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EMANCIPATION TRAIL BOOKLET

In 1776, a young, and very skilled engineer, Tadeusz Kosciusko (1746-1817), left Poland for America to help fight for the independence of the colonies from England. Only 30 years old at the time, Kosciusko became the first foreign officer to receive pay from the Continental Congress for serving in General George Washington’s Continental Army. Because of his extensive experience and knowledge, Kosciusko was appointed to serve as the Army’s Colonel of Engineers. The Continental Congress granted him $15,000 and 500 acres of land in Ohio for his service. But, as a firm believer in equality for all –

8. Thomas Cass

By Richard E. Brooks, Public Garden, Boylston Street (1899)

Born in Queens County, Ireland, Thomas Cass (1821-1862) immigrated to the United States with his parents. The Cass family settled in Boston where Cass became a businessman and a member of the Boston School Committee. In 1861, Massachusetts Governor John Andrew asked Cass to help in the war effort against the Confederacy and Cass obliged by establishing the “Fighting Ninth,” serving as the Colonel of this volunteer regiment of mainly Irish immigrants. Colonel Cass died from wounds received during the Battle of Malvern Hill in Virginia.

aza

Park Pl

Arlington

3.

Boston Massacre Memorial/Crispus Attucks

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nS

to oyls

B

Freedmen’s Memorial (Emancipation Monument)

St on

Activists & Allies 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10.

Copley

While there are many people who contribute to the success of any cause, only a few get publically acknowledged. Here are six white men who spoke out for and fought for people of African descent being denied their freedom in the “land of the free.”

William Ellery Channing Charles Sumner Tadeusz Kosciuszko Thomas Cass Wendell Phillips Edward Everett Hale

Fighting Injustice

11. Grand Army of the Republic 12. William Lloyd Garrison

Av e s bu lu m

ve en A

r War

bu

10. Edward Everett Hale

9. Wendell Phillips

Co

Roxbury Community College

Royall House & Slave Quarters, in the 1700s the home of the largest slaveholding family in Massachusetts and the enslaved Africans who made their lavish way of life possible; a museum bearing witness to intertwined stories of wealth and bondage, set against the backdrop of America’s quest for independence; 15 George Street, Medford, MA / 781-396-9032 / http:// www.royallhouse.org/ Sojourner Truth Memorial Project (c. 1797-1883), born into slavery she escaped with her infant daughter to freedom in 1826, a well-known abolitionist and women’s rights activist; a statue by Thomas Jay Warren of Truth is located in a small park at the intersection of Pine and Park Streets, Florence, MA / self-guided walking tour at http://www.sojournertruthmemorial.org/ Springfield: African American Heritage Trail / Resisting Slavery, Springfield, MA, “Our Plural History” (a project of Springfield Technical Community College) examines the idea of pluralism in the United States, email: ourpluralhistory@stcc.edu • http://ourpluralhistory.stcc.edu/maps/aaht.html • http://ourpluralhistory.stcc.edu/resistingslavery/ index.html

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m

m

in

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Hw

y

Roxbury St

e St

tr Cen

10

• Prince Hall Monument, five stone tablets highlighting Hall’s life, with quotes by both Hall and historical and contemporary activists; Cambridge Common, Garden Street between Appian Way and Mason Street, Cambridge, MA

Blvd

The Sentinel, sitting on an outcropping of Roxbury puddingstone is a sculpture by Fern Cunningham of “the wise old woman of Africa” / Contemporary Sculpture Path, Forest Hills Cemetery, 95 Forest Hills Avenue, Boston, MA / 617-524-0128 / http://www.foresthillscemetery.com / also at http://cunninghamsculpture.com Upper Housatonic Valley African American Heritage Trail Guide, 48 sites in 29 Massachusetts and Connecticut towns in the Upper Housatonic Valley National Heritage Area celebrating African Americans in the region who played pivotal roles in local, national and international events / http://uhvafamtrail.org/AAHTBrochure.html

Free at Last, by Sergio Castillo (1975)

Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Archive, Howard Gotlieb Archival Research Center, Boston University, 771 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, MA / 617-353-3696 / http:// www.bu.edu/dbin/ mlkjr/

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ve

Ri

St

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Malcolm X

Roxbury Crossing

St

St

16. Step On Board/Harriet Tubman Memorial 17. Emancipation ve

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St

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Inbound to Boston (North)

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ly

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Wendell Phillips (1811-1884), “prophet of liberty” and “champion of the slave,” became a celebrity during the Civil War for his outstanding speeches against slavery and for freedom for blacks. Born in Boston to a prominent family, Phillips attended Boston Latin School and graduated from Harvard College and Harvard Law School. In 1835, two years after graduating from law school, Phillips heard a fiery speech by William Lloyd Garrison to the Boston Female Anti-Slavery Society demanding the immediate emancipation for all enslaved people in America. That speech – along with witnessing a mob’s attempt to lynch Garrison after the speech – motivated Phillips to join the abolitionist cause and to give his own fiery speeches against slavery. For a number of years, Phillips served as President of the American Anti-Slavery Society. Phillips even opposed President Lincoln’s re-election for a second term based on Lincoln’s willingness to allow slavery to continue in order to save the Union. Besides being a firm abolitionist, Phillips also advocated for the equal rights of Native Americans, women, and prisoners. As he eloquently stated, “I love inexpressibly these streets of Boston over whose pavements my mother held up tenderly my baby feet and if God grants me time enough I will make them too pure to bear the footsteps of a slave.”

tS on

n to rle Ca

W es

Personal Power & Commitment

Inbound to Boston (North)

Mattapan

t

Roxbury

St

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Av e

Prudential

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13. Phillis Wheatley 14. Abigail Adams 15. Lucy Stone

Ri

Back Bay

Co

Prudential Center

Liberty & Justice for All

Blue Hill Ave

t nS

lsto

Boy

5. William Ellery Channing

By Herbert Adams, Public Garden, Arlington and Boylston Streets (1903) 5

and his total lack of understanding of how some Americans could be fighting for freedom while enslaving others – Kosciusko left the money and the land for a greater purpose: freeing and educating enslaved people.

gt hin Wa s

ve hA ealt

Tremon t St

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6

& ALLIES

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Robert Gould Shaw/54th Massachusetts Regiment Memorial Soldiers and Sailors Monument

First to Die for America’s Freedom

4.

