning in

late November 2013, after the Chinese government confiscated his passport, Ai tweeted a new photo each day of a bicycle outside his studio, its basket filled with fresh flowers. The gesture was both elegant and mournful, and lasted almost two years until Ai’s passport was returned in Summer 2015. His social media profiles reflect the nature of his work – activist in nature with a flair for the mischievous. This fusion of styles is perhaps best embodied by a sound bite from one of Ai’s earlier interviews: “There are no outdoor sports as graceful as throwing stones at a dictatorship.” The accessibility of Ai’s art helps to bring social justice issues from the fringes to the forefront. His work is both performance and protest, and his often far-fetched ideas amplify the visual magnitude of his work, eliciting a visceral response from all who see it. His latest installation? A piece composed of 14,000 life vests collected from refugees wrapped around the five columns of the Berlin Concert Hall, yet another testament to his voice and style.


Culture Guide: Music

13

The Story in the Name WORDS Staci Dubow y their very nature, songs tell stories, both musically and lyrically. The following songs are titled with a name--a name that carries with it a distinct narrative of both the person being written about and the musician or musicians telling the story. Each name then becomes more than a designation or a song title. Each name stands as a symbol for the individual complexity of the person who holds it as their identifier. It serves to tell the story of the vivid and inimitable life each character has led.

1. JOLENE

Dolly Parton’s “Jolene” tells the story of a woman who confronts the title character, a stunning woman she fears will steal the man she’s in love with. Some speculate a redheaded bank clerk who once flirted with Parton’s husband, Carl Dean, inspired the song. Parton has also disclosed that she drew inspiration from a young fan that came on stage for her autograph. According to this account, Parton said to the girl, “you’re the prettiest thing I’ve ever seen,” remembering her “red hair, green eyes, and fair skin.” When Parton asked the girl her name, which turned out to be Jolene, she said “well that’s just about the prettiest name I ever heard. I’m going to write a song about you, and if you ever hear it, you’ll know it was about you.” The real Jolene, nor the bank teller who inspired the song’s protagonist, have ever come forward.

2. POLLY

“Polly” tells the dark but true story about the kidnapping of a 14-year old girl. In 1987, a man named Gerald Friend abducted the young girl as she was returning home from a concert in Tacoma, Washington. The girl, whose name was not released, eventually managed to escape when her abductor stopped for gas while on a ride with her. Friend was arrested and sent to jail. The name Polly is symbolic of the young victim’s ability to escape dire circumstances and exert her own will. While many of lead singer Kurt Cobain’s songs are lyrically and instrumentally personal, Polly offers an example of Cobain writing from a different perspective. He explained his interest in writing about other people’s stories, saying he felt his own life was “boring.”

3. LOLA

“Lola” is a love song detailing the relationship between a man and a cross dresser. The song may have been inspired by Candy Darling, a famous transgender actress who the band’s lead singer, Ray Davies, allegedly dated. Some also speculate that Davies wrote the lyrics after The Kinks’ manager drunkenly danced with who he though was a woman but whose stubble began showing as the night went on. Davies discussed the somewhat taboo narrative with Rolling Stone, saying, “The subject matter was concealed … It’s a crafty way of writing. I say, ‘She woke up next to me,’ and people think it’s a woman. The story unfolds better than if the song were called ‘I Dated a Drag Queen.’” The song’s ability to discuss what, at the time, was considered inappropriate for public consumption, opened the door for musicians like Lou Reed and David Bowie, along with other artists, to explore homosexuality, and more generally sexuality, in their work.

4. MS. JACKSON

“Ms. Jackson” was written as a message to the mother of Erykah Badu, a singer whom one of the group member’s, Andre 3000, had a child with out of wedlock. The name “Ms. Jackson” was made up, but the song was intended for Badu’s mother to hear his side of the story. Feeling that Badu kept his child, Seven Sirius Benjamin, away from him deliberately, he used the song as a way to relay a message he felt was too difficult to otherwise communicate. In the Atlanta Journal-Constitution, Andre 3000 asserts, “I probably would never come out and tell Erykah’s mom, ‘I’m sorry for what went down.’ But music gives you a chance to say what you want to say.”

Culture Guide: Food 1. JOLENE BY DOLLY PARTON 2. POLLY BY NIRVANA 3. LOLA BY THE KINKS 4. MRS. JACKSON BY OUTKAST 5. RHIANNON BY FLEETWOOD MAC 6. RAMONA BY GUSTER 7. AGNES BY JOHNNY FLYNN 8. SEAMUS BY PINK FLOYD 9. SALVATORE BY LANA DEL RAY 10. OTIS BY JAY Z, KANYE WEST, FEAT. OTIS REDDING 11. MRS. ROBINSON BY SIMON & GARFUNKEL

12. ELIAS BY DISPATCH 13. CAROLINE BY JR. JR. 14. JOHN BY LIL WAYNE & RICK ROSS 15. DENIS BY BLONDIE 16. EUGENE BY SUFJAN STEVENS 17. ARABELLA BY ARCTIC MONKEYS 18. GEORGIA BY VANCE JOY 19. STAN BY EMINEM, DIDO 20. MICHAEL BY FRANZ FERDINAND 21. JOEY BY BOB DYLAN 22. ESMERELDA BY BEN HOWARD 23. IRENE BY HORSE FEATHERS 24. RUSTY BY TYLER, THE CREATOR 25. ROXANNE BY THE POLICE 26. ELEANOR RIGBY BY THE BEATLES 27. CANDY BY IGGY POP 28. KAREN BY THE NATIONAL 29. JEREMY BY PEARL JAM 30. EMMYLOU BY FIRST AID KIT 31. BELLE BY AL GREEN 32. JEAN PIERRE BY MILES DAVIS 33. DELILAH BY FLORENCE + THE MACHINE 34. ANGIE BY THE ROLLING STONES 35. KIM BY RYAN ADAMS 36. JOSEPH BY TRICKY 37. JESSICA BY THE ALLMAN BROTHERS BAND 38. GRACIE BY BEN FOLDS 39. FRANKIE BY SISTER SLEDGE 40. CELESTE BY EZRA VINE 41. SUZANNE BY LEONARD COHEN 42. CHARLIE BY RED HOT CHIILI PEPPERS 43. JEROME BY LYKKE LI 44. NOAH BY AMBER RUN 45. LAYLA BY ERIC CLAPTON 46. ISABEL BY THE WOMBATS 47. VALERIE BY AMY WINEHOUSE 48. SHEILA BY JAMIE T 49. DAISY MAE BY LEON BRIDGES 50. LYLA BY OASIS

14

Crème Brûlée WORDS Jhomely Delossantos ILLUSTRATIONS Megan Cannella

Baking, chemical engineering, and medicine all intersect in one place— the passions of first year Lara Nun, a Chemical Engineering major from Nashville, Tennessee. Nun came to Bucknell with the goal of becoming a doctor some day. “I have never pictured myself doing anything else,” she explains as we sit side by side in her dorm’s kitchen. Although her passion for the field of medicine originated in growing up with parents who double as doctors, Dunn’s Mentor, Virgina Eddy, is where the incorporation of baking comes into play. While shadowing Eddy, a trauma surgeon in Maine, last summer, Nun learned how to make crème brûlée. “One night, my mentor just started making crème brûlée and decided to teach me,” Nun explains while giving me my own personal lesson on how to make the dessert. I quickly realize the process of making crème brûlée involves a calculated dance of perfect timing and patience. She now associates the sweet dessert with a sort of reassurance that she is making the right decision by becoming a surgeon some day. “When I met my mentor, the experience just reassured my goal.” She pops the now poured desserts into the refrigerator, and we wait. The alarm goes off, announcing that our crème brulees are finally ready to exit the oven. The final step is one of Nun’s favorites—using a blowtorch to melt the sugar on top. “I guess the dessert is more than just a good snack but a reminder of where I am going.” With a finished crème brûlée in hand, we grabbed spoons and begin to enjoy what we had created.

Serves 4 to 6 Ingredients

2 cups heavy cream 8 large egg yolks or 4 large eggs ½ cup sugar ¾ teaspoon vanilla 2 to 3 teaspoons granulated light brown sugar

Instructions 1. Preheat the oven to 325 degrees. 2. Add the cream to a pot 3. Heat almost to a simmer 4. Stir the egg yolks or eggs as well as the sugar in a medium bowl with a wooden spoon just until blended 5. Gradually stir in the cream 6. Strain through a fine-mesh sieve into a bowl or a large measure with a pouring lip 7. Stir in the allotted portion of vanilla 8. Pour the mixture into four 6-ounce or six 4-ounce custard cups or ramekins 9. Cool the custards slightly in the water bath, then remove and let cool to room temperature 10. Cover each one tightly with plastic wrap and refrigerate for at least eight hours 11. Add the allotted granulated light brown sugar to the tow 12. Broil until the sugar melts and bubbles


Culture Guide: Music

13

The Story in the Name WORDS Staci Dubow y their very nature, songs tell stories, both musically and lyrically. The following songs are titled with a name--a name that carries with it a distinct narrative of both the person being written about and the musician or musicians telling the story. Each name then becomes more than a designation or a song title. Each name stands as a symbol for the individual complexity of the person who holds it as their identifier. It serves to tell the story of the vivid and inimitable life each character has led.

1. JOLENE

Dolly Parton’s “Jolene” tells the story of a woman who confronts the title character, a stunning woman she fears will steal the man she’s in love with. Some speculate a redheaded bank clerk who once flirted with Parton’s husband, Carl Dean, inspired the song. Parton has also disclosed that she drew inspiration from a young fan that came on stage for her autograph. According to this account, Parton said to the girl, “you’re the prettiest thing I’ve ever seen,” remembering her “red hair, green eyes, and fair skin.” When Parton asked the girl her name, which turned out to be Jolene, she said “well that’s just about the prettiest name I ever heard. I’m going to write a song about you, and if you ever hear it, you’ll know it was about you.” The real Jolene, nor the bank teller who inspired the song’s protagonist, have ever come forward.

2. POLLY

“Polly” tells the dark but true story about the kidnapping of a 14-year old girl. In 1987, a man named Gerald Friend abducted the young girl as she was returning home from a concert in Tacoma, Washington. The girl, whose name was not released, eventually managed to escape when her abductor stopped for gas while on a ride with her. Friend was arrested and sent to jail. The name Polly is symbolic of the young victim’s ability to escape dire circumstances and exert her own will. While many of lead singer Kurt Cobain’s songs are lyrically and instrumentally personal, Polly offers an example of Cobain writing from a different perspective. He explained his interest in writing about other people’s stories, saying he felt his own life was “boring.”

3. LOLA

“Lola” is a love song detailing the relationship between a man and a cross dresser. The song may have been inspired by Candy Darling, a famous transgender actress who the band’s lead singer, Ray Davies, allegedly dated. Some also speculate that Davies wrote the lyrics after The Kinks’ manager drunkenly danced with who he though was a woman but whose stubble began showing as the night went on. Davies discussed the somewhat taboo narrative with Rolling Stone, saying, “The subject matter was concealed … It’s a crafty way of writing. I say, ‘She woke up next to me,’ and people think it’s a woman. The story unfolds better than if the song were called ‘I Dated a Drag Queen.’” The song’s ability to discuss what, at the time, was considered inappropriate for public consumption, opened the door for musicians like Lou Reed and David Bowie, along with other artists, to explore homosexuality, and more generally sexuality, in their work.

4. MS. JACKSON

“Ms. Jackson” was written as a message to the mother of Erykah Badu, a singer whom one of the group member’s, Andre 3000, had a child with out of wedlock. The name “Ms. Jackson” was made up, but the song was intended for Badu’s mother to hear his side of the story. Feeling that Badu kept his child, Seven Sirius Benjamin, away from him deliberately, he used the song as a way to relay a message he felt was too difficult to otherwise communicate. In the Atlanta Journal-Constitution, Andre 3000 asserts, “I probably would never come out and tell Erykah’s mom, ‘I’m sorry for what went down.’ But music gives you a chance to say what you want to say.”

Culture Guide: Food 1. JOLENE BY DOLLY PARTON 2. POLLY BY NIRVANA 3. LOLA BY THE KINKS 4. MRS. JACKSON BY OUTKAST 5. RHIANNON BY FLEETWOOD MAC 6. RAMONA BY GUSTER 7. AGNES BY JOHNNY FLYNN 8. SEAMUS BY PINK FLOYD 9. SALVATORE BY LANA DEL RAY 10. OTIS BY JAY Z, KANYE WEST, FEAT. OTIS REDDING 11. MRS. ROBINSON BY SIMON & GARFUNKEL

12. ELIAS BY DISPATCH 13. CAROLINE BY JR. JR. 14. JOHN BY LIL WAYNE & RICK ROSS 15. DENIS BY BLONDIE 16. EUGENE BY SUFJAN STEVENS 17. ARABELLA BY ARCTIC MONKEYS 18. GEORGIA BY VANCE JOY 19. STAN BY EMINEM, DIDO 20. MICHAEL BY FRANZ FERDINAND 21. JOEY BY BOB DYLAN 22. ESMERELDA BY BEN HOWARD 23. IRENE BY HORSE FEATHERS 24. RUSTY BY TYLER, THE CREATOR 25. ROXANNE BY THE POLICE 26. ELEANOR RIGBY BY THE BEATLES 27. CANDY BY IGGY POP 28. KAREN BY THE NATIONAL 29. JEREMY BY PEARL JAM 30. EMMYLOU BY FIRST AID KIT 31. BELLE BY AL GREEN 32. JEAN PIERRE BY MILES DAVIS 33. DELILAH BY FLORENCE + THE MACHINE 34. ANGIE BY THE ROLLING STONES 35. KIM BY RYAN ADAMS 36. JOSEPH BY TRICKY 37. JESSICA BY THE ALLMAN BROTHERS BAND 38. GRACIE BY BEN FOLDS 39. FRANKIE BY SISTER SLEDGE 40. CELESTE BY EZRA VINE 41. SUZANNE BY LEONARD COHEN 42. CHARLIE BY RED HOT CHIILI PEPPERS 43. JEROME BY LYKKE LI 44. NOAH BY AMBER RUN 45. LAYLA BY ERIC CLAPTON 46. ISABEL BY THE WOMBATS 47. VALERIE BY AMY WINEHOUSE 48. SHEILA BY JAMIE T 49. DAISY MAE BY LEON BRIDGES 50. LYLA BY OASIS

14

Crème Brûlée WORDS Jhomely Delossantos ILLUSTRATIONS Megan Cannella

Baking, chemical engineering, and medicine all intersect in one place— the passions of first year Lara Nun, a Chemical Engineering major from Nashville, Tennessee. Nun came to Bucknell with the goal of becoming a doctor some day. “I have never pictured myself doing anything else,” she explains as we sit side by side in her dorm’s kitchen. Although her passion for the field of medicine originated in growing up with parents who double as doctors, Dunn’s Mentor, Virgina Eddy, is where the incorporation of baking comes into play. While shadowing Eddy, a trauma surgeon in Maine, last summer, Nun learned how to make crème brûlée. “One night, my mentor just started making crème brûlée and decided to teach me,” Nun explains while giving me my own personal lesson on how to make the dessert. I quickly realize the process of making crème brûlée involves a calculated dance of perfect timing and patience. She now associates the sweet dessert with a sort of reassurance that she is making the right decision by becoming a surgeon some day. “When I met my mentor, the experience just reassured my goal.” She pops the now poured desserts into the refrigerator, and we wait. The alarm goes off, announcing that our crème brulees are finally ready to exit the oven. The final step is one of Nun’s favorites—using a blowtorch to melt the sugar on top. “I guess the dessert is more than just a good snack but a reminder of where I am going.” With a finished crème brûlée in hand, we grabbed spoons and begin to enjoy what we had created.

Serves 4 to 6 Ingredients

2 cups heavy cream 8 large egg yolks or 4 large eggs ½ cup sugar ¾ teaspoon vanilla 2 to 3 teaspoons granulated light brown sugar

Instructions 1. Preheat the oven to 325 degrees. 2. Add the cream to a pot 3. Heat almost to a simmer 4. Stir the egg yolks or eggs as well as the sugar in a medium bowl with a wooden spoon just until blended 5. Gradually stir in the cream 6. Strain through a fine-mesh sieve into a bowl or a large measure with a pouring lip 7. Stir in the allotted portion of vanilla 8. Pour the mixture into four 6-ounce or six 4-ounce custard cups or ramekins 9. Cool the custards slightly in the water bath, then remove and let cool to room temperature 10. Cover each one tightly with plastic wrap and refrigerate for at least eight hours 11. Add the allotted granulated light brown sugar to the tow 12. Broil until the sugar melts and bubbles


15

Culture Guide: Literature

Characters Who Love Too Much

WORDS Courtney Wren ILLUSTRATION Megan Cannella Books exist in order to create characters with relatable qualities. By creating personas readers can relate to, books leave a lasting impression and allow us to invest a part of ourselves in what we’re reading. The following explores pieces that feature characters who love something or someone more than they love themselves—a sentiment many readers can identify with.

What I Talk About When I Talk About Running Haruki Murakami

This collection of essays and quips about life is relatable to even those who have never run more than a mile in their lives. The book focuses its attention on Murakami’s thoughts while running long distances. But his thinking is more applicable than simply the act of running, speaking instead to all of our deep, most introspective thoughts.

We Need to Talk About Kevin Lionel Shriver

How well do you really know someone and how much should you trust your gut when evaluating others? These are a few of the questions you’ll ask yourself when reading this deeply disturbing novel. We Need to Talk About Kevin is written in a series of letters to a woman’s, presumably estranged, husband regarding their son, Kevin, and the atrocities he has committed. The author details a timeline of her love (or lack thereof) for her son. This book will make you uncomfortable in the best ways possible.

Me Before You JoJo Moyes

Loving someone more than you love yourself is the pervasive and relevant theme strung throughout JoJo Moyes’ touching novel. Lou Clark, a simple, small town English woman is forced to take a job as a caretaker of a recently paralyzed quadriplegic who is deeply and irreversibly depressed. The love story that comes out of this will captivate you and, despite knowing their love is a ticking time bomb, you’ll still invest everything you have in their relationship.

Culture Guide: Health

This Is Where I Leave You Jonathon Tropper

Going home when your life is falling apart, only to find out that home is not exactly together either, is something almost everyone can relate to. In this darkly humorous novel, Judd Altman finds out that his wife is cheating on him with his boss. Soon after, his father dies and he returns home to make sense of everything, with the help of his loveable but seemingly unsupportive family. When the novel begins, Judd struggles to accept his current character, instead looking towards an illusory, prospective self. But as the novel progresses, with the help of his family, he learns to love himself again.

Home is Burning by Dan Marshall

In his moving memoir, Dan Marshall details the decline of his father from ALS and the resilience of his mother battling cancer with humor and poignancy. One minute, self-dubbed “Dickhead-Dan” was enjoying post-grad life and the next he was taking a leave of absence from his dream job to care for his sick parents. His love for his completely unconventional family will inspire you as he gives up his life to care for his parents. This memoir is unlike anything else you’ve ever read; you’ll laugh so hard that tears will fall, and then you’ll find yourself crying in earnest.

All The Bright Places Jennifer Niven

Though it is geared towards young adult readers, this novel has themes that all ages can learn something from. The two protagonists, Violet and Finch, meet atop a bell tower where both are debating jumping. From the beginning, you can assume each protagonist’s problems, as they begin a destructive, beautiful, co-dependent relationship, where each loves the other more than they love themselves. You’ll devour this novel in order to find out their story, but you’ll go back afterwards and re-read to appreciate Niven’s beautiful and intricate language.

16

Here and Now WORDS Caitlin Friel PHOTO Kayla Javaheri lass has ended for the day, and I am sitting in my dorm. The bed is unmade, the floor is barely visible from beneath my clothes and balloons from my birthday, and I have enough homework to keep me busy for hours, but instead of haphazardly tidying up my room and diving into my work, I pause. For the next five minutes, I simply breathe. I focus, non-judgmentally, on the sensation of my breath, the sounds around me, the natural scenery outside the window. When the practice is over, I feel motivated, revitalized, and prepared to make the most of the rest of the day. This is not magic—this is mindfulness, a mental practice with roots in Buddhist tradition and a plethora of empirical evidence behind it. As Jon Kabat-Zinn defines it in his book, Wherever You Go, There You Are: Mindfulness Meditation in Everyday Life, “mindfulness means paying attention in a particular way, on purpose, non-judgmentally, in the present moment.” At Bucknell, in Professor Jason Leddington’s Philosophy 100— Consciousness—class, students can engage with mindfulness on a personal level. Fridays in this course are devoted to practicing the techniques of mindfulness, an aspect

of the course that draws students in year after year. As someone who engages with mindfulness regularly in his profession, Professor Leddington recognizes the tangible impact it can have on a person’s overall well-being—benefits like “reducing stress, improving immune function, improving resilience in the face of difficult life events, and helping to stave off depression” are just the beginning of the ways mindfulness can enhance a person’s life.

eating said sandwich, walking, folding laundry, or doing homework. The techniques of mindfulness range from simply focusing on your breathing to full-on, sit-down mindfulness meditation. Especially for beginners, it is not imperative that you sit on a cushion for an hour meditating—instead, Professor Leddington stresses that it is better to frequently engage in short, high quality mindfulness practices.

