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KEL L I KIMURA DESIGN PORTFOLIO


Kelli Kimura BArch Candidate (exp. June 2018) LEED GA 1584 Ferry Aly Eugene, OR 97401 (808) 203 - 4258 kelli.kimura@gmail.com


CONTENTS

Integral Elements

01

Medford Farmers Market

07

Mauka to Makai

11

Vicenz a Civic Center

13

Chinatown U rban A cupuncture

19

Creative Work

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1

I NT E G RA L E LEMENTS Res ea r ch C o n so r ti um on the Portl and Wate rfro n t LOCATION PROJECT

TEAM MEMBERS

Portland, OR Design a building for collaborative work between the disciplines of architecture, biology and chemistry within the future development of the SW Portland waterfront. Hieu Vo, Lindsey Naganuma

INDIVIDUAL FOCUS

Schematic Design, Landscape Design, Energy and Daylight Analysis, Diagrams, Rendering

AREAS OF OPPORTUNITY

• Site previous brownfield and heavily polluted • Rethinking the setup of a typical laboratory

DESIGN GOALS

1. Curve building as a gesture, directing people from the pedestrian walkway, through the rain garden and towards downtown Portland and future green way 2. Berm the building to reduce heat gain, create green space, remediate once polluted land and support biodiversity of the site 3. Incorporate a large stack ventilation tower for passive cooling in non-laboratory spaces (laboratories need mechanical ventilation) 4. Reduce energy loads low enough to have an occupiable green roof with some area for PV panels


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3

summer solstice

Downtown Portland

N

W winter solstice

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4

4

5 tte me

2

W

illa

Fu

tu

re

Ri

Gr

ve

r

ee

nw

ay

2

3

1

S

E

Future Developement

Pedestrian Promenade

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1. Rainwater Garden 2. Sitting Nooks 3. Stack Ventilation Tower 4. PV System 5. Habitable Roof 6. Urban Bee Node

Rainwater Garden

Future Greenway

Willamette River


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Public

Architecture

Science

Offices

Services


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REDUCE LOADS: 41 % Improvement

BENCHMARK EUI

REDUCE LOADS: 54 % Improvement

EFFICIENT SYSTEMS + RENEWABLES: 79 % Improvement

BENCHMARK

H

121

71

kbtu/sf/yr

1.

1.

Typical above-ground lab building 40 % facade glazing, N/S orientated Benchmark EUI

Typical above-ground lab building 40 % facade glazing, N/S orientated

50

kbtu/sf/yr

2.

2.

3.

#1 + berm building

26

kbtu/sf/yr

3.

#1 + berm building Improvement = 41 %

#2 + passive cooling + stack ventilation tower Improvement = 59 %

#2 + passive cooling + stack ventilation tower

C

kbtu/sf/yr

4.

4.

#3 + efficient envelope + efficient active heating and cooling systems + roof PV system Improvement = 79 %

#3 + efficient envelope + efficient active heating and cooling systems + roof PV

Energy Utilization Index Analysis + Massing Iterations milkweed

lavender

inviting pollinators

Habitable Roof Garden / Entry

Rainwater Garden Path

Offices + Bermed Building

PV System

Loading Dock


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catmint

Atrium + Stack Ventilation Tower

yarrow


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ME DF O RD FAR MER S MARK ET Pas s i ve C o o l i n g Redesi gn LOCATION PROJECT

AREAS OF OPPORTUNITY

DESIGN GOALS

Medford, OR Redesigning an existing project by incorporating appropriate passive cooling strategies to overcome calculated heat gain. The farmers market was originally located in Eugene, but was moved to Medford, OR for a more challenging climate. • Busiest time of year in warmer month • Utilizing building for indoor winter market (thinking about passive heating as well) • Straightforward program allowing easier accommodation of strategies • Public program leads to more opportunity for “switch rich” design 1. Utilize flat roof 2. Provide passive cooling during market’s busiest summer months 3. Allow for comfortable use during colder months by utilizing solar gain in winter 4. Daylight from above to control E/W exposure 5. Edible shading to connect to theme of local production of food


