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NWS Community窶心chool Near West Side Neighborhood Resource 112 Wyoming Street, Syracuse NY 13204


TITLE


Kelcey Donahue McLaughlin

NWS Community窶心chool A Synthesis of Research on Learning + Community Spaces


CREDITS


FIELD MEASURING PARTNERS : Erika Boston Zeke Leonard Lauren Wilson OBSERVATIONAL + SURVEY STUDY: Montessori School of Syracuse Mary O' Connor, staff + students Manlius Pebble Hill School Kristin Hempel, staff + students Clarendon Elementary School Staff

Kelcey Donahue McLaughlin Syracuse University ISD 453 Systems Fall 2009


INTRODUCTION.


COMMUNITY + EDUCATION The future of education is schools that are designed for their students‐‐ for individual needs, flexibility, and a place that invites the community to be involved in learning. It is a place that models structure not after the factories of the industrial age, but after innovative offices that understand the value of free play and give the opportunity for independence to learn self‐regulation and motivation. It allows for shifts in use and occupancy levels to adjust to the size and interests of a city. It is a resource for all ages to continue a life‐long learning endeavour. It promotes mentorship and creative thought over uniform lecture and standards. The future of education is a community‐school that personalizes children's education and champions a supportive society of neighbors.


CREDITS


Contents 08 10 12 14 16 18 20 22 28 32 34 36 38 42

Questionnaire Site Location + Relevance Building Plans Neighborhood Conditions Site Conditions Building Analysis Egress Access Diagram + Problem Statement Precedent Studies Observational Studies Facts + Findings Goals + Relationships Adjacency Matrix Criteria Matrix References


08

RESEARCH QUESTIONNAIRE

The following series of questions were distrib‐ uted to teaching professionals in one public elementary school, and one private montessori elementary school. A range of ages and grades taught were represented, but participants were of mostly female gender. Additional comments showed that teachers in public schools wanted a less industrial‐feeling environment, more space for students to work together, fewer students per class, shading for bright windows, a quieter heating system, and more daylight‐ ing, Montessori teachers requested space for large motor activities, and a better connection between campus buildings. 1. Gender. !"Male !"Female 2. Age. !"20's !"30's !"40's !"50's !"60's+ 3. What grade(s) do you teach? !"Preschool and/or Kindergarten !"1st and/or 2nd !"3rd and/or 4th !"5th and/or 6th 4. How would you describe your school's edu‐ cational style? !"Traditional (standardized liberal arts) !"Alternative (specific concentrations, or unconventional methods) 5. Classroom furniture and resources are ar‐ ranged according to typical use. (ex. painting easels, supplies, and a sink are in the same area.) !"In most cases !"In some cases !"In few cases * circles represent the most common answers.

6. Do students work collaboratively? !"Yes, very frequently work is done this way !"No, work is mostly done independently !"Sometimes, if they choose to 7. Is technology used to aid in teaching lessons? Briefly list all examples. 8. Is it usually difficult to capture student attention while teaching a lesson? !"Almost Always !"Sometimes, fairly frequently !"Sometimes, infrequently !"Almost Never 9. Is any part of the school open to the public? !"During school hours !"After school hours !"Only for special events !"All private 10. Do lessons use primarily visual/tactile device or abstract concepts and symbols to teach students? !"Visual/tactile !"Abstract concepts/symbols !"Equal strategies are used 11. Do students have their own workspaces? !"Yes !"No, workspaces are shared 12. Do students have any place in the classroom that they decorate an claim ownership over? (ex. workspace or cubby) 13. Who is responsible for reorganizing/ cleaning the classroom each day? !"The student !"The teacher 14. Is there space in the school devoted to before/after‐school programs? !"Yes !"No


"I would like more places for students to work together, so I can see them, as well as give them their independence, [while] not being interruptive to the rest of the class." �Public school teacher


10

SITE LOCATION + RELEVANCE

This location is ideal for a community‐school because it sits in Syracuse's Near West side Neighboorhood. Known for its poverty level, the city's new Near Westside Initiative is renovating residential and mixed‐use buildings to nuture this neighborhood into a thriv‐ ing community. At this exciting juncture, add‐ ing an educational and com‐ munity resource to supple‐ ment the existing K‐12 school would alleviate crowded classrooms, give more op‐ portunity for individualized learning and serve as a space for community amenities .