Being mindful is about engaging with Aside from having a teacher, the most efsimple focus exercises on a regular basis— fective means of incorporating mindfulness the act of consciously, continuously, and more fully into your lifestyle is to follow the non-judgmentally bringing yourself “WE’RE NOT THINKING ABOUT OUR back into the pres- REGRETS, ABOUT THE PAST; WE’RE NOT ent. For a college student, this kind of THINKING ABOUT ALL OF THE CRAP practice is invalu- WE’RE GETTING DONE IN THE FUTURE. able for combatting WE’RE STICKING TO THE ONLY REAL the stress and anxiMOMENT WE HAVE, WHICH IS NOW, AND ety that school often brings. Regardless JUST BEING OKAY WITH IT.” of when or where – PROFESSOR JASON LEDDINGTON you do it, you can be mindful while doing just about anything— teachings of a book. Professor Leddington brushing your teeth, making a sandwich, recommends Mindfulness: An Eight-Week Plan for Finding Peace in a Frantic World by Mark Williams and Danny Penman as well as the aforementioned book by Jon Kabat-Zinn. Professor Leddington also endorses trying guided meditations, which are available both online and in app form—Insight Timer is his app recommendation for its “short, useful” meditations.

I like to think of mindfulness as a way of fully accessing the present moment. It is incredibly easy to focus on the past or the future, but these things are not tangible; they are not necessarily true. Truth exists in the present moment and mindfulness is how we can access that truth in order to improve our lives and to exist more wholly.


15

Culture Guide: Literature

Characters Who Love Too Much

WORDS Courtney Wren ILLUSTRATION Megan Cannella Books exist in order to create characters with relatable qualities. By creating personas readers can relate to, books leave a lasting impression and allow us to invest a part of ourselves in what we’re reading. The following explores pieces that feature characters who love something or someone more than they love themselves—a sentiment many readers can identify with.

What I Talk About When I Talk About Running Haruki Murakami

This collection of essays and quips about life is relatable to even those who have never run more than a mile in their lives. The book focuses its attention on Murakami’s thoughts while running long distances. But his thinking is more applicable than simply the act of running, speaking instead to all of our deep, most introspective thoughts.

We Need to Talk About Kevin Lionel Shriver

How well do you really know someone and how much should you trust your gut when evaluating others? These are a few of the questions you’ll ask yourself when reading this deeply disturbing novel. We Need to Talk About Kevin is written in a series of letters to a woman’s, presumably estranged, husband regarding their son, Kevin, and the atrocities he has committed. The author details a timeline of her love (or lack thereof) for her son. This book will make you uncomfortable in the best ways possible.

Me Before You JoJo Moyes

Loving someone more than you love yourself is the pervasive and relevant theme strung throughout JoJo Moyes’ touching novel. Lou Clark, a simple, small town English woman is forced to take a job as a caretaker of a recently paralyzed quadriplegic who is deeply and irreversibly depressed. The love story that comes out of this will captivate you and, despite knowing their love is a ticking time bomb, you’ll still invest everything you have in their relationship.

Culture Guide: Health

This Is Where I Leave You Jonathon Tropper

Going home when your life is falling apart, only to find out that home is not exactly together either, is something almost everyone can relate to. In this darkly humorous novel, Judd Altman finds out that his wife is cheating on him with his boss. Soon after, his father dies and he returns home to make sense of everything, with the help of his loveable but seemingly unsupportive family. When the novel begins, Judd struggles to accept his current character, instead looking towards an illusory, prospective self. But as the novel progresses, with the help of his family, he learns to love himself again.

Home is Burning by Dan Marshall

In his moving memoir, Dan Marshall details the decline of his father from ALS and the resilience of his mother battling cancer with humor and poignancy. One minute, self-dubbed “Dickhead-Dan” was enjoying post-grad life and the next he was taking a leave of absence from his dream job to care for his sick parents. His love for his completely unconventional family will inspire you as he gives up his life to care for his parents. This memoir is unlike anything else you’ve ever read; you’ll laugh so hard that tears will fall, and then you’ll find yourself crying in earnest.

All The Bright Places Jennifer Niven

Though it is geared towards young adult readers, this novel has themes that all ages can learn something from. The two protagonists, Violet and Finch, meet atop a bell tower where both are debating jumping. From the beginning, you can assume each protagonist’s problems, as they begin a destructive, beautiful, co-dependent relationship, where each loves the other more than they love themselves. You’ll devour this novel in order to find out their story, but you’ll go back afterwards and re-read to appreciate Niven’s beautiful and intricate language.

16

Here and Now WORDS Caitlin Friel PHOTO Kayla Javaheri lass has ended for the day, and I am sitting in my dorm. The bed is unmade, the floor is barely visible from beneath my clothes and balloons from my birthday, and I have enough homework to keep me busy for hours, but instead of haphazardly tidying up my room and diving into my work, I pause. For the next five minutes, I simply breathe. I focus, non-judgmentally, on the sensation of my breath, the sounds around me, the natural scenery outside the window. When the practice is over, I feel motivated, revitalized, and prepared to make the most of the rest of the day. This is not magic—this is mindfulness, a mental practice with roots in Buddhist tradition and a plethora of empirical evidence behind it. As Jon Kabat-Zinn defines it in his book, Wherever You Go, There You Are: Mindfulness Meditation in Everyday Life, “mindfulness means paying attention in a particular way, on purpose, non-judgmentally, in the present moment.” At Bucknell, in Professor Jason Leddington’s Philosophy 100— Consciousness—class, students can engage with mindfulness on a personal level. Fridays in this course are devoted to practicing the techniques of mindfulness, an aspect

of the course that draws students in year after year. As someone who engages with mindfulness regularly in his profession, Professor Leddington recognizes the tangible impact it can have on a person’s overall well-being—benefits like “reducing stress, improving immune function, improving resilience in the face of difficult life events, and helping to stave off depression” are just the beginning of the ways mindfulness can enhance a person’s life.

eating said sandwich, walking, folding laundry, or doing homework. The techniques of mindfulness range from simply focusing on your breathing to full-on, sit-down mindfulness meditation. Especially for beginners, it is not imperative that you sit on a cushion for an hour meditating—instead, Professor Leddington stresses that it is better to frequently engage in short, high quality mindfulness practices.

Being mindful is about engaging with Aside from having a teacher, the most efsimple focus exercises on a regular basis— fective means of incorporating mindfulness the act of consciously, continuously, and more fully into your lifestyle is to follow the non-judgmentally bringing yourself “WE’RE NOT THINKING ABOUT OUR back into the pres- REGRETS, ABOUT THE PAST; WE’RE NOT ent. For a college student, this kind of THINKING ABOUT ALL OF THE CRAP practice is invalu- WE’RE GETTING DONE IN THE FUTURE. able for combatting WE’RE STICKING TO THE ONLY REAL the stress and anxiMOMENT WE HAVE, WHICH IS NOW, AND ety that school often brings. Regardless JUST BEING OKAY WITH IT.” of when or where – PROFESSOR JASON LEDDINGTON you do it, you can be mindful while doing just about anything— teachings of a book. Professor Leddington brushing your teeth, making a sandwich, recommends Mindfulness: An Eight-Week Plan for Finding Peace in a Frantic World by Mark Williams and Danny Penman as well as the aforementioned book by Jon Kabat-Zinn. Professor Leddington also endorses trying guided meditations, which are available both online and in app form—Insight Timer is his app recommendation for its “short, useful” meditations.

I like to think of mindfulness as a way of fully accessing the present moment. It is incredibly easy to focus on the past or the future, but these things are not tangible; they are not necessarily true. Truth exists in the present moment and mindfulness is how we can access that truth in order to improve our lives and to exist more wholly.


Et Cetera Magazine

Local WORDS Dante Fresse PHOTO Stephen Althouse

Dante Fresse: I thought we could start by talking about the physical aspect of your work. Given your apparent interest in semiotics, interpreting, or personifying objects, how would you explain your process of choosing your artistic “subjects?” Do you derive personality through your given object? Or do you project your own emotional state onto the given subject? Stephen Althouse: Often, it is a combination. There is, truly, an autobiographical element in all of these pieces. For example, this work, Knot III, represents something different from the rest of the collection. Collectively, for me, all of these pieces are a representation of humankind. The other works utilize common tools (axes, bridles, etc.) with aesthetic connectivity to ‘everyday’ experience – Knot displays a tool of war, a sharp contrast to the trivial. At first glance, it is a piece of armor used on horses (forced into battle by human masters). I ask myself often about issues of human nature in this sense, relating to violence, conflict, and modern warfare. In this age, we often see the critical devastation caused by advanced warfare creating corpses—in contrast to dark-age military tactics where instantaneous mass destruction was implausible. This work captures an individual aspect of the broader concept of “warfare” across epochs. For me, horses carry sentimental value. I myself own several horses, so when I look at this piece, I feel attached to the “warrior” himself. I see the armor of a mythological being, the warhorses of the Apocalypse, a militant “machine.” While the creature is initially menacing, after prolonged viewing, I see sorrow in its frame, I begin to pity the being, much like I often find pity in humans, consumed by the presence of our death machines… I tied the reins at the bottom of the piece, symbolically “knotting,” disabling the continuous reel of the war machine. In accordance with a very personal connection to Amish neighbors, I have included religious quotations on the helm, a reference to the unfortunate correlation shared between theology and violence. At the top of the horse’s head is a hymn of suffering, written in braille – taken from the Ausbund; the hymn references the religiously oppressed Anabaptists, imprisoned in the 16th century for refusing to convert back to traditional Catholicism.

The piece is a collective representation of my own personal experience (my relationship with Amish neighbors, a fondness for horse raising), as well as a collective manifestation of the human condition – our propensity to engage in violence for the sake of theological conversion, malice, and injustice. All of my “subjects” represent a symbiotic relationship between the given piece and myself. So to answer your question, the object becomes a reflection of my experience, yet I choose the individual item based on its natural appearance and correlation with universal themes regarding humanity and our strange condition. DF: Remaining on the topic of the physical, your work seems to emphasize texture – what does this texture mean to you in correlation with your line of “hands-on” art? Especially in terms of your work and interest in braille. Specifically, perhaps we should focus on your piece, Wheel I. SA: Absolutely – it begins with my past experience in sculpture. I enjoy/prefer the physical activity of “making things” i.e. creation; however, I find that found objects tell more than I could ever personally create—even the experience of extended visual exposure to “common” items can promote deep contemplative analysis and thought regarding the self and the everyday. When I arrange these pieces, I get a spiritual feeling; it provides a form of internal catharsis. The white cloth in particular carries a spiritual pureness for me, and I want to organize the work in a way that its “holiness” can be distorted or exhibited (via texture). Now, in Wheel I, the cloth is agitated, and this is important for me as it relates to the passing of an old friend of mine from the Amish community, a bishop named Elam. Elam was a representative of the Amish community, orchestrating discussion and standing as a guardian of his people from the Western world. His passing was a burden upon his community and myself; therefore, here, written on this wheel is a quotation from the Ausbund relating to both the cyclical nature of life and our resounding question after his passing, “Where do we turn from here?” The cloth’s texture is representative of our grief, and the distortion of the pure by death and the morose.

18 DF: Because you seem very interested in semiotics and close interpretation, I imagine that you see art as a means of deriving the “truths” within reality/objects. Do you believe that the photographic medium is best capable of capturing the still and true representation of objects? SA: Well, these objects actually find me, rather than me finding them. I derive their “truths” within the context of varying experiences through my travels and life. These objects seem to speak to me. While these works are expository to a certain extent, I 1 believe that my only job is to reconnect unintentionally related imagery in a way that dictates my experiences with these items. In terms of photography, while I have been doing it for many years, I don’t particularly enjoy the process. I prefer the physical presentation of artwork and, in all honesty, the photographic process is difficult. I still use sheet film, 8x10, and it’s a very tedious process – however, the camera offers something unique to the piece. It forces the viewer to perceive the work as I did when I first conceived it (via lighting, composition, angles, etc.). In a way, photography is my way of combating the gallery curation of the works – instead of relying on the museum to display the work properly, I myself have control over the exposition of the piece. DF: In contrast to this hermeneutical approach, what are your views on aestheticism, or even “surface viewing”/“reading”? Do you believe in the idea of “art for art’s sake,” or do we only derive real pleasure from analysis and the act of deciphering? SA: I think that my pieces are very strange in this case – it is difficult to pinpoint an exact interpretation without hearing my personal anecdotes behind each artwork. From my works, I want the audience to get that exact experience of “visual pleasure” – to appreciate the texture, as you mentioned, and the color, the lighting, everything. I want people to gain a sense of pleasure from simply seeing the unorthodox pairing of highly contrasting objects i.e. a wheel and a cloth, just to give them a new perspective on the world and common items. Art for art’s sake is why I make my works. The interpretation process is simply a fun game for the audience, and a personally cathartic process for myself.


Et Cetera Magazine

Local WORDS Dante Fresse PHOTO Stephen Althouse

Dante Fresse: I thought we could start by talking about the physical aspect of your work. Given your apparent interest in semiotics, interpreting, or personifying objects, how would you explain your process of choosing your artistic “subjects?” Do you derive personality through your given object? Or do you project your own emotional state onto the given subject? Stephen Althouse: Often, it is a combination. There is, truly, an autobiographical element in all of these pieces. For example, this work, Knot III, represents something different from the rest of the collection. Collectively, for me, all of these pieces are a representation of humankind. The other works utilize common tools (axes, bridles, etc.) with aesthetic connectivity to ‘everyday’ experience – Knot displays a tool of war, a sharp contrast to the trivial. At first glance, it is a piece of armor used on horses (forced into battle by human masters). I ask myself often about issues of human nature in this sense, relating to violence, conflict, and modern warfare. In this age, we often see the critical devastation caused by advanced warfare creating corpses—in contrast to dark-age military tactics where instantaneous mass destruction was implausible. This work captures an individual aspect of the broader concept of “warfare” across epochs. For me, horses carry sentimental value. I myself own several horses, so when I look at this piece, I feel attached to the “warrior” himself. I see the armor of a mythological being, the warhorses of the Apocalypse, a militant “machine.” While the creature is initially menacing, after prolonged viewing, I see sorrow in its frame, I begin to pity the being, much like I often find pity in humans, consumed by the presence of our death machines… I tied the reins at the bottom of the piece, symbolically “knotting,” disabling the continuous reel of the war machine. In accordance with a very personal connection to Amish neighbors, I have included religious quotations on the helm, a reference to the unfortunate correlation shared between theology and violence. At the top of the horse’s head is a hymn of suffering, written in braille – taken from the Ausbund; the hymn references the religiously oppressed Anabaptists, imprisoned in the 16th century for refusing to convert back to traditional Catholicism.

The piece is a collective representation of my own personal experience (my relationship with Amish neighbors, a fondness for horse raising), as well as a collective manifestation of the human condition – our propensity to engage in violence for the sake of theological conversion, malice, and injustice. All of my “subjects” represent a symbiotic relationship between the given piece and myself. So to answer your question, the object becomes a reflection of my experience, yet I choose the individual item based on its natural appearance and correlation with universal themes regarding humanity and our strange condition. DF: Remaining on the topic of the physical, your work seems to emphasize texture – what does this texture mean to you in correlation with your line of “hands-on” art? Especially in terms of your work and interest in braille. Specifically, perhaps we should focus on your piece, Wheel I. SA: Absolutely – it begins with my past experience in sculpture. I enjoy/prefer the physical activity of “making things” i.e. creation; however, I find that found objects tell more than I could ever personally create—even the experience of extended visual exposure to “common” items can promote deep contemplative analysis and thought regarding the self and the everyday. When I arrange these pieces, I get a spiritual feeling; it provides a form of internal catharsis. The white cloth in particular carries a spiritual pureness for me, and I want to organize the work in a way that its “holiness” can be distorted or exhibited (via texture). Now, in Wheel I, the cloth is agitated, and this is important for me as it relates to the passing of an old friend of mine from the Amish community, a bishop named Elam. Elam was a representative of the Amish community, orchestrating discussion and standing as a guardian of his people from the Western world. His passing was a burden upon his community and myself; therefore, here, written on this wheel is a quotation from the Ausbund relating to both the cyclical nature of life and our resounding question after his passing, “Where do we turn from here?” The cloth’s texture is representative of our grief, and the distortion of the pure by death and the morose.

18 DF: Because you seem very interested in semiotics and close interpretation, I imagine that you see art as a means of deriving the “truths” within reality/objects. Do you believe that the photographic medium is best capable of capturing the still and true representation of objects? SA: Well, these objects actually find me, rather than me finding them. I derive their “truths” within the context of varying experiences through my travels and life. These objects seem to speak to me. While these works are expository to a certain extent, I 1 believe that my only job is to reconnect unintentionally related imagery in a way that dictates my experiences with these items. In terms of photography, while I have been doing it for many years, I don’t particularly enjoy the process. I prefer the physical presentation of artwork and, in all honesty, the photographic process is difficult. I still use sheet film, 8x10, and it’s a very tedious process – however, the camera offers something unique to the piece. It forces the viewer to perceive the work as I did when I first conceived it (via lighting, composition, angles, etc.). In a way, photography is my way of combating the gallery curation of the works – instead of relying on the museum to display the work properly, I myself have control over the exposition of the piece. DF: In contrast to this hermeneutical approach, what are your views on aestheticism, or even “surface viewing”/“reading”? Do you believe in the idea of “art for art’s sake,” or do we only derive real pleasure from analysis and the act of deciphering? SA: I think that my pieces are very strange in this case – it is difficult to pinpoint an exact interpretation without hearing my personal anecdotes behind each artwork. From my works, I want the audience to get that exact experience of “visual pleasure” – to appreciate the texture, as you mentioned, and the color, the lighting, everything. I want people to gain a sense of pleasure from simply seeing the unorthodox pairing of highly contrasting objects i.e. a wheel and a cloth, just to give them a new perspective on the world and common items. Art for art’s sake is why I make my works. The interpretation process is simply a fun game for the audience, and a personally cathartic process for myself.


19

On Campus

Extreme Creativity Pushes the Envelope Extreme Creativity is simultaneously an exercise in humility, self-­ exploration, acceptance, and introspection. It is a capstone course meant mainly for seniors that purports to incorporate as much of an interdisciplinary experience as possible, all within the purview of the Arts Department. This intensive 5-­ week program meets three times a week for three hours at a time and began in 2010 as a Presidential Arts Initiative. It is sponsored by the Samek Gallery and the Griot Institute for Africana Studies and includes faculty and influence from the Music, Dance, Theater, Creative Writ-

ing, Film/Media Studies, Art, and Art History Departments. By employing different creative mediums such as dance, drama, writing, photography, and film, students enrolled in the course are able to come together to share multidisciplinary experiences and perspectives that are afforded few other places on campus. Topics in the past have incorporated the formative factors of identity such as race, gender, class, (dis) ability, and sexuality in an effort to address the question of what it means to be engaged in the arts.

This past fall, the Extreme Creativity course ran under the theme of Art(I)facts, where “concepts of identity were explored across the arts,” according to Associate Professor of Music and University Arts Coordinator Barry Long. Long says that he is always amazed by the dedication and attention shown by the students to the course, despite its many challenges, especially because the content of the course is so personal for every participant. The course will most likely run again in the spring of 2017, because, as Long says, the “interdisciplinarity is a natural and necessary fit at a place like Bucknell.”

Virtuosity via Van Gogh

INTROSPECTION INTERPERSONALITY & INNOVATION WORDS Morgan Gisholt Minard PHOTO Miles Silva and Genna Hartnett What do Vincent van Gogh, inventive introspection, and engineering all have in common? They are all the subjects of interdisciplinary endeavors on or around campus. These projects range from the visceral reactions evoked by famous painters and translated into contemporary performance art, to the personal reflective nature of a creative course and the integrated and overlapping perspectives of science, entrepreneurship, and design.

Christen Moribondo ’16 is an Arts Entrepreneurship major with a penchant for dance, ingenuity, music, and visual art. In the fall of 2015, she unveiled the culmination of her studies in Marketing, Management, Accounting, Sound and Stage Production, and Dance, which manifested itself in the form of a show titled “I Saw the Paintings Dance and Heard Their Melodies.”

College of Engineering Explores KEEN Approach Among the many interdisciplinary projects and courses sponsored by the College of Engineering is the Kern Entrepreneurship Education Network (KEEN) program. In true engineering spirit, a look at the numbers will tell all:

ed principles of management, application, and design. Courses also afford students the chance to work alongside engineering students from other departments, an experience that is largely unfamiliar for them by the time they are seniors.

Moribondo got the inspiration for the project while on a visit to the Rijksmuseum and Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam. She was startled to find that the Van Gogh paintings, among other Dutch masterpieces, evoked such sadness that she was able to envision the emotions the artists intended their audiences to feel. She could, in fact, see the paintings dance while hearing their melodies.

