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Adventures on the Central Coast 10

Hiking Trail

Best Places to hike in SLO Page 3

Love to Surf?

go to page 5 to learn about the best spots to surf

“Those that come to the Central Coast tend to never leave.� Christina Favuzzi, major of San Luis Obispo County, said. photos are courtesy of Brady Teufel


Scream It From the Mountain Tops By: Wikipedia

Hiking the Hills of:

San Luis Obispo

T

he earliest human inhabitants of the local area were the Chumash people. One of the earliest villages lies south of San Luis Obispo and reflects the landscape of the early Holocene when estuaries came farther inland. These Chumash people exploited marine resources of the inlets and bays along the Central Coast and inhabited a network of villages, including sites at Los Osos and Morro Creek.[3] During the Spanish Empire expansion throughout the world, specifically in 1769, Franciscan Junípero Serra received orders from Spain to bring the Catholic faith to the natives of Alta California; the idea was to unify the empire under the same religion and language. Mission San Diego was the first Spanish mission founded in Alta California that same year. On September 1769 ,8–7, Gaspar de Portolà traveled through the San Luis Obispo area on his way to rediscover the Monterey Bay. The expedition›s diarist, Padre Juan Crespí, recorded the name given to this area by the soldiers as «llano de los Osos» or the level of the bears (Bear Plain), as this was an area with an abundance of bears. Since then, various translations of the Crespí Diary have called this area La Cañada de Los Osos (The track of the Bears) which has been further mistranslated as «the Valley of the Bears». In 1770, Junípero Serra founded the second mission, San Carlos Borromeo, in Monterey which was moved to Carmel the following year. As supplies dwindled in 1772 at the then-four missions, the people faced starvation. Remembering the Valley of the Bears, a hunting expedition was sent to bring back food in the summer of 1772. Over twenty-five mule loads of dried bear meat and seed were sent north to relieve the missionaries, soldiers, and neophytes (baptized natives). The natives were impressed at the ease by which the Spaniards could take down the huge grizzlies with their weapons. Some of the bear meat was traded with the local people in exchange for edible seed. It was after photos are courtesy of Brady Teufel

PAGE 3


courtesy of Wikipedia

Surf’s UP SLO

S Courtesy of Brady Teufel

community of priests, natives and soldiers needed to produce goods for their own livelihood. When the Mexican War of Independence from Spain broke out in 1810, all California missions were virtually self-sufficient, receiving few funds from Spain. With the independence from Spain, there was little left of the thriving community of earlier times. Soon after Mexico won her independence from Spain (1821), the missions were secularized by the Mexican government. However, the community remained in the same location of what is today San Luis Obispo. San Luis Obispo once had a burgeoning Chinatown in the vicinity of Palm St. and Chorro Street. Laborers were brought from China by Ah Louis in order to construct the Pacific Coast Railway, roads connecting San Luis Obispo to Paso Robles and Paso Robles to Cambria, and also the 1884 to 1894 tunneling through Cuesta Ridge for the Southern Pacific Railroad. The town›s Chinatown revolved around Ah Louis Store and other Palm Street businesses owned and run by Chinese business.

PAGE 4

By: Wikipedia

urfing is a surface water sport in which the wave rider, referred to as a “surfer”, rides on the forward or deep face of a moving wave, which is usually carrying the surfer towards the shore. Waves suitable for surfing are primarily found in the ocean, but can also be found in lakes or in rivers in the form of a standing wave or tidal bore. However, surfers can also utilize man-made waves such as those from boat wakes and the waves created in artificial wave pools. The term “surfing” refers to the act of riding a wave, regardless of whether the wave is ridden with a board or without a board, and regardless of the stance used (goofy or regular stance). The native peoples of the Pacific, for instance, surfed waves on Alia, patio, and other such crafts, and did so on their bellies and knees. The modern day definition of surfing, however, most often refers to a surfer riding a wave standing up on a surfboard; this is also referred to as stand-up surfing. One variety of stand-up surfing is paddle boarding. Another prominent form of surfing in the ocean today is body boarding, when a surfer rides a wave either on the belly, drop knee, or sometimes standing-up on a body board. Other types of surfing include knee boarding, surf matting (riding inflatable mats), foils. Body surfing, where the

wave is surfed without a board, using the surfer’s own body to catch and ride the wave, is very common and is considered by some to be the purest form of surfing. Three major subdivisions within standing-up surfing are long boarding, short boarding, and stand up paddle surfing (SUP), and these three have several major differences, including the board design and length, the riding style, and the kind of wave that is ridden.

“Who knew that there’s more to SLO than just HIKING.” Kelsey Donofrio, resident of SLO, said.

Body surfing, where the wave is surfed without a board, using the surfer’s own body to catch and ride the wave, is very common and is considered by some to be the purest form of surfing. Three major subdivisions within standing-up surfing are long boarding, short boarding, and stand up paddle surfing (SUP), and these three have several major differences, including the board design and length, the riding style, and the kind of wave that is ridden. In tow-in surfing (most often, but not exclusively, associated with big wave surfing), a motorized water vehicle, such as a personal watercraft, tows the surfer into the wave front.

courtesy of Brady Teufel

PAGE 5

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“According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 12.93 square miles (33.5 km2), of which, 12.78 square miles (33.1 km2) of it is land and 0.15 square miles (0.39 km2) of it (1.18%) is water.”

this that Junípero Serra decided that La Cañada de Los Osos would be an ideal place for the fifth mission. The area had abundant supplies of food and water, the climate was also very mild, and the local Chumash were very friendly. With soldiers, muleteers, and pack animals carrying mission supplies, Junípero Serra set out on a journey to reach the Valley of the Bears. On September 1772 ,1, Junípero Serra celebrated the first Mass with a cross erected near San Luis Creek. The very next day, he departed for San Diego leaving Fr. José Cavaller, with the difficult task of building the mission. Fr. José Cavaller, five soldiers and two neophytes began building what is today called Mission San Luis Obispo de Tolosa and would become later the town of San Luis Obispo. After Junípero Serra left, the difficult task of actually building the mission remained. The mission was built with adobe and tile structures. The mission included: the church, the priest›s residence, the convento, the storerooms, residences for single women and families from Spain, soldiers› barracks, and mills. The mission also had land for farming and raising livestock, as the whole


Jour 390: Magazine Design Project