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We love the Lake Sunapee/Kearsarge area of New Hampshire.

Fall 2018

Foodie Field Trip

Where to go when your destination is dinner

Hello, Fall

Gorgeous photos by Jim Block

Real Estate Section:

Lake Sunapee Dreaming

$5.00 U.S. www.kearsargemagazine.com Display until November 15, 2018


contents FEATURES

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Hello, Fall

It’s not quite time to break out the flannels and the pumpkin spice, but fall will be on your doorstep momentarily. Until then, enjoy this photo essay. Photography by Jim Block

16 Downtown Concord Draws a Crowd

Nonprofit organization Intown Concord makes downtown Concord, N.H., a fun and festive destination for residents and guests, every day of the year. By Laurie D. Morrissey Why do we love our New Hampshire hometowns? Residents share their thoughts on why they love the places they call home. Featured this issue: Newport and Warner. Compiled by Laura Jean Whitcomb

34 Foodie Field Trip

Laura Jean Whitcomb

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23 10 Reasons

ON THE COV ER Mist

When your destination is dinner, where do you go? In the Kearsarge/Lake Sunapee region, we are fortunate to have options galore. By Laura Jean Whitcomb

Photography by Jamie Murray

Kearsarge Magazin

This portrait photographer from Texas has found landscapes in New Hampshire! Jamie Murray lives in the beautiful town of Warner, N.H. See who else lives and loves the town of We love the Lake Suna pee/Kearsarge area of New Hampshire. Warner on page 28. e

Fall 2018

Fall 2018

www.kearsargem agazine.com Foodie Field Trip

Foodie Field Trip

• Fall In The Kearsarge

Where to go wh en your destinatio n is dinner

Region • InTown Concord

Hello, Fall

Gorgeous photo s by Jim Block

Real Estate Section:

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Laura Jean Whitcomb

Lake Sunapee Dreaming

$5.00 U.S.

www.kearsargemag azine.com Display until November 15, 2018


PEOPLE, PL ACES A ND THINGS

47 Business: Tents to Tables

Planning an event? ProMania Tent Rentals, based in Newport, N.H., has got you covered. By Natasha Osborne Howe

50 Art: Bringing Light to Life

With each stroke of her brush, New London, N.H., Artist Frances Weston Hoyt painted to reveal the light and beauty all around us. By Laura Jean Whitcomb

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54 Health: Advanced Bodywork

Rolfing benefits include relieving pain, improving posture, and so much more. By Brianna Marino

59 Local: Layers of Gold

Conservator Allison Jackson brings the art of gilding to her home in Wilmot, N.H. By Rosanna Eubank Long

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REA L ESTATE/HOME IMPROV EMENT

66 Lake Sunapee Dreaming

From local realtors to online options, there’s always a way to enjoy the Lake Sunapee/Kearsarge area. By Alicia Morse and Laura Jean Whitcomb

72 Custom Glass Shop

Family-owned American Plate Glass can solve any glass problem — from replacement windows to custom showers to new glass for an old cabinet. By Allison Rogers Furbish

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editor’s letter Hello friends, I know you’ll have this question after you read the Foodie Field Trip article on page 34, so I’ll answer it for you now. Yes, I ate all that. Well, come on, I have to! I can’t recommend something I haven’t tried. I made a ring at Vessels & Jewels class in winter 2005, then wrote about it. In 2006, went to a beekeeper meeting, spent a day at the transfer station, watched a blacksmith at work, participated in an afterschool program for kids, visited Kearsarge area art galleries, and attended a senior luncheon. And wrote about it. (I will admit, however, that I did not play badminton in spring 2006.)

and annual traditions; delved into local history; and interviewed business owners, artists, musicians and historians. Every issue is an opportunity to learn about the area we live in (and love!), and I’ve made some great friends along the way. I couldn’t ask for a better job. My suggestion: if you are planning a foodie field trip, please take your time. I started this article two years ago, had a burst of dining out last year, then finished up eating my way through our hometowns this summer. I gave part of my list to Leigh Ann, and then saved the rest for future issues: breakfast spots, for example. Facebook Fans also gave me a whole new list to try (see page 39)! I’ll just look for those stretchy pants now…

I’ve tested locally made products (pickles and mustard, for example); attended a variety of local events Laura Jean Whitcomb New Hampshire native Follow us on:

COMING THIS WINTER 2018 • Women in business • Locally made ornaments • Outdoor winter sports • Art, business, history, books, holiday events and more! AD DEADLINE: Friday, Oct. 19

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Rediscover your hometown with Kearsarge Magazine™ You may have lived in the big city, overseas, or maybe you’ve lived here all your life. Either way, you know there’s something special about the Lake Sunapee/Kearsarge/Concord area of New Hampshire. And every page of award-winning Kearsarge Magazine will remind you why you love it here.

P.O. Box 1482 Grantham, N.H. 03753 Phone: (603) 863-7048 Fax: (603) 863-1508 E-mail: info@kearsargemagazine.com Web: kearsargemagazine.com Editor Art Director Ad Sales Graphic Design Bookkeeping Copy Editor

Laura Jean Whitcomb Lori A. Charlonne Leigh Ann Root Lori A. Charlonne, Jennifer Stark Heather Grohbrugge Laura Pezone

Kearsarge Magazine™ is published quarterly in February, May, August and November. © 2018 by Kearsarge Magazine, LLC. All photographs and articles ©2018 by the photographer or writer unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Except for one-time personal use, no part of any online content or issue may be reproduced by any mechanical, photographic or electronic process, nor may it be stored in a retrieval system, transmitted or otherwise copied for public or private use without written permission of the copyright owner.

Subscriptions Rediscover your hometown by subscribing to Kearsarge Magazine™. Four issues a year will be delivered right to your door for $15. Subscribe online at www.kearsargemagazine. com or send a check (with your name and mailing address) to P.O. Box 1482, Grantham, NH 03753. Digital subscriptions are also available online.

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Hello, Fall

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Photography by Jim Block Introduction by Laura Jean Whitcomb all is my favorite. Why? Cooler temperatures — but still the chance for some warmth from the sun. Colorful, changing landscapes — reds and oranges — but none of the detriments of spring (bugs and mud ruin my joy of new greens and yellows). Mother Nature may be mercurial (even if you think it is a beach day, bring a sweatshirt) but fall is a great time to walk, hike, bike, paddle or drive your way around the Lake Sunapee/ Kearsarge area. It’s not quite time to break out the flannels and the pumpkin spice, but fall will be on your doorstep momentarily. For now, enjoy this photo essay.