Bucknell University has the eighth best engineering program in the country, it is one of 19 university consortium enrolled in the KEEN program, and has received a $1 million grant toward ensuring that engineering students are equipped with an entrepreneurial mindset that will allow them to “transform the workforce and economy in America,” according to bucknell.edu. The recent additions of both the KEEN program and the Innovation, Design, Entrepreneurship, Applications, and Systems (IDEAS) courses have contributed to the KEEN IDEAS Interdisciplinary Senior Design sequence of courses. IDEAS courses on their own are a semester-­long, entrepreneurially-­focused engineering design course that pushes students to use engineering principles to “solve real-­world, open-­ended problems.”

This semester, the course is listed as ENGR 453: Interdisciplinary Senior Design and is an alternative to the typical senior design courses that all engineering students complete in their final year at Bucknell. Of the 18 students in the course, all are engineering students, while the demarcation of majors is an almost equal split between Mechanical, Biomedical, Civil, Electrical, Chemical, and Computer Science Engineering. “You get a mix of backgrounds that doesn’t happen when you’ve had class with the same 16 or so people for 3 years prior,” explains Sarah Denning ’16, a Biomedical Engineering student.

Moribondo chose to incorporate various elements of the major she cobbled together by combining her various and sundry interests, both academic and extracurricular. She called upon six dancers to express the movement she had envisioned, one friend to provide the musical track to accompany it, three artists to provide two pieces of artwork each, two photographers to capture it for posterity, and a videographer to help the moment live on. A year in the making by the time it came to fruition, the project was revealed in November of 2015 at the Fall Dance Showcase. Moribondo said, “I wanted to create an innovative, thought-­ provoking show, that incorporated my love of music, the visual arts, and especially dance.”

KEEN IDEAS courses, however, take it a step further. They are the marriage between problem-­solving skills that engineering students hone in their first three years at Bucknell and the more underrepresent-

While the course and its participants are currently bound by nondisclosure agreements, the public information released about the course is that, from 11:00 a.m. to noon on Tuesdays and Thursdays and from 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. on Tuesdays, the students are working on various projects for companies such as General Electric (GE), Geisinger Health System, and Corning Inc. The course is structured around a lecture period in which Professor of Electrical

and Computer Engineering Peter Jansson or Professor of Mechanical Engineering Steven Shooter presents a problem that engineers face in the world today (think designing for user safety or environmental sustainability). Participants are then expected to complete an individual or group project that presents a solution to the problem. The longer session on Tuesdays, however, is devoted to a semester-­long project that each group has been assigned. The members of each team, each with a unique product and project, meet extensively both in and out of class hours to complete research and design. Twice a semester, teams present to a panel of engineering faculty in order to gain critical feedback from leaders in their respective fields, including weekly phone calls with their company to ensure the best possible product. The skills garnered in this class should reap benefits when engineering students enter the job market. Biomedical Engineering student Tina Tionsong ’16 says, “My major achievement so far has been learning so many new skills... As my project is highly electrical, I have had to play catch-­up with my teammates to understand all of the intricacies of the design to the level that they do, but it has been so worth it to see my design in action.”


19

On Campus

Extreme Creativity Pushes the Envelope Extreme Creativity is simultaneously an exercise in humility, self-­ exploration, acceptance, and introspection. It is a capstone course meant mainly for seniors that purports to incorporate as much of an interdisciplinary experience as possible, all within the purview of the Arts Department. This intensive 5-­ week program meets three times a week for three hours at a time and began in 2010 as a Presidential Arts Initiative. It is sponsored by the Samek Gallery and the Griot Institute for Africana Studies and includes faculty and influence from the Music, Dance, Theater, Creative Writ-

ing, Film/Media Studies, Art, and Art History Departments. By employing different creative mediums such as dance, drama, writing, photography, and film, students enrolled in the course are able to come together to share multidisciplinary experiences and perspectives that are afforded few other places on campus. Topics in the past have incorporated the formative factors of identity such as race, gender, class, (dis) ability, and sexuality in an effort to address the question of what it means to be engaged in the arts.

This past fall, the Extreme Creativity course ran under the theme of Art(I)facts, where “concepts of identity were explored across the arts,” according to Associate Professor of Music and University Arts Coordinator Barry Long. Long says that he is always amazed by the dedication and attention shown by the students to the course, despite its many challenges, especially because the content of the course is so personal for every participant. The course will most likely run again in the spring of 2017, because, as Long says, the “interdisciplinarity is a natural and necessary fit at a place like Bucknell.”

Virtuosity via Van Gogh

INTROSPECTION INTERPERSONALITY & INNOVATION WORDS Morgan Gisholt Minard PHOTO Miles Silva and Genna Hartnett What do Vincent van Gogh, inventive introspection, and engineering all have in common? They are all the subjects of interdisciplinary endeavors on or around campus. These projects range from the visceral reactions evoked by famous painters and translated into contemporary performance art, to the personal reflective nature of a creative course and the integrated and overlapping perspectives of science, entrepreneurship, and design.

Christen Moribondo ’16 is an Arts Entrepreneurship major with a penchant for dance, ingenuity, music, and visual art. In the fall of 2015, she unveiled the culmination of her studies in Marketing, Management, Accounting, Sound and Stage Production, and Dance, which manifested itself in the form of a show titled “I Saw the Paintings Dance and Heard Their Melodies.”

College of Engineering Explores KEEN Approach Among the many interdisciplinary projects and courses sponsored by the College of Engineering is the Kern Entrepreneurship Education Network (KEEN) program. In true engineering spirit, a look at the numbers will tell all:

ed principles of management, application, and design. Courses also afford students the chance to work alongside engineering students from other departments, an experience that is largely unfamiliar for them by the time they are seniors.

Moribondo got the inspiration for the project while on a visit to the Rijksmuseum and Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam. She was startled to find that the Van Gogh paintings, among other Dutch masterpieces, evoked such sadness that she was able to envision the emotions the artists intended their audiences to feel. She could, in fact, see the paintings dance while hearing their melodies.

Bucknell University has the eighth best engineering program in the country, it is one of 19 university consortium enrolled in the KEEN program, and has received a $1 million grant toward ensuring that engineering students are equipped with an entrepreneurial mindset that will allow them to “transform the workforce and economy in America,” according to bucknell.edu. The recent additions of both the KEEN program and the Innovation, Design, Entrepreneurship, Applications, and Systems (IDEAS) courses have contributed to the KEEN IDEAS Interdisciplinary Senior Design sequence of courses. IDEAS courses on their own are a semester-­long, entrepreneurially-­focused engineering design course that pushes students to use engineering principles to “solve real-­world, open-­ended problems.”

This semester, the course is listed as ENGR 453: Interdisciplinary Senior Design and is an alternative to the typical senior design courses that all engineering students complete in their final year at Bucknell. Of the 18 students in the course, all are engineering students, while the demarcation of majors is an almost equal split between Mechanical, Biomedical, Civil, Electrical, Chemical, and Computer Science Engineering. “You get a mix of backgrounds that doesn’t happen when you’ve had class with the same 16 or so people for 3 years prior,” explains Sarah Denning ’16, a Biomedical Engineering student.

Moribondo chose to incorporate various elements of the major she cobbled together by combining her various and sundry interests, both academic and extracurricular. She called upon six dancers to express the movement she had envisioned, one friend to provide the musical track to accompany it, three artists to provide two pieces of artwork each, two photographers to capture it for posterity, and a videographer to help the moment live on. A year in the making by the time it came to fruition, the project was revealed in November of 2015 at the Fall Dance Showcase. Moribondo said, “I wanted to create an innovative, thought-­ provoking show, that incorporated my love of music, the visual arts, and especially dance.”

KEEN IDEAS courses, however, take it a step further. They are the marriage between problem-­solving skills that engineering students hone in their first three years at Bucknell and the more underrepresent-

While the course and its participants are currently bound by nondisclosure agreements, the public information released about the course is that, from 11:00 a.m. to noon on Tuesdays and Thursdays and from 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. on Tuesdays, the students are working on various projects for companies such as General Electric (GE), Geisinger Health System, and Corning Inc. The course is structured around a lecture period in which Professor of Electrical

and Computer Engineering Peter Jansson or Professor of Mechanical Engineering Steven Shooter presents a problem that engineers face in the world today (think designing for user safety or environmental sustainability). Participants are then expected to complete an individual or group project that presents a solution to the problem. The longer session on Tuesdays, however, is devoted to a semester-­long project that each group has been assigned. The members of each team, each with a unique product and project, meet extensively both in and out of class hours to complete research and design. Twice a semester, teams present to a panel of engineering faculty in order to gain critical feedback from leaders in their respective fields, including weekly phone calls with their company to ensure the best possible product. The skills garnered in this class should reap benefits when engineering students enter the job market. Biomedical Engineering student Tina Tionsong ’16 says, “My major achievement so far has been learning so many new skills... As my project is highly electrical, I have had to play catch-­up with my teammates to understand all of the intricacies of the design to the level that they do, but it has been so worth it to see my design in action.”


22

On Campus

WORDS Emily Malmquist The consistency of life at Bucknell can seem dull at times. But, in spite of its limitations, there is something oddly beautiful about the mundaneness of it all. Our four years here comprise perhaps the only period of our lives during which those surrounding us conduct their lives in a way overwhelmingly similar to our own. Never again will we live in a community in which every member essentially participates in the same daily activities as their peers. This uniformity can allow us to pick up on the smallest of details. When we put a bit of effort into recognizing all of the nuances that formulate the people, places, and objects around us, we find that there is something powerful about even the tiniest dimensions of our lives. Our influences manifest themselves in all forms imaginable; while obvious sources like our parents affect us in significant ways, obscure ones like the view from our bedroom window can affect us more subtly. Both ends of this spectrum hold an equal importance. In Carl Sagan’s reflection on the famous photograph “Pale Blue Dot” (a humbling photo of Earth taken from 3.7-billion miles away), he explains, “From this distant vantage point, the Earth might not seem of any particular interest. But for us, it’s different.” Similarly, the slight particulars that formulate any given individual’s world might be completely obscured from view. In exploration of this concept, I sought to find out a bit about the people that quietly influence our lives. I asked several Bucknellians to tell me about a person whom they do not personally know that has influenced their life in some way or another. These are the responses I received.

“I am really moved by Jeanette Walls, the woman who wrote the autobiography The Glass Castle. As a kid, she moved around a ton, and her life completely lacked structure because her family didn’t believe in it. Her parents, despite her mother being severely depressed and her father being an alcoholic, really stressed the importance of learning. She ended up funding her own college education at Barnard, which is incredible considering all of the negativity that surrounded her growing up. I was fortunate enough to have people that supported my journey to college, but she was able to succeed all on her own. She inspires me to push myself harder and to be grateful for everything I’ve been handed.”

GABY LAGANA, ’18

“Jim Carrey has made a huge impact on my life. The way he has used humor to describe life and give it color by taking certain things and embellishing them is so inspiring to me. There are always multiple perspectives, and I think he does a great job of highlighting that. I do standup comedy, and he’s always been a huge role model for me in terms of his multi-dimensional approach. I remember watching one of his 90’s pieces and thinking, ‘that’s the type of vibe and style I wanna give off when I perform.’ He can make anything come to life, and I admire that.”

BEN GERBER, ’18

“When I was a sophomore in high school, there was this one senior. Although I never met her, she gave a speech to my school while going through chemotherapy. In her speech, she talked about her favorite saying, ‘memento mori,’ which means remember your mortality. Her speech really got me to start thinking about treasuring every second of life. That was four years ago...she just passed away last year. I never met her and she probably had no clue who I was, but her words were really powerful then, and now they mean even more.”

MAX KANE, ’18

“Pretty much everyone who knows me also knows that I’m obsessed with Ike from ‘Fire Emblem 9,’ my favorite video game. He is the best-developed character from any video game I’ve ever played, with two entire video games centered on his story. He starts as a young boy and is trained to join his father’s mercenary group. Later, Ike gets involved in a nationwide conflict and, along the way, his father gets killed by a disciple in front of Ike. Watching him experience this emotional trauma and grow as he comes to terms with it is very moving. Beyond that, he’s a super blunt person. He always speaks his mind and has very strong morals; he’s not afraid to speak up. Sometimes I candy-coat my words because I’m afraid of hurting people’s feelings. But when I look to Ike, I feel obligated to be more honest because he never beats around the bush and yet is always thoughtful. Being purely honest is not unkind, in fact, it is probably the kindest thing someone could do.”

KEVIN SMITH, ’19

“An inspiring person I’ve never met before is Deborah Bial, the Posse CEO and founder. Realistically, without her and her work with the Posse organization, I wouldn’t be here. Everything she does is so touching and inspiring. Her whole goal is to allow students to attend great universities even if they do not have the financial opportunity to do so. She has been so successful in preventing money from denying a student a college education. Debbie has really motivated me to become the best leader I can be, whether it be in the form of an advisor, a classmate, a friend, a big, or a little. She stresses the importance of leadership and shows how leadership can be exercised in different forms. She has really inspired me, specifically here at Bucknell, not only to challenge myself academically, socially, and mentally but also to challenge my friends, my community, and the leaders of tomorrow. Her selflessness and dedication to students like myself inspires me to give back to the communities I am part of and to help others succeed on their journeys as she has helped me in mine.”

DIEGO ALDANA, ’18

“Pope Francis is one of the most impactful figures in my life. Despite all of the different beliefs in the world, and even though not everyone has the same religion or source of faith, he advocates for love amongst everyone. If you make love your priority, all of the other conflicts in the world seem so much smaller. Our planet would probably be so much more peaceful than it is right now if we could all be like the Pope. He really inspires me to seek truth, no matter what is going on in my life. My ultimate goal for my education is to give back, and, in order to do so, I need to have a purpose. Love is my purpose, thanks to the inspiration I have received from Pope Francis.”

JAE LEE, ’19

“One influential person whom I’ve never met before is Jeremy Clarkson. I’ve always been a car person; I consider cars to be real works of art and engineering. He, along with Richard Hammond and James May, are responsible for the show ‘Top Gear,’ which has heavily impacted me for the past ten years. They are definitely responsible for keeping me motivated as a mechanical engineering student...I just hope that I can have a job like theirs someday.”

“Mindy Kaling has been very influential to me...I’m a big fan of her writing and her TV show. I didn’t realize that script writing or writing an autobiography could be so powerful until I came across her work. As a creative writing major, I am inspired by the way she tailors her writing to be so funny. I want to go in that direction with my own writing. She’s also from Cambridge, Massachusetts, which is where I’m from, so I kinda just feel like I need to follow in her footsteps.”

“Neil deGrasse Tyson, the famous astrophysicist, is my role model. He’s a modern genius. He is one of the only people pushing for NASA to have extra funding by addressing the modern community. On a more personal level, his philosophy is one of the only things connecting me to my country, as a unit. If we all work together and listen to leaders like Neil deGrasse Tyson, we can reach our full potential as the United States. I don’t think of myself as a patriotic person, but he allows me to feel really passionate and hopeful for this country.”

JEMUEL STEPHENSON, ’17

DINAH TSEGAYE, ’18

STEPHEN WALSH, ’18


22

On Campus

WORDS Emily Malmquist The consistency of life at Bucknell can seem dull at times. But, in spite of its limitations, there is something oddly beautiful about the mundaneness of it all. Our four years here comprise perhaps the only period of our lives during which those surrounding us conduct their lives in a way overwhelmingly similar to our own. Never again will we live in a community in which every member essentially participates in the same daily activities as their peers. This uniformity can allow us to pick up on the smallest of details. When we put a bit of effort into recognizing all of the nuances that formulate the people, places, and objects around us, we find that there is something powerful about even the tiniest dimensions of our lives. Our influences manifest themselves in all forms imaginable; while obvious sources like our parents affect us in significant ways, obscure ones like the view from our bedroom window can affect us more subtly. Both ends of this spectrum hold an equal importance. In Carl Sagan’s reflection on the famous photograph “Pale Blue Dot” (a humbling photo of Earth taken from 3.7-billion miles away), he explains, “From this distant vantage point, the Earth might not seem of any particular interest. But for us, it’s different.” Similarly, the slight particulars that formulate any given individual’s world might be completely obscured from view. In exploration of this concept, I sought to find out a bit about the people that quietly influence our lives. I asked several Bucknellians to tell me about a person whom they do not personally know that has influenced their life in some way or another. These are the responses I received.

“I am really moved by Jeanette Walls, the woman who wrote the autobiography The Glass Castle. As a kid, she moved around a ton, and her life completely lacked structure because her family didn’t believe in it. Her parents, despite her mother being severely depressed and her father being an alcoholic, really stressed the importance of learning. She ended up funding her own college education at Barnard, which is incredible considering all of the negativity that surrounded her growing up. I was fortunate enough to have people that supported my journey to college, but she was able to succeed all on her own. She inspires me to push myself harder and to be grateful for everything I’ve been handed.”

GABY LAGANA, ’18

“Jim Carrey has made a huge impact on my life. The way he has used humor to describe life and give it color by taking certain things and embellishing them is so inspiring to me. There are always multiple perspectives, and I think he does a great job of highlighting that. I do standup comedy, and he’s always been a huge role model for me in terms of his multi-dimensional approach. I remember watching one of his 90’s pieces and thinking, ‘that’s the type of vibe and style I wanna give off when I perform.’ He can make anything come to life, and I admire that.”

BEN GERBER, ’18

“When I was a sophomore in high school, there was this one senior. Although I never met her, she gave a speech to my school while going through chemotherapy. In her speech, she talked about her favorite saying, ‘memento mori,’ which means remember your mortality. Her speech really got me to start thinking about treasuring every second of life. That was four years ago...she just passed away last year. I never met her and she probably had no clue who I was, but her words were really powerful then, and now they mean even more.”

MAX KANE, ’18

“Pretty much everyone who knows me also knows that I’m obsessed with Ike from ‘Fire Emblem 9,’ my favorite video game. He is the best-developed character from any video game I’ve ever played, with two entire video games centered on his story. He starts as a young boy and is trained to join his father’s mercenary group. Later, Ike gets involved in a nationwide conflict and, along the way, his father gets killed by a disciple in front of Ike. Watching him experience this emotional trauma and grow as he comes to terms with it is very moving. Beyond that, he’s a super blunt person. He always speaks his mind and has very strong morals; he’s not afraid to speak up. Sometimes I candy-coat my words because I’m afraid of hurting people’s feelings. But when I look to Ike, I feel obligated to be more honest because he never beats around the bush and yet is always thoughtful. Being purely honest is not unkind, in fact, it is probably the kindest thing someone could do.”

KEVIN SMITH, ’19

“An inspiring person I’ve never met before is Deborah Bial, the Posse CEO and founder. Realistically, without her and her work with the Posse organization, I wouldn’t be here. Everything she does is so touching and inspiring. Her whole goal is to allow students to attend great universities even if they do not have the financial opportunity to do so. She has been so successful in preventing money from denying a student a college education. Debbie has really motivated me to become the best leader I can be, whether it be in the form of an advisor, a classmate, a friend, a big, or a little. She stresses the importance of leadership and shows how leadership can be exercised in different forms. She has really inspired me, specifically here at Bucknell, not only to challenge myself academically, socially, and mentally but also to challenge my friends, my community, and the leaders of tomorrow. Her selflessness and dedication to students like myself inspires me to give back to the communities I am part of and to help others succeed on their journeys as she has helped me in mine.”

DIEGO ALDANA, ’18

“Pope Francis is one of the most impactful figures in my life. Despite all of the different beliefs in the world, and even though not everyone has the same religion or source of faith, he advocates for love amongst everyone. If you make love your priority, all of the other conflicts in the world seem so much smaller. Our planet would probably be so much more peaceful than it is right now if we could all be like the Pope. He really inspires me to seek truth, no matter what is going on in my life. My ultimate goal for my education is to give back, and, in order to do so, I need to have a purpose. Love is my purpose, thanks to the inspiration I have received from Pope Francis.”

JAE LEE, ’19

“One influential person whom I’ve never met before is Jeremy Clarkson. I’ve always been a car person; I consider cars to be real works of art and engineering. He, along with Richard Hammond and James May, are responsible for the show ‘Top Gear,’ which has heavily impacted me for the past ten years. They are definitely responsible for keeping me motivated as a mechanical engineering student...I just hope that I can have a job like theirs someday.”

“Mindy Kaling has been very influential to me...I’m a big fan of her writing and her TV show. I didn’t realize that script writing or writing an autobiography could be so powerful until I came across her work. As a creative writing major, I am inspired by the way she tailors her writing to be so funny. I want to go in that direction with my own writing. She’s also from Cambridge, Massachusetts, which is where I’m from, so I kinda just feel like I need to follow in her footsteps.”

