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Spring 2016

Live Well Kearsarge Magazine’s

Guide to Good Health Mark Your Calendar for

$5.00 U.S. www.kearsargemagazine.com Display until June 1, 2016


Two teams bringing the things we love to the home you love.

kearsargemagazine.com • Spring 2016 • Kearsarge Magazine

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contents

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FEATURES

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Live Well: A Guide to Good Health in 2016 Introduction by Laura Jean Whitcomb

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Dance Well: Dance for Joy It is never too late to get out there and dance your way to a healthy mind and body. By Kelli Bogan, Cabaret Dance & Fitness

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Eat Well: 16 Tips for a Healthy 2016 The good news is that small steps can make a big difference. Here are 16 tips to help you on your journey. By Linda Howes, Nourishing Wellness

11 Age Well: It Takes a Community

What can we do to promote our own wellness as we age? We can start by asking what we can do for others. By Rebecca Desilets, Dartmouth Centers for Health and Aging

14 Think Well: Forest Bathing

Want to lower blood pressure, increase cortisol levels, and alleviate stress? Get outside. By Sheila Armen, Strong House Spa Jim Block

16 Think Well: A Beginner’s Guide to Yoga

No matter your personality or level of ability, there is a yoga practice perfect for you. By Angie Follensbee-Hall, Powerful Woman Yoga

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Think Well: Pausing between Heaven and Earth Mindfulness has reached into almost every dimension of daily life: from eating to walking, working, relaxing and relating. By Elizabeth Monson, Wonderwell Mountain Refuge

23 Train Well: Bodies Built to Move

Exercise should be part of our daily routines, much like brushing our teeth. By Lauran C. Steinmetz, Salty Dog Strength

26 Heal Well: Touch Therapy

Reiki practitioners lay their hands on (or above) a person at certain points and transfer life force energy to encourage healing. But does this form of alternative medicine work? By Laura Jean Whitcomb 2

Kearsarge Magazine • Spring 2016 • kearsargemagazine.com

ON THE COV ER Blue Mountain Artwork by Mimi Wiggin Mimi oil paints in a self-taught representational style focusing on birds, wildlife and farm animals. Her work has been featured in Kearsarge Magazine, SooNipi Magazine, The Art & Gallery Guide, and Forest Notes. Her work is also featured as covers and illustrations in the books Poems of Old Warner and Mount Kearsarge (2012) and Educators and Agitators- Selected Works of 19th Century Women Writers From a Small New Hampshire Town (2013). Mimi lives in the Mink Hills of Warner, N.H., with her freelance writer, husband Larry Sullivan.


29 Sleep Well: Sleep Well to Feel Well

Your sleep schedule, bedtime habits and lifestyle choices can make an enormous difference to the quality of your sleep. Experiment with some of the sleep strategies recommended by New London Hospital.

32 Eat Green: Everything Is Lighter

in the Spring Once the last of winter’s grip is released, go outside and take a look at your emerging lawn. You have been gifted with a powerful seasonal food: dandelion greens. By Michele Estes, Integrative Health Club

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PEOPLE, PL ACE A ND THINGS

40 The Glories of Spring

Gorgeous spring photos. By Jim Block In the 1800s, a New Hampshire farmer turned his garden into a pharmacy. By Laura Jean Whitcomb

52 Locally Made: Reclaim the Outdoors

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Jim Block

49 History: Homegrown Medicine

with YAYA Organics You don’t need chemicals, parabens or sulfates to scare ticks. Organic ingredients will do just fine. By Laura Jean Whitcomb

56 Outdoor: Moody Park

61 Health: Hospital Round Up

From rural towns to city centers, patients are receiving the best possible health care in New Hampshire.

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Jim Block

One hundred years ago, William Moody donated his land to the people of Claremont for a “free public park and recreation playground.” He would be pleased to see the jewel it is today. By Patrick O’Grady

SPECI A L SECTION: Zing into Spring

67 Mark Your Calendar 68 Schedule of Events 69 Thanks, Sponsors 70 Meet Our Vendors 71 Chinese Auction Goodies

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editor’s letter Hello friends, I’ve been ignoring winter. Why not? I was able to keep my down parka in the closet until early December. A heavy wool sweater was all I needed in New Hampshire’s warmer winter temperatures. Then, adding insult to injury, we didn’t have any snow at Christmas; it was the first brown holiday

Kearsarge Magazine’s 4th Annual Photo Contest starts March 1! See page 39 for details. Photo credit: Rod Keller

in a long while. Even now, the snowfall levels seem rather skimpy. I can still see the gravel of my driveway and my kids have been sledding once. So it makes sense that now, in February, Kearsarge Magazine is going to celebrate all things spring. We have a guide to living well with wellness articles written by local experts and an overview of the offerings at our local hospitals. There’s a gorgeous photo essay by Jim Block. And coming this March, our Zing into Spring! event at Colby-Sawyer College’s Ware Student Center in New London, N.H. (See more information on page 67!) I did finally start to wear my winter coat, and even my boots. Sometimes, I need a scarf and a hat. But some afternoons, with temps reaching the upper 30s (which is a heatwave to most longtime New Englanders), it still seems like spring might be only a day or two away… or I just jinxed it, and the worst of winter is yet to come. Either way, enjoy Mother Nature’s awesome sense of humor.

Laura Jean Whitcomb Publisher and Editor

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Rediscover your hometown with Kearsarge Magazine™ You may have lived in the big city, overseas, or maybe you’ve lived here all your life. Either way, you know there’s something special about the Lake Sunapee/Kearsarge/Concord area of New Hampshire. And every page of award-winning Kearsarge Magazine will remind you why you love it here.

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P.O. Box 1482 Grantham, N.H. 03753 Phone: (603) 863-7048 Fax: (603) 863-1508 E-mail: info@kearsargemagazine.com Web: www.kearsargemagazine.com

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Editor Art Director Ad Sales Ad Production Bookkeeping Copy Editor

Laura Jean Whitcomb Laura Osborn Laura Halkenhauser, Casey Bard Jenn Stark, David Morin Heather Grohbrugge Laura Kennedy Pezone

Kearsarge Magazine™ is published quarterly in February, May, August and November. © 2016 by Kearsarge Magazine, LLC. All photographs and articles © 2015 by the photographer or writer unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Except for onetime personal use, no part of any online content or issue may be reproduced by any mechanical, photographic or electronic process, nor may it be stored in a retrieval system, transmitted or otherwise copied for public or private use without written permission of the copyright owner.

Subscriptions Rediscover your hometown by subscribing to Kearsarge Magazine™. Four issues a year will be delivered right to your door for $15. Subscribe online at www.kearsargemagazine. com or send a check (with your name and mailing address) to P.O. Box 1482, Grantham, NH 03753. Digital subscriptions are also available online.

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A guide to good health in 2016

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more.” Another year, I decided that “eating more dessert” was a great goal. Funny, yes; e helpful, not in the slightest. to ea Good H After years of this behavior, I stopped making New Year’s resolutions. But lately, i.e., in my 40s, I realized that goals don’t have to be big. They can be little. Five years ago I decided to drink more water. Some days are good days (I drink three or four 12-ounce servings), some days I have to remind myself, but what has stuck is that the first thing I do every morning is drink a glass or two of water. Then, at least, I’ve started my day off on a positive note. For Kearsarge Magazine’s health Top 10 New Year’s resolutions for 2015 issue, I asked local experts to share their thoughts and ideas — a few ways of people who are 1 Lose weight successful in achieving that folks can live better (healthier, 2 Get organized their resolution happier, wiser) in 2016. The articles 3 Spend less, save more that came in from Nourishing of people who fail Wellness, Strong House Spa, Salty 4 Enjoy life to the fullest on their resolution Dog Strength, Powerful Woman Yoga, 5 Stay fit and healthy each year Cabaret Dance & Fitness and New 6 Learn something exciting London Hospital (to name a few) were 7 Quit smoking of Americans who absolutely wonderful: thoughtful, never make New 8 Help others in their dreams engaging and chock full of attainable Year’s resolutions 9 Fall in love ideas. Pick one thing — mine will be of the Statistic Brain Institute 10 Spend more time with family Courtesy more time outside — and see where it (statisticbrain.com) takes you this year. — Laura Jean Whitcomb or a long time, I thought New Year’s resolutions were a good idea. It was a chance to set a goal — a big one, like “buy a house” or “lose 50 pounds.” But a week or two into the New Year, I’d invariably veer from my goal, spending $500 on clothes instead of putting the money into the house fund or carbing it up for a few days on my new diet. Off track (and irritated), I usually decided that my resolution wasn’t worth pursuing. So I started making resolutions that I could possibly keep. One year I planned to “sleep

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ou know that moment when a song comes on the radio and, often unconsciously, your foot starts tapping along to the rhythm or your head begins nodding in time to the music? That reaction is instinctive; it is the dancer that lives within all of us. But dance is not just an expression of joy; it also packs in huge mental, physical and spiritual benefits. Whether you are looking to lose weight, gain flexibility, tone your muscles, or improve balance, there is a dance for you. The biggest physical benefits of dance is that it has been shown to help slow the aging process by strengthening the heart and cardiovascular system, increasing lung capacity, lubricating joints, and improving muscle mass, coordination and balance. One study has shown that people with cardiac conditions who danced for 20 minutes three times a week saw their heart health improve significantly more than those who participated in traditional cardio workouts. Other benefits include regulation of good and bad cholesterol, blood sugar control and the strengthening of your skeleton, which helps to prevent osteoporosis. Dance is also effective for weight loss, allowing participants to burn anywhere from 5 to 10 calories per minute, depending on the speed and intensity of the dance. In recent years, extensive research has been done documenting the numerous benefits that dance has on

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a person’s mental health. Not only has it been shown to increase serotonin levels, combat depression, and reduce stress, growing evidence shows that dancing can ward off Alzheimer’s disease and other dementia in the same way that physical exercise can keep a body fit. Studies have found that cognitively demanding tasks, especially those performed with others in a group setting, can delay and decrease the severity of dementia. It has also been shown that the more cognitively engaging these actions are — for example, learning new dance steps, monitoring the movements of your instructor and/or your partner, remembering previously learned steps, or linking one’s body movements to the rhythm — the better they are at helping to fend off these diseases. The New England Journal of Medicine did a 21-year study of senior citizens (aged 75 and higher) that found a 76 percent risk reduction of dementia when a person danced on a regular basis; compare that to crossword puzzles done four times a week which only had a 47 percent reduction rate. What makes dance so effective and different from other cognitive and physical activities is that it integrates several brain functions at once: kinesthetic, rational, musical and emotional which produces proteins within brain cells, causing growth of new neurons and new cell connections making minds sharper and healthier. Dance has social benefits as well; classes › › › › › kearsargemagazine.com • Spring 2016 • Kearsarge Magazine

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and studios often become second families as dance bonds people in an emotional way. Psychology Today explains that MRI scans have shown that watching people dance activates the same neurons that would fire if the person was doing the dance themselves. With all this shared joy, it is no surprise that friendships are forged in the moments before and after classes. Feeling intimidated or not sure what is the right type of dance for you? New students often think they were too old to start dancKelli Bogan, owner of Cabaret Dance & Fitness in Sunapee, N.H., teaches a dance fitness class. ing, that everyone else will have tons of experience, that other people in the class will The trick to dance is find the one(s) that bring you judge them, that they don’t have the right body type, that joy. If you are not sure where to start, try a dance fitness they have two left feet. The list goes on and on. Well, it’s class like Zumba® (Zumba® Gold is designed specifically time to let go of those fears. Dance is for everyone: every for beginners or anyone wanting to take class at a slower age, every body type, every ability. pace) which exposes students to music and dance styles from all over the world. You can figure out which ones (maybe it’s all of them!) you like and then find classes in that particular flavor. If you really want to focus on toning and flexibility, a ballet barre or belly dance class (no belly showing required) are great options. Partner classes like swing or salsa are great for meeting new people and the follower role in partner dancing has been shown to have extra cognitive benefits as followers constantly are interpreting the signals their partner is giving to them. Any of these classes — dance fitness, partnered or strengthening — will help your mental acuity, so pick your favorite and start dancing. Dance often. Dance with as many people as possible. KM KM KM Kelli Bogan is the owner of Cabaret Dance & Fitness in Sunapee, N.H. She teaches ballet, bollywood, lindy hop and dance fitness classes.

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ereaction in the just love the New Year. I love the tradition of reviewing to e a body takes place in water. Aim for at least Good H e start your day 64 ounces each day. Perhaps the past year and envisioning what I want to create in a by drinking 16 to He G obe o dwell ounces upon awaking and you’ll on your way! my life for the New Year, don’t you? Looking at what is important in our lives, what do we want to create more of, REE chew, chew. This one habit alone improves AT G Chew, E2. N and what no longer serves our well being. This requires a AIN WEL and reduces gas and the digestion and absorption TR of food, change in our thinking and a change in our behavior. Now bloating. is a good time to reassess and recommit to your vision. 3. Eat a high-energy breakfast with protein every Are you happy with your level of health? Are you your blood sugar and set the foundation wanting more energy, deeper sleep, less stress, weight loss, e day to replenish to ea H G of balance for the rest ofe the day. reduced gas and bloating, fewer headaches, pain relief, ood to ea Good H balanced moods, glowing skin and sparkling eyes, clear Enjoy an abundance of plant foods in a rainbow 4. thinking, peace of mind, reducing or eliminating prescripof colors. Deeply colored fruits and veggies are potent tion and OTC medications, creating an exercise routine, disease fighters. or wanting to release an unhealthy habit or two? 5. Use only high-quality fats and oils, such as butter, To have a different outcome means making changes. extra virgin olive oil and coconut oil. Avoid vegetable, Whatever your goal, how you eat will either help you hydrogenated and partially hydrogenated oils. succeed or hinder your good intentions. The good news is that small steps can make a big difference. Here are 16 6. Reduce your chemical cuisine. Consider purchastips to help you on your journey: ing organic foods to avoid hormones, antibiotics, pesticides and other toxic chemicals that poison our bodies, 1. Water up. Make pure water your beverage of choice. our minds, our planet and our future generations. Being hydrated is vital to good health as every metabolic id

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7. Become a label reader! Don’t be fooled by the marketing hype on the front of the product. Read the fine print. 8. Break free of caffeine and sugar. Reboot

and retrain your body by getting off the roller coaster. Although the first couple of days might be tough, you’ll soon have balanced energy and mood all day long.

9. Reduce the use of plastics in the kitchen.

Although convenient, plastic migrates into food and your body. Glass storage containers are safe and widely available.

10. Clean green. Is there a witch’s brew of chemicals lurking under the kitchen and bathroom sink? Switch to human and environmentally friendly products. Vinegar and baking soda are found in many DIY recipes. Better yet, the microfiber E-Cloth works fabulously with only water! Linda Howes is the owner of Nourishing Wellness in New London.

11. Get moving. Recent studies show that sitting for more than three hours a day is › › › › › kearsargemagazine.com • Spring 2016 • Kearsarge Magazine

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hazardous to health and longevity. Exercise is necessary to prevent stagnation and degeneration, improves mood, metabolism and decreases your risk of disease. If you have to “sit” for a living, be sure to get up every hour to move around.

12. Dry skin brushing is an oh-so

enjoyable way to healthy vibrant skin. Using a long handled firm, natural bristle brush, gently brush the skin from the extremities toward the center of the body using long, smooth strokes, covering the entire body except the face. It exfoliates and revitalizes the skin, and increases circulation.

13. Power down. Turn off elec-

tronic gadgets an hour or more before bedtime to calm and prepare your nervous system for a good night’s sleep.

14. Reduce your body burden

— detoxify! We live in a toxic world. Do a detox/cleanse program two to three times per year. Consider using an infrared sauna or doing therapeutic ionic footbaths on a regular basis.

In 1953, Ollie & Anne Kathan had big dreams, a passion for gardening and a lot of heart. Sixty years later, their dream lives on. We appreciate your continued support and look forward to your visit to our Garden Center & Gift Shop!

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Kearsarge Magazine • Spring 2016 • kearsargemagazine.com

15. Create bliss time. Relax, breathe, laugh and spend time in nature. Taking time for contemplation and meditation quiets the mind, nervous system and rejuvenates the spirit. 16. Practice compassion toward

yourself and others. Be gentle, be forgiving. Life is about progress, not perfection. Strive for excellence! KM KM KM Linda Howes — holistic health practitioner, nutritionist, gluten practitioner and body ecologist — has been in practice for more than 20 years and is the owner of Nourishing Wellness in New London, N.H. She is passionate about healthy living and is committed to helping her clients reclaim their health and reach their goals. Learn more at nourishingwellness.net


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It Takes a Community

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ging is a lifelong process from which none of us are exempt. Most of us are aware of the things we should do to become our healthiest selves at any age — exercise, eat moderate amounts nutrient-rich foods, stay mentally and socially engaged, manage stress and chronic conditions, get enough sleep, etc. The greater challenge for us, perhaps, is finding, maintaining and/or developing the support systems that foster personal wellness. “Community” takes on many forms as we age — the son or daughter who calls us weekly; friends that hold us to our fitness routines; the neighbors who offer a helping hand. Just as in the other stages of life, aging well in later life takes a community.

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Family caregivers In addition to raising four children, Elaine worked her entire adult life planning for her retirement. She and her husband, Jim, would have traveled the country in an RV, visiting national monuments and checking items off their bucket lists. Elaine and Jim never realized their dream, though, because soon after retirement Jim suffered a series of mini-strokes that weakened him physically and left him with vascular dementia. Although their later years did not turn out as planned, Elaine works hard to ensure that she and Jim lead fulfilling lives. Elaine regularly attends a caregiver support group, where she has › › › › ›

These lovely ladies are enjoying a card game at the Chapin Senior Center in New London, N.H.

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Judy Afeman leads a tai chi class at the Kearsarge Community Presbyterian Church.

established a solid network of friends. She also attended a workshop to learn more about his dementia and how to be a better caregiver. When Elaine starts to burn out, one of her children come to stay with their father while Elaine visits a girlfriend or relative. According to the National Center on Caregiving, there are nearly 44 million people like Elaine caring for a family member 50 years or older. Family caregivers come in many forms — spouses, adult children or grandchildren; live-in or long-distance; full-time or part-time. What they all have in common is that they selflessly take on many jobs that they never planned on or imagined. They become healthcare advocates, bill payers, cleaners, nurses, recreation directors, drivers and more. Caring for a family member, though exhausting, can build rich relationships and fond memories. By supporting family caregivers, other family members, friends and organizations also help us age well. ServiceLink Aging & Disability Resource Center (866-634-9412) helps caregivers with respite options and referral services and — along with the Dartmouth-Hitchcock Aging Resource Center (603-6533460) and several community-based agencies — offers support groups and specialized training for caregivers.

Networks with a purpose

Bill’s primary care doctor encouraged him to join a new walking group sponsored by the Aging Resource Center at Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center. Bill met Frank his first week in the group, and they have been weekly walking partners since. Bill and Frank have exchanged life stories and developed a friendship. Most importantly, they have inspired each other to keep walking in spite of setbacks. Each understands that if he does not show up for the walking group, the other will be 12

Kearsarge Magazine • Spring 2016 • kearsargemagazine.com

without a partner; this interdependency keeps the friends motivated. When she received her diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease, Betty felt alone and had a difficult time telling her friends about her diagnosis. She started to get isolated and depressed, leaving the house only when necessary despite her husband Dennis’ best efforts to keep her engaged. One Saturday, Dennis brought Betty to the Upper Valley Memory Café, a casual and intergenerational meeting of people with dementia, their family members and students. At the café, Betty and Dennis met other people going through similar experiences, all while enjoying breakfast, entertainment and activities. They met friends, joined more activities, and gained the confidence to share Betty’s diagnosis with family and friends, which garnered even more support for the couple. The activities that Bill and Betty joined helped them to find the support they may not have even realized they needed. They found micro-communities that helped them achieve the wellness goals of exercising and social engagement. As we age, we can seek out these communities based on our particular circumstances and interests. Locally, the Kearsarge Council on Aging (603-526-6368) offers a men’s discussion group, a walking group and a Parkinson’s support group, among many other activities.

Support for aging in place Dale lovingly built his home with his own two hands and planned to live there for the rest of his life. Dale was told that his vision loss would keep him from doing many of the things that kept him independent and in his home. Soon, he would have to stop driving. Cooking and home maintenance chores would become increasingly difficult. Dale worried that he would have to give up the home that


meant so much to **The stories included herein are him. Luckily, one of fictional, though they are based on Dale’s neighbors sat typical cases that the author sees in on the board of his her daily work. Any resemblance to local aging in place an individual is purely coincidental.** network. Before Dale even needed the services, he made contact to get home-delivered meals, transportation services and volunteers who would help with home maintenance. Dale stayed at home for many years, enjoying the creaks of the floorboards and the scents of the wildflowers when he could no longer see them. Long-established programs, such as Meals on Wheels, have been successful in helping people stay in their homes as they age for years. More recently, community-based groups have responded to additional needs they find in their communities, often on a case-by-case basis. These grassroots programs generally start with neighborly concern and grow to address multiple needs in their communities. In the Kearsarge area, At Home in New London, Newbury, Springfield, Sunapee, Sutton, Wilmot (603-4965467) is a nonprofit membership organization that vets volunteers to provide short-term services, such as respite care, light housekeeping, home maintenance and meal

preparation in the home. For those in need of longer term services, At Home maintains a list of vetted service providers that members can hire. In Eastman, a group called Eastman CARES (Community Assistance, Resources and Education Services) formed in 2012 to address growing needs of the Eastman community in Grantham. So, what can we do to promote our own wellness as we age? We can start by asking what we can do for others in our community. Here are some ideas to start: offer regular respite time to a friend who is a family caregiver; join a walking group and encourage a friend or acquaintance to join you; volunteer for a home-delivered meal program; serve on the board of a local aging in place network. When we find ourselves in need of that community support, we will be more likely to find it if we are already a part of a network. KM KM KM Rebecca Desilets is a resource specialist at the Dartmouth-Hitchcock Aging Resource Center, working with the Dartmouth Centers for Health and Aging since 2011. She provides consultation services, coordinates educational programs, and instructs selected programs for older adults and family caregivers.

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Japan has led forest therapy N WE with governAIstudies L TR ment funding $4 million in research from 2004 to 2013. Today, the research database PubMed has returned 100-plus studies on the health impact of forest bathing, eincluding studies indicating it significantly lowers blood a to He G o o d(-1.4 e rate (-5.8 percent), pressure percent), heart cortisol to ea G o o d Hnerve activity (-7 levels (-12.4 percent) and sympathetic percent) compared with city walks. The most provocative of these studies conclude that exposure to phytoncides — the airborne, aromatic chemicals/oils emitted by many trees — have a long-lasting impact on people’s immune

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f you’re like many, you wonder why, at the end of the day, your eyes are glazed over, your mind is scattered, and your “to do” list has grown. You can barely remember what you did one hour ago, and then realize the majority of your time was spent with your eyes glued to a computer screen, a handheld device or television set. The toys and devices we hold dear — iPhones, computers, the Internet — seem to overlook the needs of our bodies, mind and spirit. They are having an adverse effect on our health. While it can be stressful to step outside of the electronic virtual reality, both physically and psychologically, I know I thrive when I connect with nature. I’m hearing an overwhelming majority say the same. Forest Bathing is one way to counteract the negative effects and, in fact, shows signs of reversing the damage from our devices. A term coined in Japan, Forest Bathing means “taking in the forest atmosphere.” But it is more than just a walk in the woods. According to a 2015 trends report in Spa Finder, the average person today “bathes” their face seven hours a day in the glow of a (computer) screen. It’s not surprising that humans are in the throes of a forest deprivation crisis. The alienation from this essential, yet increasingly exotic, human experience will drive demand for forest bathing experiences in the years ahead. The more time we bathe our bodies in front of a computer screen the more we need to reconnect with nature to bring our bodies back to center. The idea is to “bathe” your being and feel the forest. The intent is to help focus on your surroundings and be aware of every sound, scent and color while meditating on your own place in the world. You’ll be Nordic walking with poles on well groomed trails in and out of fields and wooded areas. Essential oils can be used to enhance the meditation experience. Forest bathing has been proven to lower blood pressure, increase cortisol levels, and alleviate stress and depression.