The South‐West corner of the former Case Supply building at 112 Wyoming Street marks the area proposed for the Near West Side Community‐School design. This location faces the Near West Side neighborhood, but is still just a few blocks away from the heart of historic Armory Square. On the Northside of the building there is parking space, and plenty of room for outdoor recreation and reintroduction of green space. The flat‐top roof is a potential site for gardens.


12

BUILDING PLANS

Ground Floor


Second Floor


14

NEIGHBORHOOD CONDITIONS

Near Westside Neighborhood Syracuse, NY Area: 1.060 square miles Population: 8,436 Demographics. Median household in‐ come in 2007: $16, 430 Percentage of population below the pov‐ erty level: 49.6% Neighboring Businesses: The Delevan Art Gallery, P.E.A.C.E, Case Supply Showroom

Facing South on Wyoming street, (from left) the former Lincoln Supply Building ‐‐plans for renovation underway, P.E.A.C.E, a non‐profit Community Action Agency offering training to move families toward self‐ sufficiency, and an apartment complex.


Single family residential housing on Marcellus Street, and a boarded business building on Wyoming Street,


16

SITE CONDITIONS Near West Side Initative. Poverty is now a characteristic of the Near West Side community. While the close location to the city and availability of residential housing predicts a prolific community, pov‐ erty has taken over the area. New efforts between the city and several collaborators, however, have begun to take action in their effort to revitalize the community. Thanks to the Near West Side Initiative, four new residences are planned for construction, three of which were winners of the "From the Ground Up" competition sponsered by SU Architecture, Syracuse COE and Home HeadQuarters. The designs of the well‐known architects provide a sustainable addition to the neigh‐ borhood. The efforts of the initiative


have also made this area an up‐ and‐coming community for artists of the city. With the introduction of a new crowd of residents, a com‐ mon resource for NWS citizens can help to ease their transition into the neighborhood.

A vista through a vent on the sec‐ ond floor reveals potential for a courtyard, (above). Large sliding metal doors exist even after CMU fills former loading window, (top right). The first floor (right) is the only space in the building that has been recently renovated. Shown below, the former Case Supply building is pictured from the West on Wyoming Street.


18

BUILDING ANALYSIS

Total # of floors and Area: 2 fl., 19,469 sq. ft. Ceiling height: 12'‐0" exposed Existing plumbing: yes Ramps: none Elevators: 1 industrial size Parking lot: yes Loading dock: no Key features of building : Industrial brick and mortar exterior walls, previously exterior faces now serving as interior walls, wooden columns with angled braces frequently spaced on second floor, exposed ceilings, high ceilings, several windows, view to potential courtyard area, bricked‐in win‐ dows, industrial sliding doors, concrete and wooden floors. Occupancy Classification: A‐3 Assembly + Recreation, E Educational

Occupancy load: (Mixed Occupancy) (in sq. ft.) day care_ 35 net classroom_ 20 net stages and platforms_ 15 net assembly‐ unconcentrated_ 15 net assembly‐ standing space_ 5 net assembly‐ concentrated_ 7 net library‐ reading rooms_ 50 net library ‐stack are_ 100 gross excercise rooms_ 50 gross commercial kitchens_ 200 gross No. of existing restrooms: none No. of proposed restrooms: 2 per floor Assembly_ watercloset‐ 1 per 125 males 1 per 65 female lavatories: 1 per 200