“Neil deGrasse Tyson, the famous astrophysicist, is my role model. He’s a modern genius. He is one of the only people pushing for NASA to have extra funding by addressing the modern community. On a more personal level, his philosophy is one of the only things connecting me to my country, as a unit. If we all work together and listen to leaders like Neil deGrasse Tyson, we can reach our full potential as the United States. I don’t think of myself as a patriotic person, but he allows me to feel really passionate and hopeful for this country.”

JEMUEL STEPHENSON, ’17

DINAH TSEGAYE, ’18

STEPHEN WALSH, ’18


23

On Campus

On Campus

WORDS West Shepherd PHOTOS Mariele Saunders-Shultz

ackstage, she’s observing, taking deep breaths, listening for what sticks with the crowd. She’s done countless shows in the past, she’s performed all over the world, she’s bombed, and she’s lit up the room – but as comedians put it, you’re only as good as your last show. Nothing can truly prepare her for what she’s about to do, for what she knows she has to do: dive in with her shoulders back and try to keep her voice below a high C – god forbid she’d reveal early on in the set that deep down, she’s really still just a 12-year-old Jewish girl homeschooled since the womb.

24


23

On Campus

On Campus

WORDS West Shepherd PHOTOS Mariele Saunders-Shultz

ackstage, she’s observing, taking deep breaths, listening for what sticks with the crowd. She’s done countless shows in the past, she’s performed all over the world, she’s bombed, and she’s lit up the room – but as comedians put it, you’re only as good as your last show. Nothing can truly prepare her for what she’s about to do, for what she knows she has to do: dive in with her shoulders back and try to keep her voice below a high C – god forbid she’d reveal early on in the set that deep down, she’s really still just a 12-year-old Jewish girl homeschooled since the womb.

24


25

On Campus The question of ‘How to Live and Laugh Like a Pro’ is best answered by starting with the basics. Her name is Shiri Levine. When I asked her to tell me who she is, she said, “I’m a comedian, so basically I just make my parents unhappy.” More than upsetting her parents, she’s a co-founder of the ‘Nell Party –Bucknell’s Comedy Club, a Saturday Night Live (SNL) published writer, and a seasoned stand-up comic who has travelled on tours around the world. As a homeschooled child with-

On Campus During a recent comedy show at Bucknell, she came on stage and started the show by telling everyone that she had chlamydia. “We’re a huge liability, and we’re also BSG funded so…” She said she’d be sitting the next show out to help with more administrative tasks and recruiting new students to the club.

“I have no shame, I have no filter, and I’m not scared of anything, which I think is a problem.” Starting off the show like that got people’s attention. Levine WHEN I ASKED HER TO TELL ME WHO says you have to feel the crowd in the beginning to see SHE IS, SHE SAID: “I’M A COMEDIAN, SO what sticks and what doesn’t, BASICALLY I JUST MAKE MY PARENTS but she never holds back. “I like to push the boundary beUNHAPPY.” tween what’s funny and what’s out cable, Levine explains that SNL was disgusting.” She loves it when she tells a her only outlet to the real world. She says, joke and can feel the crowd groan in pain through fits of laughter, she thinks that’s because it was so over the top. “I love the part of the reason why she’s so messed power of being on stage and getting people up. Our interview started and ended with to think a different way.” It was comments Levine snickering the same comment: like this that make me realize Levine rep“Good luck writing this…” with an evil resents so much more than what it means laugh to cap it off. to be a stand-up comedian. She represents what it means to live a powerful and Although it hasn’t been as easy as actually fiercely independent life. Her Bucknell hanging out with Levine, writing this ar- stand-up comedy only scratches the surticle has opened my eyes to what it takes face of the crazy things she’s done. to be a female comedian, and, moreover, what it takes to succeed. “I’ve never cared I asked her about her experience on tour if someone else doesn’t like my stuff,” she in Europe and Australia. Specifically, I says. In fact, Levine said she loves being asked her what it was like to be a wombad at things. “I think I ran a 15 minute an on tour. “I’m always the only girl in mile in 5th grade and bragged about it to every group I’ve been in, and I hate that.” everyone.” This is where we start to get She always hears people saying she’s funto know the Levine that I’ve grown to ad- ny...for a girl. Being the only woman on mire. As a kid, she was always the odd one tour means always being an underdog, but out; never good at sports or art or any- that empowers her. “The percent of peothing else she can remember. What she ple who do comedy and have the balls to does remember is having a great time be- get up and do what I do…that’s how I can ing terrible and laughing the whole time. sleep at night.” But from my point of view, She told me that this is part of the reason Levine has much more to boast than just why she’s so fearless when she does stand having a solid set of cojones. As I menup. “I like being the underdog in a rough tioned before, Levine is an SNL published crowd. If they’re booing, I love that, I feed writer. Last summer, she got an internship off of it.” on the show that she had been watching for her entire life. “My initials are SNL, so Of course, I had to ask about the stand-up I think it was destiny,” she said semi-saritself. I asked her to describe the process, castically. Although she was stuck doing and what I learned is that stand-up has far the mundane tasks at first, there was one more structure than I thought. There are day when she was in the right place at the three main components of every show: 1) right time. Levine said Chris Pratt came The Setup 2) The Punchline and 3) The into the room and said he wanted to do a Tags (callbacks to previous jokes). “I have skit where he rapped. The writers looked to stick with the confident persona from at each other and said they had nothing the start or it’s gonna be rough,” she said. for him. But Levine spoke up and offered

a piece she had written that included a rap. Nobody took her up on it, so she got creative. “No one would read it, so I taped candy bars on it, and they all wanted the candy, so they read it…That’s how I got on SNL.” The skit she got published was called Booty Rap – you can find it online. “So much of it has to do with connections

and luck.” Going one step beyond luck, however, Levine’s work came to fruition due to her boldness to pitch her work to some of the most respected writers in the comedy world…and get it accepted. I asked her how she managed to study abroad in Australia and go on tour at the

COMEDY 101

A Lesson on Writing the Perfect Joke

When preparing a stand-up act, you can divide a joke into three main parts:

1. STATEMENT: An introductory line that explains the general topic and where the joke is going.

2. SET UP: The connection between the statement to the punchline that further explains the main ideas from the statement.

3. PUNCHLINE: The part of the joke that surprises and entertains an audience.

An Example from Shiri’s Set:

STATEMENT: My friends make fun of me all the time because me and this guy I’ve been hooking up with have been emailing back and forth on the school gmail.

SET UP: They’re always saying, “really Shi-

ri, you have so little game you’re emailing the people you have sex with now?”

PUNCHLINE: I was like, I don’t get why you’re laughing, you all email your professors too.

26 same time. She said she absolutely did not manage both and became the first person at Bucknell to fail two classes while abroad. When the School of Management brought her in to discuss her dire academic standing, they expected her to show regret and remorse for her decisions. Instead, she told them she was proud of her time abroad and wouldn’t have changed a thing, a testament to her tenacity. Levine’s reflections on her comedy experiences started sounding a lot like life wisdom, even though she didn’t mean them that way. Even though the school’s perception of her was as a failure, she didn’t need them, or anyone, to tell her what it meant to succeed. In life or in comedy, “the way you judge a person is not how they do when they’re succeeding, it’s how they do when they bomb.” And growing up, laughing at her failures was the very thing Levine excelled at. Levine said life is like comedy, “you can’t take it too seriously. Laugh at yourself, and laugh at the people around you.”


25

On Campus The question of ‘How to Live and Laugh Like a Pro’ is best answered by starting with the basics. Her name is Shiri Levine. When I asked her to tell me who she is, she said, “I’m a comedian, so basically I just make my parents unhappy.” More than upsetting her parents, she’s a co-founder of the ‘Nell Party –Bucknell’s Comedy Club, a Saturday Night Live (SNL) published writer, and a seasoned stand-up comic who has travelled on tours around the world. As a homeschooled child with-

On Campus During a recent comedy show at Bucknell, she came on stage and started the show by telling everyone that she had chlamydia. “We’re a huge liability, and we’re also BSG funded so…” She said she’d be sitting the next show out to help with more administrative tasks and recruiting new students to the club.

“I have no shame, I have no filter, and I’m not scared of anything, which I think is a problem.” Starting off the show like that got people’s attention. Levine WHEN I ASKED HER TO TELL ME WHO says you have to feel the crowd in the beginning to see SHE IS, SHE SAID: “I’M A COMEDIAN, SO what sticks and what doesn’t, BASICALLY I JUST MAKE MY PARENTS but she never holds back. “I like to push the boundary beUNHAPPY.” tween what’s funny and what’s out cable, Levine explains that SNL was disgusting.” She loves it when she tells a her only outlet to the real world. She says, joke and can feel the crowd groan in pain through fits of laughter, she thinks that’s because it was so over the top. “I love the part of the reason why she’s so messed power of being on stage and getting people up. Our interview started and ended with to think a different way.” It was comments Levine snickering the same comment: like this that make me realize Levine rep“Good luck writing this…” with an evil resents so much more than what it means laugh to cap it off. to be a stand-up comedian. She represents what it means to live a powerful and Although it hasn’t been as easy as actually fiercely independent life. Her Bucknell hanging out with Levine, writing this ar- stand-up comedy only scratches the surticle has opened my eyes to what it takes face of the crazy things she’s done. to be a female comedian, and, moreover, what it takes to succeed. “I’ve never cared I asked her about her experience on tour if someone else doesn’t like my stuff,” she in Europe and Australia. Specifically, I says. In fact, Levine said she loves being asked her what it was like to be a wombad at things. “I think I ran a 15 minute an on tour. “I’m always the only girl in mile in 5th grade and bragged about it to every group I’ve been in, and I hate that.” everyone.” This is where we start to get She always hears people saying she’s funto know the Levine that I’ve grown to ad- ny...for a girl. Being the only woman on mire. As a kid, she was always the odd one tour means always being an underdog, but out; never good at sports or art or any- that empowers her. “The percent of peothing else she can remember. What she ple who do comedy and have the balls to does remember is having a great time be- get up and do what I do…that’s how I can ing terrible and laughing the whole time. sleep at night.” But from my point of view, She told me that this is part of the reason Levine has much more to boast than just why she’s so fearless when she does stand having a solid set of cojones. As I menup. “I like being the underdog in a rough tioned before, Levine is an SNL published crowd. If they’re booing, I love that, I feed writer. Last summer, she got an internship off of it.” on the show that she had been watching for her entire life. “My initials are SNL, so Of course, I had to ask about the stand-up I think it was destiny,” she said semi-saritself. I asked her to describe the process, castically. Although she was stuck doing and what I learned is that stand-up has far the mundane tasks at first, there was one more structure than I thought. There are day when she was in the right place at the three main components of every show: 1) right time. Levine said Chris Pratt came The Setup 2) The Punchline and 3) The into the room and said he wanted to do a Tags (callbacks to previous jokes). “I have skit where he rapped. The writers looked to stick with the confident persona from at each other and said they had nothing the start or it’s gonna be rough,” she said. for him. But Levine spoke up and offered

a piece she had written that included a rap. Nobody took her up on it, so she got creative. “No one would read it, so I taped candy bars on it, and they all wanted the candy, so they read it…That’s how I got on SNL.” The skit she got published was called Booty Rap – you can find it online. “So much of it has to do with connections

and luck.” Going one step beyond luck, however, Levine’s work came to fruition due to her boldness to pitch her work to some of the most respected writers in the comedy world…and get it accepted. I asked her how she managed to study abroad in Australia and go on tour at the

COMEDY 101

A Lesson on Writing the Perfect Joke

When preparing a stand-up act, you can divide a joke into three main parts:

1. STATEMENT: An introductory line that explains the general topic and where the joke is going.

2. SET UP: The connection between the statement to the punchline that further explains the main ideas from the statement.

3. PUNCHLINE: The part of the joke that surprises and entertains an audience.

An Example from Shiri’s Set:

STATEMENT: My friends make fun of me all the time because me and this guy I’ve been hooking up with have been emailing back and forth on the school gmail.

SET UP: They’re always saying, “really Shi-

ri, you have so little game you’re emailing the people you have sex with now?”

PUNCHLINE: I was like, I don’t get why you’re laughing, you all email your professors too.

26 same time. She said she absolutely did not manage both and became the first person at Bucknell to fail two classes while abroad. When the School of Management brought her in to discuss her dire academic standing, they expected her to show regret and remorse for her decisions. Instead, she told them she was proud of her time abroad and wouldn’t have changed a thing, a testament to her tenacity. Levine’s reflections on her comedy experiences started sounding a lot like life wisdom, even though she didn’t mean them that way. Even though the school’s perception of her was as a failure, she didn’t need them, or anyone, to tell her what it meant to succeed. In life or in comedy, “the way you judge a person is not how they do when they’re succeeding, it’s how they do when they bomb.” And growing up, laughing at her failures was the very thing Levine excelled at. Levine said life is like comedy, “you can’t take it too seriously. Laugh at yourself, and laugh at the people around you.”


WORDS & PHOTOS Tom Bonan


WORDS & PHOTOS Tom Bonan


29

Feature The exterior of the factory somewhat obscures the businesses and artists that work inside it. It is an interesting juxtaposition of large industry and quiet, suburban residences.

ne of the more disorienting aspects of visiting Williamsport, PA is the proximity of large, industrial factories to suburban-style residences. Thinking about a town of just over 29,000 people does not usually conjure up images of massive factories dotting the cityscape. Nor does it necessarily stir up any thoughts on Williamsport’s eclectic mix of history – spanning from the world of Little League baseball to large-scale lumber production. Maybe the town is just quirky that way. It’s a difficult place to pin down. Travelling to Williamsport from Bucknell, you drive up Route 15 – past small towns that connect the highway to the even smaller rural farming communities – cross the Susquehanna River and end up on Market Street, where a classic Victorian promenade, with dark brick buildings, stands over wide pavilions. From there, the historic part of the town juts out east and west. The further you head in either direction, the more mid – to late – twentieth century suburban layout you see. Small townships that look almost as though they are part of the city itself, but are actually separate, fan out on either side of the city, giving it a mistakenly larger appearance. It appears, however, that most drivers bypass

this area completely, sticking to the wide arc that 15 makes as it swings around the city and heads north towards the border of New York. It is exemplary of those old industrial towns that have significantly quieted down over the years. If you stick with it and head into town, turning west a few miles up on Market Street, you’ll be immersed in a suburban grid much like the rest of Central MAYBE THE TOWN IS Pennsylvania. This QUIRKY THAT is where you come JUST across 300,000 WAY. IT’S A DIFFICULT square feet of what PLACE TO PIN DOWN. was once a rubber factory emerging high above the surrounding houses. The dark red brick squarely contrasts with the light blues and yellows of the neighboring houses, as does the turquoise-tinted, reinforced windows and rusted iron piping that juts out in every direction as you drive around. This building, originally built in 1883 by the Lycoming Rubber Company, is now home to the Pajama Factory: an “eclectic mix of emerging and established artists, businesses and entrepreneurs and community groups” – a strangely modern character awash in a uniquely historical town.


29

Feature The exterior of the factory somewhat obscures the businesses and artists that work inside it. It is an interesting juxtaposition of large industry and quiet, suburban residences.

ne of the more disorienting aspects of visiting Williamsport, PA is the proximity of large, industrial factories to suburban-style residences. Thinking about a town of just over 29,000 people does not usually conjure up images of massive factories dotting the cityscape. Nor does it necessarily stir up any thoughts on Williamsport’s eclectic mix of history – spanning from the world of Little League baseball to large-scale lumber production. Maybe the town is just quirky that way. It’s a difficult place to pin down. Travelling to Williamsport from Bucknell, you drive up Route 15 – past small towns that connect the highway to the even smaller rural farming communities – cross the Susquehanna River and end up on Market Street, where a classic Victorian promenade, with dark brick buildings, stands over wide pavilions. From there, the historic part of the town juts out east and west. The further you head in either direction, the more mid – to late – twentieth century suburban layout you see. Small townships that look almost as though they are part of the city itself, but are actually separate, fan out on either side of the city, giving it a mistakenly larger appearance. It appears, however, that most drivers bypass

this area completely, sticking to the wide arc that 15 makes as it swings around the city and heads north towards the border of New York. It is exemplary of those old industrial towns that have significantly quieted down over the years. If you stick with it and head into town, turning west a few miles up on Market Street, you’ll be immersed in a suburban grid much like the rest of Central MAYBE THE TOWN IS Pennsylvania. This QUIRKY THAT is where you come JUST across 300,000 WAY. IT’S A DIFFICULT square feet of what PLACE TO PIN DOWN. was once a rubber factory emerging high above the surrounding houses. The dark red brick squarely contrasts with the light blues and yellows of the neighboring houses, as does the turquoise-tinted, reinforced windows and rusted iron piping that juts out in every direction as you drive around. This building, originally built in 1883 by the Lycoming Rubber Company, is now home to the Pajama Factory: an “eclectic mix of emerging and established artists, businesses and entrepreneurs and community groups” – a strangely modern character awash in a uniquely historical town.


31

Feature

The anachronistic feel of the Factory only grows as you get closer. Inside, you are immersed by massive hallways – presumably due to the former presence of heavy machinery – and large rooms that fan out from these corridors. The signs outside, while large in their own right, are dwarfed by the genuine scale of the building itself, making the place feel more like a large institution than just a single place of business.

A very reasonable question to ask when visiting the Pajama Factory is why does this place exist where it does? It’s really simple actually: “the space is cheap.” Mark Winkelman told me. Winkelman is the owner and developer of this property, and I happened to catch him here during the weekend when he came up to do business. A resident of New York City, Winkelman is an architect and businessman, and he plays both parts well. He has the demeanor STREAK IS LARGELY of a creative type but can A BROADER HUMAN easily get lost in thought thinking through a WANT TO FIND A when business proposition.

THAT CREATIVE INDICATIVE OF TENDENCY TO SANCTUARY, A PLACE THAT ONE CAN RETIRE TO AND GET SOMETHING DONE. This is what I had driven up from Lewisburg to investigate. When you attend a school such as ours – where most major events take place in or around the town – it’s easy to amalgamate your physical surroundings into one large sum. Driving through town after town, one can be mistaken for another, making it easy to lose bearing on where you actually are. It takes something unique to pull you outside of your normal residence: the quirky farm-turned-restaurant a few minutes east, a farmer’s market that sells local produce, and especially a prodigious factory positioned right in the center of a town.

I asked him what originally moved him to create the Pajama Factory. From the way he was dealing with a prospective tenant before I met with him, it was clear he has the eye of a developer. Each move is oriented around creating a sustainable business that will someday be able to function on its own. Yet, in response to my question, he jokingly answered that he wanted a place to throw pottery once he retired, “And maybe one day we’ll get a whiskey distillery to open upstairs too. That’d be great; I wouldn’t even have to leave to go out and get a drink!” For him, the Factory is more than just a business; it is an initiative to foster a certain

kind of community involvement. His desire to throw pots may be his unique outlet, but that creative streak is largely indicative of a broader human tendency to want to find a sanctuary, a place that one can retire to and get something done. Many of the tenants that take up shop inside the Pajama Factory seem oriented around this central vision: to anchor themselves firmly in the center of an otherwise aimlessly spinning world. Foremost, the Factory is a provider of space – one thing that it has more than plenty of. The entrance is home to Way Cool Beans, a large coffee shop with a captivatingly bucolic atmosphere, which serves as a central meeting place for the factory. It’s a spot where anyone can come by and enjoy a warm cup of coffee in the presence of the happenings about the factory. Any ambulatory visit invariably begins and ends here. Heading up to the second, third, and fourth floors, the retail presence gives way to a different side of the Factory project. Up there, artists are basically given free reign for their work. Interweaving corridors connect with each other, physically and creatively linking each artist’s vision of their own work into a whole that is more than just the sum of its parts. Walking around, it is somewhat unclear

which areas are more studio-like – essentially full of works-in-progress – and which areas are galleries – organized for viewing. It creates an interesting dynamic where the artistic process is much more fluid. Nothing is really ever complete, as you can come back the following week and see a completely different landscape in which to view the works of the artists. The wide public throughways and spacious architectural design – both remnants of the original layout of the building – help further achieve this effect. Walking up to the fifth floor, there is a long, open space in which light pours in from both directions. While the artist spaces on the lower floors are more cordoned off, this area is more like a pristine landscape waiting to be developed. From this height, your vantage point is generally much higher than that of the surrounding buildings, which gives it the feel of a church steeple where vision is largely unobstructed in any direction. This floor is home to Mark’s vision of a “playpen for adults,” which will eventually become a series of high-end lofts and residences. This concept is where his view of the world is indelibly marked by New York: a place where people can find a home steeped within a much greater creative community. One element of the Factory that pervades each one of these spaces is this idea that things around here are constantly changing. The founders’ conception of the Factory has changed greatly over the years. This is where they are in a unique position to make an outsized impact on the local community as they curate their own initiatives to benefit the local area. One interesting plan that they have taken on recently is providing a summer residency program where artists can move into unoccupied student housing for the summer and work on their projects in the factory. This is the strong suit of the Pajama Factory mission: providing people with the opportunity to do something that they wouldn’t otherwise be able to afford. This is a common theme of both the artists and businesses that have made the Factory their home. Many have been priced out of the local market but have since been afforded greater freedom and flexibility inside the factory due to sheer size and access to resources. It is a creative realization of the practice of economies of scale.

