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We love the Lake Sunapee/Kearsarge area of New Hampshire.

Summer 2018

State Parks & Recreation Summer Starts at Deck Dock Home & Garden

Sunapee’s Sestercentennial Join the celebration of the town’s 250th

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contents FEATURES

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Parks & Recreation

From a slow hike in solitude to a family beach day, New Hampshire State Parks offer it all. Lucky for us, there are five in the Kearsarge/Lake Sunapee area. By Brianna Marino Photography by Jim Block Welcome to the Farm

Autumn Harvest Farm in Grafton, N.H., has transitioned from a seasonal farm stand to a year-round destination. By Laura Jean Whitcomb

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40 Sunapee’s Sestercentennial The Town of Sunapee celebrates its 250th birthday in August. Join Kearsarge Magazine in celebration of the event, and enjoy a photo essay of present day Sunapee. Photography by Paul Howe

60 Serendipitously Summer

Jim Block

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ON THE COV ER

Summer has officially begun when you see Sunapee’s big red barn — the home of Deck Dock Home & Garden — come alive. Text and photography by Leigh Ann Root

Sunapee Fireworks Photography by Paul Howe

Kearsarge Magazine

Paul Howe has been photographing for local publications in the area for more than 40 years. His work has also been in many shows, including photographs in juried shows at the Library Arts Center in Newport and New London Hospital art shows. See more of his work at paulhowephotography.com

We love the Lake Sunap

ee/Kearsarge area

of New Hampshire.

Summer 2018

Summer 2018

www.kearsargemagaz

ine.com

Deck Dock • Stacy's

Smoothies • Art on

State Parks & Recreation Summer Starts at

the Porch in Contoocook

Deck Dock Home & Garden

• Autumn Harvest

Farm in Grafton

• State Parks

Sunapee’s Sester

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Paul Howe

centennial Join the celebra the town’s 250thtion of

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15, 2018

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PEOPLE, PL ACES A ND THINGS

25 Art: First Thursdays

It’s easy to mark this event in your calendar: Contoocook businesses offer fun activities on the first Thursday of the month all summer long. By Laurie D. Morrissey

36 Community: As Easy As Pie

Whether you’re experiencing Newport’s Apple Pie Craft Fair for the first time or returning to see what’s new, it is easy as pie to fall in love with this annual event. Text and photography by Leigh Ann Root

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52 Eat: Stacy’s Smoothies

70 Why We Love it Here Real Estate Section 72 Local: The Art of the Swap

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Leigh Ann Root

Three ladies (and their families) have added a delicious dimension to their beloved Sunapee, N.H., summertime community. Text and photography by Leigh Ann Root

Transfer stations are more than just trash removal. They are now sophisticated recycling centers with take it/leave it tables or swap shops. Text and photography by Brianna Marino

78 On the Road

Leigh Ann Root

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Laura Jean Whitcomb

Each new issue is a celebration. Join in the fun at Kearsarge Magazine's launch parties — four times a year! By Laura Jean Whitcomb

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editor’s letter Hello friends, Mother Nature keeps changing her mind. We saw a few warm days (60 degrees!) that foretold of spring, but the snow kept coming. I’m not complaining; it is just interesting to review summer photographs — which lake shot will look best on the cover — and write articles (what’s growing on the farm) four months in advance. It probably explains why most of my Christmas shopping is done in August. There are a few New Hampshire towns celebrating a 250th anniversary this year. Grantham (ending this summer), Henniker (2018) and Springfield (starting this summer and going into 2019) are a few that come to mind. The summer issue of Kearsarge Magazine celebrates the birthday of a

town near and dear to us: Sunapee. We’ve got a photo essay by local photographers. We’ve got business profiles of two Sunapee businesses: Deck Dock and Stacy’s Smoothies. And then you’ll see Sunapee mentioned here and there throughout the book, like on the cover and in the swap table article. Most of us have a Sunapee memory. Mine was driving from Claremont to Newbury with my family for a day at Sunapee State Beach. The back seat of the car was sticky and hot, but a day at the lake was worth it. And, on the way home, we’d stop at the A&W Drive-In in Newport and get a root beer float. I’m hoping that this issue will spark some Sunapee memories for you, too.

Laura Jean Whitcomb New Hampshire native Follow us on:

COMING THIS FALL 2018 • Intown Concord’s plans and events • What we love about our towns (residents write in!) • Fall photo essay • Art, history, business, health and real estate AD DEADLINE: Monday, July 16 4

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Rediscover your hometown with Kearsarge Magazine™ You may have lived in the big city, overseas, or maybe you’ve lived here all your life. Either way, you know there’s something special about the Lake Sunapee/Kearsarge/Concord area of New Hampshire. And every page of award-winning Kearsarge Magazine will remind you why you love it here.

P.O. Box 1482 Grantham, N.H. 03753 Phone: (603) 863-7048 Fax: (603) 863-1508 E-mail: info@kearsargemagazine.com Web: www.kearsargemagazine.com Editor Art Director Ad Sales Graphic Design Bookkeeping Copy Editor

Laura Jean Whitcomb Lori A. Charlonne Leigh Ann Root Lori A. Charlonne, Jennifer Stark Heather Grohbrugge Laura Pezone

Kearsarge Magazine™ is published quarterly in February, May, August and November. © 2018 by Kearsarge Magazine, LLC. All photographs and articles ©2018 by the photographer or writer unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Except for one-time personal use, no part of any online content or issue may be reproduced by any mechanical, photographic or electronic process, nor may it be stored in a retrieval system, transmitted or otherwise copied for public or private use without written permission of the copyright owner.

Subscriptions Rediscover your hometown by subscribing to Kearsarge Magazine™. Four issues a year will be delivered right to your door for $15. Subscribe online at www.kearsargemagazine. com or send a check (with your name and mailing address) to P.O. Box 1482, Grantham, NH 03753. Digital subscriptions are also available online.

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Parks & Recreation

From a slow hike in solitude to a family beach day, New Hampshire State Parks offer it all. Lucky for us, there are five in the Kearsarge/Lake Sunapee area. By Brianna Marino Photography by Jim Block

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t is no secret that New Hampshire is a beautiful state graced with vast and diverse natural, historic and cultural resources. But it may be a surprise to residents of the Kearsarge and Sunapee area that their towns are home to five of the most beautiful parks in the state. They boast crystal clear swimming, secluded beaches, fishing, boating, expansive mountain views (completely accessible by car) and a wide array of hiking, biking, snowmobiling and ski trails. Playgrounds, a campground and dog friendly picnic areas make ample

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recreation to delight children and adults alike. More than 75 years old, New Hampshire’s park system has a rich history. “One of the more unique things about the New Hampshire State Park system is that we’re self-funded,” says Johanna Lyons, a state park planning and development specialist with the Department of Natural and Cultural Resources (DNCR). “That was a revolutionary idea. It’s a way that New Hampshire leads the country. Since then, there have been others that have become


Did You Know? One of the most unique aspects of the Kearsarge/Sunapee region’s parks is their linkage by the Sunapee-Ragged-Kearsarge Greenway (SRKG). Maintained by volunteers, the greenway is a 75-mile loop trail connecting Sunapee, Winslow, Rollins and Wadleigh State Parks, as well as Gile State Forest (the public access point of which is Gardner Memorial Wayside Park). Begun in 1980, the SRKG links trails in 10 towns: Andover, Danbury, Goshen, Newbury, New London, Springfield, Sunapee, Sutton, Warner and Wilmot.