drinking fountain: 1 per 500 1 service sink total Educational_ watercloset‐ 1 per 50 male, 1 per 50 female drinking fountain‐ 1 per 100 1 service sink total Existing egress: 3 Proposed egress: 4 Proposed ramps: none Proposed elevators: one "24 x 84". Sprinklers: yes Existing Interior Conditions: Floors are uneven with multiple finishes including unfinished wood, tile, and carpet, several bricked and boarded windows, flourescent lighting, exposed ceiling, wooden columns reinforced by angled braces, industrial sized

metal sliding doors and elevator, former exterior walls on interior corridor, street level entry, access to the larger building, excellent exposure to natural light, exposed electric and plumbing. Building History: During the Industrial Revo‐ lution, the Near West Side was a prime loca‐ tion for factories and distribution because of it's adjacency to the Erie Canal. This property was first built as two separate structures with a loading alley for carriages. However, shortly after the canal was built, the inven‐ tion of the rail replaced the demand for shipping. The carriageway was then filled with two stories to connect the two original buildings. The most recent host of the build‐ ing was The Case Supply Showroom, but is currently vacant aside from storage.

In the South‐West wing on the second floor of the former Case Supply building, industrial textures and materials reveal its history.


113'‐2"

20

EGRESS ACCESS DIAGRAM + PROBLEM STATEMENT

diagonal length of floor 144'‐0" distance between exits 140'‐0" (min. 48'‐0")

99'‐4" Ground Floor


Problem. The problem is dual‐fold. The first objec‐ tive is to support a variety of learning styles in primary‐ school learning spaces. The second is to welcome the community to use the charter school as a life‐long resource.


22

PRECEDENT STUDY

John A. John Achievment Plus Elementary This building started as a dilemna for the people of St. Paul, Minnesota. The decaying school sat on the hill in a neighborhood of people surrounded by unsecure job circum‐ stances, crime, drug‐use and poverty. Kids in the area were forced to attend school outside the neightborhood.

proves valuable to both students and adults.

In the mid‐nineties, the community decided to use the old school as part of a long‐term revitalization plan. Architects worked with citizens of the neighborhood to edit plans in order to create a new elementary school that would also vitalize the area. Beyond a learning environment, the space is the host of social services, family support and non‐school learn‐ ing opportunities. The school partnered with the YMCA to develop one destination that

The Minnesota school is nationally recognized for it's success merging education and com‐ munity ideals in one central hub.

"We figured there's got to be a way to create a place where kids really want to be, where they really get the right support, and they have rigorous academic expectations and curriculum." ‐‐Tom Kingston


John A. Johnson School building and students.


24

PRECEDENT STUDY

Chicago Public School This design was part of the New School Designs from the Chicago Competition. The building is universally designed with ramps encompassing the exterior courtyards of each wing of the school. Each of the four wings that makes up a "small school" that creates intimacy for students in the context of a larger capacity facility. Every "small school" establishes its own identity accord‐ ing to the current culture of the student body. The wings are linked by one large "in‐ terior street" hallway for circulation between schools and common spaces. The lower levels travel from end‐to‐end following out to the exterior ramps. Outdoor court‐ yards become communal learning spaces and also let in natural light to classrooms. Grass play areas on the rooftops continue

the landscape of the area and serve as garden sites for community engagement and public sculpture. The building was also designed to flex between the configuration of classes, with room for expansion onto the surrounding site if necessary. This design took a comprehensive ap‐ proach toward the creation of an educational community. Each small school is equipped with outdoor learning spaces, personal settings, flex‐ ible rooms and accessible pathways that come together to accommodate a sizeable population of students. Conquering this challenge marks this design noteworthy.


Outdoor courtyards shown above, and first and second level floor plans below.


26

PRECEDENT STUDY

Tenderloin Community School This downtown public school provides education for preschool to fifth grade and after�school programs, along with numerous community support programs. A community center, a garden, a family resource center, a kitchen, a medical, dental, and a counseling center for students and the public. Recreation areas on the roof make good use of space in an urban location. " The facility reflects the Tenderloin neighbor� hood: children want to learn here and families see the school and family center as a source of pride, stability and inspiration."