The fifth floor of the Pajama Factory will eventually become an open social area as well as house some high-end apartment style spaces. Currently, it is open up to artists who are looking for larger spaces for their projects.

The types of businesses that have taken root here are indicative of this process: from White Knight’s Game Room (which also doubles as a homemade pickle shop) to the artisan soap shop and Bicycle Recycle Program. It’s hard to envision these stores lining the main downtown area of Williamsport, yet they all seem natural within the confines of the Factory. The mix of the unusual and the ordinary, the purely creative and purely practical is something that I think Winkelman prides in himself and in how the Factory has taken shape. It is a way of respecting and preserving the unique history of the factory, as well as the town as a whole, and has allowed for the growth of something that would not have otherwise existed. In an era that increasingly bears witness to a tenuous relationship between community and space, Williamsport, among other industrial towns in the United States, has been decreasing in population since at least the early 1960’s. This population decrease has led to a profound desire to find some way to ground the self. The Factory is largely a self-contained creative space, but has a certain permeability with the goings on about the town in which it is situated. It pulls in artists from a multitude of backgrounds and locations, all sharing that same vision of finding a place where they can manifest the art they want to bring into this world. The final vision for the factory – as a meeting ground, an efflorescing creative space,

a place of residence, and a place of business – is a strange amalgamation of many disparate types of engagement with the local community. Yet, it is all tied together by this idea that communities thrive on creativity and stand to benefit from something in which its citizens have a vested interest. So in that sense, the presence of a 300,000 square foot factory in the middle of a residential neighborhood is not at all disorienting in the way in which it originally appears to be. It is a re-imagination of a historical location that tackles the decline of industry in small towns. Buildings, communities, and businesses all become repurposed in a way that integrates the unique properties of the town: its strong historical legacy, the sense of identity that all the residents share with one another, and the desire to frame itself in a purposeful way. To the people that work, create, and, in the near future, live in the Factory, this shift in the town is more than evident to them. Winkelman and his team have taken on people that don’t view their relationship with the Pajama Factory as just another job, but instead see it as a broad community project – one where each person can make of it what they will and contribute to something larger than themselves. “The final goal,” Winkelman told me towards the end of our meeting, “is to create something that a lot of people in the community identify with – something that everyone wants to be a part of. And if we can fit a beer garden in there somewhere, that would be pretty great too.” He said with a chuckle.


31

Feature

The anachronistic feel of the Factory only grows as you get closer. Inside, you are immersed by massive hallways – presumably due to the former presence of heavy machinery – and large rooms that fan out from these corridors. The signs outside, while large in their own right, are dwarfed by the genuine scale of the building itself, making the place feel more like a large institution than just a single place of business.

A very reasonable question to ask when visiting the Pajama Factory is why does this place exist where it does? It’s really simple actually: “the space is cheap.” Mark Winkelman told me. Winkelman is the owner and developer of this property, and I happened to catch him here during the weekend when he came up to do business. A resident of New York City, Winkelman is an architect and businessman, and he plays both parts well. He has the demeanor STREAK IS LARGELY of a creative type but can A BROADER HUMAN easily get lost in thought thinking through a WANT TO FIND A when business proposition.

THAT CREATIVE INDICATIVE OF TENDENCY TO SANCTUARY, A PLACE THAT ONE CAN RETIRE TO AND GET SOMETHING DONE. This is what I had driven up from Lewisburg to investigate. When you attend a school such as ours – where most major events take place in or around the town – it’s easy to amalgamate your physical surroundings into one large sum. Driving through town after town, one can be mistaken for another, making it easy to lose bearing on where you actually are. It takes something unique to pull you outside of your normal residence: the quirky farm-turned-restaurant a few minutes east, a farmer’s market that sells local produce, and especially a prodigious factory positioned right in the center of a town.

I asked him what originally moved him to create the Pajama Factory. From the way he was dealing with a prospective tenant before I met with him, it was clear he has the eye of a developer. Each move is oriented around creating a sustainable business that will someday be able to function on its own. Yet, in response to my question, he jokingly answered that he wanted a place to throw pottery once he retired, “And maybe one day we’ll get a whiskey distillery to open upstairs too. That’d be great; I wouldn’t even have to leave to go out and get a drink!” For him, the Factory is more than just a business; it is an initiative to foster a certain

kind of community involvement. His desire to throw pots may be his unique outlet, but that creative streak is largely indicative of a broader human tendency to want to find a sanctuary, a place that one can retire to and get something done. Many of the tenants that take up shop inside the Pajama Factory seem oriented around this central vision: to anchor themselves firmly in the center of an otherwise aimlessly spinning world. Foremost, the Factory is a provider of space – one thing that it has more than plenty of. The entrance is home to Way Cool Beans, a large coffee shop with a captivatingly bucolic atmosphere, which serves as a central meeting place for the factory. It’s a spot where anyone can come by and enjoy a warm cup of coffee in the presence of the happenings about the factory. Any ambulatory visit invariably begins and ends here. Heading up to the second, third, and fourth floors, the retail presence gives way to a different side of the Factory project. Up there, artists are basically given free reign for their work. Interweaving corridors connect with each other, physically and creatively linking each artist’s vision of their own work into a whole that is more than just the sum of its parts. Walking around, it is somewhat unclear

which areas are more studio-like – essentially full of works-in-progress – and which areas are galleries – organized for viewing. It creates an interesting dynamic where the artistic process is much more fluid. Nothing is really ever complete, as you can come back the following week and see a completely different landscape in which to view the works of the artists. The wide public throughways and spacious architectural design – both remnants of the original layout of the building – help further achieve this effect. Walking up to the fifth floor, there is a long, open space in which light pours in from both directions. While the artist spaces on the lower floors are more cordoned off, this area is more like a pristine landscape waiting to be developed. From this height, your vantage point is generally much higher than that of the surrounding buildings, which gives it the feel of a church steeple where vision is largely unobstructed in any direction. This floor is home to Mark’s vision of a “playpen for adults,” which will eventually become a series of high-end lofts and residences. This concept is where his view of the world is indelibly marked by New York: a place where people can find a home steeped within a much greater creative community. One element of the Factory that pervades each one of these spaces is this idea that things around here are constantly changing. The founders’ conception of the Factory has changed greatly over the years. This is where they are in a unique position to make an outsized impact on the local community as they curate their own initiatives to benefit the local area. One interesting plan that they have taken on recently is providing a summer residency program where artists can move into unoccupied student housing for the summer and work on their projects in the factory. This is the strong suit of the Pajama Factory mission: providing people with the opportunity to do something that they wouldn’t otherwise be able to afford. This is a common theme of both the artists and businesses that have made the Factory their home. Many have been priced out of the local market but have since been afforded greater freedom and flexibility inside the factory due to sheer size and access to resources. It is a creative realization of the practice of economies of scale.

The fifth floor of the Pajama Factory will eventually become an open social area as well as house some high-end apartment style spaces. Currently, it is open up to artists who are looking for larger spaces for their projects.

The types of businesses that have taken root here are indicative of this process: from White Knight’s Game Room (which also doubles as a homemade pickle shop) to the artisan soap shop and Bicycle Recycle Program. It’s hard to envision these stores lining the main downtown area of Williamsport, yet they all seem natural within the confines of the Factory. The mix of the unusual and the ordinary, the purely creative and purely practical is something that I think Winkelman prides in himself and in how the Factory has taken shape. It is a way of respecting and preserving the unique history of the factory, as well as the town as a whole, and has allowed for the growth of something that would not have otherwise existed. In an era that increasingly bears witness to a tenuous relationship between community and space, Williamsport, among other industrial towns in the United States, has been decreasing in population since at least the early 1960’s. This population decrease has led to a profound desire to find some way to ground the self. The Factory is largely a self-contained creative space, but has a certain permeability with the goings on about the town in which it is situated. It pulls in artists from a multitude of backgrounds and locations, all sharing that same vision of finding a place where they can manifest the art they want to bring into this world. The final vision for the factory – as a meeting ground, an efflorescing creative space,

a place of residence, and a place of business – is a strange amalgamation of many disparate types of engagement with the local community. Yet, it is all tied together by this idea that communities thrive on creativity and stand to benefit from something in which its citizens have a vested interest. So in that sense, the presence of a 300,000 square foot factory in the middle of a residential neighborhood is not at all disorienting in the way in which it originally appears to be. It is a re-imagination of a historical location that tackles the decline of industry in small towns. Buildings, communities, and businesses all become repurposed in a way that integrates the unique properties of the town: its strong historical legacy, the sense of identity that all the residents share with one another, and the desire to frame itself in a purposeful way. To the people that work, create, and, in the near future, live in the Factory, this shift in the town is more than evident to them. Winkelman and his team have taken on people that don’t view their relationship with the Pajama Factory as just another job, but instead see it as a broad community project – one where each person can make of it what they will and contribute to something larger than themselves. “The final goal,” Winkelman told me towards the end of our meeting, “is to create something that a lot of people in the community identify with – something that everyone wants to be a part of. And if we can fit a beer garden in there somewhere, that would be pretty great too.” He said with a chuckle.


33

Photo Story

WORDS & PHOTOS Sean Gilchrist "Many people, Govinda, must go through a lot of changes, must wear all sorts of robes, I am one of them dear friend." - Hermann Hesse, Siddhartha The face is the most immediate representation of one's identity. Subjects in these photos are isolated to just their figure, making the focus of the photos their environment. This absence of personal identity aims to encourage the viewer to transpose themselves into the mis en scene of the photo. The pairings are meant to be reflections of one another, to convey a sense of interchangeability between the respective subjects. Although the persons exhibited differ in forms such as appearance, age, and gender, similarities in their positioning highlight the communal nature of the human experience.

Photo Story

34


33

Photo Story

WORDS & PHOTOS Sean Gilchrist "Many people, Govinda, must go through a lot of changes, must wear all sorts of robes, I am one of them dear friend." - Hermann Hesse, Siddhartha The face is the most immediate representation of one's identity. Subjects in these photos are isolated to just their figure, making the focus of the photos their environment. This absence of personal identity aims to encourage the viewer to transpose themselves into the mis en scene of the photo. The pairings are meant to be reflections of one another, to convey a sense of interchangeability between the respective subjects. Although the persons exhibited differ in forms such as appearance, age, and gender, similarities in their positioning highlight the communal nature of the human experience.

Photo Story

34


35

Photo Story

Photo Story

36


35

Photo Story

Photo Story

36


37

Photo Story


37

Photo Story


Photo Story

40


Photo Story

40


Feature

ne in every ten men surveyed on Bucknell’s campus said they would never consider voting for a woman for President, even if she were qualified and represented his political beliefs. If the woman running for office held the same political ideals as the voter, why would he hesitate to vote for her? Issues and stigmas facing women in politics pervade Bucknell’s campus and saturate today’s national political arena. Studies show that women are consistently underrepresented in every branch of government and are ultimately rendered an underutilized asset for positive, political change.

WOMEN, POLITICS, AND WHAT’S UP WORDS Amanda Battle & Meghan Byrd

With all of this said, women in US politics have come a long way. Our generation could be the first to witness a female American President, which fifty years ago would have been laughable. More people today are realizing the potential women have as political leaders and, in return, women are more confident in their abilities to take part in government affairs. Just like our male political counterparts, we too care deeply about our environment, fight against social injustices, and demand equal rights for all. So why do some still doubt our abilities as policy makers and leaders solely because of our gender? And, more importantly, how can we redirect and convince young women that they too have what it takes to be active, engaged, and leading members of the political process?

42


Feature

ne in every ten men surveyed on Bucknell’s campus said they would never consider voting for a woman for President, even if she were qualified and represented his political beliefs. If the woman running for office held the same political ideals as the voter, why would he hesitate to vote for her? Issues and stigmas facing women in politics pervade Bucknell’s campus and saturate today’s national political arena. Studies show that women are consistently underrepresented in every branch of government and are ultimately rendered an underutilized asset for positive, political change.

WOMEN, POLITICS, AND WHAT’S UP WORDS Amanda Battle & Meghan Byrd

With all of this said, women in US politics have come a long way. Our generation could be the first to witness a female American President, which fifty years ago would have been laughable. More people today are realizing the potential women have as political leaders and, in return, women are more confident in their abilities to take part in government affairs. Just like our male political counterparts, we too care deeply about our environment, fight against social injustices, and demand equal rights for all. So why do some still doubt our abilities as policy makers and leaders solely because of our gender? And, more importantly, how can we redirect and convince young women that they too have what it takes to be active, engaged, and leading members of the political process?

42


43

THE WHAT

A quick history lesson: for the past 240 years, the American people have voted 44 presidents into the executive office, and every single one has been male. Women make up 51% of society, but only 10% of federal lawmakers. So, why did it take the United States so long to have a highly viable female presidential candidate in the general election? Are women less engaged in the political process than men? Let’s take a closer look at the numbers to investigate these inquiries. In terms of voting, women are more politically engaged than men. Women vote at a higher rate than men and have determined the outcome of every single US presidential election since 1974. This is significant because it demonstrates the power and influence of the female vote in elections. Women not only come out to vote, but they do so in larger numbers than their male counterparts. Yet, the politicians elected are overwhelmingly male. 90% of federal lawmakers (Senate and House combined) are male. This is consistent with state and local governments as well: elected politicians

Feature

the statement posed. Men also rated themselves as feeling slightly more politically informed than their female counterparts. In certain areas, female students tended to be more politically inclined than male students. For instance, more women (71%) said they had an interest in politics and enjoyed political conversation than men (66%). Across the board, however, a shocking figure of less than half the Bucknell students surveyed had ever voted in an election, both male and female.

THE WHY

Why are there less women in office than men? The simple answer is: less women are running. When women do run, they win at the same rate as men in comparable races. The solution? We need more women on the ballot.

There are multiple factors that play into why women run less often than men do, and why they face more challenging campaigns. For one, the gender gap in US politics is rooted in three primary causes: interest, impact, and intention. Beyond that, men are able to fundraise at highTHE GENDER GAP IN US er rates than women, women are less POLITICS IS ROOTED IN THREE likely to see government as a means of PRIMARY CAUSES: INTEREST, positive societal change, and women struggle to win elections against inIMPACT, AND INTENTION. cumbents--who are typically males-because so few women were elected in are almost always male. Women have not the first place. The U.S. ranks 54th in the reached parity in any state congress or in world for political empowerment of womany federal branch of government. en, yet only 66% of the general public believe that inequality exists. When surveyed, Bucknell women and men were fairly even when it came to political Women are also held back by a lack of participation, including voting, volunteering confidence. It’s not that women aren’t cafor campaigns, and donating money to cam- pable of serving in political office—most paigns. Where they differed, however, was just feel like they are less capable. In her when asked if they believed there is a current book Lean In, Sheryl Sandberg, COO of inequality between men and women (so- Facebook, coins this feeling “the imposter cially, politically, economically, etc.). In this sydrome.” She explains that, while men scenario, 91.5% of Bucknell women surveyed are more likely to credit their success agreed with the statement, leaving 3.25% and with their own brilliance, women often 5.25% unsure and disagreeing respectfully. explain that they were lucky or had a lot Only 64% of Bucknell men surveyed agreed, of help from others. Even at the top of the on the other hand, while 16% were unsure. corporate ladder, women still feel incapaThis left a complete 20% disagreeing with ble and undeserving.

These concepts are easily applied to politics. According to national research, women on average need to be asked seven times to run for office, whereas men only need to be asked once on average This is a clear example of the gender confidence gap. Women do not feel empowered or confident to get involved in politics as compared to their male counterparts. On Bucknell’s campus, when asked if they felt that they would be qualified to run for office in the future, 69% of women responded either “definitely not” or “probably not”, while only 54% of men answered the same. Only 9% of Bucknell women surveyed responded “definitely yes” when asked this question, even though over 50% of Bucknell women reported that they have either taken a political science class or plan to take one in the future.

THE HOW (TO FIX)

We need to fundamentally alter how we think about women and their relationship with politics and government, and this will thus change women’s political perceptions about themselves collectively and individually. We need to appreciate the value women currently bring to the political table, as well as realize their massive, untapped, political potential. Women are more likely to work across the aisle, as well as more likely to consider all perspectives when writing, sponsoring, and voting on legislation. This wide, inclusive lens with which women examine politics renders women more likely to work with the other side--the opposing party--in politics. It is probable that, if more women were in office, there might be less political polarization. So if you’re a female college student reading this article, what can you do? 1. Get informed (read the news ie. Politico, Washington Post) 2. Take this quiz to find out which candidate most closely aligns with your views: https://www.isidewith.com/ 3. Talk about issues with friends and family 4. Donate to/volunteer for a campaign 5. Vote

WORDS Amanda Battle ow many times have you heard a female voter be asked, “Are you voting for her because she is a woman?” Let me translate that question, because at the root of that inquiry is the real accusation: are you voting with your vagina in the upcoming election?

voters and female candidates. First, it insults a female voter’s knowledge about politics. This question assumes a female voter only examines gender, instead of ideology and qualification, when determining who to vote for in an election. Women are capable of determining who to vote for based on merit.

In 1916, Jeannette Pickering Rankin was elected as the first woman in Congress. On Election Day, she said, “I may be the first woman member of Congress, but I won’t be the last.” Back in Rankin’s day, a woman’s right to vote was controversial; in fact, women didn’t have the right to vote until after Rankin was elected in 1921. Here in 2016, the controversy is not if a woman has the right to vote, but rather if a woman has the right to vote for another woman without receiving immediate judgment.

Second, the question implies that the candidate is not qualified because she is a woman. In 2016, I wanted to believe this wasn’t a reality. However, there is endless research to prove that gender is often equated with qualification, and women are perceived to be less qualified. I found this instantly in the most explicit way when scrolling through comments made publicly on social media in response to female candidates (these are real and they are direct quotes):

Politically active women get this question all the time. When directed at me, I take a deep breath and answer by explaining how I align with her political affiliation and ideology as well as believe she is qualified. Usually, they’ll follow up the question by asking: “But don’t you think the fact that she is a woman influences your vote?” And the conversation will continue from there as I continue to calm their concerns. Females supporting other females has created a public outcry. These reactions make me wonder: is a woman’s right to vote questioned when she votes for a woman? Why are female voters only perceived as rational voters when they support male candidates? The question at hand is inherently sexist and reflects a disheartening perception of female

“For the love of God, can you please stop mentioning you are a woman. It’s so insulting.” “If [candidate’s name] can’t satisfy her husband, what makes her think she can satisfy America?” “ALL YOU FOCUS ON IS FOR WOMEN TO HAVE THE SAME AMOUNT OF RIGHTS AS MEN. SMH” “I’d rather a kitten randomly paw at buttons as President than have a woman even step foot in the White House” “No [women] can’t. They aren’t as physically strong or coordinated. They are soft. I think they sports are important but honestly I would rather [be fined] $5 than attend a women’s basketball game. They are also too emotional about everything and cry all the damn time. There is a reason men have been the leaders of the household and leaders of governments throughout history.”

The problem is not with a woman’s ontology; rather, it lies with the notion that women are not holding positions of power and prominence in our society at the rates we would expect given their strong population in higher education. Because women are minimally in public leadership positions, we are socialized to associate masculinity with the qualities we desire in leaders. These leadership qualities are reason, strength, and tranquility. Whereas, the qualities we are socialized to associate with femininity are emotion, passivity, and nurturing. One mother wrote on social media, “My 6 year old daughter and I were reading the names of presidents of the United States tonight; and as we got to the middle, she stops me and asks, ‘Mommy why are they all boys? Where are the girls?’ All I could tell her is that one day soon it will change.” If little girls and boys could see more women in positions of power and leadership, women would be challenging and dismantling the gender roles that have previously held them back from gender equity in government and politics via precedent. With all of this said, women don’t just blindly vote for other women because of their shared gender. In fact, if we did, there would be equitable representation of men and women in public office because women have outnumbered males in voter turnout in the majority of federal elections since 1980. Next time you ask me that question, I’ll still answer it the same and I’ll still attempt to calm your concerns. But until you stop asking me if I’m voting with my vagina, I’ll keep assuming you’re a dick.


43

THE WHAT

A quick history lesson: for the past 240 years, the American people have voted 44 presidents into the executive office, and every single one has been male. Women make up 51% of society, but only 10% of federal lawmakers. So, why did it take the United States so long to have a highly viable female presidential candidate in the general election? Are women less engaged in the political process than men? Let’s take a closer look at the numbers to investigate these inquiries. In terms of voting, women are more politically engaged than men. Women vote at a higher rate than men and have determined the outcome of every single US presidential election since 1974. This is significant because it demonstrates the power and influence of the female vote in elections. Women not only come out to vote, but they do so in larger numbers than their male counterparts. Yet, the politicians elected are overwhelmingly male. 90% of federal lawmakers (Senate and House combined) are male. This is consistent with state and local governments as well: elected politicians

Feature

the statement posed. Men also rated themselves as feeling slightly more politically informed than their female counterparts. In certain areas, female students tended to be more politically inclined than male students. For instance, more women (71%) said they had an interest in politics and enjoyed political conversation than men (66%). Across the board, however, a shocking figure of less than half the Bucknell students surveyed had ever voted in an election, both male and female.

