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Kelsey Ross Architecture Portfolio


Kelsey E. Ross ››

610.507.9993

››

ker5236@gmail.com

››

www.KelseyEricaRoss.com


Contents 4

The Ale Way

10

NCMA Live + Work Studio

16

Open Stage

20

Roman Eventarium

24

Tanzanian Home Adaptations

28

Digital Artist’s Residence

32

Design Build: Terrace

38

Global Brigades: Architecture

Performative Landscape and Brewery

Mixed Use Studio and Dwelling for Visiting Scholars

University of the Arts Student Hub

Museum, Equestrian Ring, and Commercial Center

Building Improvements to Combat Flooding and Rainwater

Custom Residence for a Digital Media Artist

Penn State Recycling Center Terrace

House Construction in Nicaragua

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PENNSYLVANIA

4

Bellefonte

Tracing beer pouring patterns to generate forms for the pathway.

Physical Site Model of Pathway Connecting the Brewery


The Ale Way

Bellefonte, PA Design Team: Allie Pladson & Danielle Mitchell

Spring 2014 |12 weeks

The Ale Way combines a performative landscape with an adaptive reuse brewery. The pathway connects the programmatic pieces of the brewery, housed in an industrial warehouse, and creates a destination to unify the surrounding towns. The forms of the path are inspired by the act of pouring beer and the patterns generated in the foam and carbonation. The layers of vegetation and hardscaping atop the foundations of the industrial warehouse create a palimpsest unique to this region.

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Site Plan materials PRIMARY PATHWAY

A concrete floor from Appalachian Brewing Company became patterned and stained as beer overflowed and spilled over time. These changes over time and beer hues manifested themselves into a stained concrete paver.

6

WATER FEATURES

Inspired by Manchester Exchange Square, slate stones form a visual and physical connection between the ponds as visitors can walk atop a small stream of water cutting through the primary path.

BEER GLASS LAYERING MODEL

TRANSITION PATHWAY

Egg rock in hues of brown and yellow form the transition between pavers and the island benches and ponds.

AXEMANN ROAD

BROOK PATHWAY INDUSTRIAL WAREHOUSES

LOGAN BRANCH BROOK

Porous concrete follows the brook path and spills over to the primary path, making its way between the beds of egg rock. Porous concrete will stop water from pooling on the site and will help water filter off of the walking surface and out of the site.

HIKING PATHWAY

EXISTING SITE PLAN

Cedar lumber makes up the hiking path and the railing edge of the brook path. It also clads facades and is used on the ground outside of the beer tasting area. Cedar wood handles water and weather well, and its colors resemble at beer tones.

SEASONAL WATERCOLOR SITE PLANS

BREWERY, TASTING AREA & GREENHOUSE In addition to being the place where the beer is produced, this building will house a greenhouse to grow food for the restaurant and ingredients to make the beer.


BREWERY EXPANSION AND COMMUNITY CENTER

This existing warehouse will be used by the brewery for a primary research and testing laboratory. This will double as a community center with meeting spaces for activities and receptions.

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SHINGLES

SHINGLES

2 X 10 WOOD TIMBER

2 X 10 WOOD TIMBER

METAL BRACKETS

METAL BRACKETS

8

WEATHER-PROOFING WEATHER-PROOFING MEMBRANE MEMBRANE

CORTEN STEEL PANELS

WATER WALL

CORTEN STEEL PANELS

EXISTING STEEL FRAMING

EXISTING STEEL FRAMING EXISTING

CLERESTORY WINDOWS

EXISTING CLERESTORY WINDOWS

RIGID INSULATION

RIGID CORTEN STEEL INSULATION HEADER

CORTEN STEEL HEADER

EXISTING STEEL TRUSS

EXISTING 2 X 4 BLOCKING STEEL DOWNLIGHT TRUSS

2X4 BLOCKING DOWNLIGHT

METAL SHEETING

METAL SHEETING

EXISTING COLUMN

COLUMN

4X6 WOOD BENCH

CORTEN STEEL BENCH FACE

CORTEN STEEL BENCH FACE

STAINLESS STEEL

EXISTING STEEL COLUMN

EXISTING STEEL COLUMN

BEER BEER BEER TASTING BEER TASTINGMANUFACTURING MANUFACTURING EXISTING INTERIOR INTERIOR INTERIOR INTERIOR TERMICA CORTEN STEEL MULLION WITHOUT THERMAL BREAK