(Above) Student mosaic artwork on exterior walls, and roof�top recreation space, (below).


28

OBSERVATIONAL STUDY

Montessori School of Syracuse In initial research, I did some observational studies in schools around Syracuse that emcompassed principles that I wanted to be presented in my final design. The Montessori School of Syracuse uses Maria Montessori's method of teaching which allows for the stu‐ dent to learn independently at his own pace. Instead of treating a class uniformly, expecting equal results, teachers teach students one‐ on‐one, or in groups of three of less so that students are more focused and teachers can play to varying learning styles and strengths. The Montessori method is also unique in that students choose what they work on and how long they need to master it based on interest. Learning is given to students as they are ready, and they seem to appreciate learning because it is not forced. These elements also make the method is ideal for students with learning disabilities. The teacher is a resource for the students, rather than a director of activities.

I looked to this unconventional teaching tech‐ nique for the dynamic of the space which al‐ lows for a variety of learning preferences. There are group work, parallel learning and private working options. One of the tenets of Montes‐ sori school designs is to keep the environment orderly and not overstimulating. Wall‐to‐wall posters and banners associated with traditional classrooms are not seen at MSS. Natural mate‐ rials are encouraged for their connection with nature, and tranquil colors brighten walls to keep concentration. Each classroom was large in square feet, but accommodated around 25 students from 3 grades, and two instructors who team taught. In visiting I could see how students were more independent learners. Because they were learning the material at different stages, they could help each other get through assignments rather than depending exclusively on the teacher.


The Montessori method uses visual and tactile devices to teach abstract conepts in context, making lessons more meaningful and achieving a deeper understanding. Floor mats are often used to define workspace on the floor where a majority of stu� dents chose to work. Kitchenettes located in the rooms help studetns learn to prepare food for themselves, and clean up. This is a part of the life skills curriculum concentration.

Children learn in a three year mixed environment.


30

OBSERVATIONAL STUDY

Manlius Pebble Hill School This private school right outside of Syracuse keeps classes intimate in small schools that make up a larger community campus. The K‐12 school has 30 children per grade, making for a close community and a personalized learning experience. Many classrooms are open an ad‐ jacent class allowing for age mixing and teach‐ er collaboration. Teachers seemed to have a great deal of influence over their classroom set‐up. One first‐grade class had three group tables where students would work on "centers" together. Different subjects would be worked on at the same time, and the teacher could concentrate on helping small groups of five at a time to facilitate learning. In a 3/4 grade mix, snowshoes were hung on the back wall, and a curtain ran through the center so that groups could be visually separated during certain

learning periods. It provided minimal sound control, but there was still significant competi‐ tion between the two groups. One observation I saw was that several students had laptops to work on material. With the rise of computers being used as learning tools, designers will have to integrate their storage and accessibility into classrooms.


Lehman Lower School (above). Knox Farmhouse (right). Campus map (below). John Paul Chappell Field Poole Road Parking

LS Playground (Supervised play only)

7

Manlius Pebble Hill School Lower Level Library, US Art

        1st   Head of School, 

         2nd: Director of Admission

                Business Office,

Maintenance

                 Community Programs 2       Coville Theater 3       Kreitzberg Family Alumni Lodge 4       The Barn

6

10

Lehman Lower School

Amos

1      Knox Farmhouse

McNeil Science Center

11

Gymnasium

Reception

5

8

Mezzalingua Humanities Center

 Nurse’s Office  Campus Shop 5       Mezzalingua Humanities Center   College Services

Bradlee

College Services

   Lower Division/Upper Division Offices

6       Amos       McNeil Science Center 7                Reception 8       Paul  & Kathy Solomon Gallery 9       Bradlee                MS After Hours 10       Lehman Lower School 11       Gymnasium 12       Falcone Dining Hall 13       Laurie Mezzalingua, Class of ‘86 ,       Center for Early Learning