Jim Block enjoys photographing almost anything: children, adults, families and celebrations; nature and wildlife; sports and action; buildings and businesses. His clients range from publishers to businesses to individuals. He has taught digital photography courses to small groups since 2000. Please explore Jim’s website at jimblockphoto.com ›››››

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Did you know that there’s a waterfall along the Riverwalk in Sunapee Harbor? It is below the old mill.

The landscape around the Blackwater River in Andover, N.H., glows with orange foliage. 8

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A childhood favorite: milkweed. In the background, Mount Kearsarge.

Moo to you. The cattle were photographed along George Hill Road in Springfield, N. H., just a bit north of McDaniels Marsh.

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A fall view of The Livery building and the pedestrian covered bridge in Sunapee, N.H. 10

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Splashes of color on McDaniels Marsh in Springfield, N.H.

A private bridge in Burkehaven Harbor that connects the Isle of Pines to the mainland. (There are 11 islands on Lake Sunapee: Loon Island, Elizabeth Island, Twin Islands, Great Island, Minute Island, Little Island, Star Island, Emerald Island, Isle of Pines and Penny Island.) kearsargemagazine.com • Fall 2018 • Kearsarge Magazine

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Green, green, green. Then, peeking through, a spot of orange. Then yellow. Then red. But still quite a bit of green in this forest on Bog Mountain.

The falls in Sunapee Harbor. 12

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Downtown Concord Draws a Crowd

Charlene Graham

Nonprofit organization Intown Concord makes downtown Concord, N.H., a fun and festive destination for residents and guests, every day of the year.

Michelle Johnson and Kate Fleming of Intown Concord

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By Laurie D. Morrissey Photography by Charlene and Bill Graham ver since Concord’s Main Street Redevelopment Project was completed in 2017, people are finding more reasons to visit the state’s capital. The main street now has wider sidewalks, outdoor seating, enhanced landscaping and lighting, and art installations. There are upwards of 70 retailers, a raft of restaurants, a performing arts center, and an art cinema. Strolling on the sidewalk, you’re likely to

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be serenaded by a saxophone soloist or a singer. On the Friday before Halloween, Concord’s main street also has a crowd of witches, pirates, superheroes, walking bananas and all manner of ghouls out for treats. It’s the annual Halloween Howl, which draws 5,000 to 7,000 families. The Howl is one of the festivities hosted by Intown Concord, a nonprofit organization that works to strengthen community, culture and business in the city.


Intown Concord is staffed by two enthusiastic, young residents of the city, Michelle Johnson and Kate Fleming. Johnson, the executive director, grew up in New Hampshire, while Fleming, the marketing and events coordinator, is from Brooklyn, N.Y. Different roots, but they view downtown Concord exactly the same way: “Wonderful.” “We’re super fans,” says Johnson. “I’ve never known a place with such a sense of community. The people here are amazing.” “There are so many different places to eat and shop within a few blocks,” Fleming says. She likes to take in a film at Red River Theatres, browse in the 100-years-old-and-still-going-strong Gibson’s Bookstore, and pick up a chic bargain at Lilise Designer Resale. “Since the new Main Street, the downtown area is very vibrant,” Johnson adds. “People are outside on the sidewalks and in the squares enjoying themselves during the day and into the evening.”

Laura Jean Whitcomb

Come visit

Concord gears up for Market Days, a three-day summer street festival.

A historical display at Market Days

Bill Graham

Intown Concord’s two other signature events are the Market Days Festival in June (formerly known as Old Fashioned Bargain Days) and Midnight Merriment in early December. This year’s Market Days was the 44th. The event typically draws 70,000 shoppers, who have more than 200 vendors to choose from. About a half mile of Main Street, as well as some side streets, are closed to traffic. Racks and tables are set up on sidewalks and in the street. Shoppers peruse the bargains, sample food from cafés and restaurants, listen to local bands, and enjoy kids’ activities. “Market Days gets bigger every year. This year, 50 new vendors were added,” says Angie Lane, a member of Intown Concord’s board of directors and the executive director of Red River Theatres. “It’s a destination event. People drive here from an hour and a half away.” Among the Market Days vendors are a few Kearsarge-area businesses, including Blackwater Mustard Company of Contoocook, N.H., and Forever Boards (hand-crafted cutting boards) of Newbury, N.H. December’s Midnight Merriment brings 10,000 people downtown to enjoy holiday shopping, eating, socializing, and caroling. Giftopolis, a market filled with local arts and crafts, is set up in the Eagle Square atrium. You can hang out with Santa (or at Red River Theatres with the Big Lebowskiesque “Santa Dude”). Restaurants and cafés may

Laura Jean Whitcomb

Shopping and more

One of the amazing costumes at Halloween Howl

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be tight, but food trucks are parked nearby and shopkeepers offer refreshments. You can even make yourself a s’more on the plaza in front of the State House. “It’s a huge night for downtown businesses. Every store offers something special,” says Lane. “But more than that, it’s truly a community social event. Even if you’re not buying anything, you get this amazing feeling of the holidays.” Twice a year, Intown Concord also hosts Upstairs Downtown, a walking tour of some of the city’s unique spaces that are not usually open to the public. The stops vary from year to year. The tour has included the old Concord Theatre, which started out as a bakery supplying bread to military camps during the Civil War and was turned into a theatre in the 1930s. It also has included the upper floor of the Odd Fellows Building and the red-brick Phenix Hall, where Abraham Lincoln and Theodore Roosevelt delivered speeches. “People love architecture, even when it’s torn apart,” Johnson says. “It’s like a time capsule. The buildings’ owners talk about the potential for the spaces, and what they’d like to do — like turning Phenix Hall into a jazz club.” The tour ends with a wine and cheese reception. There is no down time for Intown Concord’s

Bill Graham

Behind the scenes

staff. As soon as the Halloween Howls fade, Midnight Merriment planning goes into full swing — and in January, Concord’s biggest fans start planning the June Market Days. There’s really a new energy in Concord,” Johnson says. “It’s more business friendly than ever. There are plans for micro-apartments, a revived theatre and a boutique hotel.” She describes a shared “maker space” where people of all levels of talent and skill will create, share, learn, and collaborate. She envisions art walks, a music festival ›››››