WATER WALL

4X6 WOOD BENCH

STAINLESS STEEL

2 X 10 WOOD SLATS

SECTION AA

CORTEN STEEL CAP

CORTEN STEEL CAP

2 X 10 WOOD TIMBER

2 X 10 WOOD TIMBER

2 X 6 TIMBER 2 X 10FRAMING WOOD SLATS

TERMICA CORTEN STEEL MULLION WITHOUT THERMAL BREAK

DOUBLE-GLAZED DOUBLE-GLAZED CLEAR GLASS CLEAR GLASS FOR NOISE CONTROL FOR NOISE CONTROL STAINLESS STEEL

2 X 6 TIMBER FRAMING

STAINLESS STEEL

PLANTER

PLANTER

FINISH FLOOR

FINISH FLOOR

CONCRETE FLOOR SLAB

CONCRETE FLOOR SLAB

POLYETHYLENE POLYETHYLENE MOISTURE BARRIER MOISTURE BARR

SECTION EE

4Resubmission - The Envelope as a System conti GRAVEL

GRAVEL

EARTH

EARTH

Double-gl clear gla Existing steel structure

SECTION BB

Section B - B

The existing industrial warehouse truss structure is exposed at the entry and beer tasting areas. A wall with a bar ledge provides visual access but physical separation between the brewery and the tasting area.

SITE SECTION AND FRONT ELEVATION OF BREWERY

The site is located in a valley surrounded by Axemann Road to the

T co mu the

Sectio


STEEL BEARING PLATE GLASS CURTAIN WALL PANEL ALUMINUM MULLION

STEEL COLUMN

ING

T

ENTRANCE PERSPECTIVE Danielle Mitchell - Allie Pladson - Kelsey Ross

OPERABLE GLASS CURTAIN WALL PANEL

OL

HANGING PLANTER PLANTER FINISH FLOOR

Existing clerestory windows

CONCRETE FLOOR SLAB POLYETHYLENE MOISTURE BARRIER

EXTRUDED POLYSTYRENE Corten Steel FOAM INSULATION

GRAVEL

CONCRETE FOOTER

EARTH

Stainless Steel

2 x 4 Blocking Downlight

GREENHOUSE WALL SECTION Loading Dock

C

Header

Exterior Patio

Existing steel column

PATHWAY PERSPECTIVE

Beer Tasting Interior

E

Brewery

A

Beer Manufacturing Interior Termica corten steel mullion without thermal break

E A B-C Corten Steel Cap

Double-glazed clear glass for noise control

Beer Tasting 2 x 10 Wood Timber

Stainless Steel

2 x 6 Timber Framing

B Section E - E

KEY PLAN OF BREWERY AND BEER TASTING AREA

PATH ILLUMINATION

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NEW YORK NYC

SITE CONTEXT

Located in a lot adjacent to the High Line Park, the public spaces within the building are located on these levels and make a connection through a bridge for people to enter the building.

W. 20TH STREET

THE HIGH LINE PARK

HA VE.

10TH AVE.

11T

W. 19TH STREET

Physical Model in a site model showing the connection of the building to the High Line Park.


Live & Work Studio

New York City, New York Spring 2012 | 6 weeks National Concrete Masonry Association Design Competition, First Prize This live/work academy for visiting scholars is a part of the Parsons New School Academy in New York. This residence is designed to foster community within the school and the city as a whole by serving as an extension of the High Line Park. The mixeduse educational program combines temporary residences and studios with public exhibition spaces to promote the exchange of ideas between scholars and the community. The surrounding architectural language influences the building’s glazing and custom masonry block design.

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12

VIEW FROM THE HIGH LINE PARK The main public entrance can be viewed and accessed from the High Line Park.


NIGHT RENDERING The night illumination shows the light shining through the perforated custom CMU blocks in the lower levels of the building.