THE WHY

Why are there less women in office than men? The simple answer is: less women are running. When women do run, they win at the same rate as men in comparable races. The solution? We need more women on the ballot.

There are multiple factors that play into why women run less often than men do, and why they face more challenging campaigns. For one, the gender gap in US politics is rooted in three primary causes: interest, impact, and intention. Beyond that, men are able to fundraise at highTHE GENDER GAP IN US er rates than women, women are less POLITICS IS ROOTED IN THREE likely to see government as a means of PRIMARY CAUSES: INTEREST, positive societal change, and women struggle to win elections against inIMPACT, AND INTENTION. cumbents--who are typically males-because so few women were elected in are almost always male. Women have not the first place. The U.S. ranks 54th in the reached parity in any state congress or in world for political empowerment of womany federal branch of government. en, yet only 66% of the general public believe that inequality exists. When surveyed, Bucknell women and men were fairly even when it came to political Women are also held back by a lack of participation, including voting, volunteering confidence. It’s not that women aren’t cafor campaigns, and donating money to cam- pable of serving in political office—most paigns. Where they differed, however, was just feel like they are less capable. In her when asked if they believed there is a current book Lean In, Sheryl Sandberg, COO of inequality between men and women (so- Facebook, coins this feeling “the imposter cially, politically, economically, etc.). In this sydrome.” She explains that, while men scenario, 91.5% of Bucknell women surveyed are more likely to credit their success agreed with the statement, leaving 3.25% and with their own brilliance, women often 5.25% unsure and disagreeing respectfully. explain that they were lucky or had a lot Only 64% of Bucknell men surveyed agreed, of help from others. Even at the top of the on the other hand, while 16% were unsure. corporate ladder, women still feel incapaThis left a complete 20% disagreeing with ble and undeserving.

These concepts are easily applied to politics. According to national research, women on average need to be asked seven times to run for office, whereas men only need to be asked once on average This is a clear example of the gender confidence gap. Women do not feel empowered or confident to get involved in politics as compared to their male counterparts. On Bucknell’s campus, when asked if they felt that they would be qualified to run for office in the future, 69% of women responded either “definitely not” or “probably not”, while only 54% of men answered the same. Only 9% of Bucknell women surveyed responded “definitely yes” when asked this question, even though over 50% of Bucknell women reported that they have either taken a political science class or plan to take one in the future.

THE HOW (TO FIX)

We need to fundamentally alter how we think about women and their relationship with politics and government, and this will thus change women’s political perceptions about themselves collectively and individually. We need to appreciate the value women currently bring to the political table, as well as realize their massive, untapped, political potential. Women are more likely to work across the aisle, as well as more likely to consider all perspectives when writing, sponsoring, and voting on legislation. This wide, inclusive lens with which women examine politics renders women more likely to work with the other side--the opposing party--in politics. It is probable that, if more women were in office, there might be less political polarization. So if you’re a female college student reading this article, what can you do? 1. Get informed (read the news ie. Politico, Washington Post) 2. Take this quiz to find out which candidate most closely aligns with your views: https://www.isidewith.com/ 3. Talk about issues with friends and family 4. Donate to/volunteer for a campaign 5. Vote

WORDS Amanda Battle ow many times have you heard a female voter be asked, “Are you voting for her because she is a woman?” Let me translate that question, because at the root of that inquiry is the real accusation: are you voting with your vagina in the upcoming election?

voters and female candidates. First, it insults a female voter’s knowledge about politics. This question assumes a female voter only examines gender, instead of ideology and qualification, when determining who to vote for in an election. Women are capable of determining who to vote for based on merit.

In 1916, Jeannette Pickering Rankin was elected as the first woman in Congress. On Election Day, she said, “I may be the first woman member of Congress, but I won’t be the last.” Back in Rankin’s day, a woman’s right to vote was controversial; in fact, women didn’t have the right to vote until after Rankin was elected in 1921. Here in 2016, the controversy is not if a woman has the right to vote, but rather if a woman has the right to vote for another woman without receiving immediate judgment.

Second, the question implies that the candidate is not qualified because she is a woman. In 2016, I wanted to believe this wasn’t a reality. However, there is endless research to prove that gender is often equated with qualification, and women are perceived to be less qualified. I found this instantly in the most explicit way when scrolling through comments made publicly on social media in response to female candidates (these are real and they are direct quotes):

Politically active women get this question all the time. When directed at me, I take a deep breath and answer by explaining how I align with her political affiliation and ideology as well as believe she is qualified. Usually, they’ll follow up the question by asking: “But don’t you think the fact that she is a woman influences your vote?” And the conversation will continue from there as I continue to calm their concerns. Females supporting other females has created a public outcry. These reactions make me wonder: is a woman’s right to vote questioned when she votes for a woman? Why are female voters only perceived as rational voters when they support male candidates? The question at hand is inherently sexist and reflects a disheartening perception of female

“For the love of God, can you please stop mentioning you are a woman. It’s so insulting.” “If [candidate’s name] can’t satisfy her husband, what makes her think she can satisfy America?” “ALL YOU FOCUS ON IS FOR WOMEN TO HAVE THE SAME AMOUNT OF RIGHTS AS MEN. SMH” “I’d rather a kitten randomly paw at buttons as President than have a woman even step foot in the White House” “No [women] can’t. They aren’t as physically strong or coordinated. They are soft. I think they sports are important but honestly I would rather [be fined] $5 than attend a women’s basketball game. They are also too emotional about everything and cry all the damn time. There is a reason men have been the leaders of the household and leaders of governments throughout history.”

The problem is not with a woman’s ontology; rather, it lies with the notion that women are not holding positions of power and prominence in our society at the rates we would expect given their strong population in higher education. Because women are minimally in public leadership positions, we are socialized to associate masculinity with the qualities we desire in leaders. These leadership qualities are reason, strength, and tranquility. Whereas, the qualities we are socialized to associate with femininity are emotion, passivity, and nurturing. One mother wrote on social media, “My 6 year old daughter and I were reading the names of presidents of the United States tonight; and as we got to the middle, she stops me and asks, ‘Mommy why are they all boys? Where are the girls?’ All I could tell her is that one day soon it will change.” If little girls and boys could see more women in positions of power and leadership, women would be challenging and dismantling the gender roles that have previously held them back from gender equity in government and politics via precedent. With all of this said, women don’t just blindly vote for other women because of their shared gender. In fact, if we did, there would be equitable representation of men and women in public office because women have outnumbered males in voter turnout in the majority of federal elections since 1980. Next time you ask me that question, I’ll still answer it the same and I’ll still attempt to calm your concerns. But until you stop asking me if I’m voting with my vagina, I’ll keep assuming you’re a dick.


WORDS Maddie Liotta PHOTOS Becca Golding ILLUSTRATION Megan Cannella irst-year Rachel Guen has had quite the experience relocating from Boston’s bustling city atmosphere to Lewisburg: the antithesis of any large city. Boston is a city rich with history, but without much open air. Pennsylvania’s rolling hills and mountains can be a jarring change for anyone who isn’t fully prepared. “Living in the city really shaped me into who I am – especially the community I lived in and the public high school I attended, which was quite diverse. It really solidified my identity as an Asian-American,” Guen says. Guen’s switch from home to college was, as might be expected, difficult. Her close group from Posse, however, helped her to make the huge transition from Boston to Lewisburg. They have acted, and still act, as a fallback for her when times get tough. She shrugs, “Many people here have very different backgrounds and views, and the way they were raised seems quite different from me.”


WORDS Maddie Liotta PHOTOS Becca Golding ILLUSTRATION Megan Cannella irst-year Rachel Guen has had quite the experience relocating from Boston’s bustling city atmosphere to Lewisburg: the antithesis of any large city. Boston is a city rich with history, but without much open air. Pennsylvania’s rolling hills and mountains can be a jarring change for anyone who isn’t fully prepared. “Living in the city really shaped me into who I am – especially the community I lived in and the public high school I attended, which was quite diverse. It really solidified my identity as an Asian-American,” Guen says. Guen’s switch from home to college was, as might be expected, difficult. Her close group from Posse, however, helped her to make the huge transition from Boston to Lewisburg. They have acted, and still act, as a fallback for her when times get tough. She shrugs, “Many people here have very different backgrounds and views, and the way they were raised seems quite different from me.”


47 Guen’s excitement truly comes through when discussing her involvement on and off campus. “I’ve gotten involved in a lot of activities that have truly taken me out of my comfort zone!” she says with a smile. Her activities keep her busy and allow her to get to know a wide range of students on campus. She is a member of Students for Asian Awareness and Intervarsity Christian Fellowship, and she will be an usher at the Weis Performing Arts Center. She’s also a coxswain for the women’s rowing team and is a first violinist for Bucknell’s orchestra. When Guen discusses rowing and her new position as a coxswain, her enthusiasm shines through. “I haven’t taken gym since the seventh grade,” she laughed. “It’s weird going into a sport when I didn’t have much of a sports background or athletic ability. I’m really glad to have formed such a strong team bond with everyone. It’s great seeing them work together.” As a coxswain on the rowing team, Guen is required to clean the erg room where all of the rowers work, critique the rowers’ technique, provide encouragement, and keep the rowers focused during races. “Being a coxswain is helping me be more confident, but I still tend to be a bit quieter. It’s helped me develop quick-thinking skills and my voice. I’ve only been on the team for a couple of months, Rachel has performed violin pieces twice at Carnegie Hall, once in 2013 and most recently this past winter.

Feature so it’s been a work in progress,” she said. When the team rowed their first 2k of the season, Guen decided she’d hop on the erg and row one too. “They were in so much pain!” she shook her head. “I try to empathize with them as much as I can.” Guen is close to the novice girls on the team, having trained with them in the fall. “The other coxswain and I have similar jobs, and we always debrief on whatever happens during practice,” she said. Being a coxswain requires Guen to be in constant communication with her rowers and coaches.

Feature there’s much less time than there was in high school,” she said wryly.

onstage to those who were waiting to go on, Guen nodded, the memories returning.

provides full scholarship for those involved.

An accomplished violinist, Guen has played in regional, district, and national orchestras. She has also played at Carnegie Hall twice: first in her sophomore year of high school after she placed second in an international strings competition, and again this past winter when she placed second in an international concerto competition. “My first time at Carnegie Hall was exciting, but terrifying. I always dreamed of it, but never thought I’d be able to do it.” The realization of a lifelong dream is intoxicating. Guen’s opportunity to perform in front of a huge crowd at Carnegie Hall was both thrilling and nerve-wracking.

“I could feel the tension, excitement, and nervousness,” she commented. People were doing seemingly everyday things such as fixing their hair or grabbing some small snacks before their performance.”

“I wouldn’t have gotten to know the nine other students most likely if I wasn’t involved in Posse,” Guen said. “One of them actually went to my high school too, and we’d never crossed paths.” They all became close during the eight months of meeting. “It’s incredible that friendships such as these could come from 10 strangers being thrown together,” Guen added.

Guen is also extremely passionate about music. She has played the violin for 12 years and made Bucknell’s orchestra on an Arts Merit Scholarship. Orchestra has been WHEN THE TEAM ROWED THEIR FIRST 2K an incredible expe- OF THE SEASON, GUEN DECIDED SHE’D rience for her thus HOP ON THE ERG AND ROW ONE, TOO. far. Recently, she “THEY WERE IN SO MUCH PAIN!” SHE played in a concert that showcased mu- SHOOK HER HEAD, “I TRY TO EMPATHIZE sic written by mar- WITH THEM AS MUCH AS I CAN.” ginalized women. “I was the youngest performer there, and I “I started playing piano before violin, but was extremely intimidated,” she said, remiI’ve really always wanted to play violin be- niscing. She can still recall the sound of othcause of my cousin,” she smiled, continuing, ers warming up in their practice rooms and “I eventually quit piano and kept on with the music and distant applause seeping in violin. I also took up the flute in the tenth from the hall itself. There was a special mongrade but stopped when I got here because itor that also projected what was happening

For her second performance, Guen felt less nervous and more nostalgic. The night before, she got to explore the city with her parents and arrived backstage only a few hours prior to her last concert. “The second time I played there, it was so bittersweet. I just realized I probably wouldn’t be playing there again in the future. It was my last major performance as a soloist.” She smiled sadly. Guen had been playing violin for quite some time without truly considering her personal attachment to music. One concerto she played, composed by Barber, changed everything. “I felt a real connection to that music,” she said. “I found it’s an incredible outlet for different emotions. It really got me through my high school years.” Many musicians can attest to this. Music offers a solitude that cannot easily be found by pursuing any other type of activity. Music is, after all, its own language. Guen explained, “The Barber concerto is so emotional, it requires a lot of investment to play it and make it sound truly beautiful.” Her music teacher would make her play the piece repeatedly and take mental notes on what she felt as she played. By doing these drills, Guen was finally able to forge this valuable friendship between musician and music. “The best way to play music is to really feel it yourself, because anyone can play anything just out of technicality. The best music is produced when you put yourself into it.” Musicians everywhere reaffirm this sentiment – the realization of hidden emotions found only after playing a very personal piece. Like with music, Guen feels truly at home through her involvement with the Posse Scholars program. The program offers collegiate training for each core group before they head off to college and involves meeting every week to discuss social issues. “Nothing was off limits,” Guen said. The program also

The ability to meet so many different people with unique beliefs and experiences has been incredible for Guen. She expanded on the concept of becoming friends with people who she’d never even met before by conceding that it was intimidating, yet she wouldn’t exchange it for anything. “It was truly great to meet the Posse groups from L.A. and D.C. as well,” she commented. With such distinctly different cities making up the set, this seems like one of the best ways for each scholar to diversify themselves: by meeting new people with their own stories to tell. Guen has experienced some difficulty acclimating to a campus that is not only physically different from home, but also extremely homogenous. Many students have similar socioeconomic backgrounds, similar beliefs, and even hail from the same primary states. Posse, however, has helped Guen reaffirm her personal values: honesty, optimism, compassion, and hope. She believes that all of these are necessary to live a full life without the constant cloud of negativity that overshadows many college students. Her lifelong dream? To travel the world, and help the needy in Third World countries.

48


47 Guen’s excitement truly comes through when discussing her involvement on and off campus. “I’ve gotten involved in a lot of activities that have truly taken me out of my comfort zone!” she says with a smile. Her activities keep her busy and allow her to get to know a wide range of students on campus. She is a member of Students for Asian Awareness and Intervarsity Christian Fellowship, and she will be an usher at the Weis Performing Arts Center. She’s also a coxswain for the women’s rowing team and is a first violinist for Bucknell’s orchestra. When Guen discusses rowing and her new position as a coxswain, her enthusiasm shines through. “I haven’t taken gym since the seventh grade,” she laughed. “It’s weird going into a sport when I didn’t have much of a sports background or athletic ability. I’m really glad to have formed such a strong team bond with everyone. It’s great seeing them work together.” As a coxswain on the rowing team, Guen is required to clean the erg room where all of the rowers work, critique the rowers’ technique, provide encouragement, and keep the rowers focused during races. “Being a coxswain is helping me be more confident, but I still tend to be a bit quieter. It’s helped me develop quick-thinking skills and my voice. I’ve only been on the team for a couple of months, Rachel has performed violin pieces twice at Carnegie Hall, once in 2013 and most recently this past winter.

Feature so it’s been a work in progress,” she said. When the team rowed their first 2k of the season, Guen decided she’d hop on the erg and row one too. “They were in so much pain!” she shook her head. “I try to empathize with them as much as I can.” Guen is close to the novice girls on the team, having trained with them in the fall. “The other coxswain and I have similar jobs, and we always debrief on whatever happens during practice,” she said. Being a coxswain requires Guen to be in constant communication with her rowers and coaches.

Feature there’s much less time than there was in high school,” she said wryly.

onstage to those who were waiting to go on, Guen nodded, the memories returning.

provides full scholarship for those involved.

An accomplished violinist, Guen has played in regional, district, and national orchestras. She has also played at Carnegie Hall twice: first in her sophomore year of high school after she placed second in an international strings competition, and again this past winter when she placed second in an international concerto competition. “My first time at Carnegie Hall was exciting, but terrifying. I always dreamed of it, but never thought I’d be able to do it.” The realization of a lifelong dream is intoxicating. Guen’s opportunity to perform in front of a huge crowd at Carnegie Hall was both thrilling and nerve-wracking.

“I could feel the tension, excitement, and nervousness,” she commented. People were doing seemingly everyday things such as fixing their hair or grabbing some small snacks before their performance.”

“I wouldn’t have gotten to know the nine other students most likely if I wasn’t involved in Posse,” Guen said. “One of them actually went to my high school too, and we’d never crossed paths.” They all became close during the eight months of meeting. “It’s incredible that friendships such as these could come from 10 strangers being thrown together,” Guen added.

Guen is also extremely passionate about music. She has played the violin for 12 years and made Bucknell’s orchestra on an Arts Merit Scholarship. Orchestra has been WHEN THE TEAM ROWED THEIR FIRST 2K an incredible expe- OF THE SEASON, GUEN DECIDED SHE’D rience for her thus HOP ON THE ERG AND ROW ONE, TOO. far. Recently, she “THEY WERE IN SO MUCH PAIN!” SHE played in a concert that showcased mu- SHOOK HER HEAD, “I TRY TO EMPATHIZE sic written by mar- WITH THEM AS MUCH AS I CAN.” ginalized women. “I was the youngest performer there, and I “I started playing piano before violin, but was extremely intimidated,” she said, remiI’ve really always wanted to play violin be- niscing. She can still recall the sound of othcause of my cousin,” she smiled, continuing, ers warming up in their practice rooms and “I eventually quit piano and kept on with the music and distant applause seeping in violin. I also took up the flute in the tenth from the hall itself. There was a special mongrade but stopped when I got here because itor that also projected what was happening

For her second performance, Guen felt less nervous and more nostalgic. The night before, she got to explore the city with her parents and arrived backstage only a few hours prior to her last concert. “The second time I played there, it was so bittersweet. I just realized I probably wouldn’t be playing there again in the future. It was my last major performance as a soloist.” She smiled sadly. Guen had been playing violin for quite some time without truly considering her personal attachment to music. One concerto she played, composed by Barber, changed everything. “I felt a real connection to that music,” she said. “I found it’s an incredible outlet for different emotions. It really got me through my high school years.” Many musicians can attest to this. Music offers a solitude that cannot easily be found by pursuing any other type of activity. Music is, after all, its own language. Guen explained, “The Barber concerto is so emotional, it requires a lot of investment to play it and make it sound truly beautiful.” Her music teacher would make her play the piece repeatedly and take mental notes on what she felt as she played. By doing these drills, Guen was finally able to forge this valuable friendship between musician and music. “The best way to play music is to really feel it yourself, because anyone can play anything just out of technicality. The best music is produced when you put yourself into it.” Musicians everywhere reaffirm this sentiment – the realization of hidden emotions found only after playing a very personal piece. Like with music, Guen feels truly at home through her involvement with the Posse Scholars program. The program offers collegiate training for each core group before they head off to college and involves meeting every week to discuss social issues. “Nothing was off limits,” Guen said. The program also

The ability to meet so many different people with unique beliefs and experiences has been incredible for Guen. She expanded on the concept of becoming friends with people who she’d never even met before by conceding that it was intimidating, yet she wouldn’t exchange it for anything. “It was truly great to meet the Posse groups from L.A. and D.C. as well,” she commented. With such distinctly different cities making up the set, this seems like one of the best ways for each scholar to diversify themselves: by meeting new people with their own stories to tell. Guen has experienced some difficulty acclimating to a campus that is not only physically different from home, but also extremely homogenous. Many students have similar socioeconomic backgrounds, similar beliefs, and even hail from the same primary states. Posse, however, has helped Guen reaffirm her personal values: honesty, optimism, compassion, and hope. She believes that all of these are necessary to live a full life without the constant cloud of negativity that overshadows many college students. Her lifelong dream? To travel the world, and help the needy in Third World countries.

48


Peripheral WORDS & PHOTOS Alec Rogers

Every once in awhile, there are moments when we become so transfixed on something, in the physical or in the digital universe, that we fail to realize that there are others passing around us, each living their own complex life, similar to each of our own. This is the very definition of “sonder.” Chances are, most of the people we pass by, we might never have the chance to meet, and that fleeting moment may be the closest contact we will ever have.

In Copenhagen, locals tend to distance themselves from each other and at night there’s this eerie silence that often seems to consume the landscape. Since learning of “sonder,” I’ve become very interested in the motion that other people’s bodies make in our peripheral vision - how those blurred forms seem to go unnoticed or unrecognized and I attempted to replicate that visually, in the following series of photographs.


