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KEL L I KIMURA DESIGN PORTFOLIO


Kelli Kimura BArch 2018, University of Oregon LEED Green Associate 1584 Ferry Aly Eugene, OR 97401 (808) 203 - 4258 kelli.kimura@gmail.com


CONTEN TS

I nt er sect i on of an I ndust r y

01

I nt egr al El ements

11

Medf or d Far mer s Mar ket

17

Mauka to Makai

21

Vi cenza Ci vi c Cent er

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Chi nat own Ur ban Acupunct ur e

29

Det ai l Dr awi ngs

31

Sket ches + Mi xed Medi a

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1

I N T ERSECTION OF AN INDUST RY F is he r me n ’s Te r m i nal Thesi s Studi o LOCATION

Seattle, WA

PROJECT

Design a master plan and building proposal for the Port of Seattle at the current Fishermen’s Terminal site. (26 acre site, 75,000 sf building)

AREAS OF OPPORTUNITY

• Adapt to the changing context of Ballard and changing maritime industry with flexible spaces that can serve the industry for years to come • Increase competition with other ports • Support maritime industrial culture (in competition with growing tech culture) • Improve environmental conditions of site for people and ecosystems

DESIGN GOALS

1. Flexible spaces that can be used by many different stakeholders throughout the year (Ballard High School, Seattle, Maritime Academy, maritime support service businesses, visitors, locals) 2. Connect various stakeholders of the maritime industry to share knowledge and experiences while retaining site efficiency 3. Bring new programs elements to site 4. Share the values of the maritime industry and people of Seattle with others 5. Aggressive stormwater management to prevent the existing uncontrolled runoff into Salmon Bay


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3

1

Storage and Open Storage • Two story, more efficient • Open storage with offices above

2

Parking Structure • 3 stories, ~300 stalls

3

Utility + Water Management • Bathrooms and shower at West Wall • Oil and hazardous waste disposal for pick up • Water treatment baker tanks

4

Flex Incubator Space • Industrial ground, office + retail above

5

Outreach + Education • Public education (importance of fisheries to Seattle, sustaining fisheries, bycatch) • Vocational training (fishing and boat repair) • Support Services (administration, engineering, etc.)

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Restaurant + Retail + Commercial • Move existing to edges to be more visible

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Fishing + Marine Gear Warehouse • Gear for industrial marine, commercial fishing, safety

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Administration • Port offices + support service comercial businesses

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Light Industrial Warehouse • Fabrication space

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Shipyard Maintenance + Repair • New workshop space + dry dock for Fishing Vessel Owners Shipyard (est.1919)

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Seattle Ship Supply • Union meeting space • Fishermen/women Amenities: shower, bathrooms, first aid, camaraderie, food storage, large freezer • Rentable space for public (big events, views to water)

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Net Repair • Workspace year round • Special Events: Net repair, Fishermen’s Fall Festival, Blessing of the Fleet, Parking during UW games + conferences

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Transit Stop • Rapid transit bus stop connects to downtown

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13 B

Master Plan Proposal

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3


120,000 ft2 110,000 ft2 105,000 ft2

Dec

Fishing Community

Jan

Fishermen + women Commercial Fishing Boat Moorage

105k

-24.1k

115,000 ft

2

propsed functions

125,000 ft2

existing functions

7.3K

4

Nov

Visitors

Feb

-64k

100,000 ft2 95,000 ft2

Recreational Boat Moorage Tourists Locals

90,000 ft2 85,000 ft2 80,000 ft2

Maritime Businesses

1.5k

75,000 ft2 70,000 ft2

Oct

65,000 ft2

Mar

60,000 ft2 50k 37.9k

29.3k

10.7k

45,000 ft2 40,000 ft2

15k

9.8k

Program Analysis

Section AA: West Wall

Section BB: Entry to Site

Seattle Maritime Academy Ballard High School Safety Training Schools Professional Development

9k

Transit

Energy Managment

Stormwater Management

Light Industrial Workshop

Parking Structure

Net Repair

Public Open Space

Waste Management

Parking

Open Storage

Net Shed Storage

Restaurant + Retail

Shipyard Maintenance + Repair

Existing

Commercial Business

Decreased

Fishing Community Assembly

Increased

Apr

Salmon + Ecosystems Vocational Training

5,000 ft2 0 ft2

Sept

9k

10,000 ft2

5.8k

9.3k

15,000 ft2

Public Education

20,000 ft2

10.5k

30,000 ft2 25,000 ft2

Maritime Education

0k

3k

35,000 ft2

Administration

Size (sf)

