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BENTON LIBRARY

BENTON HIGH SCHOOL NOVEMBER 1, 2013

Donations of Historical Documents Received and Wanted Over the last month, we’ve been working hard to raise money for new books, but don’t forget the library is also a place to house important historical information. Three important donations were given to us in the last month. Jennifer Halter, Hyde Librarian, donated several books, pamphlets, photos, and research materials you would find at the Northwest Missouri Genealogy Library here in St. Joe.

These kinds of historic documents are important to preserve our past. Every week, at least one person contacts the library for information In addition, the Gaunt family donated about yearbooks and other a 1927 diploma along with a documents related to a family journalism string book highlighting member, or faculty and community Mary Margaret Gaunt’s senior year in members want to know a tidbit about high school, including graduation Benton’s history. Fortunately, we announcements and NHS letters. have nearly a full set of yearbooks, an archive of Bentonians, and John Finally, John Hoffman, retired teacher, Foley’s book chronicling the history donated a few of his prized possessions of Benton to assist in their searches, including the 1963 High School but there is always a need for more. Football Yearbook in memoriam to Pop Springer.

DIPLOMA AND STRING BOOK DONATED BY THE GAUNT FAMILY. RATHER THAN THROWING AWAY YOUR FAMILY DOCUMENTS, DONATE THEM TO THE LIBRARY.

WE HAVE AN ARCHIVE OF BENTONIANS. WE HAVE 1924-39, 1945 TO 2001

I am in the process of cataloging the files full of other information. This is where you come in. If you--or if you know anyone who might-- have documents, books, pictures, ephemera, relating to Benton, the South Side, or St. Joseph, please let me know. I will take donations, or I will gladly make copies of the originals to keep in the library so that you and your family can keep the originals. . My email is: kelly.lockmcmillen@sjsd.k12.mo.us

WE HAVE AN ARCHIVE OF YEARBOOKS THAT STUDENTS, FACULTY, ALUM, AND THE COMMUNITY REQUEST WEEKLY.


Standards for the 21st Century Learner

CLASSES IN LIBRARY

The arm of Common Core reaches far and wide, including in to the library. During October, in addition to other duties, I was able to co-teach lessons about Google Document Folders, using MWSU and SJSD databases, locating book reviews, and choosing the best websites to help with researching. These were all introductory lessons that took one class period or less, and some classes came to the library, and some I visited. Many of you will ask your students to research and write arguments, and I’m here to help you do that. I can guide students through analyzing sources, help them navigate the databases we have, show them how to keep notes while researching, how to develop a research plan, write an argument research paper, etc. I can visit your classroom or you can come to the library for a short lesson, or I can develop a lesson that is ongoing. I am responsible for teaching the following standards. Look at them, and see where I fit into your lesson plans:

1. Inquire, think critically, and gain

3. Share knowledge and participate

knowledge

ethically and productively as members of our democratic society

2. Draw conclusions, make informed decisions, apply knowledge to new

4. Pursue personal and aesthetic

situations, and create new

growth.

knowledge

October Facts about the Library:

Students who chec ked out books:! Students who

624

visited the

library with a teache

253

r:! 749 total visits to the library before school

Remember to check out the displays in the library. Hans pulls books regularly that are award winners, often overlooked, and books you and your students need to read.

Do you have students who forgot a book or need something different to read? Remember we receive a supply of Missouri Conservationist each month. Pop in and grab some.

Non-fiction book s checked out! 186 Fiction books checke d out!

!

New Books on Shelf

814 !

35


TECH

Authors Corner: LeAnn Neal Reilly, ’86 Benton Graduate and Author

TALK Web address: Tackk.com Difficulty: easy This on-line tool is similar to the Pages program each student has on his/her computer; however, with tackk.com you can imbed video and sound, and you can easily imbed the final product on a website, Facebook, Pintrest, Twitter and more. I created a quick example for you to see at: http://tackk.com/ cyg2fj

If you are interested in a quick tutorial, send me an email, and I’ll pop in and show you, or I can create a Screencast for you to use with your students.

LeAnn Neal Reilly was a senior at Benton High School in 1986. Her book is pictured on the left. Reilly sent the library a signed copy for Benton students to enjoy. On the right is Reilly’s senior picture.

THE FOLLOWING IS FROM THE AUTHOR OF THE MERMAID’S PENDANT WHOM WE CONTACTED ABOUT SHARING HER WRITING EXPERIENCES WITH OUR STUDENTS. “Greetings! Way back in the mists of time, I attended Benton High School and graduated in 1986 (and Hyde School just up the hill some years before). I'd loved reading as soon as I learned how, and almost from the start dreamed of writing books. In fact, my first rejection came at the tender age of 8 when my overly fond elder brother sent an illustrated fairy tale that I'd written to a publisher, who very kindly turned it down. For years after that, I spent a lot of time with a SmithCorona manual typewriter, which I placed on a desk in a bedroom closet (not having room for it otherwise). In 10th grade, I joined the TAG English class where I learned to love big-book discussions and continued writing and reading on my own. Later, I graduated from Missouri Western State College (it didn't become a university until after I left) with a B.A. in English with a Writing emphasis. At the time, I'd decided that writing a novel was too pie-in-the-sky, so I took the advice of the faculty adviser of The Griffon News where I was the editor-in-chief and went to Carnegie Mellon University for a master's degree in professional writing.   “None of that education is strictly necessary to writing a novel, but I did learn to write really well, to research and edit long-form documents, to copy edit for grammar and style, and to interview others for information and feedback. Pursuing degrees and working as a professional writer taught me the value of accurate detail, discipline, and persistence. It also gave me confidence in my own ability to learn, both the skills necessary to write fiction and the content to give it substance. Novel writing requires imagination and creativity, but it's a profession, too. It's work, sometimes hard, challenging work. I find it ultimately also very satisfying.”

Check out her book in the library or visit her website at: http:// www.nealreilly.com/

Benton Library October Newsletter  
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