WEB

Bill Graham

intownconcord.org

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Makerspace Buildings of creativity and entrepreneurism have popped up in several New Hampshire towns — Manchester, Nashua, Claremont — and now Concord is making plans for its own makerspace. Making Matters NH just completed the process of incorporating and forming the nonprofit in June, and has plans for networking groups and classes this fall. The goal is to find a facility and provide a venue where people with all levels of talent and skill can create, share, learn and collaborate. “This family friendly space will inspire you to create, take a cooking class, learn to weld, build a robot with recycled materials, use a 3D printer to invent the next great thing, design a costume for comic-con or perhaps simply learn how to fix a lamp,” says Laura Miller, owner of Marketplace New England and member of the Making Matters STEAM team. What can you do to help? Chime in! “Making Matters NH is looking to hear from you,” says Miller. “Whether you consider yourself a maker (yet!), your opinion is valuable as we want this to be a true community resource.” Learn more at makingmattersnh.org

— by Laura Jean Whitcomb ›››››

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or concert series, and a Market Days Festival with more music venues. It’s Johnson and Fleming’s job to be in the know. If there’s a new business or restaurant coming to town, or changing hands, they have the scoop. They’ll give you the skinny in their podcast, “The Cap.” For the upcoming Halloween Howl, Main Street will be closed to traffic from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. On tap for this year’s Howl there’s a costume parade, a haunted bus and a dance party. “My favorite part of Halloween Howl is watching the kids come out with their families to enjoy the downtown,” Johnson says. “Seeing the interaction between the merchants and the community is what this event — and Intown Concord — is all about.” Will Fleming and Johnson be there? You bet. In costume? “Of course!” Johnson says. “Kate looks for any reason to dress up in costume, and drags me with her!” Laurie Morrissey is a freelance writer from Hopkinton, N.H. Charlene Graham is an awardwinning certified professional photographer who loves photographing people everywhere: from the street, to the park, at an event, or in her studio. Her business in Concord, N.H., specializes in creating beautiful images for families, children, pets and high school seniors. See her work at charlenegrahamphotography.zenfolio.com. Bill Graham is a New Hampshire State Trooper and amateur photographer residing with his family in Concord. 20

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Reasons

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Compiled by Laura Jean Whitcomb

hy do we love our New Hampshire hometowns? Residents share their thoughts on why they love the places they call home. Featured this issue: Newport and Warner.

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Newport, incorporated in 1761, offers quite a bit of history across 43 square miles: three covered bridges, an 1886 Opera House, notable resident (and creator of Thanksgiving) Sarah Josepha Hale (1788-1879), and the oldest winter carnival in the United States, to name a few. But it is the residents and their community spirit that have prompted Newport’s nickname: the Sunshine Town.

It’s a town large enough to have a main street, but small enough that I can’t walk that main street without running into at least one person I know. Being a small town, if you have mind to be involved you can do just that. Because of this, Newport has an incredible sense of community. Kate Luppold, executive director of the Library Arts Center and lifelong resident

Beth Rexford

10 Reasons We Love Newport

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Newport: A small rural town of genuine citizens, living lives of hard-working real people and taking life on life terms, facing adversity and celebrating joys as a community of neighbors. Kathy and Guenter Hubert, retired, former owners of Huberts that began in Newport, N.H., in 1972, 45 years ago. Kathy has lived in Newport 34 years; Guenter lived in Newport 45 years; raised eight children in Newport.

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There is no community like the Newport community! We are a family, which means sometimes we disagree, but more often than not it means we work together to help one another when needed, cheer one another on, feel pride in the success of our community members, raise our children, and share the Sunshine Town with as many others as possible. Christy Whipple, Newport Montessori School founder and principal and 30-year Newport resident

Ella Casey, Executive Director of The Newport Chamber of Commerce

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The people. They are so generous in giving of their time and funds to so many causes. Their participation in school and town activities shows a true community spirit.

Harold and Gerry LaValley, who started LaValley Building Supply Inc. in Newport in 1962 and became residents in 1967, bringing up their children, grandchildren and now great grandchildren in Newport

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Tom McNeill

My husband retired from the United States Air Force in 1967 and Newport accepted us unconditionally even though he had been in Vietnam. We were going to stay one year.

I love Newport because of the great sense of community we share and our willingness to come together for things that are important. Our covered bridges, Library Arts Center, and the opera house come to mind. Newport is The Little Town That Could. I love Newport for how we embrace those who suffer a loss, and show them how important it is and how lucky we are to live in a small, caring community. I have always felt that Newport is a very special place to live. Jill and I have always lived here and I was born at Newport Hospital. Most of my closest friends are friends since first grade or before. It isn’t perfect, but it is a wonderful place to be. Dennis Kathan, owner of Kathan Gardens

I love Newport because the roads are always cleared early in the morning. Good churches, good senior center, neighbors, pizza. John and Hazel King Sr., lifelong residents of North Newport

Jim Block

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Steve Smith, general manager of WCNL

Leigh Ann Root

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What I love about Newport: Small town feel. You know your town officials, business owners, educators and neighbors and see them at all the various community events that take place year round.

Larry Cote, Newport Historical Society museum director and Newport resident since December of 1951 26

10 Paul Howe

The people are some of the most friendly people I have ever encountered (and I have been around a bit). I love volunteering at the Newport Historical Society Museum. Newport has a rich past and bit by bit the exploits of those who have come and gone before come to light. The generosity of the people of Newport is extraordinary. If one shows that you are willing to work towards a goal the people will support you. Example: the museum raised $23,000 in six months — all by small contributions — to replace the windows in the museum. I love the setting of the town. It is a typical mill town setting of rolling hills and valleys with a river flowing through it. And last but not least: we have Village Pizza and, in my opinion, they have the very best pizza in the world (and I have tasted a few pizzas in my day).

1. A community with an incredible work ethic 2. A community that has enabled our family to live and thrive in this area for nearly 70 years 3. A beautiful and charming Northern New England downtown Dave Lantz, owner of MJ Harrington Jewelers

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10 Reasons We Love Warner

Warner has the cutest downtown, beautiful old white houses, and winding back roads with spectacular views. That’s just a superficial glance at the town; the real reason folks love Warner is because of its diversity: artists, authors, farmers, entrepreneurs, landscapers and educators all come together to improve, celebrate and share what makes Warner special. You see the results in events like Maple Weekend in Warner, Spring into Warner Arts Festival, the Fall Foliage Festival and the Saturday morning farmers’ markets.