Boylston

Charl

7. Tadeusz Kosciusko

By Theodore Ruggles Kitson, Public Garden, Boylston Street (1927)

As an unwavering abolitionist, Massachusetts Senator Charles Sumner (1811-1874), was also a leader of the Radical Republicans in Congress. His near-death experience from being beaten

ACTIVISTS

1. 2.

One Bondage Ends, Another Begins

St

St

on the Senate floor by Representative Preston Brooks of South Carolina in 1856 is one of the most memorable moments in his life. This incident occurred to avenge insults Sumner leveled at Senator Andrew Butler, a cousin of Brooks, in his speech “Bleeding Kansas.” Two days after the speech, Brooks “defended” his cousin’s honor by meeting Sumner in the Senate Chambers and beating him on the head with a gold-tipped cane, which splintered with the force of the blows, very nearly leading to Sumner’s death. Even after almost being murdered, three years later Sumner returned to the Senate and continued to fight for African American rights, pushing for a civil rights bill, one that specifically prohibited racial discrimination in regards to public accommodations.

6. Charles Sumner

By Thomas Ball, Public Garden, Boylston Street (1878)

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In 1803, William Ellery Channing (1780-1842), a Rhode Island native, was called as the minster of the Federal Street Church in Boston. While in Boston, he studied theology at Harvard and became one of the most influential thinkers of his time. Living in an era of extremists on both sides, Channing delivered articulate and passionate speeches and sermons taking a moderate position. As a prominent Unitarian, Channing spoke out against society’s imposed limitations of freedom, especially regarding the institution of slavery. He did not agree with slavery, but he also did not believe in complete emancipation for those enslaved. He thought people should be released from slavery, but that they would need overseers once freed. He never proclaimed to be an abolitionist; Channing’s book, Slavery, criticized the moral evils of the slave system as a form of corruption imposed on both the enslaved and the masters. He argued that human rights do not derive from the laws society imposes on us but rather from our own individual moral nature. Channing’s speeches, in addition to his book, helped to give the anti-slavery cause a new respectability that it did not previously have.

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Mr. Lincoln and Freedom © 2002-2013 The Lincoln Institute, a project founded by The Lehrman Institute; http://www.mrlincolnandfreedom.org/)

By Thomas Ball, Park Square (1879)

Boston Common

nS

tmo

4

Civil Rights to Civil War

Dar

Something to Think About • What is the significance of Attucks being among the first to die in this war? • Called “mulatto in his time, Attucks could also be called, biracial, mixed race, or multiethnic. What is “race”? What does “ethnicity” mean?

4. Freedmen’s Memorial (Emancipation Monument)

Lincoln’s role in emancipation will forever be debated: to save the Union, he would have allowed slavery to continue in the “slave states” but not expand to any new states. However, Lincoln himself may have given us an insight as to what he might think of this statue’s design. Just ten days before his assassination and two days after the leaders of the Confederacy and the Confederate troops fled Richmond, Virginia, Lincoln visited the now former capital of the rebellious states. Recognized by those who were now free, some knelt at Lincoln’s feet. Lincoln became embarrassed and said, “Don’t kneel to me. That is not right. You must kneel to God only, and thank him for the liberty you will hereafter enjoy.” (“Civil War/Black Soldiers/Entering Richmond”

Boston Public Garden

co Bea

St field

Even though America received its independence, slavery continued on. In 1841, Frederick Douglass commented on what the 4th of July means to the Negro, “Your high independence only reveals the immeasurable distance between us. The blessings in which you, this day, rejoice are not enjoyed in common. The rich inheritance of justice, liberty, prosperity, and independence bequeathed by your fathers is shared by you, not by me.”

Papers, Series One: Speeches, Debates and Interviews, Volume 4: 1864-80, page 428, Yale University, 1991)

Park Street

Fair

On the snowy evening of March 5, 1770 a group of civilians upset with the presence of British army soldiers in Boston began throwing snowballs filled with stones and sticks at the troops. Without orders to fire from an officer, the British soldiers began firing their rifles into the crowd of civilians, killing five men: Crispus Attucks, Samuel Gray, James Caldwell, Samuel Maverick, Patrick Carr, and injuring many others. Attucks, a black sailor was the first of these five men to be killed. The Boston Massacre and Attucks’ death are considered to be the beginning of the Revolutionary War, America’s fight for Independence from England.

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Charles River

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By Robert Kraus, Boston Common, Tremont Street (1888)

People of African descent first arrived in the Thirteen Original Colonies in 1619 at Jamestown, Virginia – one year before the Pilgrims arrived in Massachusetts. A few years later, the first slave ship to come to Massachusetts, the Desire, arrived in 1638; eventually making Boston a major port of departure for slave ships. Two early events in American history starting the American slave system, which lasted for almost 250 years. Although there were many success stories of blacks buying their freedom or escaping to freedom in the northern states and Canada, millions of people remained enslaved. But even the Civil War failed to bring true freedom to the African American community. After the Civil War, African Americans were denied their rights to full citizenship. Harshly enforced sharecropping and segregation became the “way of life” for a vast majority of African Americans, North and South. It took 99 years after the end of the Civil War for the African American community to have the full protection of the federal government with the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Downtown Boston

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ANOTHER BEGINS

When Charlotte Scott, a recently freed woman, learned of President Lincoln’s assassination, she wanted to honor Lincoln’s role in emancipation. Scott donated $5, beginning the fund that would eventually pay for the original Freedmen’s Memorial in Washington, DC. Lincoln is shown standing tall, while a black man – wearing only a loincloth and with broken shackles – is kneeling at his feet. And, even though all of the money for the original statue was given by the black community, the organization managing the money, in addition to managing the design competition for the statue, was run by whites. Frederick Douglass gave the keynote address at the original’s dedication in the nation’s capital. “Although Douglass later wrote that he was greatly honored to have been chosen orator of the day, observers heard him remark at the ceremony that the statue, ‘showed the Negro on his knees when a more manly attitude would have been indicative of freedom.’” (The Frederick Douglass

Something to Think About • How would you depict this statue to be less controversial, with more dignity for African Americans? What story is being told? • What is the difference between referring to someone as “enslaved” rather than “a slave”? • Do you believe President Lincoln deserves the title of “Great Emancipator”? • Does it make a difference that the people who donated the money for the statue did not have a say in the efforts to design and build it? If so, why? • What is the relationship between the “bondage” that the Civil War ended and the “bondage” ended by the modern Civil Rights Movement? Is there a form of “bondage” that exists today?