Plan your visit

Gaining access to any of these (and other) amazing state parks is easy and surprisingly cost effective. For frequent visitors, the State of New Hampshire has recently made a State Park license plate available when registering vehicles. The annual fee of the plate (due at registration) is $85, which grants access to beaches and most day use parks (see nhstateparks.org for more details). Best part: this includes all the passengers in the vehicle. Lyons says, “If you only have 15 or 20 minutes and don’t want to pay a fee, get the plates because then you can drive in, have a sandwich and look at the lake and go!” Other options include the “moose plate” combo, season and family passes, or park day fees. Those 65 years and older get in free. Even when parks are not staffed, the Iron Ranger (a voluntary donation collection box) makes it possible to support the parks and enjoy them.

partially self-funded.” This means that New Hampshire’s State Parks rely entirely on the public and continued usage. Although the name has changed over the years, DNCR has been responsible for managing the NH State Parks since the first acquisition of public property in 1891. Today, DNCR’s Division of Parks and Recreation manages 93 parks. In the Kearsarge/Lake Sunapee region, the establishment of parks took place under a variety of circumstances, with eventual ownership and management

being transferred to the state. The amenities and adventures afforded by each park are as varied as their beginnings. Here’s an overview of each park. ›››››

Jim Block enjoys photographing almost anything: children, adults, families and celebrations; nature and wildlife; sports and action; buildings and businesses. His clients range from publishers to businesses to individuals. He has taught digital photography courses to small groups since 2000. Please explore Jim’s website at jimblockphoto.com kearsargemagazine.com • Summer 2018 • Kearsarge Magazine

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MOUNT SUNAPEE STATE PARK

86 Beach Access Road Newbury, N.H. (603) 763-5561

Offering the most diverse recreational opportunities, Mount Sunapee is a favorite destination year round for people of all ages. The preservation of the land began in 1910 in response to logging operations encroaching upon the 2,720-foot summit. Beginning with a 600-acre purchase by the Society for the Protection of NH Forests (SPNHF), the current 2,700-acre park has been owned and managed since the 1948 purchase by the State. Well known for skiing, the park also attracts thousands of swimmers each summer who enjoy the white sand and sparkling water at the beach. Situated on the shore of Lake Sunapee, the beach features a new playground, boat rentals, concessions, bathhouses and a boat launch for smaller crafts. Grills and picnic tables make it especially popular for family outings. “Sunapee has a great parking lot for kids’ bike riding (off season), a playground and a lot of sun exposure, so it’s good for the spring and fall,” says Sarah Mason of Sunapee. “Another benefit is they never close the entrance so it can be used year around.” Approximately one mile away, a host of activities are run by Mount Sunapee Resort (a private corporation leasing the ski area). Aerial ropes courses, mountain biking, disc golf and zipline tours are some of the challenges available. A secluded campground, operated by the State of New Hampshire, can be found by those looking. Open after May 24, there are 10 petfriendly campsites with a mix of lean-tos and platforms, as well as a handicap accessible option. Booking can also be done online. Hiking remains a popular activity at all of the region’s parks. Plenty of day hikes are available within the park, including several trails to the popular Lake Solitude destination. Perched just below the summit, Lake Solitude is a naturally formed water body with plenty of beauty and wildlife. A clear day affords views from the summit to the White Mountains, Mount Ascutney, Mount Kearsarge and Vermont’s Green Mountains. Abutting Pillsbury State Park, Mount Sunapee 8

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WEB nhstateparks.org/visit/state-parks

State Park also connects with more extensive hiking/wilderness trails including the MonadnockSunapee Greenway, allowing ambitious hikers to traverse the 48-mile trail. One of the most unique aspects of the Kearsarge/Sunapee region’s parks is their linkage by the Sunapee-Ragged-Kearsarge Greenway (SRKG). Maintained by volunteers, the greenway is a 75-mile loop trail connecting Sunapee, Winslow, Rollins and Wadleigh State Parks, as well as Gile State Forest (the public access point of which is Gardner Memorial Wayside Park). Begun in 1980,

the SRKG now links trails in 10 towns: Andover, Danbury, Goshen, Newbury, New London, Springfield, Sunapee, Sutton, Warner and Wilmot. ›››››

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ROLLINS STATE PARK

1066 Kearsarge Mountain Road Warner, N.H. (603) 456-3808 Mount Kearsarge has an elevation of 2,937 feet and is home to two state parks: Rollins on the southern slope and Winslow on the northern slope. Penned by explorers from the Massachusetts Bay Colony, a 1652 map shows “Carasarga” thought to mean “notch-pointed mountain of the pines” in Native American. In 1749, the Perrystown (Sutton) charter name wrote “Kyasarge.” Modern citizens can easily enjoy the mountain, now known as Kearsarge, from the top. Sarah McClennen of Woodstock, N.H., says “it’s a big mountain view without the big mountain hike.” In fact, the views from the parking lots at either park are phenomenal. Originally purchased by SPNHF, the 521 acres of Rollins State Park was transferred to the State in 1950 and named in honor of Frank W. Rollins, a New Hampshire governor and founder of SPNHF. The park features a 3.5-mile scenic auto road, originally constructed as a toll road by the Warner and Kearsarge Road Company in 1874. Refurbished in 1935 by the Civilian Conservation Corps, the road has scenic turnouts with views until it reaches the parking lot, referred to as “The Garden.”

From The Garden, visitors might see views of Mount Monadnock, New Hampshire’s coastal plain and as far as the Boston skyline. The summit is only a short ½-mile jaunt from the parking lot, allowing kids to experience the big mountain atmosphere of the top, including views from the fire lookout tower. Operated by DNCR, the tower is one of 15 in the state designed to provide early detection and reporting of fires. Hikers able to visit any five of the towers can receive a patch, certificate and letter of recognition as part of the State’s Tower Quest Program.

What you might see on Lincoln Trail above Rollins State Park. 10

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GARDNER MEMORIAL WAYSIDE STATE PARK 10 Route 4A Springfield, N.H. (603) 227-8745

Established in 1980, Gardner Memorial Wayside Park is a public access point to Gile State Forest, which contains 6,675 acres of managed forest. Named for Walter C. Gardner III, whose father established the forest, the wayside has a small picnic area, a brook and a hiking path that leads downstream where you can see remnants of an old mill. There is also hiking to Butterfield Pond, a popular fishing area. Although not part of the State Park, the Gile State Forest has a network of snowmobile trails in the winter and an old road. The park is also dog friendly.