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We love Warner because of Mt. Kearsarge and Rollins State Park. We love to hike and explore the mountain.

The main reason why I love Warner is family roots. My family goes many generations back. Many still live here. I feel a strong pull to the town, past, present and future. I am proud of what our town represents.

Darryl N. Parker, Jr., owner and general manager of Schoodacs Coffee House

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Penny Sue Courser, jack of trades, master of none, Warner resident for 46 years

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One reason I love Warner is this is the type of community that local residents get involved and making things happen, whether at Simonds school, children’s youth sports, Warner Historical Society, Pillsbury Free Library, NH Telephone Museum, MainStreet Warner Inc. and the Jim Mitchell Community Park or

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Marty McAuliffe

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the annual Warner Fall Foliage Festival. Warner has always been an active community of involved citizens. (I have volunteered with all of the above groups over the years!) Faith Minton, who has lived in Warner since 1977

I love Warner because it’s quirky and its residents are amazingly good-humored. There is room to be who you are with very little judgment — the opposite of Stepford. To understand this all you need do is stroll the aisles at Market Basket on a Friday evening. I was born and raised in Ohio, but living here for 20 years has helped me to understand the real meaning of “Live Free or Die.” David Elliott, author, davidelliottbooks.com

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The main reason I love Warner is the sense of COMMUNITY. People always come together to help others in need and to put on the annual Fall Foliage Festival. The town is full of friendly and hard-working individuals who care about their neighbors and their town. Anastasia Glavas, a nine-year resident of Warner ›››››

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It’s the people, all very different but all sharing a passion for preserving the beauty and the quality of life we get to enjoy here in Warner.

Jim Block

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Katharine Nevins, co-owner of MainStreet BookEnds & Gallery, board member of MainStreet Warner, Inc., and resident of Warner for 33 years

There is so much that I love about Warner, and it is hard to pick just one thing. But since I was a little girl I have loved coming to our family’s place in the Mink Hills of Warner as it was peaceful and quiet, and gave ample opportunities to explore the natural world. It is still like that today and I am still out exploring, getting inspirations that fuel my paintings. Mimi Wiggin, artist, Warner resident

Mimi Wiggin artwork

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I love Warner because of its quaint downtown, its rich history and the wonderful eclectic collection of people that live here. There is always a wide variety of events going on such as lectures, concerts, art shows, farmers’ market and more! (Not to mention the FIVE museums in town!)

I love Warner because it’s filled with such a nice mix of folks who really love and support their town. At any given gathering you’ll find farmers, artists, retirees, business people and families who really understand that they have something truly special here.

Laura French, executive director, New Hampshire Telephone Museum

Cindy Snay, owner of Warner Pharmacy

What I love most about Warner is the small-town atmosphere but still so many activities to enjoy. There are the five museums, the unique gift shops, the varied restaurants all in downtown Warner. And a mile away: a major grocery store, gas stations and so much more. The many friendly faces I see every day make this the place for me. Debra Moody, store manager at the Mt. Kearsarge Indian Museum

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Foo p i r die Field T 34

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Foodie Field Trip

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By Laura Jean Whitcomb hen your destination is dinner, where do you go? We all have our favorite local restaurants, and our favorite for different times in our life, like the one that needs reservations for an anniversary or the one that out-oftown guests just love. You probably also have your go-to restaurant when no one feels like cooking, when you need that perfect cup of coffee, or when you have a sweet tooth that can only be appeased by a fresh-out-of-the-oven treat. In the Kearsarge/Lake Sunapee region, we are fortunate to have choices galore. Here are a few of my favorites for you to check out this fall.

New London Inn & Coach House Restaurant

353 Main Street New London, N.H. thenewlondoninn.com

I’m obsessed with the Truffle French Fries at the Coach House Restaurant. Delicately fried potatoes seasoned with truffle oil and Meyer lemon aioli, ready to be dipped in roasted garlic crème fraiche. It sounds so fancy, but all manners go out the door when the server brings this starter to the table. (We’re fighting for the last fry.) “Those French fries have been on the menu since the restaurant opened and they will never come off,” says Megan Bell, general manager. “We have dedicated customers that have to have their Truffle French Fry fix at least once a week. Not to mention my employees — I have a half dozen employees that I am fairly certain I could pay solely in Truffle French Fries.” The Coach House Restaurant is also known for its Horseradish Crusted Cod, a menu staple for the last 10 years. The combination of flavors — horseradish, tarragon and salsa verde — is appealing to a wide range of guests. “A close second to the cod is our Hand-cut Filet Mignon. Guests rave over how tender and rich that particular cut is,” says Bell. “Our kitchen’s commitment to keeping all items fresh and local is, in my opinion, why we continue to be successful.”

Bubba’s Bar & Grille

976 Route 103 Newbury, N.H. bubbasbarandgrille.com

Chowder contest winners come and go, but Bubba’s Bar & Grille offers a spectacular awardwinning option on their daily menu. The recipe — shrimp, scallops and haddock in a lobster cream base — was developed back in the mid-1980s at the Gray House, which, from 1975 to 1991, was located where The Flying Goose Brew Pub is now. Thirty years later, and several chowder challenge awards under their belt, Bubba’s seafood chowder is still a local favorite. ›››››

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Foodie Field Trip Café de Olla

239 Sunapee Street Newport, N.H. (603) 477-9932 This little gem snuck into the old Zpharmacy building last November, and has been quietly gaining a loyal following ever since. You can build your own burrito (or taco or quesadilla or rice bowl) at Café de Olla, which has a second location in Peterborough. I opted for the rice bowl, which starts with rice and cheese. I added my choice of meat (chicken), beans (no thanks), three toppings (guacamole, slaw and Pico de Gallo), and a sauce (sour cream). It’s fun to personalize your meal — think slow-cooked chicken plus mango salsa or perhaps sausage and pinto beans with chipotle aioli. Don’t want to spend time thinking about all the options? There’s also an easy choices menu with nine or so burritos. Lilly, the manager of the Newport location, says that most men order the Meato-Burrito, which is filled with rice, cheese, pork, beef, sausage and chipotle aioli.

The Local

Vegetarian egg rolls have always been on the appetizer menu at The Local, but the cook, looking to use up some leftovers, said, “Hey, you can throw anything in here.” And he created a meatloaf eggroll — meatloaf, mashed potatoes and gravy wrapped in a wonton and deep fried — as a daily special. Five years later, the eggrolls have become so popular that “most people don’t say ‘Hi, how are you doing’,” says Tiffany Meadows, co-owner of The Local with her husband, Bill. “They say ‘What eggroll is on the menu today?’” Veggie is still offered daily, but be on the lookout for the pastrami eggroll (coleslaw and thousand island), chicken bacon ranch, bacon cheeseburger, steak and cheese, and buffalo chicken egg rolls, to name a few.

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Leigh Ann Root

2 East Main Street Warner, N.H. thelocalwarner.com


Leigh Ann Root

Taverne on the Square

2 Pleasant Street Claremont, N.H. claremonttaverne.com

There have been a number of restaurants located at the corner of Pleasant Street in the historic Oscar Brown Building. Taverne on the Square, which opened in 2016, has gained a loyal clientele that looks forward to the madefrom-scratch meals and full bar with local craft beers. Take, for instance, the Rangoon Dip: a crab and scallion cream cheese dip, finished with sweet red chili sauce and surrounded by wonton crisps made in house. Owner Michael Charest says that the Taverne Tips — marinated steak tip kabobs with spiced, fried onions and bleu cheese cream sauce — are also a customer favorite. Both were sublime. “Having a popular and eclectic mix for the palette has earned the Taverne a loyal customer base and impressed visitors — the mayor was just quoted saying, ‘The Taverne has become a destination and anchor for downtown Claremont’,” says Charest. “Folks are making the drive of 30 to 45 minutes to try us out. Our Franco-American fair has been catching on.” ›››››

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Suna

6 Brook Road Sunapee, N.H. magicfoodsrestaurantgroup.com/suna Suna has four sister restaurants — O Steaks & Seafood in Concord, O Bistro in Wolfeboro, and Canoe Restaurant and Tavern in Bedford and Center Harbor — but an appetizer exclusive to Sunapee: smoked gouda tater tots with spicy ketchup. “It’s a play on something we all grew up on,” says Chef Owner Scott Ouellette. “Fresh mashed and shredded potatoes with shredded gouda, handmade at the restaurant, and served with spicy ketchup.” These potato gems were so yummy that I couldn’t finish my entrée — the lobster macaroni and cheese. Turns out that was a good thing; I loved it just as much the next day as a leftover. Ouellette says that Suna’s sweet & sour calamari is a popular dish with patrons. “It’s been with us since the beginning and a little different then what you might normally find,” he says. Suna, which opened in July 2016, welcomes dinner guests six days a week. “You can join us for a romantic dinner with hand cut steaks and fresh seafood in the dining room or something more casual in the bar area serving our full dinner menu,” says Jeff Miller, director of operations. “We also have a full list of local beers, handcrafted cocktails and a wine menu personally selected by our chef owner.” ››››› 38

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Foodie Field Trip Pam Crispi: Suna, Route 103 in Sunapee Vera Siciliano: Suna

From our Facebook Friends We asked our Facebook friends where they like to eat, and here are some of the answers.

Louise DiFrumolo Elkaliouby: The Millstone in New London! New to area, but this is one of our favorites! The Bloody Mary is heavenly!

Putnam Farm: As always, The Foothills of Warner takes care of all seasons. If you are writing for fall, I highly recommend the Mink Hills Mash, and afterwards a nice leisurely respite in one of their rocking chairs, on their porch overlooking the Minks while counting all of the brilliant fall hues of the trees. Ahhhh. It really doesn't get any better than that in the Kearsarge Valley.

Lucy Thompson

Brenda Bresell Baker: Revolution Cantina, Claremont

Bubba's pizza in Newbury

Laura Gareri Buono: We have several in Hillsborough, N.H.: Mediterraneo, Taco Beyondo, Zocalo Taco & Tequila, Ming Du, Brick House and more... come take a sampling of Hillsborough!

Maralyn Doyle: Love Bubba’s pizza

Rachel Nelson Gifford: Café de Olla in Newport

Jesse P. Waring: The Goose

Sara Persechino: The School House Café, The Everyday Café and the new Lakehouse Tavern in Hopkinton!

Barbara Van Hoff: Farmer’s Table in Grantham

Shannon Nichols Howe: The Old Courthouse Restaurant, Newport

Emily Bray Cawley: The Inn at Pleasant Lake! The restaurant is called Oak & Grain

Noelle Lane Bassi: Revolution Cantina, Claremont

Quincy Hill: Appleseed, Everyday Café, Kettlehead Brewery

Anica Scekic: The Coach House at New London Inn

Heidi Hill Tobin: Tuckers in New London Jennifer Allen Giles: Suna in Sunapee, Millstone and Coach House in New London, O in Concord Sarah Jane: Intervale Farm pancake house in Henniker

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Jen Deasy: Revolution Cantina, Claremont! Jen Deasy: New Ziggys in Sunapee

Wanda Young Anderson: The Schoolhouse Café, Route 103 in Warner Cheril Maynard: The country cafe in Newport. Great prices and extensive menu! And great service. Anna Wickström: Oak & Grain at Inn at Pleasant Lake! Catherine Couture Bardier: Everyday Café, Contoocook


A refreshment at Oak & Grain at the Inn at Pleasant Lake

Jennifer Eve Boyle: Country Spirit, Henniker! Marcy Vierzen: Wildwood Smokehouse Kim-Laura Boyle: Wildwood Smokehouse in Sunapee! Crystal Bixby: Kettlehead Brewery in Tilton Scott Reed: Check out Oak & Grain! Nicole Fenton Densmore: Tuckers Jessica Barry: Appleseed Restaurant and Catering! They are amazing! Stacey Elizabeth: The Local in Warner Sarah Wilcox: It’s Appleseed‘s 40th anniversary this year and they’re doing quite the renovation! Mark Allen: Lakehouse Tavern in Hopkinton Sarah Chase Montanari: Revival in Concord Dawn Smith: Appleseed Restaurant and Catering...a whole lot of history to write about for their 40th anniversary. Pretty amazing to be able to say you're celebrating a 40th in any industry nowadays. Becky Unruh MacDonald: Schoolhouse Café in Warner Diane Lachance: Everyday Café — have The Bup!