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ONE BONDAGE ENDS,

As you approach this statue, think about these two questions: What do you see? How do you feel?

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• Native American first inhabited what is now the United States: all others have originated from somewhere else. What does it mean to be an American?

Hu

3. Boston Massacre Memorial/Crispus Attucks

Mattapan

People of Action

18. A. Phillip Randolph

Boston Today: Beyond Beacon Hill

19. Father and Child 20. Rise (Mattapan’s People: Past & Present) 21. Rise (Looking to the Future)

«

Mural of Melnea Cass

While the idea for the Emancipation Trail came to me a number of years ago as I sat quietly by Freedmen’s Memorial eating lunch and thinking about this “problematic” statue, the Emancipation Trail would not be what it is today without the help of many individuals and organizations. Frist, and foremost, the Beacon Hill Scholars – your enthusiastic support and forthright feedback has been invaluable. Additionally, my utmost thanks to: • Lyda Peters for your initial encouragement and giving the trail its name • Crystal Chandler, Steven Gilchrist and Tatiana Grant for your superb ideas and writing skills • Kari Heistad for the beautiful photographs • Artists for Humanity for the incredible graphic design and layout, especially Kelsey Arbona and Kyleen Hill • Boston African American National Historic Site for your unending support • Frieda Garcia for ensuring that Meta Warrick Fuller’s words were quoted correctly • Deborah Finn and Janine & Tom Fondon for taking it into the 21st century • And the many, many individuals who either walked the Emancipation Trail with me or have taken an interest in its creation: your personal stories, knowledge and thoughtful insights added details I would have missed or about which I would have never known This could not have happened without all of you! Thank you,

Vincent Licenziato Boston, Massachusetts June 2013

“In recognizing the humanity of our fellow beings we pay ourselves the highest tribute.” – Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall The Emancipation Trail, by Vincent G. Licenziato, MEd, brings together his love of teaching; his interest in the visual arts and history; and his passion for social and economic justice. Vincent is a member of the Beacon Hill Scholars, a diverse group of individuals who research, interpret, and help to preserve the history associated with Beacon Hill’s 19th century community of free African Americans. The Scholars honor that courageous community by continuing to work for freedom, equality, and justice.

By Bela I. Pratt, Public Garden, Beacon Street (1913)

By Daniel Chester French, Public Garden, Boylston Street (1915)

Edward Everett Hale (1822-1909), a man destined to do something great with his life, enrolled at Harvard College at the age of 13 and graduated second in his class. This Boston native grew up to be a very

7

20

11

The Emancipation Trail is also on the Web at UnityFirst.com, a national distributor of diversity-related e-news; please visit http://unityfirst.com/EmancipationTrail

For more information about the Emancipation Trail or inquires about underwriting printing costs for this booklet, please call or email Vincent / 617-720-2839 / Licenziato@aol.com Printing generously provided by ___________________

Organization Logo


EMANCIPATION TRAIL BOOKLET

In 1776, a young, and very skilled engineer, Tadeusz Kosciusko (1746-1817), left Poland for America to help fight for the independence of the colonies from England. Only 30 years old at the time, Kosciusko became the first foreign officer to receive pay from the Continental Congress for serving in General George Washington’s Continental Army. Because of his extensive experience and knowledge, Kosciusko was appointed to serve as the Army’s Colonel of Engineers. The Continental Congress granted him $15,000 and 500 acres of land in Ohio for his service. But, as a firm believer in equality for all –

8. Thomas Cass

By Richard E. Brooks, Public Garden, Boylston Street (1899)

Born in Queens County, Ireland, Thomas Cass (1821-1862) immigrated to the United States with his parents. The Cass family settled in Boston where Cass became a businessman and a member of the Boston School Committee. In 1861, Massachusetts Governor John Andrew asked Cass to help in the war effort against the Confederacy and Cass obliged by establishing the “Fighting Ninth,” serving as the Colonel of this volunteer regiment of mainly Irish immigrants. Colonel Cass died from wounds received during the Battle of Malvern Hill in Virginia.

aza

Park Pl

Arlington

3.

Boston Massacre Memorial/Crispus Attucks

nw mo t Com yS bur w e N

t

nS

to oyls

B

Freedmen’s Memorial (Emancipation Monument)

St on

Activists & Allies 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10.

Copley

While there are many people who contribute to the success of any cause, only a few get publically acknowledged. Here are six white men who spoke out for and fought for people of African descent being denied their freedom in the “land of the free.”