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PHYSICAL MODEL IN SITE MODEL

Diagram representing the residential tower in blue and the public spaces in yellow. By dividing the residences into two per floor, this promotes collaboration between the scholars as they need to move to different floors to access their studios, dining amenities, and library resources.

MECH. MECH.

U U

STUDIO

APT. CONFERENCE ROOM

ESTCODE

RECEPTION

+0

STUDIO

STUDIO

STUDIO

STUDIO

STUDIO

STUDIO

STUDIO

STUDIO

STUDIO

STUDIO

STUDIO STUDIO STUDIO

U U

D

FLOOR PLANS 1-6 This building includes eight stories. The top two stories are comprised of two residences connected by an exterior bridge to two sets of fire stairs.

+10

THIRD

U

SECOND

ADMIN. OFF.

D

LAUND.

LAUNDRY

APARTMENT

FIRST

MECH.

D

U

D

STUDIO STUDIO +20


3D PRINTED BLOCK DESIGN

SECTION PERSPECTIVE

The High Line park carves a void through parts of the high rise buildings located adjacent to it. Using this same principle, the Blue represents the solid mass of the building and the yellow represents the carved out void spaces occupied through terraces.

MECH.

LAUND.

MECH.

D

KIT. STO.

ESTCODE

MECH. U

KITCHEN

U

D

U

D

LAUND.

LAUND.

COURT. DINING HALL

+50

D

EXHIBITION SPACE

D

D

U

U

D

D

+30

+45

SIXTH

CAFE

ESTCODE

LIBRARY

HIGH LINE CONNECTION

FIFTH

FOURTH

COURTYARD U

+60

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PENNSYLVANIA Philadelphia

SITE CONTEXT

With a prominent location across from the Kimmel Center, the University of the Arts student union center needed to give the university a presence within the city. To adapt from the surrounding site context, the building incorporates a glass facade related to the Kimmel Center and maintains a height similar to the adjacent buildings to prevent from imposing on the area. In an area with a lack of street trees, the building incorporates a porch with vegetation and a green roof into the design.

ELEVATION ALONG BROAD STREET

ATRIUM DIAGRAM

The concept to integrate multiple disciplines from the university while maintaining a functional environment is to create an atrium that intersects with each of the programmatic elements on each floor. This creates visual connectivity through a spatial void.

The glass facade along Broad Street acts as a gateway to the city for students during the daylight and reverses to make the building an open stage as the performers are illuminated to the pedestrians below at night.


Open Stage

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Spring 2013 |12 weeks Society of American Registered Architects (SARA) Student Design Award Open Stage is a student union center and hub for the University of the Arts in Philadelphia. The mixed-use building acts as an area to promote collaboration between the various artistic disciplines at the university. The glass and concrete panel curtain wall facade allows the students to draw creative inspiration from the city during the day while the illumination of the building at night creates an open stage to showcase the student work, performances, and social interactions inspiring the residents of the city.

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LONGITUDINAL BUILDING SECTION

Each floor is connected visually through a glass atrium space surrounded by 5% sloped ramps leading from one space to another.

BALLET STUDIO AND ATRIUM SPACE

With an open floor plan, students gain visual access between different disciplines at the school.