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APPROACH

Because passive cooling strategies have a difficult time serving spaces with a sudden influx of occupants (both the market and cafe parts of the program), the building was divided into two components with two main cooling strategies used to serve each part: 1. Stack Ventilation – Market (4300 sf) 2. Roof Pond – Café + Support (2800 sf)

HEAT GAIN ADVANCED CALCULATION RESULTS

1. Market Heat Gain = 16.1 Btu/h ft^2 2. Cafe Heat Gain = 22.5 Btu/h ft^2 1. Market: 20 foot stack ventilation tower 2. Cafe: 4 inch deep, 2450 sf roof pond needed


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REDESIGN SUMMER SOLSTICE June 21 at noon 42˚ north latitude = 71˚ profile angle July VS insolation = 1207 BTU/day ft^2 (MEEB pg 1619)

REDESIGN FALL EQUINOX September 21 at noon 42˚ north latitude = 48˚ profile angle

roof pond can still be opened at night for cooling until temperatures drop

roof pond left open to sky at night to keep building cool during day (sky as heat sink) light diffused through operable blinds

light diffused through operable blinds

4.5’ overhang and deciduous trees keep out sun

fava bean plants provide shade from harsh western sun

Thinking about passive heating and seasonal change

1. East / West Orientation 2. Operable Shading 3. Increased South Glass 4. PV array (27˚ tilt, lat -15˚) 5. Skylight (daylight + direct gain)

7 1

5 9

4

4.5’ opt length

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2 6 3

8 Market

Design Changes

Cafe

6. Edible Shading (E/W glass) 7. Stack Ventilation Tower 8. Increased Thermal Mass 9. Roof Pond 10. Ceiling Fans (for roof pond)


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REDESIGN WINTER SOLSTICE December 21 at noon 42˚ north latitude = 25˚ profile angle January VS insolation = 565 BTU/day ft^2 (MEEB pg 1619)

operable shading for glare control

REDESIGN SPRING EQUINOX March 21 at noon 42˚ north latitude = 48˚ profile angle

roof pond can be opened during the day, absorbing heat from the sun to radiate to the building when temperature is still chilly

operable shading left open

4.5’ overhang and deciduous trees let winter sun into market

operable shading left open cafe would need assistance of small mechanical heating system thermal mass for collecting direct gain heat

concrete walls + floor = thermal mass for direct winter gain

roof pond

Market stack ventilation air movement

Passive strategies targeting different zones

Cafe


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MA UKA TO MAK AI R ev ea l i n g a Fo r g otten Watershed LOCATION PROJECT

DESCRIPTION

Honolulu, HI A conceptual proposal for a project that focuses on thinking of landscape as art as well as a tool for education. We all see pictures of waterfalls, drive over streams and admire ocean views, but do not connect these landscape features to the movement of a watershed. Illuminating the path of the Manoa Watershed using light aims to educate people about what a watershed is as well as highlight the historic importance of watersheds as they were used by the ancient Hawaiians in their division of land into ahupua’a or self sustaining communities. Stream systems were used to divide land so that each community had equal water use. For a few hours at twilight light installations installed every 200 meters over the approximate 8000 meters of travel distance (40 fixtures total) will be illuminated, highlighting the path of the Manoa Watershed. Although the path of the water is not exactly the same as during the time of the ancient Hawaiians, this visualization could help to connect us to ideas of the past, prompting people to think about the communities that once lived there and how we can learn from their practices of sustaining natural resources.

MAUKA mountains - pure, falling

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valley - open, trickling

2

Showcasing movement to break “out of sight, out of mind” thinking


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city - hidden, flowing

3

canal - controlled, structured

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MAKAI ocean - freed, released

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V I C EN ZA CI VIC C ENTER A dditi o n s t o t h e Heart of Vi cenza LOCATION

Vicenza, Veneto, Italy

PROJECT

Design a building incorporating a Farmers Market, Palladio Education and Civic Center for the Arts next to the historic Basilica Palladiana in the heart of Vicenza, a small town in the Veneto region of Italy.