Peripheral WORDS & PHOTOS Alec Rogers

Every once in awhile, there are moments when we become so transfixed on something, in the physical or in the digital universe, that we fail to realize that there are others passing around us, each living their own complex life, similar to each of our own. This is the very definition of “sonder.” Chances are, most of the people we pass by, we might never have the chance to meet, and that fleeting moment may be the closest contact we will ever have.

In Copenhagen, locals tend to distance themselves from each other and at night there’s this eerie silence that often seems to consume the landscape. Since learning of “sonder,” I’ve become very interested in the motion that other people’s bodies make in our peripheral vision - how those blurred forms seem to go unnoticed or unrecognized and I attempted to replicate that visually, in the following series of photographs.


51

Photo Story

Photo Story

52


51

Photo Story

Photo Story

52


53

Photo Story

Photo Story

54


53

Photo Story

Photo Story

54


Feature

A Renaissance Man WORDS Madeline Diamond PHOTOS Erin Ditmar

f there were ever a Renaissance man on Bucknell’s campus, it would be Joseph Scapellato. A Visiting Assistant Professor of English, Scapellato has been at the University since 2008 although since that time he’s been busy far beyond teaching. While he has now dedicated his career to writing, Scapellato didn’t get the chance to take a creative writing class until his final year of undergrad, noting that he was desperate to do so. With the advice of a professor, Scapellato decided to apply for a Master of Fine Arts (MFA) program, something he had not previously known about or considered. “My whole life I wanted to be a writer. I didn’t know how much I was going to love teaching. I thought I might like it, but I ended up really loving it,” he said

of his beginnings of teaching during his fellowship at New Mexico State University, where he received his MFA in fiction. After his wife, Dustyn Martincich, now an Associate Professor of Theatre and Dance, got a job at Bucknell, Scapellato began building his teaching experience as an adjunct professor at Bucknell, as well as at Susquehanna University in Selinsgrove, PA.

In the mind of the writer

“My first love was myth… It was all I read as a kid,” he said of his early creative inspirations. “It’s still what I read when I need to recharge myself.” Scapellato recalled being captivated by mythology from Greek, African, Native American, and Norse cultures from an early age, all of which have influenced his writing today.

56


Feature

A Renaissance Man WORDS Madeline Diamond PHOTOS Erin Ditmar

f there were ever a Renaissance man on Bucknell’s campus, it would be Joseph Scapellato. A Visiting Assistant Professor of English, Scapellato has been at the University since 2008 although since that time he’s been busy far beyond teaching. While he has now dedicated his career to writing, Scapellato didn’t get the chance to take a creative writing class until his final year of undergrad, noting that he was desperate to do so. With the advice of a professor, Scapellato decided to apply for a Master of Fine Arts (MFA) program, something he had not previously known about or considered. “My whole life I wanted to be a writer. I didn’t know how much I was going to love teaching. I thought I might like it, but I ended up really loving it,” he said

of his beginnings of teaching during his fellowship at New Mexico State University, where he received his MFA in fiction. After his wife, Dustyn Martincich, now an Associate Professor of Theatre and Dance, got a job at Bucknell, Scapellato began building his teaching experience as an adjunct professor at Bucknell, as well as at Susquehanna University in Selinsgrove, PA.

In the mind of the writer

“My first love was myth… It was all I read as a kid,” he said of his early creative inspirations. “It’s still what I read when I need to recharge myself.” Scapellato recalled being captivated by mythology from Greek, African, Native American, and Norse cultures from an early age, all of which have influenced his writing today.

56


Feature

I gave the play to Sam and the actors and pain and love, while the violence gave us they’re making it theirs,” he said. Scapellato as actors a chance to explore stage combat noted that this cycle is what he loves about and physicality in a whole new way. It theatre. He explained that one always writes was an experience that I am incredibly with some sort of intention, whether it is specific or vague. “JOE SCAPELLATO’S WHEN PUSH COMES TO In the case of When Push Comes SHOVE WAS ONE OF THE MOST INTENSE to Shove, he started out with more of a structure, although AND EYE OPENING PLAYS I’VE EVER HAD THE he noted that the work will CHANCE TO BE A PART OF.” always assert itself during the writing process. A writer might even move grateful for,” she continued, in regard to away from their original intention, he said, as how Scapellato shaped the play. the work evolves. Scapellato also noted his satisfaction Despite sitting in on a few rehearsals and with the play’s outcome, as well as advising the director, Scapellato has taken a the overall experience of bringing the back seat during the play’s production, as is play from conception to production to commonly the writer’s role. performance.

“I try to write stories that have some kind of mythic dimension to them,” he continued, referencing how his childhood inspirations have stuck with him. In the midst of teaching courses in vareas of creative writing, Scapellato is working on a short story collection, Big Lonesome, forthcoming fall 2016 and a novel, The Made-Up Man, forthcoming spring 2017, both published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. When asked about how the writing process of these two works has been, Scapellato responded with a chuckle and a semi-sarcastic “Long.” Specifically with the short story collection, Scapellato has compiled many years worth of work and is now in the revision process with his editors. “I have to go into these stories that I wrote five years ago and get back into that old

logic and try to revise the story from the inside out,” he said. “If I had the same idea for the story now, I wouldn’t write it in the same way because I’ve changed as a writer,” he continued, noting the evolution of his writing process.

“A mini world embassy”

“To be in a university community is really exciting,” Scapellato said of his experience in Lewisburg thus far. “It’s kind of a mini world embassy, there’s people from all over the world here, and the University attracts them,” he continued. In writing his play, When Push Comes to Shove, performed by students on campus, Scapellato noted the exciting nature of the collaborative process. While he is undoubtedly well versed in multiple facets of creative writing, Scapellato’s involvement in this play came about under unique circumstances. The play’s director, Sam Norton, a

Lecturer in Theatre & Dance at the University, approached Scapellato with a proposal for a theatre piece. “[Norton’s] charge was to teach Bucknell students fight choreography,” he said, noting that stage combat is one of Norton’s specialties. However, Scapellato also noted that many fight plays lack dimension, so Norton approached him to write a new play involving fight choreography.

When push comes to shove: from script to stage

Scapellato was given the concept of the play: the title, the number of characters, the location, and the general plot, although he was given the freedom to shape the characters’ personalities and decide how the plot unfolds. “I was given this proposal, then I wrote a play and made it mine. Then

The cast of When Push Comes to Shove gave their opening performance on Friday, February 19th at the University’s Tustin Blackbox Theatre. Tustin’s secluded location, perched on the outskirts of campus, felt fitting for the moody nature of the play. After a full weekend a performances, the play closed with positive reviews and a content cast. “From laughing so hard we couldn’t get through some lines to being flung half way across the stage while thumb wrestling, Joe Scapellato’s When Push Comes to Shove was one of the most intense and eye opening plays I’ve ever had the chance to be a part of,” said cast member Emily Fischer ’17. “The lines were witty and funny yet made really insightful social commentary on

“It’s a wonder to watch a script become a play, to be awestruck, phase by phase, as a play becomes a thing that belongs to others. As the writer of a script I am not the owner of a play.  This play belongs to everyone who’s worked on it, whose names are recorded in the program, who through enormous and often unseen efforts have made it raw, real, personal, functional, sturdy, otherworldly -present, present, present,” he said. While When Push Comes to Shove’s theatrical run is finished, Scapellato has still got his hands full. Between his class schedule on campus and his upcoming book releases, the writer doesn’t show any signs of stopping, leaving us wondering the next project that he’ll make his.

58


Feature

I gave the play to Sam and the actors and pain and love, while the violence gave us they’re making it theirs,” he said. Scapellato as actors a chance to explore stage combat noted that this cycle is what he loves about and physicality in a whole new way. It theatre. He explained that one always writes was an experience that I am incredibly with some sort of intention, whether it is specific or vague. “JOE SCAPELLATO’S WHEN PUSH COMES TO In the case of When Push Comes SHOVE WAS ONE OF THE MOST INTENSE to Shove, he started out with more of a structure, although AND EYE OPENING PLAYS I’VE EVER HAD THE he noted that the work will CHANCE TO BE A PART OF.” always assert itself during the writing process. A writer might even move grateful for,” she continued, in regard to away from their original intention, he said, as how Scapellato shaped the play. the work evolves. Scapellato also noted his satisfaction Despite sitting in on a few rehearsals and with the play’s outcome, as well as advising the director, Scapellato has taken a the overall experience of bringing the back seat during the play’s production, as is play from conception to production to commonly the writer’s role. performance.

“I try to write stories that have some kind of mythic dimension to them,” he continued, referencing how his childhood inspirations have stuck with him. In the midst of teaching courses in vareas of creative writing, Scapellato is working on a short story collection, Big Lonesome, forthcoming fall 2016 and a novel, The Made-Up Man, forthcoming spring 2017, both published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. When asked about how the writing process of these two works has been, Scapellato responded with a chuckle and a semi-sarcastic “Long.” Specifically with the short story collection, Scapellato has compiled many years worth of work and is now in the revision process with his editors. “I have to go into these stories that I wrote five years ago and get back into that old

logic and try to revise the story from the inside out,” he said. “If I had the same idea for the story now, I wouldn’t write it in the same way because I’ve changed as a writer,” he continued, noting the evolution of his writing process.

“A mini world embassy”

“To be in a university community is really exciting,” Scapellato said of his experience in Lewisburg thus far. “It’s kind of a mini world embassy, there’s people from all over the world here, and the University attracts them,” he continued. In writing his play, When Push Comes to Shove, performed by students on campus, Scapellato noted the exciting nature of the collaborative process. While he is undoubtedly well versed in multiple facets of creative writing, Scapellato’s involvement in this play came about under unique circumstances. The play’s director, Sam Norton, a

Lecturer in Theatre & Dance at the University, approached Scapellato with a proposal for a theatre piece. “[Norton’s] charge was to teach Bucknell students fight choreography,” he said, noting that stage combat is one of Norton’s specialties. However, Scapellato also noted that many fight plays lack dimension, so Norton approached him to write a new play involving fight choreography.

When push comes to shove: from script to stage

Scapellato was given the concept of the play: the title, the number of characters, the location, and the general plot, although he was given the freedom to shape the characters’ personalities and decide how the plot unfolds. “I was given this proposal, then I wrote a play and made it mine. Then

The cast of When Push Comes to Shove gave their opening performance on Friday, February 19th at the University’s Tustin Blackbox Theatre. Tustin’s secluded location, perched on the outskirts of campus, felt fitting for the moody nature of the play. After a full weekend a performances, the play closed with positive reviews and a content cast. “From laughing so hard we couldn’t get through some lines to being flung half way across the stage while thumb wrestling, Joe Scapellato’s When Push Comes to Shove was one of the most intense and eye opening plays I’ve ever had the chance to be a part of,” said cast member Emily Fischer ’17. “The lines were witty and funny yet made really insightful social commentary on

“It’s a wonder to watch a script become a play, to be awestruck, phase by phase, as a play becomes a thing that belongs to others. As the writer of a script I am not the owner of a play.  This play belongs to everyone who’s worked on it, whose names are recorded in the program, who through enormous and often unseen efforts have made it raw, real, personal, functional, sturdy, otherworldly -present, present, present,” he said. While When Push Comes to Shove’s theatrical run is finished, Scapellato has still got his hands full. Between his class schedule on campus and his upcoming book releases, the writer doesn’t show any signs of stopping, leaving us wondering the next project that he’ll make his.

58


CJ Moy details his transition from Geology Major to Assistant Band Manager and everything that ensues. WORDS Avid Khorramian PHOTOS CJ Moy


CJ Moy details his transition from Geology Major to Assistant Band Manager and everything that ensues. WORDS Avid Khorramian PHOTOS CJ Moy


62

Feature CAP Center was willing to take the risk to book them.”

A month after graduation, Moy started working for them. He met the other band, DREAMERS, the first day “on the job.” Moy describes the scenario nearly a year later. “Ari met me at a coffee shop near the Knitting Factory and, after determining I wasn’t an idiot, he brought me to their show.”

that’s currently touring the states and performing their post-punk set lists. When asked to describe the band, Moy immediately retorted, “They have Jordan, he shapes their aesthetic so much.” Jordan Topf serves as the lead singer and primary persona-driving force of the band. Topf and the rest of Mainland drew inspiration from The Clash’s music videos, performances, and interviews; they used what they collected to piece together a deviant identity on the rock scene. Lamenting on stories he heard of the origins of the band, Moy explained the progression of Mainland’s identity via Topf’s mindset. “Let’s add color to our wardrobe. Let’s just be crazy on stage. Let’s fall over and make mistakes and own it. They’re just like, ‘I don’t give a fuck.’ And I like that.”

A GUTSY ROLE The position Moy accepted following the coffee shop offer was with Gutsy Management as an Assistant to Ari Goldstein. The assistant role sets Moy up with a less-than-conventional daily checklist. “I just do literally whatever we need to do,” Moy explains. “So sometimes I work on PR, sometimes I work with the label to plan out a marketing strategy for the bands. Right now I’m on tour with DREAMERS to take photos and basically be the assistant to the Tour Manager.”

DREAMERS, on the other hand, fall more in tune with the grunge rock scene. “They’re all from the 90s; they love psychedelic stuff. Cosmic stuff.” Although Moy has spent far more time on tour with Mainland than DREAMERS, he describes them as “clean cut” before quickly acknowledging a shift away from that persona since they made their move from Brooklyn to Los Angeles. “They’re becoming a little bit more relaxed, I guess. And I like that too. It’s fun to be with both bands at the same time because we all

After the late-April show, Mainland stuck around on campus. Moy recounts the night. “We bro’d down hard at Blue Dollhouse,” he explains. After chilling for a few hours, the subject shifted to business. “They told me that their manager was looking for someone to join his team.”

CJ Moy poses for a photo in Mainland lead singer Jordan Topf’s apartment, holding what he explains is the band’s unofficial symbol. (Photo Courtesy of Jordan Topf)

t’s 72 and sunny in Los Angeles, and CJ Moy is doing his best to get a word in over the cacophony of traffic roaring along Sunset Boulevard just a few feet to his left. We settle on meeting at a coffee shop in the burgeoning, artistic subset of the city, Silver Lake. An assortment of Los Angeles clichés make up the interior of the shop–floral wallpaper stems out of a mustache pattern on an adjacent wall, and a buzzing, pink neon sign ties it all together. The space serves as a near-perfect foil to the pastel, collegiate persona of Moy’s alma mater.

geology,” Moy recounts. “It’s kind of cool. Rocks are cool. I did it.”

Just 24 hours prior, Moy was with the band DREAMERS in San Diego for their show. Following a late-night drive back up the I-5 in the van, Moy takes hold of his coffee, bracing himself for an hour of storytelling before heading back to the house to prepare for their next tour stop.

At the end of his senior year, he was faced with a decision–go into the field of geology or pursue photography. He weighed his options, noting that entering the field of photography can be extremely difficult at a time when, particularly in the music industry, people often do not want to pay you. After hashing out his options, Moy settled with a completely different path. “I thought, why not try management? I’m competent. I can do things. So it kind of just fell into my lap.”

A SHIFT IN ACADEMIC PARADIGM During his time at Bucknell, Moy spent little to no class time on management or music. His early stint as an Electrical Engineer came to an end his sophomore year when lackluster grades resulted in his dismissal from the College of Engineering. His response? Become a Geology major. “I decided, well, I like

The early shift in his education’s trajectory, however, did little to sway Moy from finding what made him tick; instead, it catalyzed it. During his time back home in New York, he became more engaged with photography. The hobby would go on to develop beyond being just that, a hobby, instead providing him with opportunities to engage with new communities and work on projects across a spectrum of subjects.

FROM ROCKS TO ROCKSTARS “So many people complain about how vanilla their Bucknell experience is, but they never care to do anything about it,” Moy states, lamenting

on his university experience. His tone quickly shifts, however, from one of aloofness to one of enthusiasm as he launches into the story of his involvement in the inaugural Bison Sound festival. “I spent the last four years seeing rappers, washed up 2000s acts, country stars, and almost a famous button-pushing DJ take the stage at school, Moy explained. “Bison Sound was going to bring talent that the school would never risk bringing.” Moy went on to spend the next few months helping to plan the festival, putting most of his work into booking the shows for the festival and coordinating with the headliners after the deals were made. “My goal was to turn this opportunity into something more than that fun thing I did once in college,” Moy explains. And he went on to do just that. Moy initially found Mainland on Sound Cloud and had spent the past two years attempting to see that band live to no avail– all of the shows were either inconveniently 21+ or were scheduled while Moy was at school. Eventually, Moy found a solution. “I thought, why don’t I just book them at Bucknell if somebody will let me. And, surprisingly, somebody let me.” Moy continued, “I’m very grateful that Mike Duignan in the

When he’s not posted up in the back of a tour van, Moy has a wealth of locations to set up shop around New York City, ranging from YouTube Headquarters where he’s filming an acoustic session on a fake diner set to the respective label’s office where he’s planning out what the next step is. Each new office allows him to sink his teeth into the promotion and strategy side of the artists. The question at hand? “How do we share the music with everybody?” Days in the office still see Moy hyper-engaged with the bands touring the states; proximity is irrelevant in the role. “I feel like Q in James Bond. I’m remotely sitting in my office like all right, what do you need?” Moy adds. “How can I help you guys from miles away?” THE LINEUP The Gutsy Management lineup includes four bands in total: DREAMERS, Mainland, Ethan Burns, and Controller. Moy, however, spends the bulk of his time focusing on DREAMERS and Mainland. Mainland is a New York City based band

Members of the band Mainland take a smoke break in Portland, Maine. The band was accompanying the group Atlas Genius on tour at the time.

just get along so well and just hang out.” BEFORE THE SHOWS After driving however many hours from their last show to their next destination, Moy and the band often have a quick turnaround in heading to the night’s venue for sound check. “Before the show, we’re loading in, preparing, I’ll be setting stuff up with Ari,” Moy explains. It becomes routine–help the band set up, make sure the other band he’s not on tour with doesn’t need anything, make sure the band he’s on tour with doesn’t need anything, repeat. While some pre-show schedules are a bit hastier, Moy recalls one stop that was a bit different–a DREAMERS show in Hot Springs, Arkansas. “I don’t think I ever would’ve gone there myself if not for this tour. We weren’t expecting much from the venue, but upon arrival we were brought to the ‘VIP area’ where they had a full BBQ and Thai catered meal, masseuse, beer, and 2-ply toilet paper,” Moy recounts. “The room was super vibey and DIY—sorta like they drew inspiration from the Brooklyn Night Bazaar and Portlandia. A DJ set up to play a set for the 15 people in this room while the main show was going on downstairs. I laughed cause it looked like the DJ was wearing


62

Feature CAP Center was willing to take the risk to book them.”

A month after graduation, Moy started working for them. He met the other band, DREAMERS, the first day “on the job.” Moy describes the scenario nearly a year later. “Ari met me at a coffee shop near the Knitting Factory and, after determining I wasn’t an idiot, he brought me to their show.”

that’s currently touring the states and performing their post-punk set lists. When asked to describe the band, Moy immediately retorted, “They have Jordan, he shapes their aesthetic so much.” Jordan Topf serves as the lead singer and primary persona-driving force of the band. Topf and the rest of Mainland drew inspiration from The Clash’s music videos, performances, and interviews; they used what they collected to piece together a deviant identity on the rock scene. Lamenting on stories he heard of the origins of the band, Moy explained the progression of Mainland’s identity via Topf’s mindset. “Let’s add color to our wardrobe. Let’s just be crazy on stage. Let’s fall over and make mistakes and own it. They’re just like, ‘I don’t give a fuck.’ And I like that.”

A GUTSY ROLE The position Moy accepted following the coffee shop offer was with Gutsy Management as an Assistant to Ari Goldstein. The assistant role sets Moy up with a less-than-conventional daily checklist. “I just do literally whatever we need to do,” Moy explains. “So sometimes I work on PR, sometimes I work with the label to plan out a marketing strategy for the bands. Right now I’m on tour with DREAMERS to take photos and basically be the assistant to the Tour Manager.”

DREAMERS, on the other hand, fall more in tune with the grunge rock scene. “They’re all from the 90s; they love psychedelic stuff. Cosmic stuff.” Although Moy has spent far more time on tour with Mainland than DREAMERS, he describes them as “clean cut” before quickly acknowledging a shift away from that persona since they made their move from Brooklyn to Los Angeles. “They’re becoming a little bit more relaxed, I guess. And I like that too. It’s fun to be with both bands at the same time because we all

After the late-April show, Mainland stuck around on campus. Moy recounts the night. “We bro’d down hard at Blue Dollhouse,” he explains. After chilling for a few hours, the subject shifted to business. “They told me that their manager was looking for someone to join his team.”

CJ Moy poses for a photo in Mainland lead singer Jordan Topf’s apartment, holding what he explains is the band’s unofficial symbol. (Photo Courtesy of Jordan Topf)

t’s 72 and sunny in Los Angeles, and CJ Moy is doing his best to get a word in over the cacophony of traffic roaring along Sunset Boulevard just a few feet to his left. We settle on meeting at a coffee shop in the burgeoning, artistic subset of the city, Silver Lake. An assortment of Los Angeles clichés make up the interior of the shop–floral wallpaper stems out of a mustache pattern on an adjacent wall, and a buzzing, pink neon sign ties it all together. The space serves as a near-perfect foil to the pastel, collegiate persona of Moy’s alma mater.

geology,” Moy recounts. “It’s kind of cool. Rocks are cool. I did it.”