An old mill site at Gardner Memorial Wayside State Park in Springfield, N.H.

Kimpton Brook at Gardner Memorial Wayside State Park

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WINSLOW STATE PARK

475 Kearsarge Mountain Road Wilmot, N.H. (603) 526-6168 Down the other side of the mountain from the summit, Winslow State Park has many amenities including a pavilion, grills, a new playground and sweeping views from Mount Sunapee to Vermont and even to the White Mountains. “The views without having to necessarily hike are my favorite part,” says Mason about Winslow State Park. Jeffery Heath, also of Sunapee, remembers the views of Winslow from his childhood: “When I was in a church youth group, I was introduced to the beauty of Kearsarge Mountain via Winslow State Park. After our exploring around the mountaintop and climbing the fire tower, we had an awesome cookout at Winslow. I always remember the magnificent view.” Winslow is the namesake of Admiral John Winslow who commanded the USS Kearsarge during the Civil War. Built in Portsmouth using timber from Mount Kearsarge, the USS Kearsarge sank the confederate ship Alabama off the French coast. Early in the 19th century, the land was home to the Winslow House hotel, named for the Admiral. The hotel burned, was rebuilt and ultimately abandoned to burn again. The cellar hole still remains in the picnic area, which was donated by William B. Douglas in 1933 to the state in memory of actress Katherine Raynor. It became part of the State Park System in 1935. From the parking lot, hikers can choose to summit Kearsarge via either a 1-mile hiking trail or a less steep 1¾-mile trail. They can also be hiked as a loop. Both parks are dog friendly. ›››››

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The playground and picnic area at Winslow State Park in Wilmot, N.H.

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The Barlow Trail is marked with yellow blazes; the Winslow Trail with red blazes. kearsargemagazine.com • Summer 2018 • Kearsarge Magazine

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The beach at Wadleigh State Park

WADLEIGH STATE PARK 78 Wadleigh State Park Sutton, N.H. (603) 927-4724

Wadleigh is the least frequented park in the region, but it is the solitude that makes this offthe-beaten path park and beach so attractive. Established in 1934, it was a gift from SPNHF and

A view of Mount Kearsarge and Wadleigh State Park from Kezar Lake 14

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the town of Sutton. Now the park, situated on the quiet shores of Kezar Lake, offers a shaded beach, picnic tables and a bath house. It also makes a great base for exploring the 3-mile road around Kezar Lake by either foot or bike. Adjacent to the park, there is a boat launch for kayaking, canoeing or fishing.


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Jim Block

Welcome to the Farm

Autumn Harvest Farm in Grafton, N.H., has transitioned from a seasonal farm stand to a year-round destination. By Laura Jean Whitcomb

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t’s almost too good to be true. Rows of tables, under the shade of pop-up tents, are set up in front of a thriving farm garden. And on those tables: pies. Pizza pies, fruit pies, custard pies, chocolate pies and meat pies are all available for sampling at Pie in July at Autumn Harvest Farm in Grafton, N.H. The Pie in July event was Ray and Suzanne LeBlanc’s way of welcoming customers, both old and new, to their farm and sharing the news of their recent expansion: a year-round farm stand with three CSA (community supported agriculture) options; a quilt shop with products and classes; hiking and snowshoeing trails; and a new café: Harvest Thyme. Pie in July

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Setting up the stand

You’ve probably seen the LeBlancs on the farmers’ market circuit. (Ray and Suzanne participated in several markets — including Newport, New London and Wilmot — over the course of 15 years.) You’ve probably purchased one of Suzanne’s amazing canned goods, or some of Ray’s fresh vegetables, or maybe even enjoyed a cup of farm-fresh soup with a homemade roll. And if you’ve ever been a vendor at a trade show, farmers’ market or public event, then you know how much work it is to prepare for, set up, and take down a booth. “We enjoyed it so much, but the work was getting to be too much for us,” Suzanne says. So what to do with 95 acres of farm land they bought in 1999? The original goal was retirement. It took two years, off and on, to clean and finish the house and grounds. They moved in full time in 2001, and started with a small garden, a few chickens for eggs and a pig. The LeBlancs attended two farmers’ markets in 2002. In 2007, they added a farm stand, a year-round building that included a commercial kitchen so Suzanne could preserve the harvest: tomatoes, cucumbers, strawberries, peppers (mild, sweet, hot and in-between varieties), potatoes, leeks, squash, herbs of all kinds, kale, cabbage, carrots, beets, beans, onions, artichokes, arugula and lettuce (green, red and romaine), to name just a few. Ray, not surprisingly, could always be found in the garden “doing most of the planting, tilling, weeding, harvesting, and fixing anything that breaks, which is a lot of the time,” Suzanne describes. Suzanne also gardens, but the majority of her tasks include cooking, canning, quilting and planning for the markets, which had grown to five a week. “What started as some income snowballed into a full-fledged business,” says Suzanne.

WEB autumnharvestnh.com

Some of the fruits, vegetables, flowers and herbs harvested at Autumn Harvest Farm in Grafton, N.H.

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Now one location

About 150 people sampled pies in July (eating and buying approximately 112 pies) and learned what’s new with Autumn Harvest Farm. The big news: You could now enjoy Suzanne’s delicious home cooking at any time at the Harvest Thyme Café. Suzanne uses all of the farm’s products, along with a few sourced from other New Hampshire growers and producers, to create delicious prepared food items for breakfast, lunch or afternoon tea. You can swing by in the morning to get coffee and a couple apple cider donuts, sit and enjoy a leisurely lunch of pesto grilled cheese with a side of kale chips, and even pick up a take-and-bake pizza on Friday night. There’s a fresh, seasonal menu every day. The café was quickly a success. “One car pulls in, then another,” says Suzanne. “We served 17 meals one Saturday in August. The field help had to wash up and come inside to help out.” Many of those cars had canoes; folks stopped by for a meal after spending the day on Grafton Pond. Adjacent to the café is Suzanne’s quilt shop, Maple Leaf Quilt Shop. She offers long arm machine quilting services, a quilting book lending library, products (fabrics, threads, patterns and notions) and a series of classes: make a runner in October, make a Christmas tree wall hanging in November, and a sit-and-sew class on Thursday evenings. The quilt shop is still finding its legs, and 2018 will be the year to see if it remains or gives up its space for a café expansion. And then there’s the farm stand, open every day from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. starting Memorial Day. You can stop by for greens (lettuces and cooking

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greens) in the early days of May; summer vegetables like tomatoes, cucumbers, squashes and broccoli in June and July; corn, melons, eggplant, peppers and onions in August; and fall fare — winter squash, beets, carrots, cabbages and kale — in September. Sign up for a CSA and you can pick up your items once a week for 17 weeks in the summer and 12 weeks in the winter. Last winter, the LeBlancs tested out an “omnivore” share, which included local meats. “We had so many local meats we decided to get people to try them by offering it as a share choice,” Suzanne says. If there’s interest, the omnivore share will be offered this summer, or folks can pre-buy a whole or half pig, lamb or a bulk amount of chicken.