AREAS OF OPPORTUNITY

• Strengthen the connection to the rich history and context of the site • Bring life to underutilized areas (i.e. Biade) • Enhance the character of each Piazza or Piazzetta

DESIGN GOALS

1. Remember and respect the unique history of the site while addressing current needs 2. Enhance the diversity and variation of existing public spaces 3. Create strong centers to support connectivity and gathering (addition of new courtyard) 4. Allow for a balance between opportunities to be immersed in community and experiences of individual internalization 5. Shape spaces that support curiosity inside and outside


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6 7

2

1

4

5

eat

1. Basilica Palladiana 2. Piazza della Erbe 3. Piazzetta Andrea Palladio 4. Piazza dei Signori 5. Piazza delle Biade 6. Cortile del Pensiero 7. Roman Ruins

chat

stroll reect

shop

Roles of Open Space


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1. Cortile del Pensiero 2. Roman Ruins 3. Temporary Market 4. Market 5. Foyer 6. Palladio Exhibit 7. Loading 8. Commercial Tenants

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3 1

PIA

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ZZA LE DE L BIA PIA

ZZA LE DE L

PROGRAM

BIA

U CO

Market

RD YA RT

PROGRAM

U CO

Ground Floor Public Market

RD YA RT

Ground Floor Public Palladio Center

S BA

A

S BA

ILIC

ILIC A

G

RESPONSE TO PROGRAM

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4

RESPONSE TO PROGRAM

DE

2

G Response to Program

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Palladio Center

Civic Center for the Arts N

Civic Center for the Arts

Community Space Community Space Cores Cores


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Response to Site


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GLASS LOUVER SYSTEM

DIFFUSING GLASS

CORE (FIRE STAIR)

DISPLAY PANELS

Filtering Daylight from Above

East Elevation

North Elevation


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CHINATOWN URBAN ACUPUNCTURE C om mu n i t y D e si gn for Honol ul u’s Chi nato wn LOCATION PROJECT

TEAM MEMBERS

INDIVIDUAL FOCUS

AREAS OF OPPORTUNITY

DESIGN GOALS

Chinatown, Honolulu, Hawaii Prepare the city and its patrons for the upcoming rail transit system using a community based design approach. Propose small-scale projects that can be catalysts for larger scale change to be presented to the Honolulu City Council. Woody Simpson, Lulu Feng, Ben Aiken, Erin Chow, Yuelin Yu, Jiaan Sun, Justin Wong, Omar Mirza, Theresa Gabaylo Physical Modeling, Vignette Renders, Various Implementation Proposals, Presenting at Community Design Workshops, Compilation of Final Report • • • •

Future Transit Oriented District Historic and culturally significant area Connection to waterfront and downtown Revitalization of underused spaces

1. Collaboration with fellow interns, community members, partnering organizations and practicing professionals throughout design process 2. Site inventory and analysis to identify opportunities for improvement through street documentation, stakeholder interviews, modeling and community design workshops


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1

Historic Wayfinding Signs

2

Night Time Use

40’ max

2

1

Sidewalk

Rethinking Riverwalk: A day or night market to connect Chinatown to A’ala Park

88’ Nu’uanu Stream

7’

5’ 5’

A’ala Park

6’

Sidewalk Buffer

8’

Parking

River St

Parking

Crosswalk

20’

8’

Hotel St

8’

Buffer

3’

8’


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C R E ATI VE WOR K O t her A r e a s o f I nterest DESCRIPTION

Photos, sketches and mixed media from my time as a student at the University of Oregon.

photos from Italy and Hawaii


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sketches from study abroad in Italy and Switzerland


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oil pastel + digital subtraction

scratchboard etching


Thank you for your time!

Kelli Kimura Design Portfolio  
Kelli Kimura Design Portfolio  
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