ENTRANCE

FORUM

LIBRARY

TRANSVERSE BUILDING SECTION


OFFICE

GREEN ROOF BELOW

OFFICE

OFFICE GLASS LIGHT WELL

CONF. ROOM

GLASS LIGHT WELL CONCRETE SLAB METAL DECKING MOISTURE BARRIER FIBERGLASS BATT INSULATION STEEL BEAM

WOOD BLOCKING

CONCRETE COPING ALUMINUM FLASHING MOISTURE BARRIER FIBERGLASS BATT INSULATION

MULTIPURPOSE SPACE

SIXTH FLOOR AND ROOF

MULTI - PURPOSE SPACE

LIBRARY LOUNGE

FIFTH FLOOR DN UP

LIBRARY LOUNGE DN

LIBRARY STACKS

COMPUTER LAB

LIBRARY LOUNGE

ALUMINUM MULLION UP

DN

UP DN

THIRD & FOURTH FLOOR

DOUBLE GLAZED CURTAIN WALL PANEL

CAFE OPEN TO BELOW

STEEL COLUMN

OUTDOOR PATIO

BOLT CONNECTION

WORKSHOP SPACE

WORKSHOP SPACE

ALUMINUM MULLION CONCRETE FLOOR SLAB METAL DECKING STEEL BEAM

SECOND FLOOR

ACOUSTICAL DROP CEILING

BROAD STREET

DN DN

UP

CAFE

DN

LOBBY DN

EXHIBITION SPACE

DN

MECH. ROOM BALLET STUDIO

DN

BASEMENT BATHROOM

UP UP UP

INSULATION

DN

DRAINAGE PIPE

CONCRETE SAND

GROUND FLOOR

REBAR GRAVEL

IMPERMEABLE MEMBRANE

RECEPTION GALLERY

EARTH

AUDITORIUM STAGE

MECH. & STORAGE FORUM & PERFORMANCE AREA

EGRESS CORRIDOR

BASEMENT PLAN

WALL SECTION THROUGH THE BROAD STREET FACADE


MASTER PLANNING DIAGRAMS 1. Major circulatory axis and offset axes are established based on site access points

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ITALY Rome

MUSEUM

2. Designation for location of the Museum, Arena, and Shopping Center

SHOP.

ARENA

3. Addition of sunken and elevated garden spaces

ELEVATED SUNKEN

4. Establishment of cross pathways for ample access to the site

SITE PLAN

1

1. Museum 2. Sunken Garden 3. Equestrian Arena 4. Shopping Center 5. Parking Garage

4

2 3

3

1

4

View of main axis and adjacent museum and sunken garden in the physical hand-cut model.

5

CONCEPTUAL SITE SECTION

1:500 10

20

40

60

80

100


Roman Eventarium

Villa Borghese, Rome, Italy Design Team: Lauren Borrelli and Lauren Uhlig

Fall 2013 |12 weeks

The Eventarium began with a group master plan for the Galoppatoio in Villa Borghese located just beyond the ancient city walls of Rome. This space would enhance the existing park located atop a parking garage structure with the addition of a museum, shopping mall, and equestrian arena. The master plan was generated utilizing a series of axes following the entrances to the park and optimizing the circulation through the site. The buildings were designed with the same language but individually. I designed the museum utilizing offset axes and integrating a circular light well relating to the circular vents protruding from the parking garage into the site.

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SECOND FLOOR

4 2

22

2

5

6

3

1

7 4

2

3

4

1

1. Extensive Green Roof 2. Office 3. Exhibition 4. Open to Below 5. Restoration Room 6. Cafe 7. Patio

GROUND FLOOR 1. Lobby 2. Gift Shop 3. Exhibition 4. Special Collections

BASEMENT PLAN 3

5

4

6 2 7

1. Sunken Garden 2. Exhibition Space 3. Artwork Storage 4. Mechanical 5. Kitchen 6. Restaurant + Bar 7. Auditorium

A

B MECHANICAL

STORAGE EXHIBITION

GIFT SHOP

TICKETS/COATS

1

C

C

U

SPECIAL COLLECTIONS

D

D U

SUNKEN GARDEN

B

a

LOBBY


EXTERIOR FRONT PERSPECTIVE

PERSPECTIVE OF THE MUSEUM FROM WITHIN THE SUNKEN GARDEN

0

10

CORRIDOR FROM GARDEN

20

40

80

ELEVATION ALONG MAIN AXIS

0

10

0

10

20

40

80

SECTION AA OF MUSEUM AND SUNKEN GARDEN

20

40

80

SECTION BB OF MUSEUM AND SUNKEN GARDEN

23 0

SECTION CC OF MUSEUM

10

20

40

80


TANZANIA

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Context

Mang’ula A&B

The eastern portion of Udzungwa Mountains National Park, Tanzania, receives approximately two meters of rainfall each year concentrated into five months. This rainfall places a heavy burden on the infrastructure within rural villages and results in widespread flooding and erosion. In addition to erosion of roadways and pathways, a lack of sanitary infrastructure allows storm water to carry waste and debris throughout villages. This and a lack of drainage can lead to health-related problems generated by standing water and pollution of ground, surface, and open water resources especially where water comes into contact with human and animal wastes. These problems are exacerbated by the growing population which results in rural expansion and in informal settlements with a lack of utility infrastructure A door flush with the ground permits flooding during light precipitation.