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Serving the Lake Sunapee & Upper Valley regions of NH system markers, boosting natural killer (NK) cells and anticancer proteins by 40 percent. As a spa owner, I see how our clients from around the world are begging to reconnect with nature and the environment. The stress they experience from traveling and the frantic, 24/7 bombardment of communication is taking a toll on them and further disconnecting them from the environment. The results show up in the body in the form of pain, sleep deprivation, anxiety, muscle tension and chronic patterns of dysfunction. I’ve always had a love for the outdoors and my commitment to help build local trails since 2002 seemed like a natural evolution to lead clients to extend their experience from the spa to a Forest Bathing experience. This new treatment is another example of a total health and wellness program. KM KM KM

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am is a retired teacher and a loving grandmother. She called me a few years ago, inquiring about starting a yoga class. She had used DVDs at home, but wasn’t sure if her postures were correct, or if her breathing technique was helpful. After two years of regular weekly practice, she has seen a dramatic improvement in her strength, flexibility and balance. “Nurturing my body, mind and spirit through yoga has become a lifestyle that has wonderful joyous benefits,” she says. “My body has become more flexible and my energy has increased. Yoga also has decreased joint and muscle pain through better alignment, stretching. My mind has become more in balance with my body through yoga.” Jenn came to yoga with chronic back pain; she

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regularly experienced back spasms and knotted back muscles. Regular massage brought some relief, but she wanted more. She began a twice weekly yoga class and, only a few months later, her massage therapist noticed significant change in her muscle tissue. “The therapist could not find any knots in my back at all, and declared that my back was ‘totally different.’ I can certainly feel the difference, too!” Jenn says.

Benefits

We all know that we feel great after yoga, but let’s dig deeper. Science is proving what the yogis have touted for centuries: yoga is a complete healing practice, on all levels of being and existence. Recent studies have shown that regular yoga practice reduces levels of inflammation; inflammation is our bodies’ way of reacting to pain and illness. This reduction in inflammation eases stress levels in the body and assists our body’s natural ability to heal. Here’s a great example. At the University of Maryland, researchers looked at 200 breast cancer patients who had never practiced yoga. They had 100 of the patients begin a twice weekly, 90-minute yoga class, in addition to DVDs to practice at home between classes. (The other 100 patients had no yoga practice at all). Blood samples were taken to look at cytokines, markers in the blood for inflammation that triggers disease and stress in the body. They took samples from both groups — before the start of the new yoga regimen and at the end of the study — and found that those participating in regular yoga practice had lower levels of inflammation in the body than those who did no yoga. These lower levels of inflammation reveal improvements for a myriad of health and wellness benefits. We have


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known for years that yoga is beneficial for back pain, and well-documented studies have linked yoga with lowered blood pressure and improved respiratory function, both beneficial in controlling heart disease. Yoga decreases the stress hormone cortisol, benefiting the parasympathetic nervous system, the “rest and digest” mechanism of the body, helping to improve overall mood and stress management.

Begin

There are no prerequisites to practicing yoga. No specific size, shape or ability is needed. We begin where we are, and allow what is to happen to happen. But which class and type of practice is right for you? Most styles will offer a few different levels of classes, from beginner to advanced levels. If you are new to yoga, and are not physically active, start with a beginner or gentle class. A beginner class will assume you have never done any yoga. You will learn basic breath awareness, alignment cues, a series of basic postures and guided relaxations. The movements are kept simple and slow. Over time, the class may introduce more challenging postures as you build strength and flexibility. The teacher may weave in yoga philosophy principles into each class. A gentle yoga class will stay with simple poses to increase flexibility and range of motion. Strength building is not emphasized in a gentle yoga class. You will likely be encouraged to use a variety of props to facilitate proper alignment.

Here is a basic list of styles to help you to understand the different types of yoga available and help you choose a style that will be a perfect fit for your personality. Hatha Yoga is a generalized term used to describe yoga that involves postures and breath. Classes can range from basic to advanced. Kundalini Yoga uses Kriyas, or a practice set, of repeated movements with breath and mantra. It looks and feels different from classic yoga, and works on building energy in the body. Iyengar Yoga emphasizes proper alignment and form, and the use of many props in each class. If you like precision, order and integrity of form, this is a style that will suit you. Ashtanga/Vinyasa Flow: Vinyasa yoga is a generalized term to indicate that all postures will flow into each other in a moving sequence. Many styles fall under this category, such as Jivamukti and Anusara. If you enjoy a creative and organic experience, and the flowing movement of dance, in a somewhat challenging and athletic sequence (challenge depends on the level of the class offered), this is a style that will appeal to you. Kripalu Yoga is a gentle style of Hatha Yoga that emphasizes moving at your own pace, and honoring your own body. Hot Yoga has many forms, all practiced in a humid room heated in a range of 90 to 117 degrees; the heat is said to improve flexibility. Many types of yoga fall under this category: Power Yoga, a sequenced vinyasa style practice; Bikram, a set practice of the same 26 poses and two breathing exercises in every class; and Forrest Yoga, connection with breath and core, strength, integrity and a freedom of spirit. If you enjoy a physically demanding practice, and like to sweat, hot yoga is your practice. There are as many styles of yoga as there are teachers teaching and people practicing. No matter what your personality or level of ability, there is a practice that is perfectly suited for you. May you be inspired to pursue the path to greater health and well being through yoga. KM KM KM Angie Follensbee-Hall, E-RYT 500 and BFA, is the director of Myriad Yoga Teacher Training School in Cornish, N.H., offering 200 and 300 hour trainings; creator of Powerful Woman Yoga, an online yoga resource and blog; and creator of The Paper Glade, a unique, handmade paper gallery. She succeeds in helping others realize the potential to emerge into their most powerful self. Learn more at powerfulwomanyoga.com

Styles

There are so many styles of yoga available to us; it can be confusing to the beginner to know where to start. kearsargemagazine.com • Spring 2016 • Kearsarge Magazine

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T GREE Mindfulness Toolbox: 50 Practical Tips, Mindfulness EA N without Meditation, Fully Present: Science, Art and AIN WEThe L TR Practice of Mindfulness, One Minute Mindfulness, and so forth. There is mindfulness for teachers, clinicians, therapists, addicts and for those suffering from ADHD. e We find mindfulness training for children, professionals, to ea Good H e military personnel; for persons for teenage to withHOCD; ea Good anger, anxiety and depression; for Borderline Personality Disorder; and much more. All of these approaches to mindfulness are useful and potent in the midst of a cultural context where speed, busyness and overwhelm are commonplace experiences.

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hen Kearsarge Magazine asked me to consider writing an article about the practice of meditation under the rubric of “Think Well,” I was reminded of the current explosion in modern society of discourse on the subject of mindfulness. Mindfulness, both as a concept and as a practice, has reached into almost every dimension of daily life: from eating to walking, working, relaxing and relating. Bookstores are crowded with titles such as: Mindful Eating, The Mindfulness Coloring Book: Anti-Stress Art Therapy for Busy People, Mindfulness: Mindfulness for Anxiety Relief, The Miracle of Mindfulness, The

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It is no wonder then, that we see such an interest in that object whenmindfulness as a tool for locating stillness, for fostering ever we become relaxation, and for discovering moments of respite from distracted. In this the stresses and anxieties that many of us find ourselves sense, meditation plagued with. However, as the word “mindfulness” is teaches us that to used more and more often and in so many diverse ways, “think well” is there is a risk that the term will be emptied of its original to strengthen our meaning. Ultimately, we may find ourselves with a catchability to remain all category that signifies both everything and nothing. present with our Let’s explore some of the deeper meanings of mindown constantly fulness when it is understood within the context of the changing experiTibetan Buddhist tradition of meditation where the ence. “Thinking practices of “thinking well” have been thoroughly vetted well” means and investigated. Where does this newly popular term taking a step back come from and what history of wisdom and instruction from being caught is it meant to transmit to those who encounter it? How up in the ongoing does it relate to and work directly with “thoughts” and flow of the conthe processes of mental fixation and emotional reactivity ceptual mind and Elizabeth Monson is the managing that we often find ourselves trapped by? learning how to teacher at Wonderwell Mountain Refuge in Springfield, N.H. In Tibetan Buddhism, “mindfulness” is regarded in observe our own two distinct ways. It is regarded as a practice of meditaexperience. As a tion — as a method for working intimately with and result, we discover that the rapidity of the thinking mind beginning to tame our mind/body complex. It is also slows down and we penetrate more and more deeply into regarded as an innate aspect of the mind’s inherent wisthe depths of the mind. dom — in this sense, mindfulness is the mind’s ability to The second way of understanding mindfulness, know and perceive things from the point of view as they are. of the Tibetan Buddhist How to Start When we consider tradition, is to underEven if you do not have time for formal meditation practice, there is mindfulness as a practice stand mindfulness as the an easy way to begin to access mindfulness. of meditation, we refer wisdom that recognizes to the specific activity the truth of how things First, whenever you find yourself caught up in cycles of thought or undertaken in formal actually are, as opposed in feelings of reactivity to events in our lives, just stop. Literally stop moving and stand or sit still. Notice how your body feels. Are you meditation practice, of to how we imagine, wish tense, trembling, uncomfortable? Are you relaxed? remaining aware and or hope they might be. In attentive, moment-tothis sense, mindfulness Next, once you notice how your body feels, bring your attention to moment, of an object the feeling of your feet on the earth. Feel the weight and presence of refers to the quintessential of meditation. Buddhist activity of “thinking well” just being on the earth. Have a sense that the earth itself is supporttraditions list different in that it opens the gateing you, holding you up from beneath. kinds of objects of mediway to deeper and deeper Then feel the vastness of the sky above you. Have a sense of being tation. We might focus on held between heaven and earth. Just by pausing, you can catch the insight into the nature of a statue of the Buddha or who we are, who others thinking mind as it tumbles past — you can begin to watch it, and on sensations that arise are, and the truth of realwatch your feelings or reactions, just as you would watch the clouds on and in the body. We ity itself. Mindfulness is a moving over the sky or waves rising out of and dissolving back into might remain aware of stream of flowing awarethe ocean. the feeling of the breath ness through which we If you can pause and remember to breathe, if you can bring your as it flows in and out, or remain awake and cogattention to whatever is happening in your heart and mind and to the arising, dwelling nizant of everything that simply rest with that, you are beginning to tap into the liberative and dissolving of thoughts power of mindfulness. arises within the sphere of themselves. our experience. With any of these In this second sense, objects, mindfulness involves bringing our attention mindfulness does not refer to the action of bringing our ››››› back, again and again, to being immediately present with attention back to an object of meditation, but kearsargemagazine.com • Spring 2016 • Kearsarge Magazine

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instead to our ability to become aware of the thinking process itself. Practicing mindfulness in this way allows us to take a step back from our thinking processes. We stop listening to what the mind “says” and begin to pay attention to what we “see” when we observe our own experience. Through mindfulness, we create a new relationship to ourselves. Instead of being caught up in and entrapped by habitual patterns of thought, reactivity and emotion when we observe them, these thoughts, emotions and experiences liberate themselves. Like a tangled knots untying themselves in open space, we witness the ever-changing and vivid nature of our conceptual and emotional states of mind and body. We discover a deeper and more profound level of our being that is always present, aware, completely natural and deeply interconnected to others and the world around us. From the point of view of meditation, this is what it means to “think well.” KM KM KM Elizabeth Monson is the managing teacher at Wonderwell Mountain Refuge (wonderwellrefuge.org) in Springfield, N.H. She is also associate spiritual director of Natural Dharma Fellowship. She holds a PhD in religion from Harvard University and is currently teaching part-time at the Harvard Divinity School. Elizabeth is the author of More Than a Madman: The Divine Teachings of Drukpa Kunley (2014).

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Exercise should be a part of our daily routines, much like brushing our teeth. by Lauran C. Steinmetz photography by Jim Block

F

itness has been my life since I gave birth to my daughter 22 years ago, and by that I mean it’s how I paid my bills. I have been in the fitness industry since Gin Miller created Step Aerobics with Reebok and for many years I was dedicated to my fitness routine. Every day, except Sunday, for one to two hours a day, all you had to do is go to the gym and there I was, sweating up a storm. I worked as an aerobics instructor, personal trainer and even competed on the national level in obstacle course and fitness competitions. Then one day, my life turned upside down and my routine was affected in a most devastating way. Both my parents passed away within seven months of each other. Shortly thereafter my sister passed away from cancer. The last thing on my mind was working out and being healthy. I was overcome with sadness about the loss of my family. I left the fitness industry behind and set out to find a career that made me feel complete: a police dispatcher, makeup artist, sales rep, restaurant front of house manager and wedding photographer. All of these careers kept me busy, but none touched my soul as fitness once had. I began to start my climb back into fitness by getting my certification in holistic nutrition. I began working an hour away from my home as a fitness programming director, but yet, something was still missing. I could not get myself to start actually exercising. I realized I was afraid! I had gained weight, and definitely did not look like I had in the past. When I did work out, it hurt and it wasn’t as much fun as I had remembered it being. Looking around the room at the gym I realized there were a lot of strong, fast and fit people all around me. It was truly overwhelming and incredibly intimidating. The first three months

all I did was complain about what I couldn’t do and how much better the other athletes were. I was totally in my own head and thinking negative thoughts at › › › › ›

Lauran C. Steinmetz is the owner of Salty Dog Strength, Conditioning & Wellness kearsargemagazine.com • Spring 2016 • Kearsarge Magazine

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every workout; things like, “I am fat,” “I can’t do this,” “I should just quit,” “it hurts too much,” and on and on. The negative thoughts began to wear me down and finally I gave up again. How could this be when I was once the walking talking example of fitness? Getting back in shape or starting a workout routine can seem daunting, to say the least. You know you’re going to be sore and that it will hurt. Going to a gym is intimidating. Let’s admit it: who knows how to work all those machines? And look at all those fit people! Who looks like that? So you walk into the gym and head straight for the treadmills and cardio equipment because they seem manageable, but they get boring quickly and only work your cardiovascular system. All the magazines talk about building muscle for bone density but how are you going to accomplish this? Here are some pointers to get you back to your routine, or even start a routine.

Change your mindset

movement our bodies become sick. Moving 3 to 5 times a week can lower many risk factors in our health. Working out does not need to be an all-day affair. The time you spend moving will make you a more active, happier and a healthier person in life. As a matter of fact, new research states that more intense exercise for shorter durations actually gives you more benefit than running for an hour every day. This will make your heart stronger and healthier. Did you know that the average person moves 60 percent less than we did 50 years ago? Starting out or getting back to an exercise routine or just finding ways to get more movement in your day may be enough for now. Put down the phone, get off the couch, push the computer away and get outside and walk, play with your children, walk the dog, or go for a bike ride. As winter nears find activities to do outside, build a snow fort, go sledding, go snowshoeing, cross country skiing, or just bundle up and go for a nice winter walk.

Change the way that you look at fitness and working out. Start looking at fitness as a way to get movement into your day-to-day life. Accept that our bodies crave movement (movement means elevating the heart rate for 20 to 30 minutes), and need movement. Without

Determine your primary goal for starting an exercise program. This goal could be as simple as “I want to start getting 20 to 30 minutes of heart elevating movement into my day.”

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Make a plan


It is important to define your secondary goal, one that complements your original goal. For example, “I would like to fit into a smaller clothing size.” These goals are realistic goals. They are attainable and practical. It is important to keep your goals attainable and realistic because when we make goals that are unrealistic we tend not stick with our plan.

the kids to the track and doing some sprint training, or jumping rope. Including Strength training helps you: strength training, cardio• Develop strong bones (and reduce the risk of osteoporosis). vascular training and flex• Control your weight. As you gain muscle, your body begins to ibility training into your burn calories more efficiently. weekly routine is important • Boost your stamina. As you get stronger, you won't fatigue to create balance within as easily. Building muscle also contributes to better balance, your body. which can help you maintain independence as you age. Life constantly throws • Sharpen your focus. Some research suggests that regular curveballs that will most strength training helps improve attention for older adults. definitely interrupt your Courtesy of the Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and weekly schedule. Don’t Research stress out; set your weekly plan to accommodate these Choose the exercise events workout earlier in the As we grow older, morning, or later in the evening. Even though you may weight bearing exercises are highly suggested by our dochave a set schedule there is always room to change it or tors. Bone density plays an important role in how we are modify. Look for consistency, not perfection. KM KM KM able to move through our older years, and assure broken bones are kept to a minimum. The stronger our bones the Lauran C. Steinmetz, ACE, NASM CPT, ACCEPT better our movement and the less likely we are to sustain Movement Specialist, IIN Holistic Health Coach, is the injury. The stronger our muscles the more they will help owner of Salty Dog Strength in Grantham, N.H. Learn support our bones and structure. The more flexible and more at Saltydogscwnh.com mobile our bodies are, the more our joints and muscles will be able to handle to impact of day-to-day movement. If you are unsure of what type of exercise to implement you may want to speak with a qualified fitness professional. Looking for those fitness professionals that have a good understanding of biomechanics and movement patterns is extremely important to your program. It will decrease your risk of injury and ensure that your fitness program will deliver the results you are looking for.

Why Build Muscle?

Ask for help

Getting family and friends involved in your routine is helpful because you know you have someone else counting on you and this makes you more likely to show up. Getting a personal trainer, coach or gym membership will keep you accountable. You will be more likely to show up for appointments with a trainer if you are spending money.

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Be consistent

Being consistent in your exercise routine is key. Determine the amount of days you will devote to movement and strength training. For example Monday, Wednesday and Fridays are dedicated to 20 to 45 minutes of strength training. Tuesday, Thursdays and Saturdays are dedicated to getting 20 to 45 minutes of heart pumping cardio. Sunday is a day of rest or active recovery (taking a walk or going for a hike). Cardio does not mean going out and running for 60 minutes. It could mean going for a bike ride, or taking

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Reiki is an important part of a package to support and encourage healing — it has been shown to reduce stress, e to ea provide pre-operative relaxation, in chroniGood H e and ease pain a t e o cally ill patients. Good H There is power in touch; it’s a language all its own. A simple hug, arm squeeze, back scratch, foot massage — they all speak to the individual receiving it and even provide positive benefits to the person giving it. My son, diagnosed with autism, does not like being touched. My grandmother, who is living in an independent nursing facility, craves it. So when I meet Angie Follensbee-Hall, owner of Powerful Woman Yoga and Reiki Master, I tell her that I’d be interested in taking a class. A few months later, I’m in a Follensbee-Hall’s yoga studio with seven other women — a lawyer, a teacher, a retiree, a yoga instructor, id

t was my favorite part of yoga class. At the end of the session, the instructor placed her hands on my head (or shoulders) and sent good intentions my way. I’d feel the heat of her hands, and relax into the flow of positive energy. This is Reiki, a holistic technique for stress reduction and relaxation. It was developed in 1922 by Japanese Buddhist Mikao Usui and has been adapted across varying cultures since its introduction. It’s a simple idea: Practitioners lay their hands on (or above) a person at certain points (head, shoulders, feet) and transfer “life force energy” to encourage healing. Does this form of alternative medicine work? Articles, publications, opinions and research studies abound on the Internet. Some say “energy medicine” is nonsense; life energy can’t be measured by science. Others say that

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a health service provider — ready to learn the Usui Follensbee-Hall assures that, with practice, Reiki system of Reiki natural healing. We’re all on the journey will become second nature. She suggests conducting for different reasons — one woman wants to add balance Reiki sessions on 10 people: family members, friends, to her life, another wants to help children, yet another neighbors. We receive our first degree course certificates wants to add to her yoga practice. (many go on to take Reiki II and Reiki III) and leave Today we are learning the basics. “All things have empowered to help others focus on healing. energy,” Follensbee-Hall says. “Reiki tries to create it in My mother, who took all three classes, meditates evabundance, and get it to move freely.” ery morning and sends energy out into the universe (some There are no limits to Reiki. “If you can imagine and of it comes my way). She might even purchase a table so think it, you can send Reiki,” she says. “There are only she can provide Reiki sessions. My one class has taken two things you need to do during the process: trust and me in a different direction than I expected: my clients relax. Everyone has healing energy, but not everyone is are my dog and my cat. They seek me out, I send energy using it. This is part of why it becomes powerful — your their way, they send it back to me, and we all enjoy the intention will open a whole new path in your life, make moment of peace and happiness. Maybe, just maybe, I’ll your desire known to the universe.” start practicing on the Kearsarge Magazine team. KM KM KM It’s an exciting prospect. I’m worried because I’m not Laura Jean Whitcomb is the owner of Kearsarge good at meditation (Follensbee-Hall says I only need one Magazine LLC, a marketing solutions company that or two minutes to reset brain patterns), and I have some offers niche solutions: print (Kearsarge Magazine, Kid health issues of my own. But Follensbee-Hall explains Stuff, Art & Gallery Guide), events (Zing into Spring that energy will automatically flow no matter what is and FamilyFest), and online resources (Kearsarge going on with me. There’s an attunement process where Directory). she “makes adjustments in my chakras, opening the doors and linking me to the source of wisdom,” she says. I don’t know about any of that, but I do know that I feel terrific after my attunement, and that feeling stays with me for weeks. Creating a community where people find hope & discover possibility In the afternoon, the students Join our 640 volunteers, 4,156 donors and staff who are changing lives every day! watch the master give a Reiki treatment (the client falls asleep), then we practice on each other. It’s more difficult than I expected: chatting with a client to get a sense of how they are feeling, opening the session, remembering hand placements, keeping palms open so energy will The Haven serves 13,500 people per year, is always open, and its services are free. flow, and closing the session with The Haven relies overwhelmingly on community support to carry out its mission. an intention. Follensbee-Hall offers suggestions throughout: “You three homeless shelters — family, adult & seasonal: 81 beds total don’t have to heal every issue. You problem solving: Care coordination for housing, finances, education, health, just need to let the energy move transportation and other life issues for those not in our shelters. through and it will address the root food shelf: Provides households a week’s supply of healthy groceries once a cause” or “Use your intuition; hand month, and unlimited access to bread and produce. placements are just a suggestion.” I The Healthy Eating Program gives daily cooking demonstrations, samplings and think I’m doing well, until it’s time ingredients; and the Backpack Program ensures adequate nutritional food for families during the weekends. for the patient to flip over on to her stomach. The other students are still children’s education: Preschool, after school and summer camp components for children; and parenting support. adult education: Focuses on self-knowledge, focusing mid-torso; I’ve gone from life and employment skills, financial literacy and sustainability, health and nutrition. crown to heel too quickly on my Upper Valley Haven • 713 Hartford Avenue • White River Junction, VT 05001 client. (802) 295-6500 • Fax (802) 296-5055 • www.uppervalleyhaven.org

kearsargemagazine.com • Spring 2016 • Kearsarge Magazine

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Kearsarge Magazine • Spring 2016 • kearsargemagazine.com


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sleep strategies recommended by Dr. Aleksandra Stark, T GREE who sees patients a Dartmouth-Hitchcock neurologist EA N at New London Hospital and from the National SleepRAIN WEL T Foundation, to find the ones that work best for you.

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leep is vital for good health and well being. Most healthy adults need at least eight hours of sleep each night to function at their best; however, many of us don’t get enough sleep. A recent survey found that more people are sleeping less than six hours a night, and sleep difficulties visit 75 percent of us at least a few nights per week. Infrequent bouts of insomnia are generally not something to worry about, but chronic sleep deprivation, is as it can contribute to health issues such as weight gain, high blood pressure and heart disease. Your sleep schedule, bedtime habits and lifestyle choices can make an enormous difference to the quality of your sleep. Experiment with some of the following

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2. If you have trouble sleeping, avoid naps, especially in the afternoon.

Power napping may help you get through the day, but if you find that you can’t fall asleep at bedtime, eliminating even short catnaps may help.

3. Exercise daily.

Regular physical activity can promote better sleep, helping you fall asleep faster and enjoy a deeper sleep. Timing is important, though. If you exercise too close to bedtime, you might be too energized to fall asleep. If this seems to be an issue for you, exercise earlier in the day.

4. Avoid alcohol, cigarettes and heavy meals in the evening.

Alcohol, cigarettes and caffeine can disrupt sleep. Eating big or spicy meals can cause discomfort from indigestion that can make it hard to sleep. If you can, avoid eating large meals for two to three hours before bedtime. Try a light snack 45 minutes before bed if you’re still hungry.

5. Make your bedroom more sleep friendly.

Create a room that’s ideal for sleeping. It should be cool (between 60 and 67 degrees), dark and quiet. Consider using room darkening shades, eye shades, earplugs, white noise machines, humidifiers, fans and other devices to create an environment that suits your needs.

6. Sleep on a comfortable mattress and pillows.

Make sure your mattress is comfortable and supportive. The life expectancy for a quality mattress is about 9 or 10 years. Have comfortable pillows. Make the room attractive and inviting for sleep — but also free of allergens that might affect you and objects that might cause you to slip or fall if you get up during the night.

7. Use bright light to help manage your circadian rhythms.

Avoid bright light in the evening and expose yourself to sunlight in the morning. This will keep your circadian rhythms in check.

8. Wind down.

Do the same things each night to tell your body it’s time to wind down. This might include taking a warm bath or shower, reading a book, or listening to soothing music — preferably with the lights dimmed. Relaxing activities can promote better sleep by easing the transition between wakefulness and drowsiness.

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Kearsarge Magazine • Spring 2016 • kearsargemagazine.com

“It’s also helpful to dim the lights — and turn off that iPad and television — at least 30 minutes before bedtime. I recommend that the bedroom be used only for sleep and intimate activities. That means no reading, writing, eating or watching television in bed,” says Dr. Stark. Some research suggests that screen time or other media use before bedtime interferes with sleep. Nearly everyone has an occasional sleepless night — but if you often have trouble sleeping, contact your doctor. Identifying and treating any underlying causes can help you get the better sleep you deserve. KM KM KM Dr. Aleksandra Stark is a Dartmouth-Hitchcock neurologist who sees patients at New London Hospital. Dr. Stark earned her medical degree from New York Medical College in Valhalla, N.Y., and completed her internal medicine internship and neurology residency at the University of North Carolina Hospitals in Chapel Hill, N.C. She also completed two Fellowships in Neurology, one at the Center for Translational Cognitive Neuroscience in Boston and one at Boston University Alzheimer’s Disease Center. New London Hospital is a Critical Access Hospital serving the Kearsarge/Lake Sunapee region in central New Hampshire, providing primary care and specialized clinical services to the community in a patient and family centered environment. For more information, visit newlondonhospital.org


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Once the last of winter’s grip is released and the sun has sprouted the land green, take a look at your emerging lawn. You have been gifted with a powerful seasonal food: dandelion greens! by Michele Estes photography by Jim Block

I

grew up eating dandelion greens. Each early spring, my dad could be seen, at least a couple of times a week, with a white five-gallon bucket and his jackknife ready to forage for these green leafy bitters. I can’t say that I loved eating dandelion greens as a child, but I did not dislike them. It was merely a given that the whole family would eat them. In fact, they were present on our table one or two times per week until the short season was over. This abundant weed has a purpose to animals and to

humans. The bitters from the young tender greens yield a diuretic and alkalizing tonic effect after a long winter of eating heavy foods that leave the body more acidic. In the early spring, animals like deer, can be seen hoofing away through the last of the snow cover and the dirt to get to these most needed greens, as the deer are guided by intuition to bring alkalinity to their system after a long winter. Intuitively, we also know (or did at one time) that each season gives us what we need precisely when we need it.

Visit us: belletetes.com Belletetes is happy to provide our customers with free, noobligation installation estimates. Call Mike Welch, Installed Sales Manager, at 603.735.2137 to learn more. 2014 Marvin Windows and Doors. All rights reserved. Registered trademark of Marvin Windows and Doors.

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Kearsarge Magazine • Spring 2016 • kearsargemagazine.com

Andover, NH 603.735.5193 Sunapee, NH 603.763.9070

Pembroke, NH 603.224.7483 Moultonborough, NH 603.253.4404

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The French term I heard as a child for dandelion was pissenlit, or “piss the bed”, for its gentle diuretic effect. The French often drink fresh dandelion tea in the spring at dinner time for aided digestion using the bitter elements to encourage the production of proper levels of hydrochloric acid and digestive enzymes. Actually, the entire plant — from flower to leaf to root — is edible and holds a host of vitamin, minerals

RECIPE: Sautéed Dandelion Greens with Pancetta over Polenta 1 bunch (couple of generous handfuls) cleaned dandelion greens 1½ inch round of good quality pancetta cut by a butcher or deli 1 to 2 cloves of garlic, minced Unrefined extra virgin olive oil for the pan and to drizzle after Dry white wine A pinch of red pepper flakes, crushed with fingers Whole nutmeg, grated Quality salt (try pink Himalayan salt!) to taste Freshly ground pepper to taste Organic polenta log (or any polenta you prefer) Dice pancetta and sauté in heavy bottomed skillet with small amount of olive oil. Once beginning to crisp, remove from pan and set aside. Add cleaned dandelion greens to the seasoned pan with another drizzle of olive oil and toss about the warm pan. Once beginning to wilt, add a good splash of the white wine, minced garlic, crushed red pepper flakes, pinch of ground or a few pass overs on the micro plane of the nutmeg, salt and pepper to taste. Continue to add wine and olive oil as needed. Meanwhile, cut the polenta into ½-inch rounds and fry in a heavy bottomed pan with a good drizzle of olive oil. Add salt, pepper and nutmeg to the polenta; cook each side until beginning to brown. Plate the polenta, add the sautéed dandelion greens on top, and drizzle with olive oil. Sprinkle the crispy pancetta.

and medicinal properties. According to Identifying and Harvesting Edible and Medicinal Plants in Wild (and Not So Wild) Places, “the leaves are more nutritious than anything you can buy. They’re higher in beta-carotene than carrots. The iron and calcium content is phenomenal, greater than spinach. You also Michele Estes get vitamins B-1, B-2, B-5, B-6, B-12, C, E, P, and D, biotin, inositol, potassium, phosphorus, magnesium, and zinc by using a tasty, free vegetable that grows on virtually every lawn. The root contains the sugar insulin, plus many medicinal substances.” I can remember only one way my dad prepared the greens: boiled with salt pork, drained, and seasoned with butter, salt, pepper and vinegar. Here is my grown-up version of my dad’s dandelion greens. KM KM KM Michele Estes is an integrative nutrition wellness educator and coach. She received her training from the Institute for Integrative Nutrition and Columbia University, and is an accredited member of the American Association of Drugless Practitioners. Michele’s clients take incremental action steps toward vibrant health in body, and bring mindfulness to all aspects of daily living. In addition to one-on-one health coaching, Michele offers various workshops, teaches cooking, and provides delivered healthy meals. Learn more at integrativehealthclub.com

kearsargemagazine.com • Spring 2016 • Kearsarge Magazine

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Kearsarge Marketplace What you need. How to do it. Benefits

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Dexter’s Inn, Trails & Restaurant is a country

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resort. Dexter’s ability to provide lodging, dining, and attractive indoor & outdoor gathering spaces in one convenient idyllic location makes it a popular spot for weddings, reunions, meetings, and retreats.

breakfast with the services and on-site activities of a small resort. Dexter’s ability to provide lodging, dining, and 258 Stagecoach Road, Sunapee, NH 03782 www.dextersnh.com indoor & outdoor gathering spaces in one 800-232-5571 attractive www.dextersnh.com idyllic makes it a popular spot 258 Stagecoachconvenient Road | Sunapee | NHlocation 03782 | 800-232-5571 for weddings, reunions, meetings, and retreats.

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We know you’re taking some great photos out there. Kid Stuff magazine is looking for children who live in our readership area (the Upper Valley region of NH and VT) to be on our 2016 covers! If you have a great vertical, high resolution (no phone photos, please) photo of your kid, send it in! They could be a local superstar!

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Kearsarge Magazine • Summer 2014 • kearsargemagazine.com


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Kearsarge Marketplace Traditional New England Food & Spirit’s In Quaint Henniker! SINCE 1984

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Dining overlooking the Sugar River

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Sawyer Theater at Colby-Sawyer College 5:30pm cocktails and silent auction 7:00pm The Dancing Begins $25 in advance/$20 for CFA Members and $30 at the door. Tickets can be purchased at Morgan Hill Bookstore, Tatewell Gallery or online at

www.CenterForTheArtsNH.org

4 38

9/25/15 8:23 AM

ars!

Up A Tree_Kearsarge Anniversary Book_quarter page_outlined.indd 1

Kearsarge Magazine Magazine •• Spring Summer 2014• kearsargemagazine.com • kearsargemagazine.com Kearsarge 2016

Hand-tossed brick oven NY pizzas, hearty homemade pastas, artisan sandwiches, fresh salads, and local homemade desserts. Hand selected wines and 14 local microbrews on tap.

Ramunto’s Brick Oven Pizza, 71 Broad Street, Claremont (603) 542-9100 | ramuntos.com * Every Wednesday evening is “Charity Night.”

$1 from your dessert (with the purchase of an entré) will go to our charity of the month.


2015

Photo by Faye Burgin

WINNER!

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4 th

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Photo Contest!

Are you ready for local fame (publication in fall Kearsarge Magazine) and fortune (well, some really cool gift certificates)? Enter your favorite photos into one of four categories (people, places, things and animals). Readers will pick their favorite, and a panel of judges will pick a grand prize winner.

The contest is completely free; go online for rules: www.kearsargemagazine.com Contest begins March 1, 2016 at 12 p.m. and ends May 1, 2016 at 9 a.m.

kearsargemagazine.com • Spring 2016 • Kearsarge Magazine

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Boats in the water by the Burkehaven Lighthouse on Lake Sunapee 40

Kearsarge Magazine • Spring 2016 • kearsargemagazine.com


The Glories of Spring photography by Jim Block

Spring is nature’s way of saying, “Let’s party!” A Red Fox on Burkehaven Hill in Sunapee

– Robin Williams

American Bullfrog in Sunapee kearsargemagazine.com • Spring 2016 • Kearsarge Magazine

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Dogtooth Violet 42

Kearsarge Magazine • Spring 2016 • kearsargemagazine.com


Spring, when the earth tilts closer to the sun, runs a strict timetable of flowers. – Alice Oswald Blue-eyed grass

Red Trillium

Bunchberry

Pink Lady’s Slipper kearsargemagazine.com • Spring 2016 • Kearsarge Magazine

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Jack McCrillis, 5, on Burkehaven Road in Sunapee

A quiet morning at Goose Hole Pond in New London 44

Kearsarge Magazine • Spring 2016 • kearsargemagazine.com


Looking at a tiny snake on the Lincoln Trail in Sutton

In the spring, at the end of the day, you should smell like dirt. — Margaret Atwood

Painted lady butterfly at Spring Ledge Farm in New London

Owen Anderson looking for minnows in Bradford

kearsargemagazine.com • Spring 2016 • Kearsarge Magazine

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Sunset over Lake Sunapee

Burkehaven Harbor at dawn 46

Kearsarge Magazine • Spring 2016 • kearsargemagazine.com


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people, places and things

Grantham history

Homegrown Medicine

In the 1800s, a New Hampshire farmer turned his garden into a pharmacy. by Laura Jean Whitcomb

DR. HARDY’S Y, CATHARTIC ELECTUAR

Or Tonic Bitters. ion — the remedy for A purely vegetable preparat on derangement of that all complaints depending Among which may be important organ the Liver. lious Colic, Wind Colic, enumerated, Jaundice, Bi Headache, Costiveness, Nephritic Colic, Dyspepsy, ss of Appetite, Worms, Dizziness with Lo ss at Stomach and accompanied with Faintne a safe and efficient physic, Weakness of Knees. It is mmon case where an and may be given in any co is called for. Dose for an excavation of the bowels lasses or spirit, or any adult, a teaspoonful in mo ren in proportion to convenient article — child ses, may be used for age. A portion, say 3 or 4 do if not satisfactory. proof — the rest returned Price 25 Cents.

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ould you take medicine with this description? Probably not, but many folks did in the 1800s. It was an era when doctors and hospitals were few and far between, and people relied on home remedies made of herbs and plants that grew nearby or on their farms. Samuel Hardy, born in Grantham, N.H., in 1804, was a product of his time: a farmer who turned a home remedy into a longlived, family-owned medicine company.

The founder Samuel grew up in Grantham. He went to public school in town and learned the trade of chair maker from his father. Samuel moved to Cayuga County, New York, at age 21. He returned briefly to New Hampshire to marry Croydon resident Sally Follansbee Carroll. They had five children — Follansbee C., Mary Ann G., Edmund, Mehitable and Tristram. › › › › › kearsargemagazine.com • Spring 2016 • Kearsarge Magazine

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It is said that Samuel learned to make medicines from a Cayuga Indian. The Cayuga was of the five original constituents of the Haudenosaunee (Iroquois), a confederacy of American Indians in New York. The Cayuga tribe were farmers

Also

Local!

on the shores of Lake Ontario. After 10 years in New York, Samuel returned to New Hampshire, to the small rural town of Cornish Flat, to farm. In 1836, with $2.40 to his name, Samuel started producing Hardy’s Salve, a “drawing salve” that

softens the skin around a splinter, and draws the splinter out. Hardy’s Salve is described as a stick, somewhat “like an enlarged Tootsie roll.” The amber-colored salve would be melted with a match. It dripped into a spoon, and was applied directly to

Pure Bliss Balm

Entrepreneurism is alive and well in New Hampshire. Crystal Mondor, a small-scale organic farmer growing mostly medicinal herbs in Sunapee, N.H., is taking her talents in the garden to a new level by creating a skin healing moisturizer she’s named Pure Bliss Balm. “Several years ago, when I began to transition to an all natural organic diet, I found that the cleaner I ate the less tolerant my skin was of the harsh chemicals found in most beauty products,” Mondor recalls. That was when she decided to start making her own. “Having always had sensitive skin, my main concern was seeking out pure,

high quality ingredients. And as a farmer, my skin demands extra moisture.” After a year of experimentation, Mondor settled on a recipe “that was just.... bliss.... from this, my Pure Bliss Balm was born.” The balm, packaged in a fourounce glass jelly jar, has a light peppermint lavender scent. It sinks right into the skin with no greasy residue — you can garden or type or shake hands with no worries. “What’s nice about my balm, besides the heavenly scent, is the lasting moisture. The water repelling action and new-skin feeling of the organic beeswax is especially nice for those of us who work the land, acting as a protective layer against the elements and as a healing treat at the end of a long day,” Mondor says. “From the delicate skin around our eyes to the rough bottoms of our feet — and everything in between — this versatile moisturizer is gentle enough for even the most sensitive skin.” Mondor, 34, works full time at Spring Ledge Farm: you may have seen her managing the cut your own flower field in the summer months. She makes her balms — one cooling and calming and the other warming and invigorating — in microbatches using all organic ingredients. They are sold exclusively at Spring Ledge in New London, N.H. — Laura Jean Whitcomb

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Salves and bitters Samuel’s products were popular. He advertised in newspapers, he distributed circulars, and he sent out “a great many gorgeous carts drawn by fine handsome horses, which were the envy of small boys,” according to Biographical Review, Containing Life Sketches of Leading Citizens of Sullivan and Merrimack Counties, published in 1897. Son Follansbee (1769-1850) worked as a traveling salesman for Hardy medicines out of Worcester, Mass. He is reported to have operated a spectacular all-glass (except for the wheels) traveling medicine cart, said to be “one of the most famous medicine carts ever put on the road.” Over the years, Samuel’s company produced quite a few different medicines, including Dr. Hardy’s Magnetic Pain Destroyer, Dr. Hardy’s External Anodyne, Dr. Hardy’s Salve, Dr. Hardy’s Indian Vegetable Worm Powder, Dr. Hardy’s Porous Plasters, Dr. Hardy’s Capsicum Plasters, Dr. Hardy’s Cathartic Electuary, Dr. Hardy’s Root and Herb Tonic Bitters, and Dr. Hardy’s Woman’s Friend (“Nature’s Grand Assistant for Weakly Females”). The best known product was Hardy’s Salve. During the Civil War, some soldier boys of New Hampshire found a quantity of Hardy’s Salve in Winchester, Va.; and they wrote home to their friends that they were “going to have him prosecuted for abetting the Confederates in giving or supplying them with medicine which was able to heal or to save the lives of enemies.” An old sea captain once told Samuel that rolls of the salve could be found in every port of South America. Dick Sheaff of Bethel, Vt., remembers the salve. “When I lived in Cornish Flat in the early 1970s, it was still a small town of about 800. I bought Hardy’s Salve directly from

the farmhouse of a man who still made the product on an occasional basis. I used the product: it worked.”

A family business Sally, Samuel’s first wife, died in 1838. Samuel married Prudentia Coburn; they had four children, all born in Cornish: Philemon C., Sally, Hannah S., and Charles T. Samuel’s third wife was Phebe A. Pratt, who had one child, William Wallace. An invalid for the last seven years of his life, Samuel died in 1879 at age 75. The stern, bearded face on the packaging is his likeness. In 1869, 10 years before his death, the business was taken over by two of Samuel’s sons, Philemon (1840-d.) and Charles (1846-1885). They worked together until Charles’ death. Philemon, known as PC, was educated in the schools of Cornish and in Kimball Union Academy. He worked on his father’s farm until he was 21, then he travelled in the interests of Hardy Remedies. Philemon’s date and location of death is unknown, but Sheaff’s research found that he eventually sold the business, later named “Phil. C. Hardy & Co.”, to Dr. George W. Hunt (1829-1907) of Cornish. By that time, about the only product being marketed was the salve, “the kind your father used” as the tagline. Hunt’s wife, Kate Thrasher Hunt, operated the business until it was taken over by their two sons, Harry and Kenneth. The salve was produced and sold from 1836 to the 1990s. The company changed hands several times. In 1933, new molds for the salve were made in the pattern shop of the Sullivan Machine Company of Claremont. In the 1950s, the Hunt family sold the business to Milton Sklar of Claremont, who contracted with Kenneth Hunt to continue manufacturing of the salve. In 1965, the business was sold to retired Cornish road agent Robert LaClair who ran

the company as “The Hardy Salve Company, Inc.” A box, in Sheaff’s possession, has a sticker on the side celebrating “150 years in the marketplace, 1836-1986.” Sheaff learned that the business was purchased by Claremont florist Robert E. Weaver and his wife, who ran it for a couple years as the Hardy Salve Company, Inc. “When I corresponded with Weaver in 1991, he told me that they had at first had a difficult time finding suppliers for the ingredients needed to manufacture the salve,” he recalls. The product is not being made today, but, for more than a century, “few households were ever without their trusty stick of Hardy’s Genuine Salve.” KM KM KM Special thanks to Richard Sheaff and his research on his site: sheaff-ephemera.com

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Hopkinton

people, places and things

Locally Made

Reclaim the outdoors with YAYA Organics You don’t need chemicals, parabens or sulfates to scare ticks. Organic ingredients will do just fine.

I

t’s always tick season if you live in New Hampshire. But a Hopkintonbased mother/daughter company has found a way to help people, kids, dogs and horses enjoy the great outdoors with YAYA Organics Tick Repellent. Kearsarge Magazine interviews Rebecca O’Connor — coowner of the organic, family operated business — to find out how this product provides an alternative to risky chemicals like DEET.

Q. How long did it take you to

develop the product, and how did you know when you got “the” formula?

A. YAYA Organics began when my

mother and I noticed an increasing health concern in our own backyards: ticks. We couldn’t believe how many people we knew were coming down

Valeria, Alex and Rebecca O’Connor at a trade show.

with Lyme disease in our home state of New Hampshire. After attending a “Tick Talk” by Dr. Alan Eaton at the Hopkinton Town Library in the spring of 2014, we knew it was a threat we could not ignore. Dr. Eaton’s research indicated that Lymeinfested deer ticks have been dramatically rising in numbers throughout New England. We also learned about a chemical, Permethrin, that is recommended for repelling ticks. Curious to know more, we did some research and found that Permethrin is a neurotoxin and cannot be put directly on your skin. We live a very healthy lifestyle

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and were horrified to spray any risky chemicals — especially on my baby boy, who was just learning how to walk and wanted to explore the yard — so we knew we had to find a way to repel ticks naturally. After extensively researching books, articles, websites and studies, we compiled a list of essential oils that repel ticks. We sourced the best organic and natural essential oils, including rosemary, cedar and peppermint. With an abundance of deer ticks in our own backyard, it was easy to put WEB our formula yayaorganics.com to the test.


Before long, we discovered we had a winner formula — it worked every time! This product was so liberating, we knew we had to share it. YAYA Organics was born.

Q. What year did you introduce the product?

A. We launched locally in the fall of 2014. Our local vendors were supportive and could really see the need for a natural tick repellent. The following spring we expanded to more than 100 stores in New England, as well as launched an online presence on Amazon.com. It turns out the “tick problem” isn’t just in our own backyard; there’s people buying our tick spray from all corners of the United States. Q. What has been the reaction

Q. What would you like readers to know about your company?

A. YAYA Organics is committed to

providing all-natural products that are simple, effective, and really meet a need. We like to think of ourselves as a down-to-earth type of company. We are real people that identify real-life challenges and are willing to do something about it, naturally. Our goal is that when you see or hear “YAYA Organics” you think, “This is a brand I can trust.” YAYA Organics Tick Repellent is available at Z Pharmacy in Newport, Yankee Farmers Market and Warner Pharmacy in Warner, and Rusty’s General Store for Pets in Contoocook. KM KM KM

from customers?

A. The response has been overwhelmingly positive! We hear feedback from such a wide range of people, including dog walkers, gardeners, runners, grandmothers, hikers, hunters, the list goes on. The common link is that they feel safe going outdoors again and love the fresh scent. It is very rewarding to see our product make a positive impact on people’s lives.

Q. What do you like about the product?

A. It gives people peace of mind. Our motto is “Reclaim the Great Outdoors” because it really gives people a sense of freedom to enjoy going outside again. I also love that it smells amazing! We laugh sometimes because people will say “You smell so good!” and ask what we’re wearing for cologne or perfume. Q. Will YAYA Organics come out

with other products?

A. Yes! We are currently developing an all-natural deodorant as well as an organic mosquito repellent.

kearsargemagazine.com • Spring 2016 • Kearsarge Magazine

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Claremont

people, places and things

Outdoor

Moody Park

One hundred years ago, William Moody donated his land to the people of Claremont for a “ free public park and recreation playground.” He would be pleased to see the jewel it is today. text and photography by Patrick O’Grady

W

ith sunlight streaming through the towering pines at Moody Park on a warm afternoon, several cars pull into the park entrance off Maple Avenue. Leashed dogs bound out of vehicles; mountain bikers inflate tires, strap on helmets and pedal off on a trail; and a young woman readies for

a run. Others opt for a stroll with eager children on the park road. Soon they have all found their preferred route to savor the solitude, challenge and beauty of Moody.