Marketing genius

Have too many apples? Rent the cider press. Don’t want to cook? Order a pie for Thanksgiving. Need a gift? Enter a quilt raffle to win a queen-size quilt created by Suzanne, or stop by the farm stand to create a gift basket of locally made products. Suzanne and Ray always have a good idea to get people out of their house and out to the farm. And you’d usually arrive to see Ray smiling from his seat on the tractor, or Suzanne emerging from the kitchen to greet you. Winter, normally a struggle for most businesses, did give the LeBlancs a challenge. “It made me put together the last part of the picture: getting the attention of the snow and winter loving people,” says Suzanne. They offered lodging at their farm on Airbnb, worked with the local snowmobile club to bring trails right to the café’s door, and ›››››

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The quilt shop offers products for purchase, quilting services and classes.

Jim Block

Laura Jean Whitcomb is the editor of Kearsarge Magazine and Kid Stuff. She drives from Grantham to Springfield to Grafton, enjoying the scenic landscape on Route 114 and 4A as she drives. (Reread Jim Block’s Route 4A photo essay in fall 2017 Kearsarge Magazine to see what she means.)

Jim Block

started monthly, reservation-only dinners at the café. For a fixed price, folks enjoyed a Blue Moon Dinner with four courses (soup, salad, entrée and dessert) and a local storyteller as entertainment in late January. “We had been searching for a way to make our business and property sustainable. I think we’ve hit on it now,” says Suzanne. Indeed they have. The LeBlancs can share their beautiful property with loyal farmers’ market clientele and new customers. They can feed folks at the café, or through the farm stand. They can offer a hike on a trail in the summer, a quilting class in the fall, or provide dinner and entertainment in winter months. You can even vacation there. And don’t forget Pie in July, which will be held on Saturday, July 21 from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. “We can’t wait for this year,” says Suzanne.

Lodging is also available at Autumn Harvest Farm through Airbnb. 22

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PEOPLE, PLACES AND THINGS CONTOOCOOK · ART

First Thursdays It’s easy to mark this event in your calendar: Contoocook businesses offer fun activities on the first Thursday of the month all summer long. By Laurie D. Morrissey

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n the old days, the fountain in the center of the village of Contoocook, N.H., stood by establishments such as a dry goods store, hardware store, hotel, undertaker and a busy train depot. The railroad is no longer active, but the business scene is. Today’s Fountain Square businesses are newly vibrant, with places to buy fashionable clothing, original art, gifts and decorative items. Contoocook (“Tooky” to the locals) is a fine place to shop any time, but retailers have cooked up several events to draw visitors and give shoppers (including window shoppers) a good time. One is First Thursdays, a summer-long event celebrating local culture, commerce and community. “I’ve written it in my planner. It’s fun and social, and I like going even if I don’t buy anything,” says Hopkinton, N.H., resident Sarah Hoffman. Patty Fuller, also of Hopkinton, brought a sister who was visiting from California. Before shopping (and a wine tasting), they had dinner at the Everyday Café. First Thursdays are becoming a tradition in towns across the country, from Oregon to Arkansas. In Tooky, the event runs from April through September, the first Thursday of the month, from 5 to 7 p.m.

Steve and Annie Frye enjoy at Art on the Porch in Contoocook, N.H.

“It’s a fun evening for everybody, and lots of people stay and have dinner in town, too,” says LeeAnne Vance, who came up with the idea for the event that saw its third successful year in 2017. Vance is the proprietor of Indigo Blues and Co., a clothing boutique she opened in 2012. “We all try to do something special,” she says. “There are First Thursday discounts, confectionary goodies, and the chance to win a gift basket if you visit all the participating shops.” She likes to invite a local band to perform at her store. Others offer wine tastings or a hands-on activity. Families and

groups of friends sit in the bandstand, stroll through the covered bridge with ice cream cones in hand, or pause on the stone bridge to look at the water flowing in the Contoocook River. “It’s kind of like a grown-up treasure hunt,” says Shannon Secore, the owner of 3 on Main Mercantile.

Art in June

Another annual event that draws a crowd is Art on the Porch. It all started with a comment at a meeting of Explore Contoocook: “We have all these porches in Fountain Square; let’s fill them with artists!” ›››››

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CONTOOCOOK · ART PEOPLE, PLACES AND THINGS

M A RK YOUR CA LENDA R Art on the Porch Contoocook Village Saturday, June 2 Be sure to check out the Village of Contoocook’s Annual Artists on the Porch Celebration. This open air celebration of local artisans in a quaint village square is sure to delight. Enjoy demonstrations from painters to potters and everything in between. In addition to the special items from the artists available for purchase, the local farmers’ market will be in full swing. >> ExploreContoocook.com

Amy Rothe, owner of Sage and Twine

PA RTICIPATING PORCHES 3 on Main, Polkadots Gift Boutique, Covered Bridge Frame Shop & Gallery, Sage & Twine, der Markt at Marklin, Magic Secret Garden, Hashtag Art Studio, Rymes Oil, Travers Insurance

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Art on the Porch began as a September event, and moved to the first weekend in June to coincide with the opening of the summer Contoocook Farmers’ Market at the Depot. Shops and businesses host painters, jewelers, woodworkers, photographers and other artists. “There are so many talented artists around here,” says Amy Rothe, owner of Sage & Twine. “People are surprised to see someone they know from the grocery store demonstrating

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their work on my porch or at 3 on Main. It’s a super way to get the community involved and let people see what our local artists are doing. People bring their kids, and it encourages them to be creative.” Rothe displays her own work, which is repurposed and re-styled painted furniture. Another artist on her porch is Sher Kamman of Henniker, N.H., who uses various filters and print techniques that make her photos look more like paintings.


“It’s wonderful meeting people and being able to talk to them about what I do,” says Kamman. “It was also fun for me to walk around and look at other people’s art. It’s a good crowd, especially with the farmers’ market going on at the same time.”

Take a walk Most of the participating businesses are clustered around Fountain Square, but der Markt, a retail store at Marklin Candle, is a short walk away. It’s next to the fire station, just off Pine Street. Artists on the porch include fiber artists Gina Hawley and Annette Lynn Frye; painters Byron Carr, Denise Green and Julie Ford; ceramic sculptor Rachel Montroy; and woodworker Steve Frye. Sara Diaz creates abstract coloring books, and gets visitors (young and old) coloring on the porch of Polkadots. When summer’s over, there is still one more event on the Contoocook shopping calendar. Starry, Starry Weekend is the most popular event in town. It’s in early December — which will be here before you know it! Laurie Morrissey is a freelance writer from Hopkinton, N.H.

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NEWPORT · COMMUNITY

PEOPLE, PLACES AND THINGS

As Easy As Pie Whether you’re experiencing Newport’s Apple Pie Craft Fair for the first time or returning to see what’s new, it is easy as pie to fall in love with this annual event. Text and photography by Leigh Ann Root

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ewport’s Apple Pie Craft Fair (APCF) comes at a perfect time to say goodbye to sweet summer and hello to crisp autumn. This is one of Newport’s most cooperative days on the common — a successful and memorable mix of more than 130 artisans and craft booths, a famous fireman’s BBQ, live music, a huge book sale, a cookie walk and, of course, apple pies. Each year, it continues to be a celebration of what makes Newport special: its deep history and unflagging community spirit.