55,000 ft2 50,000 ft2

Ship Building + Maintenance Light Industrial Fabrication Support Services Port Administration

Aug

May

July

Site Seasons Analysis

June


5

interpretive center vocational school support service + port offices shared

1. PARTITION 1. PARTITION 1. PARTITION

partition footprint into two east-west oriented pieces to organize program into an office + education wing partition footprint into two east-west oriented pieces to organize program partition footprint into two wing east-west into an office + education oriented pieces to organize program into an office + education wing

vertical circulation horizontal circulation services

priv

2. OFFSET 2. OFFSET 2. OFFSET

ate

offset pieces to shape gathering spaces (formal + informal) offset pieces to shape gathering spaces (formal + informal) offset pieces to shape gathering spaces (formal + informal)

pub l ic

e trat ce n conork w

3. CARVE 3. CARVE 3. CARVE

Design Intent

d

l rma on info eracti int

ed trat ce n conork w

carve out cores for daylight, air, circulation and community space carve out cores for daylight, air, circulation and community space carve out cores for daylight, air, circulation and community space

N

Program


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DN

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DN

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9 DN

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UP

1. Entry 2. Cafe 3. Workshops 4. Interpretive Center Entry 5. Interpretive Center Gallery 6. Shared Meeting 7. Shared Kitchen 8. Shared Demonstration Space 9. Office (port or maritime business) 10. Classrooms 11. Administrative Office 12. Computer Lab

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DN

SECOND FLOOR

UP

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6 2 3

9 UP

UP

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GROUND FLOOR


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Section Model

energy

air + cooling

bioswale

• south roof 275 kw (330,260 kwh/yr) pv system • contributes to district wide energy collection

• earth tube and operable window inlets • stack ventilation using height of core • mechanical turbines to assist in larger spaces

stormwater runoff

to site treatment

post primary treatment uv treatment storage

Air, Water, Light, Systems

constructed wetland


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water

• rainwater collected for toilet flushing • graywater treated for reuse

• toplighting classrooms and offices for even light distribution light

rainwater

toilet flushing

potable water graywater

storage

to radiant floor system

heating

• radiant floor system in concrete slab • ground source heat pump and geothermal steel pile system


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1

2

1

Longitudinal Section: Carving Out Cores

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Daylight Analysis Using Physical Model and Li-cor Sensors in ArtiďŹ cial Skybox

8.5 6.4

7.3

6.3

CLASSROOM DAYLIGHT FACTOR

12.7

daylight factor(%) (%) daylight factor

Daylight Factor (DF) Results

as designed AVG DF = 6.5% without toplighting AVG DF = 1.3%

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5.7 4.9

5.5

6.8

as designed AVG DF = 8.0% without toplighting AVG DF = 1.0%

0

6.2

5.0

4.6

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OFFICE DAYLIGHT FACTOR

7.0

6.9

5.7

8.7

9.3

4.4

13.7

8.3

9.4

4.1

8.0

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I NT E G RA L E LEMENTS Res ea r ch C o n so r ti um on the Portl and Wate rfro n t LOCATION PROJECT

TEAM MEMBERS

Portland, OR Design a building for collaborative work between the disciplines of architecture, biology and chemistry within the future development of the SW Portland waterfront. (25,000 sf) Hieu Vo, Lindsey Naganuma

INDIVIDUAL FOCUS

Schematic Design, Landscape Design, Energy and Daylight Analysis, Diagrams, Rendering

AREAS OF OPPORTUNITY

• Site previous brownfield and heavily polluted • Rethinking the setup of a typical laboratory

DESIGN GOALS

1. Curve building as a gesture, directing people from the pedestrian walkway, through the rain garden and towards downtown Portland and future green way 2. Berm the building to reduce heat gain, create green space, remediate once polluted land and support biodiversity of the site 3. Incorporate a large stack ventilation tower for passive cooling in non-laboratory spaces (laboratories need mechanical ventilation) 4. Reduce energy loads low enough to have an occupiable green roof with some area for PV panels