A single sloped roof increases runoff concentrated on one side of the building.

Problematic Conditions of Homes Due to the unavailability of new property in Mang’ula as a result of population increasing, people are forced to combat flooding in the houses they already own. There are several key factors that contribute to the flooding of houses in flood-prone areas. The shape of the roof contributes to the amount and location of the water flowing over the building. If this location is close enough to the building and there is no distance between the door and the exterior ground, minimal rains can bring water into the house. Lastly, a lack of a moisture barrier in the foundations often leads to moisture spreading up the walls ultimately weakening the structural integrity of the walls. This will repeatedly shorten the building’s lifespan.

Brick foundations move water through the walls shortening the lifespan of the building.

A raindrop collects in a puddle outside of a home foundation during a seasonal rainstorm.


Tanzanian Home Adaptations Mang’ula A&B, Tanzania

Summer 2014 | 4 weeks

This projects aims to identify and illustrate design and planning strategies that address the water related issues associated with the construction and planning of individual household units within expanding rural Tanzanian villages with varying economic circumstances. This project generates design schemes for the rural Tanzanian households surrounding the Eastern boundary of the Udzungwa Mountains National Park with environmentally sustainable designs incorporating water management, human and household waste disposal, and programmatic relationships of buildings and landscape.

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Rainwater Collection systems

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One solution to this problem is to install a stormwater collection tank on one side of the house. The size of this tank can vary depending upon the household’s needs and available space. It can be anywhere from 500 Liters to 1000 Liters. Installing a gutter system to divert water into the collection tank will minimize water collecting on the ground and leading to flooding in addition to providing a source of non-potable water for household needs. This can be of use to families during the rain and dry seasons. Excess water from the roof will be diverted with an overflow pipe from the tank to a desirable location on the property.

Utilizing bricks as a foundation material is cost effective and elevates the house to prevent flooding, but does not protect against the spread of moisture through the walls.

Using concrete masonry as a foundation and base of a building can minimize the amount of moisture spread. This can also elevate the floor height to keep water from reaching the threshold and interior of the house.


The most common form of cooking utilizes three bricks with a charcoal or wooden fire in the center. It is the most inefficient use of fuel for cooking.

Fuel efficient stoves utilize less charcoal and wood than the traditional brick method.

Converting animal wastes into biogas is the only form of fuel that can be implemented indoors.

Proposed kitchen Adaptations

Existing Cooking Methods

Raised Cooking Platform

Fuel Efficient Stove

Window for Cross Ventilation and Exhaust

Elevated Wood Storage

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PENNSYLVANIA

28

State College

The form of the light boxes in the plan are generated by the shadows cast upon the site by the adjacent building.

In many of Ed Purver’s digital projections he combines light and sound to create life in abandoned buildings or ordinarily unoccupied spaces. This combination manifested itself into his residence through an exploratory design for a lamp creating a form from sound wave projections.


Digital Artist's Residence State College, PA

Spring 2012 |6 weeks

Through the integration of light and abandoned buildings, the relationship digital artist Ed Purver shared with his work in digital light projections manifested itself into his residence designed at the industrial Corning Glass Factory in State College, PA. The form of the residence was derived from the shadows cast by the existing buildings at the site. These forms created the light boxes for Purver to experiment with light and shadow in his own residence. Lastly, by developing a terrace at the edge of the site, Purver could use the surrounding buildings of the factory to showcase more of his own projections.

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30

AERIAL PERSPECTIVE

FLOOR PLAN

SOUTHEAST ELEVATION

LIGHT SHOW RENDERING


31 SECTIONAL PERSPECTIVE


32

PENNSYLVANIA

Master Planning

State College

TERRACE MASTER PLAN

!"#$%#&&$'()(#$ *#+,+-.&/$0#&(#1

The master plan includes the paved terrace, !#11)+#$%-)& concrete table, projection screen, and cmu wall.