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Sweet Treats & Baked Goods

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By Laura Jean Whitcomb

29 Main Street Newport, N.H. (603) 454-8368

Laura Jean Whitcomb

Manager Megan Walker just smiles when I ask her if she likes to bake. There are a surprising number of options at Aurora Bakery in their retail case: cookies (ginger, white chocolate cranberry, peanut butter chunk, raspberry thumbprint, and gluten-free coconut macaroons), whoopee pies, brownies (with and without nuts), cupcakes (including gluten free) and lemon pound cake. While I’m trying to decide, a couple from Washington, N. H. pays for their breakfast (two mini quiches) and picks up treats for the road. “No need for a box,” the woman says. “These won’t make it to the car.” Another lady, in town for an appointment, wisely pre-ordered a coconut cream pie. I end up bringing home a large bakery box of items and my favorite was the butternut squash cream cheese roll. Spongy cake studded with walnuts wrapped around a sweet cream cheese filling.

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love cookies. I blame the Betty Crocker oven I had as a child. I’d take some of my mom’s leftover pie crust, add sugar and cinnamon, and, voila, cinnamon roll cookies, baked by the heat of a light bulb. The chefs in the Kearsarge/Lake Sunapee area are much more talented than I am, so I let them do the work (and enjoy the results). Here are a few places to check out.

Courtesy photo

Aurora Bakery

Pleasant Lake Cheesecake

75 Newport Road New London, N.H. pleasantlakecheesecake.com

For three years, Mary Wicenski and her team of bakers have been delighting residents with their cheesecakes. Soon after they opened, I fell in love with the Turtle — Pleasant Lake Cheesecake’s original filling in a chocolate crust, topped with chopped pecans and drizzled with our salted caramel sauce and our chocolate ganache. I’m not alone. “There are three flavors that always vie for title of top seller: Key Lime, Lemon Zinger and Turtle,” says Wicenski. “We offer three different sizes: 9 inch, 6 inch and 2-inch mini cheesecakes. The minis are, by far, the most popular size. People seem to like to try an assortment of flavors!” Who wouldn’t? Pleasant Lake Cheesecake makes everything in house, from scratch using the finest ingredients. And, Wicenski says, “we’re obsessed with making our products the best they can be. When we are introducing a new flavor or product, or are trying out a new ingredient, we do test after test after test in order to make sure it’s the very best!”


Blue Loon Bakery

Marzelli Deli

889 NH-103 Newbury, N.H. (603) 763-2222

One spoonful and you’ll be instantly addicted to the gelato at Marzelli Deli in Newbury. It’s rich, smooth and, because gelato is made with milk rather than cream, it has less fat than ice cream. Lou Marzelli — with his brother Richie and his brother-in-law Tom — started making gelato in the early 1980s in the basement of their Newbury Harbor restaurant, the North End Pub. In 1998, Lou traveled to Italy for a seminar led by the best gelato makers in the world and later opened the Sunapee Harbor Sweet Shop & Café offering 16 flavors of gelato. Today you can pick up pints and quarts at Marzelli Deli, including Pistachio Sicilia (with whole pistachio nuts) and Coffee Crunch. “The crunch in the coffee-flavored gelato is inspired by my study abroad experience in 2007 to Perugia, Italy,” says Owner Vincent Marzelli, who started making gelato as a college student on summer break. “Our gelato is special to me because it’s something I can share with my kids, and every flavor has a story to tell.”

When I lived in Hartford, Conn., I was spoiled — the Italian section of town was a block from my apartment. A short walk and I had all the fresh bread, pastries or savories that I needed. I’m super excited about Blue Loon Bakery, owned and operated by Laurie Schive and Mike Morgan. Now it’s a short drive but I’ll be able to bring home a French baguette, ciabatta and other traditional artisan-style breads. Thursdays only you can pick up fresh, soft Bavarian pretzels, but the Sunapee Sourdough you can purchase anytime. Schive developed her first sourdough starter in Austria, and created the Sunapee starter after making New Hampshire her home. “Wheat flour, water, salt, a touch of rye and a long fermentation period gives this bread a creamy flavor,” she says. What I love: slathering extra butter on the chewy crust.

Courtesy photo

Laura Jean Whitcomb

12 Lovering Lane New London N.H. blueloonbakery.com

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Schoodacs Coffee House

1 East Main Street Warner, N.H. schoodacs.com

Schoodacs Coffee House in Warner offers numerous alluring options. Each season brings new favorites to their coffee café. During the fall, they’re best known for their Pumpkin Pie Latte. This smooth and tasty mug is full of delight, bringing together pumpkin puree, local maple syrup (from Kearsarge Gorge Farm) and a dash of cinnamon with two shots of house espresso, topped with steamed milk and sprinkles of cinnamon. One sip and you’re ready to put on your sweater and hit the local orchards to pick some pumpkins!

Bottoms Up W Text and photography by Leigh Ann Root

hether you’re starting your day with a luscious latte or ending it with a quenching cocktail, our region boasts a large variety of choices in the drink department. We went on the road in search of the area’s best. We were not disappointed.

Grounds

374 Main Street New London, N.H. (603) 526-6010 In New London, Grounds (the home of endless ways to have coffee) features a lovely alternative to coffee, The New London Fog. It’s a silky and hearty tea choice. They combine Earl Grey tea with your choice of steamed milk (whole, skim, soy, chocolate almond or unsweetened almond or coconut) and vanilla syrup. You can take a seat in their cushioned seating section or at the beautiful outfacing bar, while sipping and taking in the day. This creamy blend is a tea treat.

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Flying Goose Brew Pub & Grille 40 Andover Road New London, N.H. flyinggoose.com

A year-round, best seller for the Flying Goose Brew Pub & Grille in New London is their Long Brothers American IPA. According to our server, people often return and ask for “that Brothers Beer.” It a wellbalanced IPA with a “hop forward” presence. It’s dry hopped with Citra for a huge hop aroma. They use seasonal ingredients (they even harvest their own hops in the summer, right outside the dining room) and local products to create their brews. The Flying Goose offers up to 17 handcrafted brews, pleasing a wide array of taste buds.

Revolution Cantina 38 Opera House Square Claremont, N.H. revolutioncantina.com

Lola’s Revenge is a signature drink at Revolution Cantina on Opera House Square in Claremont. It’s just as imaginative as their entrees. This cantina cocktail is billed as “Sweet & Bitter Heat”, made with jalapeno-infused tequila, lemon, lime and sweet cherry with smashed fresh mint. This compliments the many Mexi-Latin specialties. The Rev, as locals call it, have ongoing bar specials, such as a happy hour offering two-for-one house margaritas.

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S P ECIAL AD VER T IS ING S E C T I ON


PEOPLE, PLACES AND THINGS

NEWPORT · BUSINESS

Tents to Tables Planning an event? ProMania Tent Rentals in Newport, N.H., has got you covered.

Courtesy photo

By Natasha Osborne Howe

ProMania sets up the tents for the annual League of New Hampshire Craftsmen's Fair.

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hatever the occasion, season, weather or equipment appropriate for the event, Don Gobin, owner of ProMania Tent Rentals, has got you covered. Gobin translates the meaning of the business name as “bring order to chaos” because there are so many things to think about when planning an event. ProMania is located at 15 Beech Street in Newport, but

the tents — as well as 14 trailers and 7 trucks — are stored in Claremont, N.H. In addition to tents and canopies, tables, chairs, lighting, heaters, inflatables, dance floors and linens are also available. The company started as a family business in 1965 by Gobin’s father, Harold C. Gobin, Jr. and has expanded from five tents to 100. “We thought we hit the parent lottery,” says Gobin, who grew up

in Claremont, graduating from Stevens High School in 1978 and later earned a business degree at Franklin Pierce College. “My brothers and I were taught how to control your own destiny by being self-employed.” His busy season is April through November, with preparation spanning several months. Winter requests have included chairs, tables and staging for Christmas concerts and parties. ›››››

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Many venues

In 2016, Gobin supplied chairs, stages and barricades for the Trump and Clinton campaign rallies in New Hampshire and Massachusetts. “I really enjoy doing this. It keeps me interested with every customer and every event,” he says. “It is stimulating and challenging.” Gobin started renting out barricades for the Boston Marathon in 2006 after working for the Boston Athletic Association (BAA) since 1995. In 2013 after the bombing, the BAA reached out to ProMania for additional barricades. “We were able to accommodate their needs for the new security plan going forward,” says Gobin.

Don Gobin, owner of ProMania Tent Rentals in Newport, N.H.

Courtesy photo

One of his largest venues in the area is the League of New Hampshire Craftsmen’s Fair in August at Mount Sunapee, which ProMania has been supplying since 2006. Forty-six tents are required for the event. Gobin and crew can complete the project in two weeks. The New Hampshire Highland Games and Festival at Loon Mountain in Lincoln, N.H., every September ranks as another top event with 48 tents. ProMania also services the Cheshire Fair, Cornish Fair, Hillsboro Balloon Festival, New Boston Agricultural Fair, the book sale at Richards Free Library in Newport, as well as an assortment of other events.

PEOPLE, PLACES AND THINGS

Paul Howe

NEWPORT · BUSINESS

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NEWPORT · BUSINESS

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promaniallc.biz

Safety measures The tragedy at Lancaster Fairgrounds in Lancaster, N.H., where two people died in 2015 after a tent collapsed, created a heightened awareness for safety. New regulations are now enforced. “It was a wake-up call,” Gobin explains. “We must abide by the state fire marshal’s rules — and he takes notice — and everyone has had to step up their game.” The state fire marshal is strict about safety conditions. There must be a flame retardant label, adequate exit signs, fire extinguishers and a diagram showing where exits are located. Soil conditions must be tested for stability and each tent strap must be able to bear 500 pounds. A tent also has to be at least 400 square feet in order to be in compliance with the state fire marshal’s office.

“Tents need to be strong enough to withstand 76 mile an hour winds,” Gobin says. “The installer must adhere to strict guidelines in order to achieve that rating and we do, which makes ProMania unique.”

Big and small He gets many calls from competitors seeking professional advice. ProMania has served all of New England. Gobin has also traveled throughout the country for some jobs and as far as Hawaii. His crew will do overnights if it is a big job, with four full-time and four part-time employees in the busy season. “They are a capable crew, loyal and hardworking,” Gobin says. “Traveling is not a problem.” ProMania also covered Run for the Troops in Andover, N.H., a benefit for housing veterans, and the Boston Children’s Hospital Eversource Walk for

Kids. The annual Family FunFest, hosted by Kid Stuff and Kearsarge Magazine every fall, was lucky to have the shelter of a ProMania tent. Attendees brought food items and toiletries for the Upper Valley Haven instead of paying an admission fee. “We are happy to be part of benefit events for nonprofit,” Gobin says. “It is an incredible joy of achievement.” The business handles only about a dozen weddings a year, which Gobin says is a bit unusual. Most companies center around weddings. He does rent out for company picnics and family reunions. “People don’t always want to do a rain date, so a tent is perfect,” Gobin says. “And take down is equally important because people want their space back for regular use.” Gobin, who lives in Grantham, N.H., with his wife Joy, has developed a successful, thriving business, which provides for a wide variety of functions. “It is a recession-proof business, and I have never lacked for work,” he says. Natasha Osborne-Howe has previously written for the Argus-Champion and has been a contributing writer for the Eagle Times, and at present a contributing writer/columnist for the Intertown Record. She currently lives in Goshen, N.H., with her husband, Paul, and their two dogs and cats. She enjoys crafts, local culture and nature.

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NEWBURY & NEW LONDON · ART

PEOPLE, PLACES AND THINGS

Bringing Light to Life With each stroke of her brush, Frances Weston Hoyt painted to reveal the light and beauty all around us. See her work — and the work of her students — at the Fells. By Laura Jean Whitcomb

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rances Weston Hoyt (1908-2005) was a wellrespected, classically trained landscape artist. She attended the Art Students League of New York in the 1920s and 30s where she studied under Frank Vincent DuMond (18651951), one of the country’s most influential painters and 50

art teachers. She won numerous awards, participated in group and solo exhibitions, and has artwork in permanent exhibition at locations from New Jersey to New London, N.H. But, accolades aside, Hoyt was a joyous person with a generous nature. At every stage of her career, she worked with

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other artists, taught classes, and mentored private students. You can see her influence (and DuMond’s) in the work of some Kearsarge-area artists — Mary Jane Q. Cross of Newport, N.H., Lisa Jelleme-Miller of East Andover, N.H., and John W. Sargent of New London. “We are a family of painters,”


PEOPLE, PLACES AND THINGS

NEWBURY & NEW LONDON · ART

says Cross. “Fran had a lineage with DuMond, and shared it with us.”

