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Kelly Corin Weldon Sr Undergrad Analyst Intern Dell, Jan-Aug. 2015


01 Healthcare UX in 2015


01 Digitally enabled care is no longer nice to have, it’s fundamental for delivering high quality care. — Daniel Garrett Health Information Technology Practice Leader, PwC US


01

Dell + Healthcare Today

Changes in Healthcare

#1 Worldwide Healthcare IT Services vendor for years

As of 2014 insurers can’t make policy decisions based on current health or a pre-existing condition

First to market with Dell Openstack Solution Serving more than 50% of US Hospitals Serves 7 out of 10 top pharmaceutical companies

Preventive procedures are free of cost Young adults can remain on parents plan up to the age of 26 Obamacare outlawed lifetime limits for essential health benefits Cheaper drugs for people on Medicare


01 What does this mean for Healthcare Technology? More people have access to healthcare, meaning there is more information to be organized and more patients to be seen.


01

Trends in Healthcare Tech Holistic / Holism: the medical consideration of a complete person, physically and psychologically, in the treatment of a disease.


01

Trends in Healthcare Tech

wellness > weight loss

natural ingredients

customized plans

integrated food scanners

holistic approach

value nutritional benefits

neutraceuticals

prevent > treat


01

Media + Marketing Trends

transparency

growth of online entertainment

authenticity

“brand of me�

small state networks

hyperpersonalization

peers > traditional media

environmental awareness


01

Healthcare Apps / Products

SCIO

BIYO

Breathometer

Sensotrack

FirstOpinion

Spire

Rise

Peek


02 The Problem Statement


02 Healthcare has become more attainable, causing a rise in doctors’ visits. There has also been a rise in the amount of yearly emergency visits, many of which are unnecessary and costly. This increase causes Physicians to be overworked and costs more for insurance providers. The goal is to get people to see their doctor regularly to maintain health and manage their health on their own and at home.


02

1 BILLION

doctor’s visits per year

1.2 BILLION

visits to physicians offices, hospital outpatient services, emergency departments

70%

could’ve been avoided by consulting with a physician electronically first


02 What will Dell’s place be in the internet of things?


03 Opportunities


03

Opportunities for Dell + Design Allowing for the consumer to have primary control over their health information

Design for the future of healthcare tech and integration

Tools that record AND analyze medical data

Personal “internet of things” that analyze a person’s health and wellness

Increase life quality & decrease cost of care


03

Project Proposals

After I presented these options, I decided with my team to pursue Mobile Health Monitoring, which showed the most potential for innovation and included Dell’s interest in wearables.

A kit (series of products) for out of office care in different situations i.e. “rugged kit,” “on-call kit,” “rural care kit,”etc.

Slate device with software for clinicians in small clinics

Clinic Kiosk Machine diagnosis (facial recognition software, palm vein recognition, other tools) Gives recommendations based on symptoms and vitals

Mobile Health Monitoring The use of mobile devices and information & communication technologies Patients provided with mobile & wearable medical devices Aiding industry cooperatives: Continua Health Alliance, the Zigbee Alliance, the Bluetooth Special Interest Group


04 Research & Development


04

Timeline Research

Concept Development

Defining Specs

Prototypes

User Testing

Contact relevant research subjects

Based on research insights, define concept

Create prototypes based on concept specs

Contact relevant users

Figure out needs for all parties

Propose specified ideas

Specify product ecosytem + capabilities + details of implementation and use

Narrow down specs

Test products + ask questions Adjust designs

Final Proposal


04

Online Journaling

I chose Type 1 Diabetes, a difficult disease to manage, to use for research purposes in order to design an efficient mobile health monitoring system. Along with Sentier, a research and strategy company, I gathered 10 participants. Half had Type 1 Diabetes and half had children with Type 1 Diabetes. We asked them to complete several tasks over 5 days, including outlining how they manage their T1D currently, what their pain points are, and what the ideal device would be.


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Participant Screener All participants will either have Type 1 diabetes or care for minor children with Type 1 diabetes. (preferably evenly split)

At least 6 (preferably 10) of the 20 use some sort of wearable health tracking device/system. (FitBit, Jawbone, AppleWatch, etc.)

Between ages of 18 and 65 Mix of income levels (on average, should have a total household income around 75K),

NOTE: In order to participate in the study, participants will also need access to a computer with a connected webcam AND daily access to internet for uploading data NOTE: Participants MUST be available to login and complete do daily research tasks during the entire 5-day period (total time commitment is approximately 6 hours spread over 5 days) NOTE: Participants will be expected to upload responses on a daily basis during the 5-day study period

Mix of education level ethnicity, and gender

Limited number of students or retired (1 full time student, 1 retired) (majority full time employed, NO unemployed)


04

Online Journaling

Resource used for online journaling study:

Recollective is an online research platform for developing insights communities and conducting qualitative research studies.


04

Results

On the following page is a sample of the results from the study and my insights from those results on how technology could be used to make monitoring T1d easier.


Sylvia’s Morning —

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SYLVIA: I wake up an hr before my kids so that i can prepare for the day in advance.