William Ellery Channing Charles Sumner Tadeusz Kosciuszko Thomas Cass Wendell Phillips Edward Everett Hale

Fighting Injustice

11. Grand Army of the Republic 12. William Lloyd Garrison

Av e s bu lu m

ve en A

r War

bu

10. Edward Everett Hale

9. Wendell Phillips

Co

Roxbury Community College

Royall House & Slave Quarters, in the 1700s the home of the largest slaveholding family in Massachusetts and the enslaved Africans who made their lavish way of life possible; a museum bearing witness to intertwined stories of wealth and bondage, set against the backdrop of America’s quest for independence; 15 George Street, Medford, MA / 781-396-9032 / http:// www.royallhouse.org/ Sojourner Truth Memorial Project (c. 1797-1883), born into slavery she escaped with her infant daughter to freedom in 1826, a well-known abolitionist and women’s rights activist; a statue by Thomas Jay Warren of Truth is located in a small park at the intersection of Pine and Park Streets, Florence, MA / self-guided walking tour at http://www.sojournertruthmemorial.org/ Springfield: African American Heritage Trail / Resisting Slavery, Springfield, MA, “Our Plural History” (a project of Springfield Technical Community College) examines the idea of pluralism in the United States, email: ourpluralhistory@stcc.edu • http://ourpluralhistory.stcc.edu/maps/aaht.html • http://ourpluralhistory.stcc.edu/resistingslavery/ index.html

Cu

m

m

in

s

Hw

y

Roxbury St

e St

tr Cen

10

• Prince Hall Monument, five stone tablets highlighting Hall’s life, with quotes by both Hall and historical and contemporary activists; Cambridge Common, Garden Street between Appian Way and Mason Street, Cambridge, MA

Blvd

The Sentinel, sitting on an outcropping of Roxbury puddingstone is a sculpture by Fern Cunningham of “the wise old woman of Africa” / Contemporary Sculpture Path, Forest Hills Cemetery, 95 Forest Hills Avenue, Boston, MA / 617-524-0128 / http://www.foresthillscemetery.com / also at http://cunninghamsculpture.com Upper Housatonic Valley African American Heritage Trail Guide, 48 sites in 29 Massachusetts and Connecticut towns in the Upper Housatonic Valley National Heritage Area celebrating African Americans in the region who played pivotal roles in local, national and international events / http://uhvafamtrail.org/AAHTBrochure.html

Free at Last, by Sergio Castillo (1975)

Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Archive, Howard Gotlieb Archival Research Center, Boston University, 771 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, MA / 617-353-3696 / http:// www.bu.edu/dbin/ mlkjr/

r

ve

Ri

St

t rS

Malcolm X

Roxbury Crossing

St

St

16. Step On Board/Harriet Tubman Memorial 17. Emancipation ve

m Tr e

St

k

od

n

oa

wo

to

Inbound to Boston (North)

Elm

ly

ew

sA ve

Ho

tN

lum

Wendell Phillips (1811-1884), “prophet of liberty” and “champion of the slave,” became a celebrity during the Civil War for his outstanding speeches against slavery and for freedom for blacks. Born in Boston to a prominent family, Phillips attended Boston Latin School and graduated from Harvard College and Harvard Law School. In 1835, two years after graduating from law school, Phillips heard a fiery speech by William Lloyd Garrison to the Boston Female Anti-Slavery Society demanding the immediate emancipation for all enslaved people in America. That speech – along with witnessing a mob’s attempt to lynch Garrison after the speech – motivated Phillips to join the abolitionist cause and to give his own fiery speeches against slavery. For a number of years, Phillips served as President of the American Anti-Slavery Society. Phillips even opposed President Lincoln’s re-election for a second term based on Lincoln’s willingness to allow slavery to continue in order to save the Union. Besides being a firm abolitionist, Phillips also advocated for the equal rights of Native Americans, women, and prisoners. As he eloquently stated, “I love inexpressibly these streets of Boston over whose pavements my mother held up tenderly my baby feet and if God grants me time enough I will make them too pure to bear the footsteps of a slave.”

tS on

n to rle Ca

W es

Personal Power & Commitment

Inbound to Boston (North)

Mattapan

t

Roxbury

St

on

Av e

Prudential

gt

13. Phillis Wheatley 14. Abigail Adams 15. Lucy Stone

Ri

Back Bay

Co

Prudential Center

Liberty & Justice for All

Blue Hill Ave

t nS

lsto

Boy

5. William Ellery Channing

By Herbert Adams, Public Garden, Arlington and Boylston Streets (1903) 5

and his total lack of understanding of how some Americans could be fighting for freedom while enslaving others – Kosciusko left the money and the land for a greater purpose: freeing and educating enslaved people.

gt hin Wa s

ve hA ealt

Tremon t St

a

es St

6

& ALLIES

ve lth A

nwe

mo

Com

Robert Gould Shaw/54th Massachusetts Regiment Memorial Soldiers and Sailors Monument

First to Die for America’s Freedom

4.

Boylston

Charl

7. Tadeusz Kosciusko

By Theodore Ruggles Kitson, Public Garden, Boylston Street (1927)

As an unwavering abolitionist, Massachusetts Senator Charles Sumner (1811-1874), was also a leader of the Radical Republicans in Congress. His near-death experience from being beaten

ACTIVISTS

1. 2.

One Bondage Ends, Another Begins

St

St

on the Senate floor by Representative Preston Brooks of South Carolina in 1856 is one of the most memorable moments in his life. This incident occurred to avenge insults Sumner leveled at Senator Andrew Butler, a cousin of Brooks, in his speech “Bleeding Kansas.” Two days after the speech, Brooks “defended” his cousin’s honor by meeting Sumner in the Senate Chambers and beating him on the head with a gold-tipped cane, which splintered with the force of the blows, very nearly leading to Sumner’s death. Even after almost being murdered, three years later Sumner returned to the Senate and continued to fight for African American rights, pushing for a civil rights bill, one that specifically prohibited racial discrimination in regards to public accommodations.