The beginning

Courtesy photo

The Apple Pie Craft Fair family from left to right: Kate Luppold, Kathy Niboli, Marie Bugbee, Lesley Scheele, Olivia Scheele, Jackson Scheele

The McKenney family, clockwise from top: Kelly McKenney, Madeline Blewitt, Olivia Scheele (part of the Niboli family) and Meredith Blewitt 36

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Marie Bugbee, along with her daughter Kathy Niboli, is one of the fair originators. She’ll be 96 years young when the pies come to the common this year. What started as an idea for a craft fair and pie sale on the town common has become a multi-faceted event that attracts thousands of people. It’s no surprise that Bugbee says, “It’s one of my favorite days of the year.” Early on, the McKenney family joined to make it a dual family effort. This joint force by these families laid the foundation for which the fair firmly sits today. Kathy Niboli and Peggy McKenney are best friends


PEOPLE, PLACES AND THINGS

and co-chair the event. Peggy’s mother-in-law, Mary McKenney, still bakes pies and volunteers to collect the pies and Bugbee still sells the pies, too. Four generations work on all aspects of planning and running the one-day event. “I have memories of our grandchildren, when they could barely walk, wearing the adorable old-timey sandwich boards, walking up and down the common promoting the event,” says Niboli. “Fast forward to now, where they help run the event. We tell them to pay attention, because they’ll be running the event someday. They’re the next generation to continue these community traditions.” As success would dictate, the fair has grown much larger than two families could handle. Niboli and McKenney saw the growing potential for the event and decided that it was time to find a local organization to take it on. The Library Arts Center was a perfect fit. Fran Huot, the marketing coordinator at the arts center, has been involved with the fair for more than a decade. Her whole family can be found “knee deep” in volunteering that day, too. Niboli’s daughter, Kate Luppold, is the director of the Library Arts Center and instrumental in “all things Apple Pie Craft Fair” through her family and her job. The center’s board and staff, along with a large amount of community volunteers, come out each year to contribute to this day’s community melding that is pure magic.

Piles of pies Hundreds of pies are donated to the event. However, only

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Artisan and craft booths on the common at Apple Pie Craft Fair in Newport, N.H.

the first 12 pies will be voted on for “best apple pie.” The rest of the pies are for sale, proceeds which benefit the Library Arts Center programming. Olivia Steele, whose family has been volunteering since the fair’s birth, says, “I love making a bunch of pies with my grandmother. I can make the crust all by myself now; it’s my favorite part.”

Each year, the Apple Pie Crafts Fair continues to be a celebration of what makes Newport special: its deep history and unflagging community spirit. Leslie Steele, Olivia’s mom, says, “It means so much that our whole family volunteers and takes part in this fun day, everyone from my grandmother to my children. I love spending the day on the common surrounded

with laughter and chatter.” Volunteers begin buzzing around at 6 a.m., setting up and directing vendors to their spots and free homemade muffins and coffee. Pie donations start as soon as the pie tent is erected. Live music kicks off the day at 9 a.m., putting the fair into full swing. Quickly, the common is flooded with fairgoers shopping, eating, catching up with friends and enjoying the wholesome atmosphere. You’ll likely see a variety of animals — from family pets to llamas and pigs — walking around. At 11 a.m. the pie judging happens and the ribbons, and the bragging rights, are handed out. The fair officially runs until 3 p.m.; however, The Old Courthouse hosts a fantastic finale to benefit the Library Arts Center, with a farm-to-table dinner at their restaurant. New this year: a spin on the classic root beer float. Apple cider floats will be available, the brainchild of McKenney’s granddaughters, and you can find them by the apple pie a la mode. ›››››

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NEWPORT · COMMUNITY

PEOPLE, PLACES AND THINGS

Community spirit M A RK YOUR CA LENDA R 45th Apple Pie Crafts Fair Newport Common Saturday, Aug. 25 Always the fourth Saturday in August, from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.

It’s a winning recipe of connection to community, outpouring of volunteers and local things to eat, see and buy. It’s when the Richards Free Library hosts a popular book sale, and the fireman break out their legendary barbecue. “It’s one day in Newport that everyone plans on. The town comes alive, people plan trips back to town for the day, and class reunions are often planned around the event, too,” says Niboli. Each year builds upon the previous year’s success. “We all make notes of what to add and what could make each station better. Even in the snowy season, we’re always thinking of ways to enhance the day,” says Katie Blewitt, Peggy McKenney’s daughter. “People look forward to seeing what’s new and enjoying what they’ve come to expect. The variety of vendors seems endless and somehow the common seems so much bigger on this day.” Leigh Ann Root is a freelance writer, photographer and yoga instructor. She teaches yoga throughout the Lake Sunapee region. Her traveling yoga business is Sunapee Yoga Company (sunapeeyogacompany.com). Leigh Ann lives in Newbury, N.H., with her husband, Jonathan, and two children, Parker and Joleigh.

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Sunapee’s Sestercentennial

The Town of Sunapee celebrates its 250th birthday in August. Join Kearsarge Magazine in celebration of the event, and enjoy a photo essay of present day Sunapee.

Boats on the lake. Photo by Paul Howe 40

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Burkehaven Lighthouse, one of three lighthouses on Lake Sunapee. Photo by Jim Block

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One of the many boats moored in Sunapee Harbor. Photo by Paul Howe 42

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Fourth of July fireworks light up Sunapee Harbor. Photo by Paul Howe

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The Knowlton House in Sunapee Harbor is home to the Lake Sunapee Protective Association. Photo by Paul Howe

A common view in the harbor. Photo by Leigh Ann Root 44

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Children and adults enjoy Project Sunapee's Haunted Harbor Halloween. Photo by Paul Howe

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Loon Lighthouse. Photo by Jim Block 46

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Peaceful Burkehaven Harbor. Photo by Jim Block kearsargemagazine.com • Summer 2018 • Kearsarge Magazine

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SUNAPEE · EAT

PEOPLE, PLACES AND THINGS

Stacy’s Smoothies Three ladies (and their families) have added a delicious dimension to their beloved Sunapee, N.H., summertime community. Text and photography by Leigh Ann Root

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ith its bright colored accents and festive exterior, Stacy’s Smoothies in Sunapee Harbor is hard to miss. Once you’re through the door, the eye-popping colors continue, only to be complimented by an energetic vibe and unique food and drink offerings. Once home to popular restaurant Woodbine Cottage and, later, Sotheby Realty, this perfectly placed locale is now the habitat of healthy eating. In the summer of 2016, Stacy’s Juicebar (which has a year-round location in Needham, Mass.) opened a “pop-up” shop in the heart of the harbor, Stacy’s Smoothies. With two successful summers of local kids serving up savory smoothies (and a large variety of homemade items, too), their third season is shaping up swimmingly.