A recreation playground It was a scene William Moody could never have envisioned when he donated a portion of his 600-acre

Moody Park visitors walk up the access road in Moody Park on a summer afternoon. 56

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property, Highview Farm, to the people of Claremont for a “free public park and recreation playground” 100 years ago. But it was one he would have taken special pleasure in observing. For Moody’s gift in 1916 has indeed become Claremont’s playground jewel: a mostly wooded landscape with deep ravines and an


Rob Walker races down stump jumper (a single track trail) in Moody Park during a group ride in September 2015.

a partner in shoe manufacturing concerns in Boston and southern New Hampshire before failing health brought him home in the 1880s where he devoted his time to buying property and establishing Highview Farm. His donation for a park was accepted by voters at town meeting in March 1916. Two years later, a town committee hired landscape architect Arthur Shurtleff to develop a general plan for the park. In his 1995 book, The Landscape of Community: a history of communal forests in New England, author Robert McCullough noted that although some of Shurtleff’s plan, which included a network of roads and additional courtesy of Claremont Parks & Recreation

access road that climbs to a field with a pavilion and picnic tables shaded by several trees. Moody Park abuts city-owned parcels to the west and combined there are about 250 acres for bicyclists, hikers, runners, cross country skiers and snowshoers to explore on seven miles of trails. “The trails they put in last summer made it really nice,” says Elaine Loranz. “It is just a nice place to walk the dog. It is never really gets crowded so you can feel you have little touch of nature.” William Henry Harrison Moody (18421925) was born in Claremont and learned the shoe industry trade as a teenager. He became a salesman and later William Moody

park entrances, never happened, “Claremont’s park was generally developed according to plan and has remained a densely wooded reserve with picnic areas and footpaths.” Jim Feleen of Claremont, a runner and park user since the 1980s, says the city is fortunate to have a park with so much variety. “There is a great trail system for biking, and running and hiking,” says Feleen. “It is just fabulous.”

And the view After the morning sun slowly burns off the clouds shrouding Mount Ascutney to the west, the broad shoulders and summit of the 3,100-foot mountain are revealed. It was a view that may have inspired Moody as well when he donated what was mostly agricultural land with a young forest around the ravines. Years of growth had blocked › › › › ›

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courtesy of Claremont Parks & Recreation

the vista until the implementation of a forest management plan in 2014. “That was really important to people — bringing that view back,” says Scott Hausler, the city’s former parks and recreation director. The 2008 comprehensive forest management plan recommended tree harvesting to improve the long term health of the forest and proposed extending the trail network to increase recreational opportunities. “It was a prime piece of land underutilized for its capacity,” Hausler says. “With the management plan, we tried to enhance its use so everyone has an opportunity to use it for recreational purposes.” In the winter of 2013-2014, selective cutting was done on the eastern side of the access road up to the pavilion and on the western slope, reopening the view of Mount Ascutney. Damaged trees in the picnic area near the entrance were also removed. The initial public reaction to the changed landscape and loss of some trails was less than favorable. “The forest management plan, when it got implemented, was

A trail map of Moody Park, located off Maple Avenue, shows several multipurpose trails for hiking, running, cross country skiing and mountain biking along with picnic areas, playground and tennis courts.

shocking,” Feleen says. “You came in here that first season and it looked like a bomb had gone off.” But new growth changed the view yet again. “Nature has a way of doing what we are seeing here and you can hardly

tell there was a logging effort now.”

Improvements

Last summer, Sinuosity of Morrisville, Vt., with volunteer help, constructed bridges over wet areas, cut a twisting mountain bike trail down the western slope, rerouted and cleaned up other trails and improved drainage. On Gravity Cavity, a short steep section that is a favorite among mountain bikers, Sinuosity installed concrete pavers to prevent erosion and built a new bridge at the bottom. A new ADA accessible multiuse trail winds its way through the tall pines at the entrance. When funding becomes available, additional trails, including one for skiing, are planned. “Connectivity” is how Parks and Recreation Director Mark Brislin describes the goal of the new A rider is just a blur as he shoots down Gravity Cavity in Moody Park. Concrete pavers to prevent erosion were installed on the popular descent and a new bridge was constructed at the bottom. 58

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trails. “Walkers and bikers can now traverse from one side of the park to the other by using the trail network. Since the trails were finished, I have heard nothing but positive comments.” Jeff Choate compliments the park’s new look. “It is one of the more dog friendly areas. I hit all the trails,” says Choate, coaxing his two dogs back into the car. “The improvements they did with the walkways make it a lot more user friendly.” The critics of the logging have quieted and everyone seems elated with the park’s transformation. “I was in here a couple of weeks ago and a couple stopped me from Plymouth,” says Feleen. “They got their bikes out. When I saw them a half hour later and they were very enthused. They just loved the ride.” Rob Walker, manager of the nearby Claremont Cycle Depot bike shop, has been a regular at Moody for years, not only as a rider but as part of a group that helped maintain trails as volunteers. “Our first group ride we had about 30 riders and, for some, it was their first time back after the logging,” says Walker, before a morning ride in early September. “They said, ‘Wow, this is in really good shape.’ ” Walker says the new bridges over the wet areas will make a big difference for everyone. “From what was here, it is a dream,” he says. The new stump jumper trail, which winds its way down to the old ballfield, is fast becoming a favorite. “I think everybody wants to ride it now,” says Walker. “Anybody can go down it. There are no roots or rocks and, as you increase your confidence, you can try different things.” On a wide, flat trail, Walker offers a different assessment: “You can ride it smoking fast or you can come out here with your family.” The trail work shows what the

Sandra Soucy leads a few runners across one of the trail bridges in Moody Park.

park can become but for now, Walker hopes more will visit to experience the improvements. “I tell people at the shop what they are going to get out of Moody Park and I say every day it is getting better. It gives me and the people of Claremont an outlet that is so very close, and an experience they can’t get without leaving

Claremont,” he says. “If they come out, they will remember it.” KM KM KM Patrick O’Grady is an editor and reporter with the Valley News and previously served as editor and managing editor of the Eagle Times in Claremont, N.H.

kearsargemagazine.com • Spring 2016 • Kearsarge Magazine

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New London Hospital entrance

Hospital Round Up From rural towns to city centers, patients are receiving the best possible health care in New Hampshire. Among the many advantages of living in New Hampshire is access to excellent health care. The Granite State enjoys state-of-theart medical facilities, top-notch physicians, dedicated staffs and cutting-edge technology. Even in rural communities, many of the smaller institutions are affiliated with larger hospitals or networks, further enhancing their ability to give their patients the best possible care.

In Kearsarge Magazine’s spring issue, we focus on some hospitals in the Kearsarge region to give readers a quick and easy guide as to what is available at each facility. Our starting point is that all the facilities featured provide outstanding care; we are looking beyond that to gain an inside perspective on what makes each hospital unique. › › › › ›

Alice Peck Day Senior Care Social Worker Erica Direnzo with one of her patients kearsargemagazine.com • Spring 2016 • Kearsarge Magazine

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Community Focused

Alice Peck Day Memorial Hospital, Lebanon alicepeckday.org

For 30 years after its founding in 1932, APD operated as a small “cottage hospital” in the house that used to belong to its founder. In 1964 the organization undertook a fundraising capital campaign and transitioned into a then-modern health care facility. The not-for-profit institution has continued to expand and modernize, and today APD’s staff of 500 sees more than 90,000 patients each year. While the organization has grown, its philosophy towards patient care remains consistent. “People come to APD because they get highly personalized, unrushed care,” says APD President and CEO Sue Mooney. “Our patients have relationships with providers that last decades if not generations, and people really value that today. As everything gets less and less personalized, this is a place where people know who you are when you walk in the door. And if you are a new patient, our providers take the time to get to know you.” As an example, Mooney relates a story about a patient who was visited by an offthe-clock APD food service employee for more than an hour. “There’s a warmth here APD Adult and Geriatric Nurse Practitioner Christina Tangredi meets with one of that people appreciate,” says Mooney. her patients. In 1996, APD expanded into the world of senior living when its then parent organization, APD Health and Therapies (which enables employers to reduce Health Systems opened Harvest Hill, a 72-bed assisted health care costs while improving care); a Specialty living facility. In 2010 APD Health Systems built the Surgery program in Orthopaedics and Neurosurgery Woodlands, a 66-unit independent living facility. Both that minimizes inpatient hospitalization and maximizes facilities are on the APD campus. successful outcomes; and a Senior Care program that helps In 2014, Mooney began implementing a strategic plan more seniors in the Upper Valley age with dignity in their intended to guide the organization for the coming years. homes, and without expensive institutional care. The cornerstone of that plan involves construction of a At the same time it is building the MSC, APD will two-story, 44,000 square-foot building known as the APD be completing renovations to its hospital building with Multi-Specialty Clinic (MSC). This building (due to open improvements in the lobby, same-day surgery, patient in 2017) is designed to serve as a “one-stop” destination registration, radiology and other departments. for many of the outpatient services that patients need from “We’ve got a very exciting future between our new their healthcare providers. medical building and our programs. We’ve been in the APD’s strategic plan also calls for three existing community now for 83 years and look forward to being service lines to be further developed, including Business here for many more decades,” says Mooney. 62

Kearsarge Magazine • Spring 2016 • kearsargemagazine.com


©Concord Hospital Public Affairs

Patient Centered Concord Hospital, Concord concordhospital.org

with a nurse navigator to develop the best course of treatment for that patient. They will work with them as long as necessary to find the best option,” explains Puleo. Welcome to the Payson Center for Cancer Care Nurse navigator (NN) is a relatively new role in serve,” says Puleo. “Part of that is health care. Usually an RN, the NN making sure that people who are low generally gets involved in complex income can access needed services.” cases both in primary and specialty Concord Hospital also provides care, like cancer, to work one-on-one emergency services to roughly 60,000 with the patient to identify and suppatients annually. In addition to the port the patient’s goals. emergency department, the Urgent In 2014, the hospital invested Care Center at Horseshoe Pond pro$52 million in programs and services vides walk-in care for minor illnesses to address community and individual or injury. health needs. Much of the money “Many people feel that if they supported charitable care for people can just get to a hospital their needs who don’t have insurance and the will be met,” explains Puleo. “As a means to pay for care. health system, we strive to address “Everything ties back to our needs in an effort to keep people out mission of meeting the needs of the of the hospital.” › › › › › individuals in the communities we

©Rixon Photography

Founded in 1956, today Concord Hospital is a nationally accredited, not-for-profit regional health system providing acute care services and programs. The 114-acre campus houses the main hospital, with additional off-campus locations in the greater capital region. Concord Hospital offers more than 40 medical specialties and subspecialties, including Centers of Excellence in orthopaedics, cancer, cardiac, urology and women’s health. The hospital staffs on average 230 beds and, in 2014, the hospital had 17,898 total admissions. There are 2,700 full-time employees, which includes more than 255 primary and specialty medical providers with Concord Hospital Medical Group (CHMG), trained in 18 subspecialties and practicing in 28 locations throughout central New Hampshire. “Whether at Concord Hospital or in a primary care and specialty practice, our patients are at the center of focused and coordinated efforts to improve their experience, and improve their overall health,” says Pamela Puleo, vice president of Community Affairs. “In the hospital, patients and their families are part of the process. Using team-based rounding, the patient’s entire care team, physician, nurse, social worker and others come to the patient’s room to discuss the patient’s progress and engage them in setting goals for their health,” explains Puleo. “This happens not only in the hospital setting, but also in the outpatient setting.” “At the Payson Center for Cancer Care, medical providers, including radiation oncologists and medical oncologists, work together

Aerial of the Concord Hospital campus kearsargemagazine.com • Spring 2016 • Kearsarge Magazine

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Community Wellness New London Hospital, New London newlondonhospital.org

As a critical access hospital serving 15 rural communities, New London Hospital focuses on primary care and certain secondary care services at both its main campus in New London and at its Newport Health Center. The New London facility also operates 25 in-patient beds, which is the legal limit for critical access hospitals. Reaching out to the community, particularly the lowincome community, is at the core of the hospital’s mission, says President and CEO Bruce King. “Two things that make us unique are: we have a 58-bed embedded nursing home within the hospital, and we run an ambulance service for seven out of 15 towns we consider to be in our service area,” explains King. “But we want to do more.” In addition to primary care for all ages and surgical, emergency and inpatient services, other services available at New London Hospital include cardiopulmonary care, Coumadin services, dermatology, diagnostic imaging and radiology, mental health services, neurology, nutrition counseling, oncology/hematology and infusion services, laboratory services, orthopaedics, otolaryngology, pain management, podiatry, rehabilitation, rheumatology, urology and women’s health. Since 1991, New London Hospital has run the Newport Health Center, a Rural Health Clinic for a medically underserved area (according to federal and state guidelines). It is open six days a week, and has a staff of about 40, including eight providers. The center currently operates in a former food store, but in October broke

A patient room at New London Hospital 64

Kearsarge Magazine • Spring 2016 • kearsargemagazine.com

ground on a new 28,000 squarefoot modern facility, due to open in late 2016. “The vast majority of what we do is out-patient. The concept of emphasizing ‘heads in beds’ is one health care is moving away from,” says King. “Our focus is ancillary care, and the Newport Health Center provides lab, radiology and rehab services. With the new building we’ll have more specialty services, and that will include some Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center (DHMC) providers coming to Newport. We believe patients should be seen in their own community whenever possible.” In addition to its affiliation with DHMC, New London Hospital is part of the Northeast Alliance for Heath, which encompasses 17 organizations throughout New Hampshire and Vermont. Member hospital CEOs meet once a month, and work on improving quality and reducing patient costs. Three years ago the hospital used an anonymous donation to start The Wellness Connection, an initiative to enhance wellness in the communities New London Hospital serves. “We’re working with local employers, towns and other organizations, creating programs for healthy eating, active living and on-site services,” explains King. “The notion is to change incentives; instead of providers getting paid from visits and services, the goal is that they’re paid to keep people away from the institution and minimize emergency department visits.” “Patients are embracing these changes, and we’re working to make The Wellness Connection sustainable after the five years for which we have funding. That’s one part of our overall commitment to quality that pervades our organization and back out into our community,” says King.