6. Charles Sumner

By Thomas Ball, Public Garden, Boylston Street (1878)

ugh

oro

lb Mar

uth

In 1803, William Ellery Channing (1780-1842), a Rhode Island native, was called as the minster of the Federal Street Church in Boston. While in Boston, he studied theology at Harvard and became one of the most influential thinkers of his time. Living in an era of extremists on both sides, Channing delivered articulate and passionate speeches and sermons taking a moderate position. As a prominent Unitarian, Channing spoke out against society’s imposed limitations of freedom, especially regarding the institution of slavery. He did not agree with slavery, but he also did not believe in complete emancipation for those enslaved. He thought people should be released from slavery, but that they would need overseers once freed. He never proclaimed to be an abolitionist; Channing’s book, Slavery, criticized the moral evils of the slave system as a form of corruption imposed on both the enslaved and the masters. He argued that human rights do not derive from the laws society imposes on us but rather from our own individual moral nature. Channing’s speeches, in addition to his book, helped to give the anti-slavery cause a new respectability that it did not previously have.

t

Mr. Lincoln and Freedom © 2002-2013 The Lincoln Institute, a project founded by The Lehrman Institute; http://www.mrlincolnandfreedom.org/)

By Thomas Ball, Park Square (1879)

Boston Common

nS

tmo

4

Civil Rights to Civil War

Dar

Something to Think About • What is the significance of Attucks being among the first to die in this war? • Called “mulatto in his time, Attucks could also be called, biracial, mixed race, or multiethnic. What is “race”? What does “ethnicity” mean?

4. Freedmen’s Memorial (Emancipation Monument)

Lincoln’s role in emancipation will forever be debated: to save the Union, he would have allowed slavery to continue in the “slave states” but not expand to any new states. However, Lincoln himself may have given us an insight as to what he might think of this statue’s design. Just ten days before his assassination and two days after the leaders of the Confederacy and the Confederate troops fled Richmond, Virginia, Lincoln visited the now former capital of the rebellious states. Recognized by those who were now free, some knelt at Lincoln’s feet. Lincoln became embarrassed and said, “Don’t kneel to me. That is not right. You must kneel to God only, and thank him for the liberty you will hereafter enjoy.” (“Civil War/Black Soldiers/Entering Richmond”

Boston Public Garden

co Bea

St field

Even though America received its independence, slavery continued on. In 1841, Frederick Douglass commented on what the 4th of July means to the Negro, “Your high independence only reveals the immeasurable distance between us. The blessings in which you, this day, rejoice are not enjoyed in common. The rich inheritance of justice, liberty, prosperity, and independence bequeathed by your fathers is shared by you, not by me.”

Papers, Series One: Speeches, Debates and Interviews, Volume 4: 1864-80, page 428, Yale University, 1991)

Park Street

Fair

On the snowy evening of March 5, 1770 a group of civilians upset with the presence of British army soldiers in Boston began throwing snowballs filled with stones and sticks at the troops. Without orders to fire from an officer, the British soldiers began firing their rifles into the crowd of civilians, killing five men: Crispus Attucks, Samuel Gray, James Caldwell, Samuel Maverick, Patrick Carr, and injuring many others. Attucks, a black sailor was the first of these five men to be killed. The Boston Massacre and Attucks’ death are considered to be the beginning of the Revolutionary War, America’s fight for Independence from England.

St

con

Bea

Charles River

in

By Robert Kraus, Boston Common, Tremont Street (1888)

People of African descent first arrived in the Thirteen Original Colonies in 1619 at Jamestown, Virginia – one year before the Pilgrims arrived in Massachusetts. A few years later, the first slave ship to come to Massachusetts, the Desire, arrived in 1638; eventually making Boston a major port of departure for slave ships. Two early events in American history starting the American slave system, which lasted for almost 250 years. Although there were many success stories of blacks buying their freedom or escaping to freedom in the northern states and Canada, millions of people remained enslaved. But even the Civil War failed to bring true freedom to the African American community. After the Civil War, African Americans were denied their rights to full citizenship. Harshly enforced sharecropping and segregation became the “way of life” for a vast majority of African Americans, North and South. It took 99 years after the end of the Civil War for the African American community to have the full protection of the federal government with the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Downtown Boston

t sS

ANOTHER BEGINS

When Charlotte Scott, a recently freed woman, learned of President Lincoln’s assassination, she wanted to honor Lincoln’s role in emancipation. Scott donated $5, beginning the fund that would eventually pay for the original Freedmen’s Memorial in Washington, DC. Lincoln is shown standing tall, while a black man – wearing only a loincloth and with broken shackles – is kneeling at his feet. And, even though all of the money for the original statue was given by the black community, the organization managing the money, in addition to managing the design competition for the statue, was run by whites. Frederick Douglass gave the keynote address at the original’s dedication in the nation’s capital. “Although Douglass later wrote that he was greatly honored to have been chosen orator of the day, observers heard him remark at the ceremony that the statue, ‘showed the Negro on his knees when a more manly attitude would have been indicative of freedom.’” (The Frederick Douglass

Something to Think About • How would you depict this statue to be less controversial, with more dignity for African Americans? What story is being told? • What is the difference between referring to someone as “enslaved” rather than “a slave”? • Do you believe President Lincoln deserves the title of “Great Emancipator”? • Does it make a difference that the people who donated the money for the statue did not have a say in the efforts to design and build it? If so, why? • What is the relationship between the “bondage” that the Civil War ended and the “bondage” ended by the modern Civil Rights Movement? Is there a form of “bondage” that exists today?

rle Cha

ONE BONDAGE ENDS,

As you approach this statue, think about these two questions: What do you see? How do you feel?

nt

• Native American first inhabited what is now the United States: all others have originated from somewhere else. What does it mean to be an American?