Pita chips connection Stacy Madison is the founder of the industry-changing and well-known snack, Stacy’s Pita Chips. The concept of a baked snack versus a fried snack revolutionized the concept that you can have a healthy snacking alternative and not sacrifice taste. In 2006, after building this nationally recognized brand, Pepsi acquired the company. 52

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WEB stacysjuicebar.com stacyssmoothies.com

In 2014, after several years of traveling and working for other food companies, Stacy wanted to build something local. Stacy’s Juicebar in Needham was born from the desire to work closer to home and have something that fit into her lifestyle. “I wanted a hands-on business where my kids could learn the importance of hard work and wholesome food,” Madison says. Her mission has been to create healthy food and beverage choices that are accessible to her community. “We use ‘better for you’ ingredients. We bake our own breads, cookies, brownies and muffins. We don’t own a can opener; we use fresh tomatoes and beans and avoid Stacy's founding team: Deb Pasculano, Stacy Madison and Marybeth Carroll

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artificial ingredients, preservatives, refined sugars and flours,” Madison says. “We make it simple for you to make healthy choices.”

Sunapee love In the winter of 2015, while on vacation in Cuba, Deb Pasculano (Madison’s sister) and Stephanie Wheeler (a family friend) were talking about their mutual love of Sunapee. Wheeler, a realtor with Sotheby’s Realty and co-owner of the former Woodbine location, expressed how great it would be to have a Stacy’s Juicebar-type of business in her building. The seed was planted. Pasculano, an industry veteran involved in the creation of the Needham business with her sister, loved the idea of bringing Stacy’s concept to Sunapee. Madison did, too, and they pulled in Marybeth Carroll, a close friend and longtime Sunapee summer resident for this new endeavor. This formed the family trifecta that brought Stacy’s Smoothies to life.

Eat healthy The smoothies are comprised of 100 percent frozen fruit (no ice allowed), and they’re dairy free, gluten free and less than 300 calories. One specialty is the Watermelon Slush (100 calories) made with fresh watermelon, frozen and blended with watermelon juice and agave. The girls of Stacy’s are most proud of their Acai bowls. “They are hip, trendy, cold and a nice alternative to eating an ice cream sundae. It’s like a smoothie that you can eat with a spoon. This product really stands for what we are. Acai is a super berry, rich in antioxidants and fiber,” says Carroll. Other harbor hits include banana bread, cold summer soups, zucchini squares and raw 54

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energy bars. They also offer catering for those lazy days of summer. New for 2018, they’ve added menu items focused on the ‘tweeners, capturing that audience in between their children and adult menus. Quesadillas on organic tortillas, baked versions of buffalo chicken wings, pulled BBQ chicken sandwiches and “make your own” options are now part of the menu. They’ve expanded their lunch items to include an assortment of sandwiches, available on their own homemade ciabatta rolls and focaccia bread. In addition, a do-it-yourself Orange Juice Machine helps kiddos become part of the process. Pasculano compares it to a Willy Wonka experience — but healthier. “They put in the whole orange and watch it roll through the machine and turn into juice,” she says. The boosters and add-in items are also available. Customers can add protein powder, hemp hearts, nut butters, turmeric, macro greens and chia to their favorite concoctions, making them even better.

Weaving into the community fabric The Stacy’s Smoothies family is thrilled to be a part of Sunapee Harbor. They support, engage, and contribute to community happenings. The Stacy’s staff, dressed as fruit, went to the top of Mount Sunapee for a yoga class and handed out free water and smoothie coupons to participants during the 2017 season. They came back, offseason, to paint faces and give out hot cider at Halloween in the Harbor. They’ve donated to the 250th celebration fireworks this August. It’s clear they revel in all that makes Sunapee special.

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SUNAPEE · EAT

PEOPLE, PLACES AND THINGS

The Stacy's staff, dressed as fruit, went to the top of Mount Sunapee for a yoga class and handed out free water and smoothie coupons to participants.

Enjoy a seat on Stacy's sunny porch. 56

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This venture has been rewarding in a variety of ways. For Pasculano, “It’s when whole families fill the porch while enjoying smoothies.” For Carroll, “It’s when our kids and other local kids really came together and embraced the notion of healthy food.” Madison says it’s about her girls: “They take part in the business, creating smoothies and other items that would be attractive to their peers.” Scott Blewitt, Sunapee Recreation director and customer, says it best: “Sunapee Harbor is a great setting to enjoy the perfect smoothie, excellent products and meet a friendly staff.” Flip flop your way to the brightest little building in the harbor this summer, and give your taste buds a treat!

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Serendipitously Summer

Summer has officially begun when you see Sunapee’s big red barn — the home of Deck Dock Home & Garden — come alive. By Leigh Ann Root

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ummer has officially begun when you see the big red barn, on Edgemont Road in Sunapee, N.H., come alive. This old horse barn is surrounded by colorful Adirondack chairs, a potpourri of patio sets and outdoor décor galore. Once the flag flies, a favorite season of Sunapee’s has started — the Deck Dock Home & Garden open flag waves every day of summer. Opening for its 19th season this year, Lynne Wardlaw and Sally Bourdon are proud to be one of Sunapee’s summertime stops. “We’re an unusual and serendipitous place to find fine outdoor furniture and finishing touches for any home,” Wardlaw says.

The road to Sunapee Local business is in Bourdon’s blood. She has fond memories of their family’s upholstery business in Claremont. The Bourdon sisters spent many years around fabrics in a noisy upholstery shop, a background that created their love for artistic design. Their father, Richard Bourdon, went on to own Flock Fibers, Inc., where Sally would go through fabric books. Both sisters were inspired 60

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by these early days to study art in their adult lives. Today, they’re talented artists whose work can be found at the store. “My training at The Oakland Museum, love of art, and time spent in my dad’s factory with all the fiber and fabrics, have contributed to the store’s style — the creation of an artful and playful business,” says Bourdon. Wardlaw grew up in Virginia and Indiana, the daughter of an economics professor and later real estate broker. Wardlaw understands family business, as her father, 84, is still working with her mother and brother in real estate. Wardlaw studied graphic design and photography at Indiana University. “I became interested in computers and learned programming. That took me to the computer scene in the San Francisco Bay area,” says Wardlaw. In 1985, Wardlaw got a job doing custom color printing at a photo lab in San Francisco. A year later, she was in charge of production computers, which soon took over the business. When Wardlaw and Bourdon first met, Bourdon was head of the framing department. Wardlaw says, “Sally made an impression on me. She had a beautiful studio


in an old cigar factory and did large scale pastels.” Their relationship began here, and the couple celebrated their 30th anniversary this year.