Just 24 hours prior, Moy was with the band DREAMERS in San Diego for their show. Following a late-night drive back up the I-5 in the van, Moy takes hold of his coffee, bracing himself for an hour of storytelling before heading back to the house to prepare for their next tour stop.

At the end of his senior year, he was faced with a decision–go into the field of geology or pursue photography. He weighed his options, noting that entering the field of photography can be extremely difficult at a time when, particularly in the music industry, people often do not want to pay you. After hashing out his options, Moy settled with a completely different path. “I thought, why not try management? I’m competent. I can do things. So it kind of just fell into my lap.”

A SHIFT IN ACADEMIC PARADIGM During his time at Bucknell, Moy spent little to no class time on management or music. His early stint as an Electrical Engineer came to an end his sophomore year when lackluster grades resulted in his dismissal from the College of Engineering. His response? Become a Geology major. “I decided, well, I like

The early shift in his education’s trajectory, however, did little to sway Moy from finding what made him tick; instead, it catalyzed it. During his time back home in New York, he became more engaged with photography. The hobby would go on to develop beyond being just that, a hobby, instead providing him with opportunities to engage with new communities and work on projects across a spectrum of subjects.

FROM ROCKS TO ROCKSTARS “So many people complain about how vanilla their Bucknell experience is, but they never care to do anything about it,” Moy states, lamenting

on his university experience. His tone quickly shifts, however, from one of aloofness to one of enthusiasm as he launches into the story of his involvement in the inaugural Bison Sound festival. “I spent the last four years seeing rappers, washed up 2000s acts, country stars, and almost a famous button-pushing DJ take the stage at school, Moy explained. “Bison Sound was going to bring talent that the school would never risk bringing.” Moy went on to spend the next few months helping to plan the festival, putting most of his work into booking the shows for the festival and coordinating with the headliners after the deals were made. “My goal was to turn this opportunity into something more than that fun thing I did once in college,” Moy explains. And he went on to do just that. Moy initially found Mainland on Sound Cloud and had spent the past two years attempting to see that band live to no avail– all of the shows were either inconveniently 21+ or were scheduled while Moy was at school. Eventually, Moy found a solution. “I thought, why don’t I just book them at Bucknell if somebody will let me. And, surprisingly, somebody let me.” Moy continued, “I’m very grateful that Mike Duignan in the

When he’s not posted up in the back of a tour van, Moy has a wealth of locations to set up shop around New York City, ranging from YouTube Headquarters where he’s filming an acoustic session on a fake diner set to the respective label’s office where he’s planning out what the next step is. Each new office allows him to sink his teeth into the promotion and strategy side of the artists. The question at hand? “How do we share the music with everybody?” Days in the office still see Moy hyper-engaged with the bands touring the states; proximity is irrelevant in the role. “I feel like Q in James Bond. I’m remotely sitting in my office like all right, what do you need?” Moy adds. “How can I help you guys from miles away?” THE LINEUP The Gutsy Management lineup includes four bands in total: DREAMERS, Mainland, Ethan Burns, and Controller. Moy, however, spends the bulk of his time focusing on DREAMERS and Mainland. Mainland is a New York City based band

Members of the band Mainland take a smoke break in Portland, Maine. The band was accompanying the group Atlas Genius on tour at the time.

just get along so well and just hang out.” BEFORE THE SHOWS After driving however many hours from their last show to their next destination, Moy and the band often have a quick turnaround in heading to the night’s venue for sound check. “Before the show, we’re loading in, preparing, I’ll be setting stuff up with Ari,” Moy explains. It becomes routine–help the band set up, make sure the other band he’s not on tour with doesn’t need anything, make sure the band he’s on tour with doesn’t need anything, repeat. While some pre-show schedules are a bit hastier, Moy recalls one stop that was a bit different–a DREAMERS show in Hot Springs, Arkansas. “I don’t think I ever would’ve gone there myself if not for this tour. We weren’t expecting much from the venue, but upon arrival we were brought to the ‘VIP area’ where they had a full BBQ and Thai catered meal, masseuse, beer, and 2-ply toilet paper,” Moy recounts. “The room was super vibey and DIY—sorta like they drew inspiration from the Brooklyn Night Bazaar and Portlandia. A DJ set up to play a set for the 15 people in this room while the main show was going on downstairs. I laughed cause it looked like the DJ was wearing


63 a Groucho Marx mask. Turns out he is a member of Alt-J.” DURING THE SHOWS During the sets, Moy is typically capturing what’s on stage in one form or another— whether it be shooting photos on his camera or taking videos of the sets for fans on Periscope. Depending on the venue, you can find Moy on the wings, in the pit, or wherever he can squeeze in. He does, however, make a point to be conscious of the crowd when positioning himself at sets. “You know, you want to be nice to the fans because they’re paying to be there,” Moy asserts. “I hate those photographers from like Rolling Stone who’re just like, ‘Oh, screw the fans. I’m here, I’m getting paid, I’m doing my job.’ No. You’re part of the show too.” In terms of the crowds’ relationships with the bands, Moy describes a spectrum of reactions, each show differing greatly from the next. “Even though Mainland, Dreamers, they’re New York City-based, fans in New York, they’re just not as excited as other places in the country,” Moy explains. “We go to Buffalo and these fans, they don’t get to see bands all the time, cool bands. So they’re really engaged;

Feature they just want to hug you. They just want to talk to you about their problems. They want to buy all your t-shirts. It’s so nice.” Moy continued to discuss the fans’ relationships with the bands. “It’s refreshing to see people share the same appreciation for the music that I enjoy,” he explains. He went on to discuss the extent to which some fans go to express their dedication to the bands and their gratitude. “Some have gotten tattoos in the bands’ handwriting. Some have changed the way they dressed to reflect the band—even to reflect the band’s girlfriends’ styles. Some write and Snapchat the band every day to say how a song changed their life,” the list goes on. Taking a macro look, he reflects on the larger implications of these fans’ actions. “Cynics reduce the music industry to just a business,” he begins. “Working so close with rising bands and smaller labels that give a shit about their artists proves to me that music is still more than the money. We’re in business of shaping culture and making people feel things, even at the smallest scales.” AFTER THE SHOWS Some of Moy’s most distinct memories, however, come from after the sets are com-

pleted. He dubbed Boston his favorite tour stop with Mainland, referencing the opportunity to hang out with Magic Man as a part of his reasoning, and said that he was enjoying the first main stop he had with DREAMERS on tour, Los Angeles. He also began a story of that one time he celebrated his birthday in Ferndale, Michigan at a bar hosting a karaoke night. Beyond the distinctly positive memories is a wealth of noteworthy “others.” One night, for example, Moy found himself en route to a goth party while on the road with Mainland and DREAMERS who were supporting Atlas Genius on tour. Following their show at Rochester’s Montage Music Hall, they stuck to their routine of settling down at a bar. “We went out for drinks at this bougie hip bar that seemed better suited for Manhattan rather than upstate New York,” Moy begins. “Both bands seemed out of place not wearing the button up oxfords and blazers. We were about to head in for the night when one of the guys was tipped off about a goth party in town. Tour is all about the weird experiences before and after gigs. We had to go.” Moy continued, “This was when I learned Rochester had a big enough goth population DREAMERS work to debunk their van troubles in New Mexico.

to open up a three story lair of darkness. I felt like a first year walking into a frat party for the first time, except people were wearing dog collars, black leather everything, and platform shoes instead of Vineyard Vines. The DJ was spinning Joy Division and The Cure instead of Fall Out Boy. All the patrons were there to fulfill strange fantasies and have fun being weird. Great vibes. They don’t teach you about this in college.” Moy tapers off, “You get to see parts of the country that I would never get to see and hang out with people and really slum it and it’s fun. I like that.” OUT OF THE MICROCOSIM During his first week on the job with Mainland, Moy had the opportunity to meet their label head at 300 Entertainment, Lyor Cohen. Mainland was playing a gig at the Chelsea Hotel, and the band and crew had just finished dinner and were now waiting outside the venue to be let in for set up. Moy recalls, “Lyor came out of nowhere and scolded us for waiting.” Cohen approached the group. “Rock stars don’t wait outside,” he stated almost as bluntly as the music industry itself. “Either go in like you own the place, or find the nearest bar.” He took them to bar next door, ordered them all drinks, a plate of bacon for himself, and every cake on the menu. Upholding the rock star persona while assuming a role behind the scenes is where Moy’s position comes in. “Yeah, I’m not going to be the one that everyone wants to take photos with and sign autographs, even though that’s actually happened,” Moy explains, laughing at the memory of one fan going out of her way to request his autograph. “And yeah, I’m not the main character, but it’s fun to help other people see through their artistic vision. Working in management and photography puts me behind the scenes. The story is about the band, not me, but I’m here to help write it and record it.” Moy takes a second to realign his thoughts– quickly shifting from views about how easy it is to feel important on a campus as small as Bucknell’s to the varying influences of respective city sizes–before asserting his takeaway. “The second you step out, you realize that in LA or New York City, nobody cares about you. And it’s okay. It’s kind of cool.”

TOP Mainland bassist Alex Pitta performs in the “Not As Cool As Me” music video shoot. Director Pete Voelker filmed the shot in East Williamsburg, while Moy stood by to assist. BOTTOM DREAMERS takes the stage in Austin, Texas to perform a televised rooftop show. The set was a part of their involvement at South by Southwest RIGHT Members of Mainland take a quick stop at Skeeter’s BBQ Pit in Selinsgrove, PA for dinner. The band drove through Lewisburg on their tour route.


63 a Groucho Marx mask. Turns out he is a member of Alt-J.” DURING THE SHOWS During the sets, Moy is typically capturing what’s on stage in one form or another— whether it be shooting photos on his camera or taking videos of the sets for fans on Periscope. Depending on the venue, you can find Moy on the wings, in the pit, or wherever he can squeeze in. He does, however, make a point to be conscious of the crowd when positioning himself at sets. “You know, you want to be nice to the fans because they’re paying to be there,” Moy asserts. “I hate those photographers from like Rolling Stone who’re just like, ‘Oh, screw the fans. I’m here, I’m getting paid, I’m doing my job.’ No. You’re part of the show too.” In terms of the crowds’ relationships with the bands, Moy describes a spectrum of reactions, each show differing greatly from the next. “Even though Mainland, Dreamers, they’re New York City-based, fans in New York, they’re just not as excited as other places in the country,” Moy explains. “We go to Buffalo and these fans, they don’t get to see bands all the time, cool bands. So they’re really engaged;

Feature they just want to hug you. They just want to talk to you about their problems. They want to buy all your t-shirts. It’s so nice.” Moy continued to discuss the fans’ relationships with the bands. “It’s refreshing to see people share the same appreciation for the music that I enjoy,” he explains. He went on to discuss the extent to which some fans go to express their dedication to the bands and their gratitude. “Some have gotten tattoos in the bands’ handwriting. Some have changed the way they dressed to reflect the band—even to reflect the band’s girlfriends’ styles. Some write and Snapchat the band every day to say how a song changed their life,” the list goes on. Taking a macro look, he reflects on the larger implications of these fans’ actions. “Cynics reduce the music industry to just a business,” he begins. “Working so close with rising bands and smaller labels that give a shit about their artists proves to me that music is still more than the money. We’re in business of shaping culture and making people feel things, even at the smallest scales.” AFTER THE SHOWS Some of Moy’s most distinct memories, however, come from after the sets are com-

pleted. He dubbed Boston his favorite tour stop with Mainland, referencing the opportunity to hang out with Magic Man as a part of his reasoning, and said that he was enjoying the first main stop he had with DREAMERS on tour, Los Angeles. He also began a story of that one time he celebrated his birthday in Ferndale, Michigan at a bar hosting a karaoke night. Beyond the distinctly positive memories is a wealth of noteworthy “others.” One night, for example, Moy found himself en route to a goth party while on the road with Mainland and DREAMERS who were supporting Atlas Genius on tour. Following their show at Rochester’s Montage Music Hall, they stuck to their routine of settling down at a bar. “We went out for drinks at this bougie hip bar that seemed better suited for Manhattan rather than upstate New York,” Moy begins. “Both bands seemed out of place not wearing the button up oxfords and blazers. We were about to head in for the night when one of the guys was tipped off about a goth party in town. Tour is all about the weird experiences before and after gigs. We had to go.” Moy continued, “This was when I learned Rochester had a big enough goth population DREAMERS work to debunk their van troubles in New Mexico.

to open up a three story lair of darkness. I felt like a first year walking into a frat party for the first time, except people were wearing dog collars, black leather everything, and platform shoes instead of Vineyard Vines. The DJ was spinning Joy Division and The Cure instead of Fall Out Boy. All the patrons were there to fulfill strange fantasies and have fun being weird. Great vibes. They don’t teach you about this in college.” Moy tapers off, “You get to see parts of the country that I would never get to see and hang out with people and really slum it and it’s fun. I like that.” OUT OF THE MICROCOSIM During his first week on the job with Mainland, Moy had the opportunity to meet their label head at 300 Entertainment, Lyor Cohen. Mainland was playing a gig at the Chelsea Hotel, and the band and crew had just finished dinner and were now waiting outside the venue to be let in for set up. Moy recalls, “Lyor came out of nowhere and scolded us for waiting.” Cohen approached the group. “Rock stars don’t wait outside,” he stated almost as bluntly as the music industry itself. “Either go in like you own the place, or find the nearest bar.” He took them to bar next door, ordered them all drinks, a plate of bacon for himself, and every cake on the menu. Upholding the rock star persona while assuming a role behind the scenes is where Moy’s position comes in. “Yeah, I’m not going to be the one that everyone wants to take photos with and sign autographs, even though that’s actually happened,” Moy explains, laughing at the memory of one fan going out of her way to request his autograph. “And yeah, I’m not the main character, but it’s fun to help other people see through their artistic vision. Working in management and photography puts me behind the scenes. The story is about the band, not me, but I’m here to help write it and record it.” Moy takes a second to realign his thoughts– quickly shifting from views about how easy it is to feel important on a campus as small as Bucknell’s to the varying influences of respective city sizes–before asserting his takeaway. “The second you step out, you realize that in LA or New York City, nobody cares about you. And it’s okay. It’s kind of cool.”

TOP Mainland bassist Alex Pitta performs in the “Not As Cool As Me” music video shoot. Director Pete Voelker filmed the shot in East Williamsburg, while Moy stood by to assist. BOTTOM DREAMERS takes the stage in Austin, Texas to perform a televised rooftop show. The set was a part of their involvement at South by Southwest RIGHT Members of Mainland take a quick stop at Skeeter’s BBQ Pit in Selinsgrove, PA for dinner. The band drove through Lewisburg on their tour route.


editors-in-chief Avid Khorramian Kelsey O’Donnell

copy editors

web developer

Emma Downey Morga Klein Bridget Shaffrey Tong Tong

marketing manager

marketing social media head

chief copy editor

marketing social media team

Tom Bonan

Tooba Ali

Staci Dubow

designers

Megan Cannella Sam Kelly

writers

Mamta Badlani Amanda Battle Meghan Byrd Amanda Carlson Jhomely Delossantos Madeline Diamond Dante Fresse Caitlin Friel Joanna Harrold Maddie Liotta Emily Malmquist Katie Sidlowski West Shepherd Lauren Whelan Delaney Worth Courtney Wren

photographers

Erin Ditmar Sean Gilchrist Becca Golding Kayla Javaheri Alec Rogers Mariele Saunders-Shultz

Julia Gee

Natalie Dumart Caroline Sullivan

marketing event planning head Cristina Bartalacci

marketing event planning team Elisabeth Curtis Patxi Elizalde Madison Farley Ellie McGuire Taylor Sheldon Phebe Wong

marketing general outreach team Sam Cohen Priyanka Junankar Tom Murphy Tara Malloy Sawyer Owens Angela Ri Madeleine Silva Elias Strizower Megan Summers Sara Wedeking

faculty advisor James Dunlap

Et Cetera was produced using Adobe InDesign CC and Adobe Illustrator CC. The body text is styled in Crimson Text Roman 10 point. Bylines are 14 point Fira Sans Bold and Ratio Modern Italic. Captions are Crimson Text Italic 9 point. Titles are in Feena Casual, Oswald Light, or Ration Modern in a range of sizes. Bucknell University’s Publications, Printing, and Mail located in Lewisburg, Pennsylvania, printed 300 copies of Et Cetera Issue 1. The issue is 70 pages measuring 8 and 3/8 inches by 10 and 7/8 inches. The theme for Issue 1 was “sonder.” This publication was made possible through grants awarded by the Bucknell Arts Council and the Bucknell Innovation Group. Their generosity and support is greatly appreciated.  Further thanks to our talented staff. Thank you for bringing Et Cetera to life. Additional gratitude to Professor Connie Timm who welcomed us into our first graphic design class with open arms and provided us with ample inspiration. A final thanks is directed towards Professor James Dunlap for providing guidance and insight throughout the process of putting this issue together.  Et Cetera Issue 1 has found homes across the world: Copenhagen, Denmark. Amsterdam, Netherlands. Berkeley Heights, New Jersey. Gimmelwald, Switzerland. Kaunas, Lithuania. Lewisburg, Pennsylvania. Los Angeles, California. Reykjavik, Iceland. Yungaburra, Australia.  The cover photography was completed by Sean Gilchrist. Covers were embossed with stamps created by Box Car Press.  “You flipped the script and you shot the plot; And I remember, I remember when your neon used to burn so bright and pink; A Saturday night kind of pink.” –Sedona, Houndmouth


editors-in-chief Avid Khorramian Kelsey O’Donnell

copy editors

web developer

Emma Downey Morga Klein Bridget Shaffrey Tong Tong

marketing manager

marketing social media head

chief copy editor

marketing social media team

Tom Bonan

Tooba Ali

Staci Dubow

designers

Megan Cannella Sam Kelly

writers

Mamta Badlani Amanda Battle Meghan Byrd Amanda Carlson Jhomely Delossantos Madeline Diamond Dante Fresse Caitlin Friel Joanna Harrold Maddie Liotta Emily Malmquist Katie Sidlowski West Shepherd Lauren Whelan Delaney Worth Courtney Wren

photographers

Erin Ditmar Sean Gilchrist Becca Golding Kayla Javaheri Alec Rogers Mariele Saunders-Shultz

Julia Gee

Natalie Dumart Caroline Sullivan

marketing event planning head Cristina Bartalacci

marketing event planning team Elisabeth Curtis Patxi Elizalde Madison Farley Ellie McGuire Taylor Sheldon Phebe Wong

marketing general outreach team Sam Cohen Priyanka Junankar Tom Murphy Tara Malloy Sawyer Owens Angela Ri Madeleine Silva Elias Strizower Megan Summers Sara Wedeking

faculty advisor James Dunlap

Et Cetera was produced using Adobe InDesign CC and Adobe Illustrator CC. The body text is styled in Crimson Text Roman 10 point. Bylines are 14 point Fira Sans Bold and Ratio Modern Italic. Captions are Crimson Text Italic 9 point. Titles are in Feena Casual, Oswald Light, or Ration Modern in a range of sizes. Bucknell University’s Publications, Printing, and Mail located in Lewisburg, Pennsylvania, printed 300 copies of Et Cetera Issue 1. The issue is 70 pages measuring 8 and 3/8 inches by 10 and 7/8 inches. The theme for Issue 1 was “sonder.” This publication was made possible through grants awarded by the Bucknell Arts Council and the Bucknell Innovation Group. Their generosity and support is greatly appreciated.  Further thanks to our talented staff. Thank you for bringing Et Cetera to life. Additional gratitude to Professor Connie Timm who welcomed us into our first graphic design class with open arms and provided us with ample inspiration. A final thanks is directed towards Professor James Dunlap for providing guidance and insight throughout the process of putting this issue together.  Et Cetera Issue 1 has found homes across the world: Copenhagen, Denmark. Amsterdam, Netherlands. Berkeley Heights, New Jersey. Gimmelwald, Switzerland. Kaunas, Lithuania. Lewisburg, Pennsylvania. Los Angeles, California. Reykjavik, Iceland. Yungaburra, Australia.  The cover photography was completed by Sean Gilchrist. Covers were embossed with stamps created by Box Car Press.  “You flipped the script and you shot the plot; And I remember, I remember when your neon used to burn so bright and pink; A Saturday night kind of pink.” –Sedona, Houndmouth


AFTER DARK CURATED Caitlin Friel PHOTO Caroline Sullivan


AFTER DARK CURATED Caitlin Friel PHOTO Caroline Sullivan


SONDER.

Profile for Kelsey O'Donnell

Et Cetera Magazine Issue 1: Sonder  

Et Cetera Magazine Issue 1: Sonder  

Advertisement

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded