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MAKING AN IMPACT THROUGH EXPERIENCE & STORY

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A MAD student speaks out about his professional relationship with professor Fran Balistreri and his impact at MIAD

2010 NOVEMBER


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es PHOTOGRAPHY: Maurizio Murru Alejandra Perez Omot Akway

ILLUSTRATION:

Roberto Galindo

ART DIRECTION:

Kelsey Barnowsky

ADVISING:

Anne Ghory-Goodman

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Kyle Baldwin Kelsey Barnowsky Brittany Patz Renae Bastar Omot Akway Kezra Cornell

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ARTICLES:


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{ FEATURES }

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BY KYLE BALDWIN An article about professor Fran Balistreri and his impact at MIAD

Bow Master

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MURRU

BY KELSEY BARNOWSKY Professor Maurizio Murru’s impact on the MIAD Community through his passion of nature

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BY BRITTANY PATZ Alex Perez set up the art gallery Art for OIl to help raise money for the clean up in the Gulf of Mexico

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Habitat for Humanity

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This I Believe

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Redline Milwaukee

BY RENAE BASTAR

BY OMOT AKWAY

BY KEZRA CORNELL


HAVING BEEN THROUGH FOUR YEARS OF MANY CLASSES, projects, and activities, I can tell you that learning from experience and advice is what will help you make your time at MIAD worthwhile. I still remember my freshman year when I was asking Seniors what classes to pick and which teachers to take. This magazine is a reflection and compilation of articles that I feel are worth sharing to those who may not have had the chance to explore all the possibilities and activities MIAD has to offer. As a reader, I hope you gain some insight and advice from those who have been through it all. Experience and story are what this magazine is made of and my intent is for it to inspire other students to explore the limitless possibilities MIAD provides to it’s community. Thanks for reading!

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{ FEATURE: Fran & VR }

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ith my relatively short time in the working world, I realized we must be creatively fit on a day-to-day basis. From the August till May time has no meaning, just deadlines. Working all hours of the night doesn’t bother you when you realize the task at hand is

A MIAD senior speaks out about professor Fran Balistreri & his impact at MIAD. BY KYLE BALDWIN

nothing more then a challenge from one professional to another. However, with days of struggling for inspiration and grinding aimlessly though work, counting spreads or thumbnail drawings like a kid seems like the only thing getting you though the day. Then when we’re through the hard work block of April and May, restructure for August and September seems difficult. Going into these months giving a huge push through the following months when people are worn out from a mismanaged year of tough work. At this time every single day you don’t have the energy to embark on new ventures like starting a new website. By the time the holidays come around, you

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can kick back and recover for the following year. Best of all is that by now you’re feeling fresh and can enjoy a good creative season, not having burnt yourself out working at 100% effort 24/7/365. However, graphic design is not an independent field; it is a collaboration of minds within a community of creativity. Creative community. What does it mean to be a part of a creative community? It today’s world it seems everyone is looking out for number one. What is best for you? Many people find themselves going though their lives looking out for themselves. Sometimes it’s hard to stop and look around at the community we are a part of and try to give back.

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When looking directly at my life and inspirational designers surrounding the community I think about Visual Resources and Francis Balistreri. To most people within the community, Visual Resources is nothing but an odd name for a confusing class. However, for a select few within the design community it means much more. Currently enrolled as a Visual Resource student, I have known Francis Balistreri for two semesters. Starting off as professor and student relationship he has become much more then just a professor. Fran is a well-known designer and creative artist known for his somewhat radical thinking and passion for

pushing the boundaries of design. Throughout the years he has worked with numerous professionals from various agencies from all over the country. However, at MIAD many people have the pleasure of knowing Fran on a much more personal level. He no longer works solely as a professional designer, he instead has chosen to contribute his knowledge and design skills to teach driven students pursuing a career in the design industry. As professor of the only self-sustaining class at MIAD he accepts creative challenges from non-profit organizations from around the area and pushes the 8 students to solve these creative challenges and to present design ideas to

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professionals. Students have the opportunity to get design solutions produced and to meet clients while creating professional relationships. However, there is a breath of fresh air in the city. While helping students within MIAD, Fran also contributes to the community. He does this by bringing young designers together with non-profit organizations that are in need of further marketing and advertising. Using his personable skills and charismatic personality, Fran not only teach students about production issues designers must face on a daily basis but also to connects them with outside organizations. This allows students to get a taste of the creative marketplace while allowing organizations can appreciate the solutions produced.

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Many organizations would never be able to afford professional design creativity unless a supportive designer like Fran, was there for them to reach out to. He provides a much-needed service to the community by establishing relationships between creative students and driven organizations. Knowing Fran has allowed me to find my place as a confident designer at MIAD. He chooses to take time out of his schedule to devote himself to any and all students who reach out to him. Bbeing a part of Visual Resources is one of the best experiences of my MIAD career. It forces you to push the boundaries of design while at the same time communicating clearly to a specific goal for a client with a limited budget. It is an extremely rewarding experience that brings unity to the community.

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{ FEATURE: Bow Master Murru }

Bow Master

MURRU

Professor Maurizio Murru uses his passion for nature and science to set up unique and outdoor activities for students & faculty at MIAD ARTICLE BY KELSEY BARNOWSKY - ILLUSTRATIONS BY ROBERTO GALINDO

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t an art school like MIAD, there is a good chance you will run into people who have a lot in common with you. But being the creative, unique people we are, there are bound to be some unusual or unexpected things we do in our free time. We aren’t a big enough school to have it’s own major sports time or anything like that, but we are lucky to have faculty that give us the opportunity to take part in some very exclusive, smaller activities. As for me, I happen to be an avid archer and hunter. After one of my professors knew this about me, she told me I should get in contact with Maurizio Murru. If you haven’t gotten the pleasure to meet him, Maurizio Murru is one of MIAD’s most dedicated science professors.

Not only does he teach courses like biology and ecology, he takes time out of his busy schedule to organize out-of-school classes and adventures associating with science and the outdoor world. Maurizio is extremely passionate about biology and nature, constantly sharing his knowledge and experience with students and faculty. One of those very unique activities Maurizio has started at MIAD happens to be a bow making class. The reason you probably haven’t heard about Maurizio’s bow making class is because it’s something that takes a lot of passion, dedication, and commitment. I found out about it simply because I was one of the only girl hunters Maurizio had met at MIAD. When we met, we had a long conversation about our hunting experiences.

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After I mentioned that I had been shooting bow since I was 4 years old, Maurizio’s eyes lit up. He then took a wooden longbow off of his wall and said he made it by hand and actually hunts with it. Maurizio is a very primitive hunter and all in good fun, enjoys making fun of people like me who use compound bows to hunt. This is just one of many reasons why Maurizio decided to pursue a bow making class at MIAD.

Out of the interest of students and teachers, Maurizio gave up one of the few free slots of time he has in his schedule so he can share his knowledge and talent. Not many schools have teachers that are that willing to sacrifice 3 hours of their day for a class that is solely for fun and enjoyment. Since the bows take a long time to make, the classes have to be very small. There is only one a semester with about 9-10 people in them.

It all started when he was talking to another faculty member who was really interested in making a bow like the ones Maurzio has showcased in his office. He offered to help him make them in the 3D lab on their own time. Lots of people started noticing what they were doing in the lab and became really interested in the beautiful longbows. As Maurizio said, once people start becoming interested is when you have to get permission. Because so many students were interested in making the bows, he went to the board and inquired about the class. They were really concerned at first with the fact that the bows were weapons. But Maurizio proved them wrong by saying that they weren’t weapons until they had arrows, which wouldn’t be at school. So with that settled, the bow making class began.

When I asked Maurizio how he picks who can be apart of the class, he said, “Well, I like to know who they are, they are making a weapon!” Anyone with interest signs up and is put on a waiting list. Maurizio said if they make more effort to contact him about it, they are bumped up on the list because he needs to know they are committed. Maurizio pays for all of the wood for the bows and the students reimburse him and buy their own tools. The class is very worthwhile because almost everyone in the class uses their bow when they are done making it, whether it is for actual hunting or just target shooting. Each bow is very different and Maurizio likes everyone to research what kind of bow they would like to make, whether it is a certain tribe of Native American or an


English bow. No matter what type though, they all turn out to be gorgeous, strong longbows. Maurizio also offers to help everyone make their own arrows outside of school. He even makes special exceptions when it comes to the bow class; he is doing one independent study with a student and also helping another make bows as a part of her MIAD Senior Thesis.

Having people like as a part of our community is what makes MIAD and

Maurizo unique

diverse.

Maurzio is a big asset to the MIAD community. He gets together students and instructors who share an interest in nature and outdoors activities, which is a big thing here in Wisconsin. All of the things he does are on his own time and with the intent of sharing the enjoyment and knowledge with others. He said he loves seeing everyone interact outside of the classroom where it’s not a forced situation. Not only does he instruct the bow making class, but he also gets together kayaking trips and rides down the Wolf River. Having people like him as a part of our faculty is what makes MIAD’s community so unique and diverse. Hopefully his dedication and passion will be inspiring to other students and faculty at MIAD and that our exceptional student organizations will continue to grow.


{ FEATURE: Art for Oil }

Alex Perez, a painting major at MIAD, set up the art gallery Art for Oil to help raise money for the clean up in the Gulf of Mexico BY BRITTANY PATZ

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n April 20, 2010 there was a great oil disaster in the Gulf of Mexico. The offshore oil rig Deepwater Horizon caught fire and exploded. Swiss-based Transocean Ltd Owns the Deepwater Horizon and leased the rig to Uk-based BP PLC. The 56-million gallon oil spill created environmental and political dilemmas and has led to the largest natural disaster in United States History. When reading many articles about the disaster, writers put the main focus on how it is affecting tourism and people who live and work near the coast when they are forgetting how it is affecting natural

habitat. According to federal authorities at Associated Press, nearly 800 dead birds, sea turtles, dolphins, and other animals have been found in the Gulf and on its shores. At MIAD, we have many enthusiastic artists who are eager to help out in their community. Sometimes many students reach farther than just the community by also helping out with issues in the environment. Alex Perez, a painting major at MIAD, set up an art show labeled Art for Oil to help raise money for the clean up in the Gulf of Mexico. Art for Oil featured eleven artists whose work ranges from these categories: Printmaking,

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The work of Lindsay Woods displayed at the Art for Oil Gallery

painting, photography, drawing, handmade, and digital artwork. Alex was inspired to start Art For Oil after she was given the opportunity to put on an art show. She was also able to help others in the mean time. Her intentions were not only to help out the oil spill but also to support injured and disabled seabirds due to oil pollution. Alex states, “By purchasing an art piece through the show, you are supporting a young and upcoming local artist and also helping save the lives of wildlife struggling in some very important ecosystems.” All donations go towards the National Audubon Society and Save Our Seabird, Inc.

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Save Our Seabirds Incorporation helps to rehabilitate seabirds. Lee Fox founded SOS in 1990. They have been privileged to receive permits from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission. Each year, they have saved hundreds of native and migratory birds. Lee has been working with major oil companies, environmental groups, and state officials for almost ten years now. The National Audubon Society organization works directly with oil damaged seabirds. Their mission is, “To conserve and restore natural ecosystems, focusing on

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Erik Johnson was an artist featured on the Bravo show WORK OF ART which ended this summer. He is a Chicago based self-taught artist. We were extremely honored to have him offer his help!

birds, other wildlife, and their habitats for the benefit of humanity and the earth’s biological diversity”. Even though the oil has stopped leaking, the Gulf of Mexico and its wildlife continue to be threatened by millions of gallons of oil that is both on the surface as well as below the surface of the water. NAS is looking for support so that they been working with major oil companies, environmental groups, and state officials for almost ten years now. The National Audubon Society organization works directly with oil damaged seabirds. Their mission is, “To conserve and restore natural ecosystems,

focusing on birds, other wildlife, and their habitats for the benefit of humanity and the earth’s biological diversity”. Even though the oil has stopped leaking, the Gulf of Mexico and its wildlife continue to be threatened by millions of gallons of oil that is both on the surface as well as below the surface of the water. NAS is looking for support so that they will have the funds to assist birds and other wildlife. They have been pretty successful since they have a mighty fusion of science and education to protect and restore local habitat in the U.S. and across America. Alex originally picked SOS,

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MAKE A DONATION TO S.O.S. SOS is 501(c)(3) tax exempt nonprofit organization, so your donations are fully tax-deductible. AND, with Save our Seabirds, 100% of your donations go to help the birds, support our education programs and to defray expenses. SOS is a completely volunteer organization!

FORE MORE INFORMATION ON SAVE OUR SEABIRDS INC., VISIT: HTTP://WWW.SAVEOURSEABIRDS.ORG

Erik Johnson was an artist featured on the Bravo show WORK OF ART which ended this summer. He is a Chicago based self-taught artist. We were extremely honored to have him offer his help!

but she says, “SOS really hasn’t seen any oil like NAS, who will really reach out to oil soaked birds.” Audubon was the first non-profit group to have volunteers on the ground when U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service needed them because of their quick response. Both of these organizations need all the donations they can get. Even though the Gulf oil spill has already had tragic consequences for birds, other wildlife, coastal communities, and essential beach and wetland


mer. He is a Chicago

habitat, we know that its continuing impacts will be revealed over time resulting in a long-term process. Alex Perez brought together not only students from MIAD but also Chicago, Madison, Indiana, and Massachusetts. The artists from MIAD that donated their creative pieces are Alex Perez, Autumn Clark, Janson Rapisarda, Lilly Duermeier, and Nate Pyper. Other creative pieces donated were produced by: Erick Fruehling, Jeff Herwig, Erik Johnson, NERS, Cassandra

Warren, and Lindsay Woods. These artists spent long hours on these pieces that they donated to help support the cause. They wanted this show to provide proof that art can make a impact. Alex really believes that this will make a difference since the community will be exposed to different styles of art not only from MIAD but also other artists from around the United States. She has set up a tumblr site for people to view and purchase artwork still available from the art show at artforoil.tumblr.com.

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{ DEPARTMENT: Habitat for Humanity }

Taking the strong MIAD foundation on the road, to volunteer in communities of need. BY RENAE BASTAR

Student’s always look forward to vacations during the school year, and one of the most popular is spring break. The majority of people would think the vocabulary for “spring break” includes; beaches, sun, relaxing, suntan, drinks, and partying. For a group of MIAD students who volunteer for Habitat for Humanity, spring break has a little different definition than it’s typical understanding. This group of student’s main goal of their vacation is to help people in need build a place called home. The first MIAD Spring Break Habitat for Humanity trip took place in 2008, and has been going strong ever since. That group of students took a road trip to the Smokey Mountains of Oakridge, Tennessee. Since then students have also traveled out west to Cody, Wyoming in 2009, and the latest group of students traveled to the “birthplace of blues” Tutwiler, Mississippi in 2010. It all started when a group of six students from MIAD wanted to travel somewhere for spring break, but wanted to do more then satisfy themselves with a week off from school. Habitat for Humanity is a non-profit organization that is located throughout the world. Devoted to building housing for families in need. All houses are built by volunteers and are sold at no profit. The qualifications for ownership of the houses are based on the families need, their ability to pay an affordable mortgage, and willingness to volunteer with Habitat for Humanity in the future. During the Habitat for Humanity trips MIAD students have experience what it takes to build a house, and how fast and easy it can be if many people are willing to join in on the fun. Some tasks students have learned during their time volunteering for Habitat include, the basics of construction, creating a foundation, installing roofing, siding, windows, flooring, cabinets, lighting, dry wall, plastering, painting, and landscaping. All of these volunteer efforts have helped people who had very poor living conditions. They are now able to enjoy a nice, warm, money conscious place called home.

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Having been a part of the first MIAD Habitat for Humanity trip, I learned so much from the experience. Being on site and learning from professionals the reasoning and techniques involved in creating a sound structure was exciting. The crew leaders who run the show at the construction site don’t hesitate to help explain how to do a job if anyone is confused. On site there were many laughs that made every work day go by fast. During time off from volunteering we were able to discover the area and community near the Habitat for Humanity site. On the 2008 trip we were able to go hiking in the Smokey Mountains, and venture into the surrounding towns. It was to fun to travel to a different part of the United States, and to talk to people from the area. Through the spring break trip I met new people and have stronger relationships with my fellow MIAD classmates that I took the journey with. The trip was a learning experience for myself as well as everyone involved in the effort. The greatest satisfaction during the trip I partook in was meeting the woman who we were building the house for. She drove up to the mountain every day to thank the volunteers and to see the process of what was soon to be her new house. The woman described the current living conditions her family is living in, which made for a very emotional event. Walking her into the house every day to show her what we’ve been working on was very rewarding. Everyone could tell how excited she was for the future that was in store for her. Witnessing this event made the trip that much better. I felt like I had accomplished something that spring break, knowing I played a small part in making someone’s dream come true. Spring break will be here before you know it! What better way is there to spend it than volunteering your time for the better of someone else? Get your work boots and hard hat on this spring break! For more information about this upcoming 2011 MIAD Habitat for Humanity trip contact Ricky Heldt at rheldt@miad.edu.

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{ DEPARTMENT: This I Believe }

I’VE ALWAYS BELIEVED IN HARD WORK AND MOTIVATION. Almost nine years ago on March 28 2000 my family and I arrived at the St. Paul, Minneapolis Airport and about two weeks later I started school. I was placed in 5th grade in a big school somewhere in south Minneapolis. The first day in school almost seemed surreal to me with only two English words “hello” and “hi”. That day was the beginning of this long journey.

made fun of me, and I was pretty upset. So the following year I had to prove to my parents and friends that I could work harder then all of them, and by the end of that year I was on top and had to skip second grade to third. Not only that I made my parents proud of me but it made me believe in hard work and motivation equal success. Throughout the 9 years in the Unites States I never backed down on school. FROM THE FIRST DAY IN SCHOOL IN AMERICA, NOT KNOW how to speak, read, and write in English to right now in junior year at MIAD. It’s been a long journey to be able to participate in class discussions and critiques. On the way I learned that there are no short cuts, no excuses and the only way to succeed is through hard work and motivation. This I believe.

AS A CHILD IN AFRICA IN FIRST GRADE I DIDN’T THINK school was important at all because both of my parents didn’t finish school due to wars and Ethiopian government changing in the early 90’s. So when I attended school some of these wars were still happening and I wasn’t able to take school serious and that resulted in failing first grade. This is something that I still keep in mind until today, both my parents weren’t happy, friends

One MIAD student shares his beliefs on school and hard work BY OMOT AKWAY

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{ DEPARTMENT: RedLine Milwaukee }

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A MIAD Senior talks about the local Milwaukee print shop RedLine, started by MIAD Alumni BY KEZRA KORNELL

MILWAUKEE IS LUCKY TO HAVE AN ARTIST RESIDENCY, exhibition space, and print shop all in one building. The RedLine Milwaukee is a non-profit organization that encourages and helps keep alive contemporary art and creative freedom in Milwaukee. Located on 1422 4th Street, RedLine can house up to 12 artist residents, has an exhibition hall, a well-equipped print shop, and space for education programs. Steve Vande Zande and Lori Baumen helped found the RedLine to give Milwaukee a place to create, talk, explore, learn, and help others enjoy and experience art. REDLINE IS POSSIBLE THROUGH NUMEROUS VOLUNTEERS, mentors, educators, and very talented people who love to share art. They fund their programs and equipment through donations and also membership fees. The residents also pay a small fee for studio space. ARTIST RESIDENCIES OCCUR AT THE REDLINE BUILDING where apartments and studio space are included in the building. The artists bring a wide range of talents and techniques that can be shared with students and other artists. This enriches the art culture and experience in Milwaukee to bring in diverse, fresh viewpoints from outside the area. The resident artists help mentor teens and also perform two hours of community service each week. They are required to do 10 hours of work in their studio a week and also mentor and learn from other artists while in their residency, which usually lasts for two to three years. International as well as national artists are welcome and there is no limit to what medium they can work in. Artists usually apply for the residency and an outside judging panel picks several artists and interviews are conducted to make the final decision. REDLINE HAS IT’S OWN GALLERY SPACE IN THEIR BUILDING and wants their exhibits to reach beyond the audience of artists and critics. They have four exhibits a year

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including an international artist, national artist, as well as the artist residents. It’s great to walk through the building and see the artwork from start to finish. This type of experience separates the RedLine gallery from other galleries. THE PRINT SHOP OFFERS INTAGLIO, CALLOGRAPH, RELIEF, monoprint, silkscreen and photolithography. To have a studio with this variety of printmaking techniques helps encourage and continue the printmaking community that is often found in college arts. The print shop is managed by MIAD alum, Kari Couture and Kim Weiss. Both artists have been planning and hoping for an opportunity to start a communal print shop because most printmaking techniques are expensive and need a lot of space, so most printmaking artists have a hard time obtaining equipment. The print shop has open studio times as well as classes in case students or adults have never printed before. THE REDLINE MILWAUKEE HAS MADE EMERGING ARTISTS and mid-career artists the core of the their focus. These artists often need a support system and encouragement to help them grow and evolve. The RedLine also offers them exposure by displaying their works in the gallery space or even having members of the community walk by and ask questions. Breaking into the professional art world can be intimidating and frightening, but by having a supportive group of fellow artists can help create connections and relationships that make things easier. THE REDLINE HAS SHOWN HOW ART CAN IMPACT AND ADD to a community. This community of artists and students will hopefully grow in the future and maybe MIAD alum or students can help expose RedLine and it’s great opportunities.

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Kelsey Barnowsky MIAD Bridge