The birth of the business In 1998 Bourdon’s mom became ill. After many trips back to New Hampshire, the two decided to begin a new chapter in Sunapee. Bourdon and Wardlaw began renovating a Bourdon building — constructed by Paul Hodges, Bourdon’s grandfather, and her uncle, Willard Hodges — in Sunapee Harbor. Locals may remember that Paul and his wife Ilene, with other family members, ran the Bizarre Bazaar gift shop at that location in the 1950s. “Having done lots of renovations in the past, we completely overhauled Gumpy’s building,” says Bourdon. “Then our skills in art and design services and woodworking quickly led us into home furnishings.”

Deck Dock was born in Sunapee Harbor in that family building in 2000. Initially, they were designing a store around Bourdon’s sister Mary’s garden products: gorgeous dried flower wreaths and potpourris. Her watercolor landscapes and display work can still be seen at the store today. “Home and garden was a natural fit and we set up the store showing ‘transition’ spaces: mudrooms, porches, patio and garden. Once we started selling porch rockers and Adirondack chairs, we realized that folks come to Sunapee to be outside and they need good places to sit,” says Bourdon. “We were kind of surprised to find that our backgrounds were an excellent fit for this business — small business management, computers, design and woodworking,” says Wardlaw. This blend of business and personal lives has proven to be a Sunapee success. “We’ve been fortunate that our skill sets compliment each another and that we both have entrepreneurial experience.” ›››››

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“The early days in the harbor were magical. We bought merchandise befitting to our home and garden concept, like the chimeneas. We had one burning outside of the store that became a gathering spot. It was an open hearted and easy going time — Sunapee Funapee,” says Bourdon. Wardlaw adds, “It was a fun period in the harbor, working with other business owners and the Sunapee gardeners to make it what it is today.” They purchased the property on Edgemont Road (the store’s forever home on Route 103B) the same year they established Deck Dock, with the hopes of one day expanding the business into the large barn. In 2002, renovations on the barn began. “During this time in the harbor, we added new product lines that included more outdoor furniture. We were bursting at the seams,” says Bourdon. In the summer of 2005, Deck Dock’s first expansion happened. They added a “furniture only” location in the old horse barn. Smaller inventory remained at their harbor spot. “In 2008 we made the decision to consolidate everything to the barn,” says Wardlaw. Their biggest motivation was bringing the operation into one location, but the year round traffic on Route 103B, as opposed to the seasonal traffic in the harbor, has helped Deck Dock thrive.

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Expanding to Route 103B in 2002

“I always said that we’re not leaving the harbor — we’re expanding it,” says Bourdon.


The business will continue to expand in 2018, adding more displays and taking their show on the road. Deck Dock will bring some of their “best sellers” to home and garden events this year. More archival framing and original art will adorn their bustling barn, too.

Sunapee community The Deck Dock entrepreneurs love Sunapee. “It’s our home and Sally’s family has been here for almost 100 years. We love supporting town events and organizations like the historical society and the library. It’s a vibrant small town,” says Wardlaw. “I’ve moved around a bit, so I’m endlessly enchanted with the long history and close community of our beautiful state.” They’re proud of their history of hiring and training kids for their first jobs. “They get experience with customer service and sales, working with tools and in design,” says Wardlaw. Being a seasonal business in a rural community, they’ve had to hone their flexibility and creativity skills. They’ve adapted to changes in the economy, shopping patterns and seasonal rhythms. “This type of business is not for everyone. It’s quite challenging with never-ending work and varying sales, but it’s great to work hard and take long breaks that allow us to pursue other interests and

prepare for the next season. The freedom to ski when it snows is a big consideration,” says Wardlaw. The Internet may have changed consumers shopping patterns, but Wardlaw says that Deck Dock’s “customers come in more educated about their options, but still prefer to see the products and benefit from our years of experience.” This is because Deck Dock is known for their design expertise and solutions for decks, docks, patios and porches. They pride themselves on carrying products that are durable, require minimal maintenance, and have exceptional design. The comeback customers make Bourdon happy. “It’s great having a business that people love returning to,” she says. “I’m proud that we’ve created a fun and comfortable shopping experience.”

Leigh Ann Root is a freelance writer, photographer and yoga instructor. She teaches yoga throughout the Lake Sunapee region. Her traveling yoga business is Sunapee Yoga Company (sunapeeyogacompany.com). Leigh Ann lives in Newbury, N.H., with her husband, Jonathan, and two children, Parker and Joleigh. kearsargemagazine.com • Summer 2018 • Kearsarge Magazine

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Real Estate Why We Love It Here Real Estate Section In the city, you just leave your trash and recycling on the sidewalk, and someone comes to pick it up. But here in the Kearsarge/Lake Sunapee area, we have transfer stations and we drop off our trash to a bustling center of activity. You say hello to the attendant — who you know by name — and place your recycling in the correct bins. You greet a neighbor or two, and catch up on town happenings. Then you check out the swap table for a treasure you can’t live without. You leave with less trash and more community connection — one of the reasons we love living here.

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Real Estate The Art of the Swap Transfer stations are more than just trash removal. They are now sophisticated recycling centers with take it/leave it tables or swap shops. Text and photography by Brianna Marino

You never know what you'll find at the Sunapee swap shop.

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or yard sale enthusiasts, nothing epitomizes success like finding a great deal after a long bargain hunt — except, that is, finding something wonderful for free! Swap shops and take it/leave it tables at local transfer stations are providing the perfect opportunity to find antiques, curiosities, household items, baby gear and so much more — all free of charge to town residents. In fact, these transfer station treasures are doing more than feeding a yard saler’s bargain-lust, they’re saving taxpayers money and are good for the environment, too. Once simply referred to as the “town dump,” modern transfer stations are running sophisticated recycling opera72

tions. The transfer stations of Sunapee, Newbury and Wilmot all boast an impressively active swap (or take it/leave it) scene. So, what exactly is the swap scene? It’s simple: instead of throwing away items that still have life and value, residents can leave them for others to take home. Likewise, residents are free to peruse other people’s unwanted items and repurpose them in their own lives. It’s like a thrift store, except donations are “resold” free of charge. “It’s been a big hit. People love it,” says Earl Towle, Sunapee town foreman. To accommodate the burgeoning items, Sunapee recently completed the construction of a large outbuilding dedicated as the town swap

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shop. The building is roughly 20 feet long and half as deep, but houses an impressive array of knick knacks, household items, toys, books and more all neatly arranged by category. A few of the items found one visit include (but are by no means limited to): a pantry canister set, a rocking chair, a Winnie the Pooh play tree, a coffee maker, a golf bag and a wide assortment of books. Towle says the swap shop program began two years ago when “A lot of people inquired about it saying that other towns had them.” So far, “They love

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WEB newburynh.org wilmotnh.org town.sunapee.nh.us

Household goods — for free! — inside the Sunapee swap shop.

the idea and scoping it out and are very pleased with it.” Of course, like any program, there are a few rules. Items with disposal fees (such as electronics) and large items (like couches) are not accepted into the swap shop. Although some residents are not enthused with the attendants when their items

are rejected, the overall response has been overwhelmingly positive. This isn’t surprising considering the extra element of fun it adds to the transfer station run and, as Towle points out, “It’s a way to keep waste out and disposal fees down.”