Hu

3. Boston Massacre Memorial/Crispus Attucks

Mattapan

People of Action

18. A. Phillip Randolph

Boston Today: Beyond Beacon Hill

19. Father and Child 20. Rise (Mattapan’s People: Past & Present) 21. Rise (Looking to the Future)

«

Mural of Melnea Cass

While the idea for the Emancipation Trail came to me a number of years ago as I sat quietly by Freedmen’s Memorial eating lunch and thinking about this “problematic” statue, the Emancipation Trail would not be what it is today without the help of many individuals and organizations. Frist, and foremost, the Beacon Hill Scholars – your enthusiastic support and forthright feedback has been invaluable. Additionally, my utmost thanks to: • Lyda Peters for your initial encouragement and giving the trail its name • Crystal Chandler, Steven Gilchrist and Tatiana Grant for your superb ideas and writing skills • Kari Heistad for the beautiful photographs • Artists for Humanity for the incredible graphic design and layout, especially Kelsey Arbona and Kyleen Hill • Boston African American National Historic Site for your unending support • Frieda Garcia for ensuring that Meta Warrick Fuller’s words were quoted correctly • Deborah Finn and Janine & Tom Fondon for taking it into the 21st century • And the many, many individuals who either walked the Emancipation Trail with me or have taken an interest in its creation: your personal stories, knowledge and thoughtful insights added details I would have missed or about which I would have never known This could not have happened without all of you! Thank you,

Vincent Licenziato Boston, Massachusetts June 2013

“In recognizing the humanity of our fellow beings we pay ourselves the highest tribute.” – Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall The Emancipation Trail, by Vincent G. Licenziato, MEd, brings together his love of teaching; his interest in the visual arts and history; and his passion for social and economic justice. Vincent is a member of the Beacon Hill Scholars, a diverse group of individuals who research, interpret, and help to preserve the history associated with Beacon Hill’s 19th century community of free African Americans. The Scholars honor that courageous community by continuing to work for freedom, equality, and justice.

By Bela I. Pratt, Public Garden, Beacon Street (1913)

By Daniel Chester French, Public Garden, Boylston Street (1915)

Edward Everett Hale (1822-1909), a man destined to do something great with his life, enrolled at Harvard College at the age of 13 and graduated second in his class. This Boston native grew up to be a very

7

20

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The Emancipation Trail is also on the Web at UnityFirst.com, a national distributor of diversity-related e-news; please visit http://unityfirst.com/EmancipationTrail

For more information about the Emancipation Trail or inquires about underwriting printing costs for this booklet, please call or email Vincent / 617-720-2839 / Licenziato@aol.com Printing generously provided by ___________________

Organization Logo


FONT POSTER

EVENT POSTER designed by

Heavy “He chose to study art after attending a secondary school called the Gymnasium for humanities. He completed his training in the arts at Munich in 1900.�

ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz

ABOUT PAUL RENNER

ABOUT FUTURA

Paul Friedrich August Renner is a German typograher particularly famous for his typeface Futura designed in 1927. He chose to study art after attending a secondary school called the Gymnasium for humanities. He completed his training in the arts at Munich in 1900. Although Futura is not a direct observation of the Bauhuaus movement, it shows a functionalist aesthetic. Renner admired modernism but questioned abstract art.

Paul Friedrich August Renner is a German typograher particularly famous for his typeface Futura designed in 1927. He chose to study art after attending a secondary school called the Gymnasium for humanities. He completed his training in the arts at Munich in 1900. Although Futura is not a direct observation of the Bauhuaus movement, it shows a functionalist aesthetic. Renner admired modernism but questioned abstract art.

Renner resisted political ideologies and was vocal if his opposition of the Nazis. Due to this, Renner was exiled from Munich.

Renner resisted political ideologies and was vocal if his opposition of the Nazis. Due to this, Renner was exiled from Munich.

Instead of fine arts, Paul Renner focused on typefaces and book design. He used his intellectual knowledge of literature and philosophy

Instead of fine arts, Paul Renner focused on typefaces and book design. He used his intellectual knowledge of literature and philosophy


FONT POSTER

EVENT POSTER designed by

Heavy “He chose to study art after attending a secondary school called the Gymnasium for humanities. He completed his training in the arts at Munich in 1900.�

ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz

ABOUT PAUL RENNER

ABOUT FUTURA

Paul Friedrich August Renner is a German typograher particularly famous for his typeface Futura designed in 1927. He chose to study art after attending a secondary school called the Gymnasium for humanities. He completed his training in the arts at Munich in 1900. Although Futura is not a direct observation of the Bauhuaus movement, it shows a functionalist aesthetic. Renner admired modernism but questioned abstract art.

Paul Friedrich August Renner is a German typograher particularly famous for his typeface Futura designed in 1927. He chose to study art after attending a secondary school called the Gymnasium for humanities. He completed his training in the arts at Munich in 1900. Although Futura is not a direct observation of the Bauhuaus movement, it shows a functionalist aesthetic. Renner admired modernism but questioned abstract art.

Renner resisted political ideologies and was vocal if his opposition of the Nazis. Due to this, Renner was exiled from Munich.

Renner resisted political ideologies and was vocal if his opposition of the Nazis. Due to this, Renner was exiled from Munich.

Instead of fine arts, Paul Renner focused on typefaces and book design. He used his intellectual knowledge of literature and philosophy

Instead of fine arts, Paul Renner focused on typefaces and book design. He used his intellectual knowledge of literature and philosophy


APPAREL DESIGN

boston, ma.

TOTE BAG DESIGN


APPAREL DESIGN

boston, ma.

TOTE BAG DESIGN


Top 100 Award Front

ICIC AWARD DESIGNS

FRONT

BACK

5 in

INNER CITY

Happy Family New York, NY

51.

2.

Revolution Foods Oakland, CA

3.

Coyote Logistics Chicago, IL

52. Tumbador Chocolate Brooklyn, NY 53. ServerLIFT Corporation Phoenix, AZ

4.

InGenesis San Antonio, TX

5.

Neutron Interactive Salt Lake City, UT

6.

QuoteWizard Seattle, WA

7.

APB & Associates Cleveland, OH

8.

Panther Solutions Rochester, NY

9.

Aspenmark Roofing & Solar Dallas, TX

10. Kemp and Sons General Services Fort Worth, TX 11.

Sovereign Security Philadelphia, PA 12. DMC Consultants Detroit, MI 13. Team Henry Enterprises v , VA 14. Rise Interactive Chicago, IL 15. Watermark Lowell, MA 16. BWI Indianapolis, IN 17. Xtra 21 Express Trucking Dallas, TX

8 in

Cellular Specialties Manchester, NH

1.

