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A28 capital news Friday, April 22, 2009

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NEWS

▼ ACUPUNCTURE

Return of spring also means a return of allergy flare-ups S pring is once again upon us and with it, allergy season. The last couple of weeks, I have seen a number of people for allergy flare-ups, a sure sign that spring is here, even if the weather doesn’t seem to agree. Hay fever, also called allergic rhinitis or seasonal allergies, is an allergic response to indoor or outdoor airborne allergens, such as pollen, dust mites, or pet dander. This causes cold-like symptoms such as runny nose, congestion, sneezing and sinus pressure. For many people, hay fever gets worse at certain times of year, especially in the spring, summer or fall, although some people have hay fever year-

NEEDLE NOTES

James Kaufman round. Hay fever affects about one in five people and can begin at any age but is most likely to develop in childhood or early adulthood. Hay fever is due to an over-reactivity of the immune system where the immune system mistakenly identifies a harmless airborne substance as something harmful, and then starts producing allergy-causing antibodies in a process called sensitization.

NOTICE OF PROPOSED AMENDMENTS TO THE OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH AND SAFETY REGULATION AND NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING PURSUANT TO SECTIONS 225 AND 226 OF THE WORKERS COMPENSATION ACT OF BRITISH COLUMBIA

Every time the body comes in contact with the substance after that, these antibodies recognize it and signal the immune system to react, releasing chemicals (such as histamine) that lead to the irritating symptoms of hay fever. Hay fever can be triggered by either seasonal or year-round (perennial) allergens. Seasonal triggers include tree pollen, grass pollen, weed pollen, and spores from fungi and molds, which can be worse in warm-weather months. Year-round triggers include dust mites, cockroaches, pet dander, or spores from indoor and outdoor fungi and molds. Symptoms of hay fe-

ver usually develop immediately after exposure to allergens and often start or worsen at a particular time of year, such as in the spring when they are triggered by tree pollen, grasses, or weeds. People with sensitivities to indoor allergens such as dust mites, cockroaches, mold or pet dander may have year-round symptoms. Common symptoms include runny nose and nasal congestion, watery or itchy eyes, sneezing, cough, itchy nose, roof of mouth or throat, sinus pressure and facial pain, swollen, blue-colored skin under the eyes (allergic shiners), and decreased sense of smell or taste. More intrusive are

symptoms of sleeplessness, fatigue, and irritability. Treatment may involve over-the-counter and/or prescription medications to relieve symptoms. Medications may include nasal or pill-form corticosteroids to treat and prevent the inflammation symptoms, antihistamines for itching, sneezing, and runny nose, decongestants, or medications that have an effect on the immune system. With Chinese medicine, the lungs, kidney, and immune system often play a role in the cause of hay fever. Hay fever is very often due to a kidney deficiency because the kidneys are responsible for breathing

WORKSAFEBC – WORKERS’ COMPENSATION BOARD OF B.C. HEREBY GIVES NOTICE OF PROPOSED AMENDMENTS TO THE OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH AND SAFETY REGULATION (BC Reg. 296/97, as amended) The proposed amendments to the Occupational Health and Safety Regulation (“OHSR”) pertain to the following items. There is an additional proposal for Part 16, Mobile Equipment. • Part 4, General Conditions – relating to a third option to protect workers assigned to work alone in a late night retail premises.This third option is proposed because some employers have found it impracticable to install barriers to separate workers from the public or alternatively employ two workers on shift during late night hours; • Part 6, Substance Specific Requirements; and consequential amendments to Part 20, Construction, Excavation and Demolition – relating to updating asbestos requirements; • Part 6, Substance Specific Requirements – relating to updating the reference to the Pesticide Control Act; • Part 9, Confined Spaces – relating to clarifying that atmospheric testing must be conducted by a qualified person; • Part 12, Tools, Machinery and Equipment – relating to safer driven-feed mobile chipper requirements; • Part 14, Cranes and Hoists – relating to updating the reference to the Elevating Devices Safety Act; • Part 15, Rigging – relating to clarifying the correct number of wire rope clips to be used in wire rope splices; • Part 16, Mobile Equipment – relating to the requirement for trailer units with a dump box to have a permanently affixed mechanical device capable of supporting the empty box in the raised position; • Part 16, Mobile Equipment – relating to permitting a worker riding on a rear-mounted work platform to retrieve traffic cones when the vehicle is backing up; • Part 20, Construction, Excavation and Demolition – relating to new requirements that concrete pumps and placing booms meet the requirements of CSA Standard Z151-09; • Part 23, Oil and Gas – relating to updating the reference to the Power Engineers and Boiler and Pressure Vessel Safety Act; • Part 28, Agriculture – relating to the requirement for rollover protective structures on agricultural tractors; • Removal from the OHSR of the requirements for “prior approval” or “prior permission” before proceeding with certain types of work or using certain work arrangements. The sections identified for change by identifying specific requirements or referencing standards are as follows: Part 5, Chemical Agents and Biological Agents, relating to extended work periods; Part 14, Cranes and Hoists, relating to chimney hoists; Part 19, Electrical Safety, relating to high voltage; Part 21, Blasting Operations, relating to mobile drill rigs; • Removal from the OHSR of the requirements for “acceptable to the Board” before proceeding with certain types of work or using certain work arrangements. The sections identified are in Part 6, Substance Specific Requirements, and relate to: the removal of asbestos debris and acceptance from the Board; posting warning signs and acceptance from the Board; and monitors and alarms for equipment and machinery and acceptance from the Board. PUBLIC HEARINGS You are invited to provide feedback on the proposed regulatory amendments. Your views may be presented orally at the public hearings and/or submitted in writing. Please register if you wish to make an oral presentation at the public hearings by telephoning 604-232-7744 or toll free in BC 1-866-614-7744 prior to the hearing. Information on the proposed amendments and the public hearings, including details of registration/ participation procedures, are on WorkSafeBC’s website at www.worksafebc.com. PUBLIC HEARING DETAILS Date May 3, 2011 May 10, 2011 May 12, 2011 May 31, 2011 June 2, 2011 Session Times:

Location Coast Inn of the North 770 Brunswick Street, Prince George, BC Prestige Rocky Mountain Resort & Convention Centre 209 Van Horne Street South, Cranbrook, BC Executive Airport Plaza Hotel & Conference Centre 7311 Westminster Highway, Richmond, BC Best Western Kelowna Hotel & Suites 2402 Highway 97 N, Kelowna, BC Coast Victoria Harbourside Hotel & Marina 146 Kingston Street, Victoria, BC 3:00 pm to 5:00 pm 7:00 pm to 9:00 pm

WRITTEN SUBMISSIONS The deadline for receipt of written submissions is 4:30 p.m. on Friday, June 3, 2011. Written submissions can be made online or via e-mail, fax, mail, or delivered at the public hearings during the session times. Online: via the WorkSafeBC website at www.worksafebc.com E-mail: regquery@worksafebc.com Fax: 604-279-7599; or toll-free in BC: 1-877-279-7599 Mail: Policy and Research Division WorkSafeBC – Workers’ Compensation Board of B.C. P.O. Box 5350, Station Terminal Vancouver, BC V6B 5L5

as well as sneezing. The kidneys also play a role in our immune system so when the kidneys are weak, our immunity is affected. In the case of hay fever, this manifests as a hyper-reactive immune response. The more severe the kidney deficiency, the more frequently the allergic reactions are experienced- this includes yearround allergies to things such as dust, fungus, or animals. A kidney deficiency leaves the body susceptible to external environmental invasions, leading to an invasion of wind in the nose, and this is when allergy symptoms begin to occur. Wind-cold pattern will produce symptoms of sneezing, profuse runny nose with white-watery discharge, pale complexion, stuffed nose, slight headache and no thirst. Wind-heat pattern will lead to sneezing, runny nose with white-watery discharge, itchy throat, itchy red eyes, and slight thirst.

During allergy season, frequent acupuncture treatments focus on alleviating the symptoms experienced and often yield a quick response. Patients may notice a decrease in their nose stuffiness, sneezes, and number of itching episodes around the eyes, as well as an increase in overall energy levels. Outside of allergy season, treatments may be less frequent and focus on correcting the underlying imbalance in order to strengthen the body and boost the immune system in order to prevent future allergic reactions from reoccurring. Acupuncture offers effective relief for hay fever, either as an alternative to conventional methods of treatment, or in conjunction with them, and for sufferers of hay fever, is well worth considering. James Kaufman is a registered acupuncturist at Okanagan Acupuncture Centre, 1625 Ellis St. 250-861-8863 www.okanagan acupuncture.com

▼ UBCO

Charity web sites get revamped UBC students taking a third-year Human Computer Interaction course have been working with seven non-profit organizations in the Okanagan to revamp their web sites. In teams of three, students have spent the last few months gathering information on their assigned community organization and conducting a detailed analysis of the web site, its users, and its functionality. The goal is to leave the non-profits with a more user-friendly and effective web site from both technical and user viewpoints. The student teams presented their redesigns to the partnering organizations on Tuesday. “Our objective was to deliver a web site that was clean, attractive and met the needs of both the clients and service providers,” said UBC student Ryan Trenholm, whose group worked with the KiLow-Na Friendship Society. “It was a great experience—a lot of work, but

in the end we learned a lot, especially about the user perspective of web design and the consultation process.” The project was partially funded by Interior Savings through their Community Investment Fund. The seven nonprofit organizations involved are: • Ki-Low-Na Friendship Society • Project Literacy Kelowna Society • Kelowna and District Society for Community Living • Central Okanagan Food Policy Council • Central Okanagan Hospice Association • Central Okanagan Community Gardens • Peachland Wellness Centre “The students’ enthusiasm and energy was wonderful. They paid careful attention to detail, took a creative approach that was outside the box, and delivered a very positive experience,” said Barb Hagan, executive director of Project Literacy Kelowna.

Kelowna Cap News 22 April 2011  

The Kelowna Capital News from April 22, 2011. Find more news online at kelownacapnews.com

Kelowna Cap News 22 April 2011  

The Kelowna Capital News from April 22, 2011. Find more news online at kelownacapnews.com

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