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Real Estate

Wilmot Savings for the town means savings for the taxpayers. Dave Lorden of the Wilmot Transfer Station estimates that their swap shop table “saves thousands that we don’t have to pay for shipping.” He says, “It’s good to see stuff that is still good put to use. We have a lot of waste in this country. Why grind up a vacuum that still works to make another vacuum?” The idea of a swap area is not new to the town of Wilmot. “It’s something that’s always been around,” Lorden says. “The crusher has an engine box upon which people used to put their stuff. It got to the point where things were falling off.” His coworker suggested putting out a table, which works a lot better as people see it on the way out. Lorden says, “Most drive by turning their necks, turn on the brakes and then back up!” Wilmot residents have been all positive about the swap table, with one possible exception: Lorden says, “Some wives don’t like it when their husbands go and bring stuff home and vice versa.” 74

One of the interesting things about swap shops is the unpredictability — there’s no way to determine what will be left to peruse. However, serious swappers can employ some strategy. The Wilmot swap area was five times as large as normal after the town yard sale weekend. Wilmot has similar rules as the Sunapee swap shop: no padded furniture, electronics, televisions or other items with disposal fees. Anything that will be damaged when wet is also discouraged. A big fan of the swap area himself, Lorden has some ideas for the future. “It would be great if Goodwill or like organizations would stop by and pick everything up. There’s plenty of things (like dishes) that poor people or folks that may have lost their home in a fire could really use,” he says. “It could be more organized as there is a lot of money involved (in the value of items left behind).” For now, the residents get to enjoy such bounty as complete Thomas the Tank Engine train sets, asparagus steamers, bolts and brackets, bicycling seats for infants, elliptical machines and more.

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Newbury A few miles over in the town of Newbury, their transfer station has dedicated two areas to the swap shop cause. Under cover in the main building, a robust book, magazine, video, DVD and board game library has taken shape. There’s a wide array of children’s literature, school books, nonfiction and fiction, as well as plenty of VHS tapes for any audience. Outside, there’s an impressive pile that serves as the non-media swap shop area. ›››››

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Churchill Heselton, transfer station attendant, says that the swap shop has “just taken off a little at a time. After a while, people were taking some good stuff and leaving some good stuff.” He remembers it used to be a small shack when he started working there years ago. Although Heselton admits it is “sometimes a pain because people leave junk,” he also says that “anything not going the trash saves money” and that “people are over there [at the pile] constantly. They love it. Some people come I don’t know how many times a day.” Similar to Wilmot and Sunapee, the rules for Newbury swapping include: town residency, no stuffed furniture and a disposal fee for electronics (but if people are interested in taking them, they can ask). Frequently found items include indoor furniture, outdoor furniture, vacuums, power tools, skis, leaf blowers, baby swings, strollers, toys, dishes and even more. Some of the busier swap shop times include the end of a weekend and the end of a season, as vacationers empty their houses. Although swap shops may not be for everyone, most of the residents in the towns of Wilmot, Newbury and Sunapee have embraced it wholeheartedly. Perhaps it’s the Yankee mentality or perhaps just the thrill of the hunt. In either case, Lorden of Wilmot sums it up best: “It’s just smart.”

Brianna Marino lives on a small farm in Wilmot with her two children and patient husband. Together they can be found tending to chickens, turkeys and pigs; unless it’s Saturday morning, which is swap table time! 76

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NEW HAMPSHIRE · ON THE ROAD

PEOPLE, PLACES AND THINGS

On the Road Launch parties: See the magazine first, and meet the people who are in it! By Laura Jean Whitcomb

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Leigh Ann Root

Leigh Ann Root

I

t only took me 13 years to think of the idea: a launch party for each new issue of Kearsarge Magazine. And two years to host the first one! It’s not a new idea; most metro magazines have launch parties for each issue, or special issues (like “best of”). But in the city, there are many, many more people, and many within walking distance. Here in New Hampshire, well, the weather might squash a launch party (or any event, really) flat. There’s no bus or train system — no hopping on the T, no flagging down a taxi — so we’re at the mercy of Mother Nature some seasons. Who’d want to leave the warmth and coziness of their home after a long day of work? Plenty of people, actually. Our first launch party was held at MainStreet BookEnds in Warner, N.H., for the winter 2017-18 issue. There was a feature idea that I’d been sitting on for two years that Katie Bushueff (I miss you!) was able to pull together in six months: profiles of five local artists and their work, including one neverbefore-seen creation. Katharine Nevins at MainStreet generously offered us gallery space, and we hosted the article’s debut in conjunction with Open Doors, a statewide art event sponsored by

All the artists featured in the winter issue.

the League of NH Craftsmen. We gave out the magazine for free, offered desserts (from Autumn Harvest Farm in Grafton,

Kearsarge Magazine • Summer 2018 • kearsargemagazine.com

N.H., featured in this issue), poured wine, and greeted more than a hundred folks. It was lovely.


PEOPLE, PLACES AND THINGS

Our second launch party — this time for the spring 2018 issue — was held at the Newport Historical Society. I’ve always loved this museum: the displays are well thought out and engaging; the artwork is spectacular; and the docents are friendly and knowledgeable. Mary Lou McGuire and Ray Reid wrote a new history book on Newport, and were there to sell and sign copies. Bev McKinley from Silent Warriors was on hand to talk about the needs of the homeless and make some connections so her nonprofit could branch out to the Kearsarge region. Morning snow kept folks inside, but the 40 or so who made it were treated to limited edition postcards, Kearsarge Magazine pens and a few raffles to try to win local items (including a gift certificate from Nourish and wine from Coffin Cellars). Please note: all names dropped in this paragraph were featured in the spring issue! (Laura Jean, and you know who you are, I need to call you for our spa visit.)

NEW HAMPSHIRE · ON THE ROAD

I’m not a center-of-stage kind of gal. I’m behind the scenes, usually, in front of the computer or on the phone. But these events have made my heart swell. Each issue, with its hyper local articles, knits our community a little bit closer. Each launch party cements those connections in person. My original idea of “meeting your neighbor” has come true on and off the paper pages.

If you’re reading this, you’ve already missed our summer launch party at Deck Dock in Sunapee, N.H. You’ll want to like us on Facebook to see the photos, and learn the location of our fall launch party, yet to be determined. (But we do have some GREAT ideas.) See you soon!

Linda McCallum, photographer Paul Howe, and longtime subscriber Roberta McCallum kearsargemagazine.com • Summer 2018 • Kearsarge Magazine

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Kearsarge Magazine • Summer 2018 • kearsargemagazine.com

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Kearsarge Magazine Summer 2018  

Happy 250th Sunapee! Photo essay on Lake Sunapee, profiles of Sunapee businesses and more summer fun in the Kearsarge/Lake Sunapee area of N...

Kearsarge Magazine Summer 2018  

Happy 250th Sunapee! Photo essay on Lake Sunapee, profiles of Sunapee businesses and more summer fun in the Kearsarge/Lake Sunapee area of N...

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