MS After Hours

Faculty Parking

LS Drop-Off/Pick-Up Zone

4

The Barn Coville Theater

ing

MS/US Drop Off/Pick Up Zone

2

PreK/K (after 8 am/before 2:45 pm)

Visitor Parking

Campus Shop

Nurse

Parking Park

Falcone Dining Hall

No Parking

Lower Division/ Upper Division Offices

Grace R. Kniesner                         Extended Day Program

Tennis Courts

12

Breezeway

9

Solomon Gallery

3

Kreitzberg Family Alumni Lodge

13

1

Knox Farmhouse Head’s Office 1st Floor

Center for Early Learning Playground

Laurie Mezzalingua Center for Early Learning

Upper Athletic Fields

(Supervised play only)

Admission,Business Office, Community Programs 2nd Floor

Grace R. Kniesner Extended Day

Saybook Lane

Randall Road

Jamesville Road E.Genesee St.

MPH Overflow Parking and Senior Student Parking

Pebble Hill Presbyterian Church

MPH Overflow Parking and Junior Student Parking


32

FACTS + FINDINGS

CLASSROOM LEARNING Active participation, camraderie, discussion and collaboration support learning. Smaller classrooms give a more personalized experience and individual attention, which cor‐ relates with student social development and parent/teacher satisfaction. "'A growing body of research, including large‐scale studies involving thousands of students and hundreds of schools, confirms that small schools lead to improved student achievement and enable educators to real‐ ize many of the other goals of school reform (e.g., increased attendance and higher grades). Evidence of student social develop‐ ment and parent and teacher satisfaction are equally compelling (Raywid 1997/98; Wasley and Lear 2001).'" 1 Playfulness and exploration in learning is aided by having materials closely accessible to the working space. Construction play and role play help individuals to understand abstract concepts concretely "Harvard psychologist Howard Gardner’s theory of multiple intelligences counters the view of intelligence as a single trait or set of traits that some people have more of or less than compared to others. He argues that individuals have a number of ways in which they comprehend, understand, and benefit from experience. Learners produce knowledge by using words, logical reason‐ ing, physical movement, spatial awareness, interpersonal skills, personal reflection, and responding to the natural world. Everyone

has a personal blend of learning styles with some pathways more “turned on” than oth‐ ers. All these pathways can be developed under the right circumstances. Learning can be facilitated by activities that allow children to learn in harmony with their own unique minds." 2 Order of the environment helps children avoid distractions and eases anxiety of where to find and put away class materials. Giving students opportunities to learn without adult direction at non‐schools times leads to a better sense of self‐regularion. "' But perhaps the most important is self‐ regulation — the ability for kids to control their emotions and behavior, resist impulses, and exert self‐control and discipline. Executive function — and its self‐regulation element — is important. Poor executive function is associ‐ ated with high dropout rates, drug use and crime. In fact, good executive function is a better predictor of success in school than a child's IQ." 3

"I think a lot of kids get diagnosed with ADHD now, not all but many just because they never learned how to exercise self‐con‐ trol, self‐regulation, the executive functions early." 3

Current trends in office workspaces favor cus‐ tomization and sense of ownership, over the industrialized approach of the past learn.


COMMUNITY Personal happiness is related to social capital. The more connected and trusting a community is, the more content each member is‐‐ regard‐ less of class. "Research shows that its integrated focus on academics, health and social services, youth and community development, and community engagement leads to improved student learning, stronger families, and healthier communities." 4 Schools that operate as community resources attain greater parental engagement. Life‐long learning retains interest of former students and other community members a as well as aiding community members in self‐ determination and civic responsibility. "Today's students spend 14% of their time in school and 53% at home or in the commu‐ nity where a third of the time, not counting sleep, is spent watching television. Increas‐ ing amounts of time also are devoted to surfing the Web and chatting with friends online (Donovan, Bransford and Pellegrino 1999). So, schools today are challenged to find ways to ensure learning that occurs during non‐school time enhances what is learned in school." 1 "Community‐centered learning also means that school should not be isolated from the student's life outside of formal education, because much of a child's learning takes

place in times and places outside of school." 1 "Nationwide, Communities in Schools found net increases in elementary, middle, high school attendance for community schools over their matched comparison group." 5