Service Oriented Valley Regional Hospital, Claremont vrh.org

Established in 1893, today Valley Regional Hospital is a modern, nonprofit healthcare organization. An extensive renovation and expansion effort, completed in 2010, resulted in a facility with 22 private patient rooms, hotel-style on-demand meal service, free Wi-fi for patients and visitors, 24/7 emergency services, primary care for all ages and a variety of the most-needed specialty services. Valley Regional’s patients can access their own electronic health record through an online portal, where they can view their records, request appointments and prescription refills and stay in touch with their care team. In 2015, Valley Regional was named one of the most wired rural hospitals in a national survey by Hospitals & Health Networks. At primary care clinics in Claremont and Newport, Valley Regional Healthcare offers care for all ages. In Claremont, several specialty care services are readily available. Valley Regional’s Rehabilitation Department offers extensive inpatient and outpatient physical and occupational therapy services, including one of the region’s only certified

Valley Regional’s main entrance lobby is bright, spacious and welcoming.

hand therapist, who sees patients in Newport and Claremont. In September 2015, Valley Regional opened an urgent care center as a faster and less costly alternative, when a minor illness or injury doesn’t merit a visit to the ER. Urgent Care at Valley Regional is open seven days a week, and visits generally take 20 minutes or less. “Urgent Care is here if you can’t get to your primary physician or don’t have one,” says Rolf Olsen, former director of Community Engagement. “The advantage of urgent care is that it’s first comefirst served, unlike the ER where the severity of the patient’s condition dictates when they are seen; and this can mean you’ll have a long wait if you come in for a sprained ankle, for instance.” “In emergency care, our role is to evaluate and stabilize,” says Olsen. “Our Board Certified emergency physicians determine

if a patient should be treated and released, admitted here, or stabilized and discharged to another hospital if the injury or illness is beyond the scope of what we can do.” The Claremont facility has a helipad to rapidly transport the most critically ill or injured patients to hospitals that offer appropriate specialty care. Like most hospitals in the area, Valley Regional has an excellent working relationship with Dartmouth-Hitchcock, though it is not officially affiliated. “Everything’s changing,” explains Olsen. “We have an evolving relationship with DHMC, and many of their specialists are shared between their facility and Valley Regional. Many surgeries can be performed here in our state-of-theart operating rooms. Complex cases might be brought up to DHMC for additional support.” “The truth of the matter is that we all collaborate. In today’s healthcare environment, small, rural hospitals simply cannot compete with each other for patients. We all have our strengths and our people know when it’s best to send a patient to another nearby place. We are all about providing the right care in the right place at the right time, every time.” KM KM KM

Renovated and expanded in 2010, Valley Regional Hospital makes a modest but beautiful architectural statement. kearsargemagazine.com • Spring 2016 • Kearsarge Magazine

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Kearsarge Magazine PO Box 1482 | Grantham | NH 03753


Join Us! .

• Free hourly activities include: a yoga session, a belly dancing class, make your own sugar scrub class, a mixed media art class, a selfdefense class and bollywood for beginners

• Visit and learn from dozens of vendors, local business owners, nonprofit organizations, artists and craftsmen. Make a PEEP-le with the Library Arts Center!

• Sign up for a free chair massage, skin analysis, bone density testing, hand massage, and more. Enjoy special discounted 30-min foot detox sessions!

• Stay for lunch: KJ’s Cafe, Yia Yia’s Creations Greek cuisine, King of Cupcakes, Sweet Beet Market, Bubba’s Bar & Grille, ZuZu’s Sandwich & Gift Shop and more • Music all day with Folk Fusion!

kearsargemagazine.com/Zing into Spring • Spring 2016 • Kearsarge Magazine

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Schedule of Events

All classes, demos and hands-on activities are free, but you may need to sign up to reserve your space. 9:15 a.m. Yoga for Every Body

Brianna Renner, Namaste Newport

namastenewport.org 10:45 a.m. Belly Dance Foundations

• Make a PEEP-le at the Library Arts Center booth! • Get a hand massage at the Sunapee Lake Massage booth! • Add your creativity to a community art mosaic at Carrie Fradkin’s booth! • Sample Blackwater Mustard, Porter’s Finest and Infuse Me products! • Have your skin analyzed at the Walk In Beauty Day Spa booth!

68

Learn moves to protect yourself in any situation

Sensei Gayle Fleming, Tiger Mountain Karate

Raq-on.net

2:30 p.m. Bollywood for Beginners

11:30 p.m. Guided meditation

cabaretdancefitness.com

Abi, Raq-on-Dance

Save time in your Zing day to:

1:45 p.m. Women’s Self Defense

Kelli Bogan, Cabaret Dance & Fitness

Liz Monson, Wonderwell Mountain Refuge

wonderwellrefuge.org 12:15 p.m. Make Your Sugar Scrub!

Heather Albrecht, Honestly Simple Soaps

honestlysimplesoaps.com

Special thanks to our MC:

Marie Allen, Fun with Marie And huge thanks to vocal group Folk Fusion: Susan Church Cancio-Bello, Nicole Densmore and Laurie Reeder!

1 p.m. Mixed Media Art Class Artist Carrie Fradkin

carriefradkin.com

Kearsarge Magazine • Spring 2016 • kearsargemagazine.com/Zing into Spring

Thank you to Zing sponsors:


Thank you to our Zing into Spring Sponsors

Lumber Barn puts the Zing into Spring projects!

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Print: $15/year Digital: $8/year

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EVENTS AT COLBY-SAWYER COLLEGE

You provide the guests, we provide the rest.

colby-sawyer.edu/functions kearsargemagazine.com/Zing into Spring • Spring 2016 • Kearsarge Magazine

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Zing into Spring Vendors This is only a partial line up of the great folks you’ll see at our event! AlliOops Flowers & Gifts Anne Boisevert Pottery Blackwater Mustard Cabaret Dance & Fitness Carrie Fradkin Fine Art Center for the Arts Colorful Journey Deer Meadow Homestead Dippy Chippy and More! DMGPhotography Folk Fusion Emma Chase Designs Honestly Simple Soaps Hygeia Infuse Me Jo Shields Jewelry Karma Soap Kathleen Sirois Jewelry Kearsarge Magazine King of Cupcakes KJ’s Café Leave It to Leslie Library Arts Center Little Nature Museum LulaRue Lumberbarn

Meadow Pond Photography Mimi Wiggin Namaste Newport Nantucket Jewels Nature’s Palette New London Hospital Nourishing Wellness Platinum Puzzles Pleasant Acres Landscaping Porter’s Finest Raq-on Dance ReRe Pareo Serenity Products Sew There! Silly Bee Design Soake Pools Summercrest Sunapee Lake Massage Sweet Beet Market The AlpacArt Studio at Parris Hill Farm Tiger Mountain Shotokan Karate School Tina Boardman Totes with Tales Tummy Time Dog Treats Walk In Beauty Day Spa Wonderwell Mountain Refuge Yia Yia’s Creations ZuZu’s Sandwich & Gift Shop

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Kearsarge Magazine • Spring 2016 • kearsargemagazine.com/Zing into Spring


About the Chinese Auction at Zing!

You pay your $10 entry fee, and you automatically receive five tickets for the auction. You purchase a product at a vendor table, and you are given more tickets! Take a look at our great list of items (growing daily) and see what you can to try to win! Names are selected between the hours of 12 and 4 p.m., so you can take home your prize!

✿ ✿

✿ ✿

✿ ✿

Gift basket from WS Badger Company, $57 Gift certificate for a class at the Library Arts Center, $20 Mini wood framed print by Leave It to Leslie, $15 Soaps by Karma Soap, $20 Two gift certificates to Infuse Me, $25 each

Apron by Sew There, $25 Earrings by Jo Shields Jewelry, $30

The book Colorful Journey, $35

Necklace by Kate’s Kottages, $70 Lip balm set and soap set by Honestly Simple Soap, $30 Stuffed fox by Silly Bee Design, $20

Ladies night party at Raq-on Dance, $150 Three family passes to the Little Nature Museum, $36

Miniature oil painting by artist Mimi Wiggin, $50

Blackwater Mustard sampler, $25

Five-class pass to Cabaret Dance, $45 Facial at the Walk in Beauty Day Spa, $70

Hot stones to the back at Sunapee Lake Massage, $45

Small mosaic by artist Carrie Fradkin, $400

12-by-16 photographic print by Nature’s Palette, $25

Yoga cushion from Serenity Products, $35

Dips and fudge from Dippy Chippy and More, $25 Gift certificate for $100 off a custom tote by Totes with Tales Pottery by Anne Boisevert, $25 Box of jams crafted by Sweet Beet Market, $36 Handknit scarf by Barbara Brill and Pam Joslin, $15

$50 gift certificate to Mountain Edge Resort & Spa Wood puzzle by Platinum Puzzles, $300

The Golden Ticket

Cookbook donated by Hygeia Optimal Health, $20

One person will have the Golden Ticket in their swag bag and they will win Kearsarge Magazine’s “Take Care of You” kit: books, jammies, scarf, jewelry, portable power source, spices, candle, and other editor favorites. Includes gift certificates to several local restaurants. Check your swag bag before you leave Zing into Spring!

Two biscuit mixes and jelly by Deer Meadow Homestead, $25 $100 gift certificate for Pleasant Acres Landscaping services Five-class yoga pass to Namaste Newport, $45 Dinner for two at Bubba’s Bar & Grille, $75

kearsargemagazine.com/Zing into Spring • Spring 2016 • Kearsarge Magazine

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Community Wellness, Together. At New London Hospital, our teams of healthcare professionals work together with you to keep you healthy. You can rely on our winning combination of expertise and compassion. From wellness check-ups to diagnosing and treating illnesses, let us put our collective training and experience to work for you.

Call 603-526-5544 for an appointment at New London Hospital. To learn more about our services, visit www.newlondonhospital.org.

“Your show inspired me to re-experience the joy of hiking. Happy trails!”

JOIN THE ADVENTURE! Explore New England’s wild places with Will Lange.

WEDNESDAYS 7:30 PM

ONLINE NHPTV.ORG

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Kearsarge Magazine • Spring 2016 • kearsargemagazine.com


Valley Regional Healthcare


P.O. Box 1482 Grantham, NH 03753

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oodcrest Village has been caring for individuals for nearly 30 years. It all started with a simple vision – to create an assisted living community that offers a meaningful and active quality of life for all seniors. Today, Woodcrest Village is one of the most experienced and innovative assisted living communities in the area, with dedicated staff who have longevity and experience. Come see the Woodcrest Village difference.

Call us today to schedule a tour. Assisted Living in a Gracious Village Setting 356 Main Street, New London, NH 03257 (603) 526-2300 www.woodcrestvillage.com

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Kearsarge Magazine Spring 2016  

The spring issue has a health focus, with a guide to living well written by area experts: yoga teachers, nutritionists, fitness coaches, doc...

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