LOTUS PAVING PATTERN The Penn State Recycling Center

N

Terrace Paving Pattern

The paving pattern creates a lotus flower oriented to show the cardinal directions on site.

PATTERN DIMENSIONS

To ensure an accurate depiction of the pattern in the bricks, a grid system was generated to apply using wooden steaks on the site. Each of the center points for the arcs were determined based upon the grid and the arc radii. The Penn TheState Penn State Recycling Recycling Center Center

N

Terrace Terrace Paving Paving Dimensions Dimensions

Measuring the bricks that Need to be cut to a unique Shape to fill the gaps between The rounded edges.

N


Design Build: Terrace State College, PA

Spring 2011 | 8 weeks

Among one of the top recycling centers in the world, the Penn State recycling center was in need of a space to gather for outdoor presentations and functions. To solve this project, the PSU first year architecture students paired up to complete a design build project incorporating a paved brick and slate terrace, a concrete block wall, a concrete table and chairs for forty guests, and a projection screen for presentations. The goals of the project were to utilize primarily recycled materials and create a space to be used as a teaching tool.

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THE PROCESS

1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

6.

After using three grades of rock to level the site, a layer of geotextiles were laid to reinforce the base and act as a rainwater filtration system. These geotextiles were made by weaving plastic strips from broken recycling bins together. Next, a superfine gravel was laid through a screed board process to create a level surface for

the bricks. The gravel was compacted with a tamper and the entire process was repeated three times. Using a mathematical grid system, the lotus pattern was spray painted onto the gravel and then the bricks were placed. Custom bricks were cut with an electric saw to fill the gaps and fine gravel was swept over the terrace to

fill the gaps between each brick. Next the slate was placed to fill the petals. Due to varying thicknesses of slate, each piece was individually leveled. To relate to the other three projects that incorporated glass as an aggregate, a recycled metal bowl filled with recycled and tumbled glass was placed at the center of the terrace.


BUILDING THE LAYERS BENEATH THE BRICKS

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Before

After


NICARAGUA

38

El Naranjo

The previous home of Mariela (19) Enrique (25) and Hendry (2).

Upon our arrival, the masons had brought all of the materials to the site from local suppliers.

Without the use of an electric cement mixer, we made the mixture of gravel, cement, and water by hand.


Global Brigades: Architecture El Naranjo, Nicaragua

Spring 2015 |1 week

Global Brigades’ mission is to empower communities through sustainable community development. Over one week, a group of seven PSU students paired with a team of 24 Notre Dame students on a hybrid architecture and public health brigade in Nicaragua. Over the course of four days, the students were able to build an entire house from concrete masonry blocks, wood, and corrugated aluminum and two washing stations each with a sink, latrine, and shower. Through the process of working with local masons, students learn the skills to construct the house and washing stations while working with the community members that these projects will benefit.

39 39


DAY 3: Wooden walls & Concrete Floor

By the end of the first day, we had finished four courses of CMU block.

DAY 2: POURING CONCRETE

DAY 1: LAYING CMU

40

The second day of construction consisted of making and pouring concrete into the framework containing rebar for columns and a solid course of concrete.

With the removal of the concrete formwork, the wooden supports and cladding for the exterior walls was constructed. The wooden base for the framing was attached to rebar poured into the concrete course.

For a level floor, a screed board process smoothed the concrete in four sections. The floor and three of the four walls were completed by the end of day three.


DAY 4: Painting, Interior Walls, and Roof

After the completion of the fourth wooden wall, students began painting the exterior of the house the family’s preferred colors.

Construction of the interior walls, which were made of wood and gypsum wall board, and the corrugated aluminum roof.

Mariela, Enrique, and Hendry at the house dedication.

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The FINAL house

The combined efforts of the PSU and Notre Dame students helped to make this house a reality for Mariela and her family. When we handed the house to her, she told us that we “made her dreams come true.�


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