"A study of the Children's Aid Community Schools found significant increases in self‐ esteem and career/ other aspirations for all surveyed students and decreased reports of problems with communication across all three study years." 5 Combining several community resources into one central location can establish a greater diver‐ isty of people and reduce redundancies funded 1"“Redesigning Schools to Meet 21st Century Learning Needs.” The Journal. N.p., n.d. Web. 27 Oct. 2009. <http:// thejournal.com/articles/2003/04/01/redesigning‐ schools‐to‐meet‐21st‐century‐learning‐needs.aspx>. 2 Melaville, Atelia, Amy C. Berg, and Martin J. Blank. “Community‐Based Learning, Engaging Students for Success and Citizenship.” Coalition for Community Schools: n. pag. PDF file. 3 “Creative Play Makes for Kids in Control.” Morn‐ ing Edition. National Public Radio. WAER‐FM, Syra‐ cuse, 28 Feb. 2008. NPR. Web. Transcript. 14 Dec. 2009. <http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story. php?storyId=76838288&ps=rs>. 4

“Community Schools Research Brief.” Coalition for

Community Schools: n. pag. PDF file.


34

GOALS + RELATIONSHIPS

Balance a versatile learning environment with a valuable community resource.

Provide opportunities for customization and sense of ownership in learning spaces.

Facilitate collaborative, parallel and private working preferences.

Serve as a community outlet for life‐long learn‐ ing, recreation and gathering.

Ergonomically design the environment to be comfortable and useful for all ages.

Welcome the upcoming artist community to the area with gallery space.

Define public, private and semi‐private areas of the facility for security.

Support a school that caters to student inde‐ pendence in school and non‐school hours to develop self‐regulation and self‐motivation in students.

Grant flexibility between rooms to optimize space based on occupancy and use changes between years.


Staff Lounge

Copy Room Sun./ Outdoor Garden Class Storage

Admin. Office

Conference Secretarial Office Room Classrooms Cafeteria

Coat Room/ Lockers

Rest. Kitchen

Corridor

Rest.

Auditorium/Stage

Counselors Office Nurses Office Outdoor Recreation

Janitors Closet

Rest. Study and Tutor Space

Library

Gymnasium

Community Enrichment Area Welcome Office

Rest.

Museum/ Gallery Entry/Student Display


m ss ro om Co St at or Rm ag e / A L oc dm ke in rs .O ffi Se c e c O reta ffi r ce i a l

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Re st ro om s Co rri do En r try D /S is tu p Ca lay den t fe te ria Ki tc he n

36

ADJACENCY MATRIX

Classroom Stor‐ age Coat Room/ Lock‐ ers Administrative Office

$

Secretarial Office Staff Lounge Copy Room Welcome Office Janitors Closet Library Outdoor Recreation Nurses Office Counselors Office Sunroom/ Outdoor Garden Conference Room Auditorium/Stage Study and Tutor Community Enrich. Key $

= Immediately # Close

=

Relatively Close

%

=

Distant

&

= No Relationship


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38

CRITERIA MATRIX

#

Room

Min.Sq. Ft.

Min. Sq. Ft. per Function Occupant

A1

Classroom (3)

320 ea.

20 net.

A2

Restroom (4)

180 (4 stall, 1 ADA, 2 lavatory)

52.5 gross (1 ADA stall, 1 lavatory)

A3

Corridor

44" wide (A) 72" wide (E, oc‐ cupancy > 100)

n/a

A4

Entry/ Student Display

75

5 net.

Initial welcome for students and the public, display of student work and school news

A5

Cafeteria

720

15 net.

for meals to be served, sold and consumed

A6

Kitchen

800

200 gross.

A7

Exercise Rm.