18. The Menkiti Group Washington, DC 19. Dean Media Group Chicago, IL 20. OriGen Biomedical Austin, TX 21. Allied Industries North Hollywood, CA 22. PMG Project Management Group Houston, TX 23. PrintFresh Philadelphia, PA 24. Sensis Los Angeles, CA 25. RM Technologies Lawrence, MA 26. Computech Corporation Detroit, MI 27. Vynamic Philadelphia, PA 28. International Asbestos Removal Woodside, NY 29. Gorilla Commerce Chicago, IL 30. Luggage Forward Boston, MA 31. InfoPeople New York, NY

54. Alameda Construction Services Compton, CA 55. Xantrion Oakland, CA 56. GovDelivery St. Paul , MN 57. S & W Contracting of WNY Buffalo, NY 58. Ellicott Dredge Enterprises Baltimore, MD 59. Tire Group International Miami, FL 60. Orbit Media Studios Chicago, IL 61. Park Inc. Charlotte, NC 62. Network Deposition Services Pittsburgh, PA 63. Stone & Grzegorek Los Angeles, CA 64. Zycron Nashville, TN 65. West Monroe Partners Chicago, IL 66. SiteCrafting Tacoma, WA 67. Clinical Trial Network Houston, TX 68. DornerWorks Grand Rapids, MI 69. DuneCraft Cleveland, OH 70. Compass Solutions Washington, DC 71. The Online 401k San Francisco, CA 72. KW Engineering Oakland, CA 73. World Pac Paper Cincinnati, OH 74. Edibles Rex Detroit, MI 75. Red Iguana Salt Lake City, UT 76. PepperDash Technology Allston, MA Pinck & Co. Roxbury, MA

77.

78. Aztec Promotional Group Austin, TX 79. Azavea Philadelphia, PA 80. Yerba Buena Engineering & Construction San Francisco, CA 81.

Call One Chicago, IL

32. Premier Organics Oakland, CA 33. Navigator Management Partners Columbus, OH

82. Pipe Wrap Houston, TX 83. Alpi International Oakland, CA

34. SEER Interactive Philadelphia, PA 35. Great Northern Building Products Louisville, KY

84. The Locator Services Group Boston, MA 85. Mahaffey Tent & Awning Memphis, TN

36. Fennick McCredie Architecture Boston, MA 37. Freedom Metals Louisville, KY

86. El Clasificado Los Angeles, CA 87. Long Wave Oklahoma City, OK

38. Ansira St. Louis, MO 39. PetRelocation.com Austin, TX

88. Brown, Richardson & Rowe Boston, MA 89. E.C. Ortiz and Co. Chicago, IL

40. Postmodern Company Denver, CO 41. One Stop Environmental Birmingham, AL

90. International Medical Group Indianapolis, IN 91. LaSalle Network Chicago, IL

42. TANTARA Corporation Worcester, MA 43. MSDSonline Chicago, IL

92. AutoCrib Santa Ana, CA 93. Intelect Corporation Baltimore, MD

44. True Fabrications Seattle, WA 45. Recovery Networks Philadelphia, PA

94. Rico Brands Salt Lake City, UT 95. On-Demand Services Group Minneapolis, MN

46. TCG Washington, DC 47. Research Into Action Portland, OR

96. Marlin Steel Wire Products Baltimore, MD 97. The Alamo Travel Group San Antonio, TX

48. Ace Exhibits Los Angeles, CA 49. Nitel Chicago, IL

98. Color FX Sun Valley, CA 99. CrunchTime! Information Systems East Boston, MA

50. Raining Rose Cedar Rapids, IA

100. Frontline Public Strategies Springfield, IL


Top 100 Award Front

ICIC AWARD DESIGNS

FRONT

BACK

5 in

INNER CITY

Happy Family New York, NY

51.

2.

Revolution Foods Oakland, CA

3.

Coyote Logistics Chicago, IL

52. Tumbador Chocolate Brooklyn, NY 53. ServerLIFT Corporation Phoenix, AZ

4.

InGenesis San Antonio, TX

5.

Neutron Interactive Salt Lake City, UT

6.

QuoteWizard Seattle, WA

7.

APB & Associates Cleveland, OH

8.

Panther Solutions Rochester, NY

9.

Aspenmark Roofing & Solar Dallas, TX

10. Kemp and Sons General Services Fort Worth, TX 11.

Sovereign Security Philadelphia, PA 12. DMC Consultants Detroit, MI 13. Team Henry Enterprises v , VA 14. Rise Interactive Chicago, IL 15. Watermark Lowell, MA 16. BWI Indianapolis, IN 17. Xtra 21 Express Trucking Dallas, TX

8 in

Cellular Specialties Manchester, NH

1.

18. The Menkiti Group Washington, DC 19. Dean Media Group Chicago, IL 20. OriGen Biomedical Austin, TX 21. Allied Industries North Hollywood, CA 22. PMG Project Management Group Houston, TX 23. PrintFresh Philadelphia, PA 24. Sensis Los Angeles, CA 25. RM Technologies Lawrence, MA 26. Computech Corporation Detroit, MI 27. Vynamic Philadelphia, PA 28. International Asbestos Removal Woodside, NY 29. Gorilla Commerce Chicago, IL 30. Luggage Forward Boston, MA 31. InfoPeople New York, NY

54. Alameda Construction Services Compton, CA 55. Xantrion Oakland, CA 56. GovDelivery St. Paul , MN 57. S & W Contracting of WNY Buffalo, NY 58. Ellicott Dredge Enterprises Baltimore, MD 59. Tire Group International Miami, FL 60. Orbit Media Studios Chicago, IL 61. Park Inc. Charlotte, NC 62. Network Deposition Services Pittsburgh, PA 63. Stone & Grzegorek Los Angeles, CA 64. Zycron Nashville, TN 65. West Monroe Partners Chicago, IL 66. SiteCrafting Tacoma, WA 67. Clinical Trial Network Houston, TX 68. DornerWorks Grand Rapids, MI 69. DuneCraft Cleveland, OH 70. Compass Solutions Washington, DC 71. The Online 401k San Francisco, CA 72. KW Engineering Oakland, CA 73. World Pac Paper Cincinnati, OH 74. Edibles Rex Detroit, MI 75. Red Iguana Salt Lake City, UT 76. PepperDash Technology Allston, MA Pinck & Co. Roxbury, MA

77.