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summer solstice

Site specific Northerly winds in summer and winter

Downtown Portland

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W winter solstice

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4

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5 tte me

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illa

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tu

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Ri

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ve

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ee

nw

ay

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Future Developement

Pedestrian Promenade

2

1. Rainwater Garden 2. Sitting Nooks 3. Stack Ventilation Tower 4. PV System 5. Habitable Roof 6. Urban Bee Node

Rainwater Garden

Future Greenway

Willamette River


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ROOF

LEVEL 2

LEVEL 1

Public

Architecture

Science

Offices

Services


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REDUCE LOADS: 41% Improvement

BENCHMARK EUI

REDUCE LOADS: 54% Improvement

EFFICIENT SYSTEMS + RENEWABLES: 79% Improvement

BENCHMARK

H

121

71

kbtu/sf/yr

1.

1.

Typical above-ground lab building 40 % facade glazing, N/S orientated Benchmark EUI

Typical above-ground lab building 40% facade glazing, N/S orientated

50

kbtu/sf/yr

2.

2.

3.

#1 + berm building

26

kbtu/sf/yr

3.

#1 + berm building Improvement = 41 %

C

#2 + passive cooling + stack ventilation tower Improvement = 59 %

#2 + passive cooling + stack ventilation tower

kbtu/sf/yr

4.

4.

#3 + efficient envelope + efficient active heating and cooling systems + roof PV system Improvement = 79 %

#3 + efficient envelope + efficient active heating and cooling systems + roof PV

Energy Utilization Index (EUI) Analysis + Massing Iterations Using Sefaira milkweed

lavender

inviting pollinators

Habitable Roof Garden / Entry

Rainwater Garden Path

Offices + Bermed Building

PV System

Loading Dock


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catmint

Atrium + Stack Ventilation Tower

yarrow


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ME DF O RD FAR MER S MARK ET Pas s i ve C o o l i n g Redesi gn LOCATION PROJECT

AREAS OF OPPORTUNITY

DESIGN GOALS

Medford, OR Redesigning an existing project by incorporating appropriate passive cooling strategies to overcome calculated heat gain. The farmers market was originally located in Eugene, but was moved to Medford, OR for a more challenging climate. (7,100 sf) • Busiest time of year in warmer month • Utilizing building for indoor winter market (thinking about passive heating as well) • Straightforward program allowing easier accommodation of strategies • Public program leads to more opportunity for “switch rich” design 1. Utilize flat roof 2. Provide passive cooling during market’s busiest summer months 3. Allow for comfortable use during colder months by utilizing solar gain in winter 4. Daylight from above to control E/W exposure 5. Edible shading to connect to theme of local production of food


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APPROACH

Because passive cooling strategies have a difficult time serving spaces with a sudden influx of occupants (both the market and cafe parts of the program), the building was divided into two components with two main cooling strategies used to serve each part: 1. Stack Ventilation – Market (4300 sf) 2. Roof Pond – Café + Support (2800 sf)

HEAT GAIN ADVANCED CALCULATION RESULTS

1. Market Heat Gain = 16.1 Btu/h ft^2 2. Cafe Heat Gain = 22.5 Btu/h ft^2 1. Market: 20 foot stack ventilation tower 2. Cafe: 4 inch deep, 2450 sf roof pond needed


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REDESIGN SUMMER SOLSTICE June 21 at noon 42˚ north latitude = 71˚ profile angle July VS insolation = 1207 BTU/day ft^2 (MEEB pg 1619)

REDESIGN FALL EQUINOX September 21 at noon 42˚ north latitude = 48˚ profile angle

roof pond can still be opened at night for cooling until temperatures drop

roof pond left open to sky at night to keep building cool during day (sky as heat sink) light diffused through operable blinds

light diffused through operable blinds

4.5’ overhang and deciduous trees keep out sun

fava bean plants provide shade from harsh western sun

Thinking about passive heating and seasonal change

1. East / West Orientation 2. Operable Shading 3. Increased South Glass 4. PV array (27˚ tilt, lat -15˚) 5. Skylight (daylight + direct gain)

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5 9

4

4.5’ opt length

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2 6 3

8 Market

Design Changes

Cafe

6. Edible Shading (E/W glass) 7. Stack Ventilation Tower 8. Increased Thermal Mass 9. Roof Pond 10. Ceiling Fans (for roof pond)


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REDESIGN WINTER SOLSTICE December 21 at noon 42˚ north latitude = 25˚ profile angle January VS insolation = 565 BTU/day ft^2 (MEEB pg 1619)

operable shading for glare control

REDESIGN SPRING EQUINOX March 21 at noon 42˚ north latitude = 48˚ profile angle

roof pond can be opened during the day, absorbing heat from the sun to radiate to the building when temperature is still chilly

operable shading left open

4.5’ overhang and deciduous trees let winter sun into market

operable shading left open cafe would need assistance of small mechanical heating system thermal mass for collecting direct gain heat

concrete walls + floor = thermal mass for direct winter gain

roof pond

Market stack ventilation air movement

Passive strategies targeting different zones

Cafe


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MA UKA TO MAK AI R ev ea l i n g a Fo r g otten Watershed LOCATION PROJECT

DESCRIPTION

Honolulu, HI A conceptual proposal for a project that focuses on thinking of landscape as art as well as a tool for education. We all see pictures of waterfalls, drive over streams and admire ocean views, but do not connect these landscape features to the movement of a watershed. Illuminating the path of the Manoa Watershed using light aims to educate people about what a watershed is as well as highlight the historic importance of watersheds as they were used by the ancient Hawaiians in their division of land into ahupua’a or self sustaining communities. Stream systems were used to divide land so that each community had equal water use. For a few hours at twilight light fixtures will be illuminated, highlighting the path of the Manoa Watershed. Although the path of the water is not exactly the same as during the time of the ancient Hawaiians, this visualization could help to connect us to ideas of the past, prompting people to think about the communities that once lived there and how we can learn from their practices of sustaining natural resources.

Showcasing movement in response to “out of sight, out of mind” thinking


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V I C EN ZA CI VIC C ENTER A dditi o n s t o t h e Heart of Vi cenza LOCATION

Vicenza, Veneto, Italy

PROJECT

Design a building incorporating a Farmers Market, Palladio Education and Civic Center for the Arts next to the historic Basilica Palladiana in the heart of Vicenza, a small town in the Veneto region of Italy. (39,000 sf)

AREAS OF OPPORTUNITY

• Strengthen the connection to the rich history and context of the site • Bring life to underutilized areas (i.e. Biade) • Enhance the character of each Piazza or Piazzetta

DESIGN GOALS

1. Remember and respect the unique history of the site while addressing current needs 2. Enhance the diversity and variation of existing public spaces 3. Create strong centers to support connectivity and gathering (addition of new courtyard) 4. Allow for a balance between opportunities to be immersed in community and experiences of individual internalization 5. Shape spaces that support curiosity inside and outside


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6 7

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1

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5

eat

stroll reect

chat

1. Basilica Palladiana 2. Piazza della Erbe 3. Piazzetta Andrea Palladio 4. Piazza dei Signori 5. Piazza delle Biade 6. Cortile del Pensiero 7. Roman Ruins

shop

Roles of Open Space


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1. Cortile del Pensiero 2. Roman Ruins 3. Temporary Market 4. Market 5. Foyer 6. Palladio Exhibit 7. Loading 8. Commercial Tenants

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3 1

PIA

2

ZZA LE DE L BIA PIA

ZZA LE DE L

PROGRAM

BIA

U CO

Market

RD YA RT

PROGRAM

U CO

Ground Floor Public Market

RD YA RT

Ground Floor Public Palladio Center

S BA

A

S BA

ILIC

ILIC A

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RESPONSE TO PROGRAM

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4

RESPONSE TO PROGRAM

DE

2

G Response to Program

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Palladio Center

Civic Center for the Arts N

Civic Center for the Arts

Community Space Community Space Cores Cores


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Response to Site


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GLASS LOUVER SYSTEM

DIFFUSING GLASS

CORE (FIRE STAIR)

DISPLAY PANELS

Filtering Daylight from Above

East Elevation

North Elevation


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CHINATOWN URBAN ACUPUNCTURE C om mu n i t y D e si gn for Honol ul u’s Chi nato wn LOCATION PROJECT