2500

50 gross

A8

Classroom Storage (3)

15

n/a

A9

Coat Room/ Lockers

24

1 net/ 2 occupants

A10

Administra‐ tive Office

100

100 gross

small conference space, file storage, desk

A11

Secretarial Office

100

100 gross

aiding administators with organization and directing phone calls

A12

Staff Lounge

600

100 gross

lesson planning, teacher conversing and col‐ laboration, staff meetings, lunch storage and eating space, lounge

A13

Copy Room

100

100 gross

paper cutting, copying, laminating

for students to learn and collaborate

use toilets and sinks

transition between rooms

meal preparation indoor physical recreation storage of supplies and materials not in use

storage of personal items


Equipment/Furniture

Access Type

Daylight/ View

Plumbing

table space, chairs, individual work storage, wall space/ white boards, material/supply accessible stor‐ age

private

yes

yes

toilets, sinks, paper towels machine

private, public

not re‐ quired

yes

rails in elevation changes

private, public

yes

yes

soft seating or benches, wall space/ display box, bul‐ letin or alternative news display

public

yes

yes

hard seating, tables, serving stations, registers

semi‐private

yes

no

oven, microwave, refrigerator, counter space, dish‐ washer, food and storage for pots and pans, plates and cutlery

private

not re‐ quired

yes

basketball hoops, balls, sports equipment, bleachers/ spectating space

semi‐pri‐ vate,

yes

yes

shelves / cabinets, drawers

private

no

no

hooks, shelves, lockable

semi‐private

no

no

hooks, shelves, lockable

private

yes

no

desk, file storage

private

yes

no

file storage, desk

private

yes

yes

paper cutter, copy machines, laminater, supply stor‐ age

private

not re‐ quired

no


40

CRITERIA MATRIX (CONT)

#

Room

A14

Welcome Office

A15

Janitors Closet

Mini‐ mum Square Ft.

Minimum Sq. Ft. per Occu‐ pant

Function

300

100 gross

welcome information for visitors, student at‐ tendance records

25

25 gross.

storage of cleaning supplies, water source

3,500

50 net. (reading) 100 gross (stacks)

reading lounge, workspace, storage of read‐ ing materials, computer access

A16

Library

A17

Outdoor Recreation

960

n/a

A18

Nurses Office

200

100 gross

for students to rest and get medical treatment for ailments, also possibly connected to a community clinic

A19

Counselors Office

200

100 gross

student guidance

A20

Sunroom/ Outdoor Garden (3)

40

5 net.

place for connecting with nature, natural sunlight

A21

Conference Room

120

20 net

for staff or community meetings to be held, presentations

A22

Auditori‐ um/Stage

750

7 net (aud.) 15 net (stages)

student and community productions, drama practices and assemblies

Study and Tutor Space

1050

35 net.

space for indiviual and parallel study, student‐to‐student, and student‐to‐tutor help

A24

Community Enrichment Area

1750

35 net.

versatile host space for club gatherings, meetings, hang‐out and mentoring,

A25

Museum/ Gallery Space

150

5 net.

display space for local art and student proj‐ ects.

A23

recreation for students and the community


Equipment/Furniture

Access Type

Daylight/ View

Plumbing

desk, file storage, school map

public

yes

no

mop sink, supply storage

private

no

yes

book shelves, soft seating, worktops and hard chairs, computers, reference desk

semi‐pri‐ vate,

yes

no

playground equipment, green space, pavement bas‐ ketball court, tennis courts, sports fields

semi‐private

no

examination bed, medication storage, first aid sup‐ plies

semi‐private

not re‐ quired

yes

conference chairs, desk, file storage

semi‐pri‐ vate,

yes

no

plants, planting supplies and storage

private

yes

yes

conference area for small group seats, projection screen/smartboard

public

yes

no

semi‐private

no

no

private

yes

yes

semi‐private

yes

yes

public

yes

no

seating for 100+ people, stage, dressing rooms, light box, ticket office small group desks, white board