78. Aztec Promotional Group Austin, TX 79. Azavea Philadelphia, PA 80. Yerba Buena Engineering & Construction San Francisco, CA 81.

Call One Chicago, IL

32. Premier Organics Oakland, CA 33. Navigator Management Partners Columbus, OH

82. Pipe Wrap Houston, TX 83. Alpi International Oakland, CA

34. SEER Interactive Philadelphia, PA 35. Great Northern Building Products Louisville, KY

84. The Locator Services Group Boston, MA 85. Mahaffey Tent & Awning Memphis, TN

36. Fennick McCredie Architecture Boston, MA 37. Freedom Metals Louisville, KY

86. El Clasificado Los Angeles, CA 87. Long Wave Oklahoma City, OK

38. Ansira St. Louis, MO 39. PetRelocation.com Austin, TX

88. Brown, Richardson & Rowe Boston, MA 89. E.C. Ortiz and Co. Chicago, IL

40. Postmodern Company Denver, CO 41. One Stop Environmental Birmingham, AL

90. International Medical Group Indianapolis, IN 91. LaSalle Network Chicago, IL

42. TANTARA Corporation Worcester, MA 43. MSDSonline Chicago, IL

92. AutoCrib Santa Ana, CA 93. Intelect Corporation Baltimore, MD

44. True Fabrications Seattle, WA 45. Recovery Networks Philadelphia, PA

94. Rico Brands Salt Lake City, UT 95. On-Demand Services Group Minneapolis, MN

46. TCG Washington, DC 47. Research Into Action Portland, OR

96. Marlin Steel Wire Products Baltimore, MD 97. The Alamo Travel Group San Antonio, TX

48. Ace Exhibits Los Angeles, CA 49. Nitel Chicago, IL

98. Color FX Sun Valley, CA 99. CrunchTime! Information Systems East Boston, MA

50. Raining Rose Cedar Rapids, IA

100. Frontline Public Strategies Springfield, IL


MERIDA RUG DESIGN

TIE DESIGN


MERIDA RUG DESIGN

TIE DESIGN


Emirates is one of the world’s fastest growing airlines. Its main activity is the provision of commercial air transportation services. Dnata is one of the largest combined air services providers in the world and the largest travel management services company in UAE. Emirates and Dnata are independent entities and do not form a group as defined by International Financial Reporting Standards.


Contents

EMIRATES Chair Message

1

Corporate Profile

2

Corporate Present

3

Corporate Future

4

FINANCIAL INFO Income Statement

5

Balancing Sheet

6

ADDITIONAL INFO Board of Directors

7

Inside Cover

8


“IT TAKES A WORLD”

Message The United Arab Emirates attaches great importance to the travel and tourism sector. It is an integral part of implementing the country’s strategy for building a sound and sustainable economy. The industry, in the UAE, has been built with a solid foundation focusing on high standards and class-leading excellence, resulting in the country’s world-class reputation both on a regional and international level. This vital sector does not only shape the country’s economy but also contributes significantly to its cultural and social fabric. Additionally, it provides boundless opportunities in new markets and strengthens our trade links with the world as well as broadening our cultural understanding. RASHID AD MAKTOUM


Corporate Profile Emirates is one of the world’s fastest growing airlines. Its main activity is the provision of commercial air transportation services. Dnata is one of the largest combined air services providers in the world and the largest travel management services company in UAE. Its main activities are the provisions of cargo and ground handling, catering, information technology and travel services. Emirates and Dnata are independent entities and do not form a group as defined by International Financial Reporting Standards. However, these entities are under common management. Therefore, in the Management Review section of this document, they are together referred to as the Emirates Group.


Board of Directors HH Sheikh Ahmed bin Saeed Sir Maurice Flanagan KBE Tim Clark Gary Chapman Ismail Ali Albanna Ali Mubarak Al Soori Abdulaziz Al Ali Adel Ahmad Al Redha Nigel Hopkins Thierry Antinori


IT TAKES A WORLD


YOU’ RE INVITED

Kennedy Center Honors Invitation Lifetime Achievement Award

SHAQUILLE O’NEaL

r.s.v.p

O’Neal attended Louisiana State University from 1989-1992 and twice won the SEC Player of the Year Award and was also two-time first-team All-American selection.

O’Neal played for the Orlando Magic from ‘92-’96 and won the Rookie of the Year award in 1993. He then played for the LA Lakers from ‘96-’04 and helped win the NBA title in 2000.

Kelsey Arbona 294 Chestnut Ave., 6 Jamaica Plain, MA 02130

Will you be attending?

yes no Name Guest

Kennedy Center Honors 2700 F Street, NW Washington, DC 20566


On Sunday December 9th 2014,

O’Neal starred in the film Kazaam where he played a rapping genie. He also is the cover athlete for three video game series.

the Kennedy Center will honor

Shaquille O’Neal with the

Shaquille O’Neal retired from the Boston Celtics in 2013. He has made an impactful constribution to the sports, music, entertainment, and philanthropic communities. We are pleased to honor him with this award.

Lifetime Achievement Award for his lifetime of contribution to the arts and American culture.

Kennedy Center Honors 2700 F Street, NW Washington, DC 20566

Kelsey Arbona 294 Chestnut Ave., 6 Jamaica Plain, MA 02130


THE 3 BIG QUESTIONS OF LIFE

and your business. who are you? what do you do? why does it matter? A great graphic designer will use your answers to these questions to create the perfect creative solutions for branding your company. We can help!

www.kelseyarbonadesign.com

who are we? Graphic Design Professionals.

what do we do? •logos •stationery •business cards •web design •t-shirts

•books •textiles •invitations •banners •and everything else!

why does it matter? Design is everywhere! Your clothes, your furniture, your groceries. Everywhere!


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