TEAM MEMBERS

INDIVIDUAL FOCUS

AREAS OF OPPORTUNITY

DESIGN GOALS

Chinatown, Honolulu, Hawaii Prepare the city and its patrons for the upcoming rail transit system using a community based design approach. Propose small-scale projects that can be catalysts for larger scale change to be presented to the Honolulu City Council. Woody Simpson, Lulu Feng, Ben Aiken, Erin Chow, Yuelin Yu, Jiaan Sun, Justin Wong, Omar Mirza, Theresa Gabaylo Physical Modeling, Vignette Renders, Various Implementation Proposals, Presenting at Community Design Workshops, Compilation of Final Report • • • •

Future Transit Oriented District Historic and culturally significant area Connection to waterfront and downtown Revitalization of underused spaces

1. Collaboration with fellow interns, community members, partnering organizations and practicing professionals throughout design process 2. Site inventory and analysis to identify opportunities for improvement through street documentation, stakeholder interviews, modeling and community design workshops


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1

Historic Wayfinding Signs

2

Night Time Use

40’ max

2

1

Sidewalk

Rethinking Riverwalk: A day or night market to connect Chinatown to A’ala Park

88’ Nu’uanu Stream

7’

5’ 5’

A’ala Park

6’

Sidewalk Buffer

8’

Parking

River St

Parking

Crosswalk

20’

8’

Hotel St

8’

Buffer

3’

8’


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DE TA IL D RAW INGS DESCRIPTION

Drawings from Building Enclosures that focused on detailing a four-story laboratory building with a double skin facade hung from the roof. Structure and materiality in this project included a steel stud framing, a concrete floor slab and columns, a terra cotta rainscreen and interior/exterior shading devices.

10” POST-TENSIONED CONCRETE SLAB

BLOCKING C CHANNEL

TERRA COTTA PANEL CLIP

ALPHATON® TERRA COTTA PANEL VERTICAL ALUMINUM EXTRUSION (included) 3” RIGID INSULATION LIQUID APPLIED WRB (ALSO VAPOR RETARDER) 1/2” USG DENSGLASS EXTERIOR GYPSUM SHEATHING (AIR BARRIER) 20 GAGE 6” METAL STUD WALL WITH DENSE PACK CELLULOSE 5/8” GYPSUM

ALUMINUM HORIZONTAL Z-GIRT (included)

METAL FLASHING TAPE BACKER ROD SEALANT

INTERIOR ROLLER SHADE (connected to stud wall at either side) GYPSUM INTERIOR FINISH

KAWNEER TRIFAB™ 451 UT SSG PUNCHED OPENING TYPE WINDOW

air barrier sealant tape water resistant barrier

ALUMINUM CAP OVER SPRAY FOAM INSULATION METAL DRIP

TIE BACK BRACKET (connected to window mullion) SHILDAN BAGUETTE TERRA COTTA MODULE

BAGUETTE ALUMINUM END PLATE

ALUMINUM REINFORCED INNER TUBE

CONTINUOUS PAINTED ALUMINUM CARRIER PLATE


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1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16.

BENDHEIM VENTILATED GLASS RAIN SCREEN SYSTEM 4” VERTICAL HSS STEEL TUBE BENDHEIM RAIN SCREEN SYSTEM SIDE PANEL STEEL GRATED CATWALK WIND CONNECTION AT FLOOR SLAB 6” STEEL TUBE (carries intermediate wind connection loads) EXTERIOR OPERABLE ROLLER SHADE KAWNEER TRIFAB™ 451 UT WINDOW METAL FLASHING AEP SPAN PRESTIGE SERIES METAL HORIZONTAL PANEL SYSTEM AEP VERTICAL METAL SUBGIRT AND HORIZONTAL Z-GIRT SHILDAN ALPHATON® TERRA COTTA PANEL SYSTEM SHILDAN VERTICAL ALUMINUM EXTRUSION AND HORIZONTAL Z-GIRT ALUMINUM CLOSURE 20” X 20” CONCRETE COLUMN 10” POST-TENSIONED CONCRETE SLAB

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7

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S K E TCH ES + MIX ED MEDIA DESCRIPTION

Hand sketches and projects from my time as a student at the University of Oregon.

sketches from study abroad in Italy


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oil pastel + digital subtraction

scratchboard etching


Thank you for your time!

Kelli Kimura Portfolio  
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