SYLVIA: 3 days worth of food for 9 meals Get started on breakfast

SYLVIA: Also figuring out my schedule on my laptop & figuring out when i can fit in a run / hike

SOLUTION: Sylvia gets a light nudge on her wearable an hour and 15 minutes before her son is set to wake up Her wearable knows it takes her a good 15 minutes to wake up and get out of bed

SOLUTION: Sylvia’s AI helps her with a step by step breakfast omelet recipe, which it formulated based on the ingredients in her smart fridge Glucose check & insulin shots

SOLUTION: Sylvia’s AI knows her schedule for the day, and suggests she fit in a 2 mile run at 11 am before having a quick lunch

SYLVIA: Scan recipes on platejoy.com

When the omelets are done, Sylvia gets a small nudge/alert frm her AI letting her know it’s time for a glucose reading

SYLVIA: Get kids off to school Go back home & do some work from home

Sylvia simply lets out a deep breath over the wearable and a sensor can read the glucose levels in her breath,

SOLUTION: Sylvia’s AI is silent while she’s working, and gives her a nudge 15 minutes before her scheduled run to have a snack before her exercise

SOLUTION: When Sylvia is awake, she gets a notification with a pleasant alert that she’s low on groceries Sylvia looks in her fridge and verbally lists groceries she thinks she needs for the week Her wearable devices records this list SYLVIA: Order meals for the month SOLUTION: Sylvia’s wearable sends a grocery order out to Whole Foods to arrive when Sylvia will return from taking her son to school

When the reading is complete her AI advises her to take “this much” insulin to correct her levels *A normal blood sugar level 2 hours after eating is less than 140 mg/dL The AI automatically sends this data to her insulin pump & the pump dispenses the correct # of units of insulin It gives her an overall current health rating “green” (Maybe colors are red, orange, yellow, green) Breakfast


04

Focus Groups

During the focus groups, I presented story boards and ideas that represented how a new system for monitoring Diabetes might work. Participants were asked to respond and were also given prompts to create conversation among themselves. In each session there were 4-6 participants, with a total of four sessions.


I Have T1D 1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

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I Have T1D 10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

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My Child Has T1D 1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

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My Child Has T1D 10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

04


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Focus Groups

Feedback from the focus groups led to changes in the story boards. I even made adjustments between groups. The storyboards seen here are the final versions, and I can show versions 1, 2,and 3 upon request. The responses from the focus groups led me to my final concept, which can be seen here: https://vimeo.com/175143363


05 Results, Insights, and Decisions


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Results: Tools That Adults With T1D Want Streamlined Devices

Discretion

Diet Management

Minimal Discomfort

One of the most frustrating aspects of T1D is keeping track of all the various devices. For example, the desire for a device that combined glucose reading with insulin administering was universal.

People living with T1D don’t want to be identified by their condition. Therefore, they want devices that are out of sight and convenient to use.

In addition to dealing with the physical problem that accompany T1D, participants have to deal with the discomfort of managing T1D: finger pricks with glucose readings, insulin injections, bruising from pumps, etc.

Parents want to reduce the potential for stigma or standing out for their children, so making devices discreet and comfortable is a priority.


Daily Routine

WAKE UP

Adults with T1D and parents of children with T1D must prepare for a busy day: Prepare appropriate lunch and snacks Prepare kits with items used to manage T1D, such as insulin, needles, glucose monitors, etc.

GLUCOSE READING

FREQUENT COMMUNICATION / RECORDING

FITNESS

NUTRITION

A glucose reading is the first order of business, and the first reading is one of anywhere between 3 and 10 readings taken per day, requiring the discomfort of finger pricking.

Throughout the day, parents often text their children to remind them to check their glucose, take insulin, have a snack, or to check in.

Fitness is a vital component of managing T1D, so sports and working out are often part of after school or before / after work and weekend activities.

Meal planning is central to ensuring proper nutrition. Coordinating ingredients that all household members can ear or choosing to eat out can present major challenges.

Adults often use apps to track numbers (glucose readings, carbs, etc.)


BRAND OF ME

REACTIVE

TRANSPARENT

SPECIALIZED

HOLISTIC

In All Your Devices

Reads Environment

Personal Health Score

Measure + Respond

Nudge: Visual, Audio, Tactile

Your Health Needs i.e. Diabetes

Disease Management

Silent while working

Wellness Fits Your Schedule

Weight, Diet

User Requests, AI Fulfills Constant health / welness monitoring Effects of daily habits

Alerts user only

Learned Habits, Likes / Dislikes Read You + Adjust Syncs To Your Schedule

Overall Health Score Disease or Sickness Detection


Insulin Patch Concept + Sketch

Cannula + Insulin Capsules Adhesive Strip Color-Coded LED

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UI Samples


Kelly Corin Weldon Interaction Design Sr Undergrad Analyst Intern Dell 2015 Final Concept: https://vimeo.com/175143363

Pure  

Process document for a Healthcare UX project created for Dell in 2015.

Pure  

Process document for a Healthcare UX project created for Dell in 2015.

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