lounge are, kitchenette, building toys, computers

pedastel, glass casing


42

REFERENCES Ching, Francis D.K., and Steven R Winkel. Building Codes Illustrated, A Guide to Understanding the 2006 International Building Code. Hoboken: John Wiley & Sons, 2007. Print. “Community Connectedness Linked to Happiness and Vibrant Communities.” The Social Capital Com‐ munity Benchmark Survey. N.p., n.d. Web. 10 Dec. 2009. <http://www.cfsv.org/communitysurvey/results4. html>. “Community Schools Research Brief.” Coalition for Community Schools: n. pag. PDF file. “Creating a School For the Future.” Achievement Plus: A Patnership for Community Schools: n. pag. PDF file. “Creative Play Makes for Kids in Control.” Morning Edition. National Public Radio. WAER‐FM, Syra‐ cuse, 28 Feb. 2008. NPR. Web. Transcript. 14 Dec. 2009. <http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story. php?storyId=76838288&ps=rs>. Gardner, James. Schools as Centers of Community: A Citizen’s Guide for Planning and Design, Second edi‐ tion. National Clearinghouse for Educational Facilities, 2003. PDF file. Leonard, Zeke. "Case Building Tour." Syracuse University. 16 Dec. 2009. Class presentation. McMorrough, Julia. Materials Structures Standards. Beverly: Rockport, 2006. Print. Melaville, Atelia, Amy C. Berg, and Martin J. Blank. “Community‐Based Learning, Engaging Students for Success and Citizenship.” Coalition for Community Schools: n. pag. PDF file. “Near Westside Neighborhood in Syracuse, New York (NY) 13202.” City‐Data. Urban Mapping, 2009. Web. 4 Dec. 2009. <http://www.city‐data.com/neighborhood/Near‐Westside‐Syracuse‐NY.html>. None. Ken Robinson Says Schools Kill Creativity. Ted. N.p., Feb. 2006. Web. 25 Oct. 2009. <http://www.ted. com/talks/ken_robinson_says_schools_kill_creativity.html>. ‐ ‐ ‐. Schools as Centers of Community: John A. Johnson Achievement Plus Elementary School. Archfounda‐ tion. Target, n.d. Web. 22 Nov. 2009. <http://www.archfoundation.org/aaf/gsbd/Video.Johnson.Short.htm>. “Redesigning Schools to Meet 21st Century Learning Needs.” The Journal. N.p., n.d. Web. 27 Oct. 2009. <http://thejournal.com/articles/2003/04/01/redesigning‐schools‐to‐meet‐21st‐century‐learning‐needs. aspx>. “Report from the National Summit on School Design.” American Architectural Foundation : n. pag. PDF file. “Research Spotlight on Community Schools.” National Education Association. N.p., n.d. Web. 10 Nov. 2009. <http://www.nea.org/tools/31861.htm>. Robinson, Ken. Out of Our Minds, Learning to Be Creative. Chichester, West Sussex: Capstone, 2001. Print. Sharp, Robert V. Architecture for Education. Singapore: Business and Professional People for the Public Interest, 2002. Print. “Tangible Steps Toward Tomorrow.” SPARK. W.K. KelloggFoundation, n.d. Web. 20 Oct. 2009. <http://www. wkkf.org/default.aspx?tabid=101&CID=168&CatID=168&ItemID=5000408&NID=20&LanguageID=0>. Willingham, Daniel T. Why Don’t Students Like School? A Cognitive Scientist Answers Questions About How the Mind Works and What it Means for Your Classroom. San Francisco: Jossey‐Boss, 2009. Print.


Photos were taken from referenced materials as well as the following websites: images.google.com marblefairbanks.com saltdistrict.com www.aia.org www.barcelonjang.com www.bawcc.org/tcschool.html www.facebook.com www.flickr.com www.haleyaldrich.com www.mph.net www.mssyr.org www.nearwestsidestory.org www.trincoll.edu


NWS Community School