Would a rabbit eat those greens? DuMond was a National Academy of Design member whose students included John Marin, Georgia O’Keeffe, Norman Rockwell and Ogden Pleissner. He was known for creating a palette of color and value used especially for landscapes. This is what Hoyt used, and passed on to her students. Cross describes it as a “beautifully formulaic palette. Middle C is the center of the palette — to the left is color going into shadow and to the right is color going into light or night.” The palette changed over time, but you can see his influence in first generation DuMond students, like Hoyt, who learned from him early in his career. “Fran did not teach us how to paint; she taught us how to see color,” Cross says. “We’d ask, ‘What brushes should I use?’ and she’d say, “I don’t care what brushes you use. It’s about color and value.” Hoyt challenged her students at every opportunity to see color. “She’d ask us to go pick out the lightest point in a painting and tell her what it was. Then she’d take a piece of paper and say, ‘Wrong, it’s middle C. You have to train your eye,” says Cross. This expertise was also shared at home. “Mom enjoyed a wonder-full relationship with our natural world,” says her daughter, Edie Garrett. “She encouraged my brother and me to see and to think about what we could see. She might ask: ‘What color are the clouds?’ We, most

An example of DuMond's palette

“Embracing the palette (color and value) and the perspective of Frank V. DuMond, she shared what she had learned from him, and from her life experiences, with her students.” Edie Garrett, Fran Hoyt’s daughter likely, answered ‘white’, which then allowed her to draw us more deeply into the changing mystery of clouds with a (predictable) next question: ‘What other colors do you see in the clouds?’”

Dedicated to nature For the last 30 years of her life, Hoyt lived in New London, where she continued to paint and share her wealth of artistic knowledge. She was a natural teacher. One of her students, Debbie Campbell of Newbury, N.H., remembers Fran as a “no-nonsense artist who loved nature and loved painting. She

was a small woman who commanded great respect. You always knew what she was thinking and she just loved to share her knowledge — be it nature or painting. She loved to be around artists and to talk about art.” Hoyt hosted many informal events at her home and at the local coffee shop. But her real love was being outside in nature painting with others; she was known to call early in the morning to say, “Let’s go paint — we need to leave now to capture the good light.” She led trips to the White Mountains to capture ›››››

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NEWBURY & NEW LONDON · ART

PEOPLE, PLACES AND THINGS WEB thefells.org

Discussion was saved for later. “Fran often held ‘crit’ or ‘show-and-tell’ gatherings at her home in New London,” says Jelleme-Miller. “These were gatherings where all would bring a finished painting or one in progress for a critique. Each would put their painting up and tell their thoughts, motivations and/or struggles with the subject and a discussion with all would follow. These were fun gatherings with a strong feeling of comradery, good food and lots of laughter. Fran's friendship, art and teaching inspired and touched so many.” “Her voice still speaks,” says Cross. This fall Hoyt’s work will be on display at The Fells Historic Estate and Gardens in Newbury. The exhibit runs until Oct. 8 and will also include an exhibit and sale of works by artists who painted with Hoyt. Mary Jane Q. Cross shares a photo of Hoyt (center in pink).

the beauty of winter, and as far afield as the Canadian Rockies where she and a painting pal took a helicopter to an isolated glacier lake to set up their easels. She continued to paint outside well into her 90s. Jelleme-Miller remembers these impromptu trips well. “She was known to call at any time from the crack of dawn to a moonlit evening to say ‘Grab your paints. We are going to catch the light’,” she says. “Sometimes it would be just the two of us, or as many as 10 or more painters would join for the outing.” 52

"Last Light on the Presidentials" by artist Lisa Jelleme, a Hoyt student

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NEW LONDON · HEALTH

PEOPLE, PLACES AND THINGS

Advanced Bodywork Rolfing benefits include relieving pain, improving posture, and so much more. By Brianna Marino Photography by Paul Howe

Rolfing focuses on how the body moves as a whole. Here, McClennen checks a client's posture.

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or most folks, the mention of “body work” is quick to elicit pleasant thoughts of a soothing massage. While this widely known treatment has often been considered pampering or even indulgence, the healing power of massage therapy is rapidly gaining acceptance as a valuable tool in maintaining one’s body. 54

But the mention of Rolfing®, however, is more likely to result in blank stares, maybe a vague recollection of an article or an exclamation of “Isn’t that painful?” One local practitioner is looking to change this: Sarah McClennen, a Certified Rolfer®, is on a mission to help the people of the Lake Sunapee/ Kearsarge region move with

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comfortable ease and live better. McClennen began her exploration of naturopathy, chiropractic and CranioSacral therapy following a car accident in 1982. At 17, she was experiencing some chronic health issues that traditional medical care was not addressing. In 1992, she became a massage therapist hoping to help others


PEOPLE, PLACES AND THINGS

in a similar situation and, as she says, “to help people in general find more comfort and better body function in their life.” From there, McClennen developed an interest in Rolfing®. She took a course on Structural Integration (aka Rolfing®) and was hooked. After being treated herself, McClennen began training as a practitioner in 2012, finishing two years later. “It helped me immensely,” she says. “In addition to loosening the chronically tight areas of my body, Rolfing® taught me to move and use my body differently so those areas remain open and more comfortable.”

About the practice Rolfing® was developed by Ida Rolf as part of her quest to improve her own health and that of her two sons. According to the Rolf Institute of Structural Integration, Rolf earned a doctorate in biochemistry in 1920 but was intrigued by the human body studying homeopathy, osteopathy, chiropractic and yoga. She developed Rolfing® in the 1940s and was teaching by the 1950s. “Rolfing® teaches you to move with grace and ease, and to explore the relationship between ground and space,” McClennen describes. “This

NEW LONDON · HEALTH

gives rise to more coordinated movement, better balance and comfort.” Rolfing® is different than massage. “No oil is used in Rolfing®. Rolfing® uses slow, steady pressure into areas of tightness and restriction while waiting for the tissue to release. Massage uses kneading, stroking and rolling motions,” McClennen explains. “In addition, there are many different positions used during a Rolfing® session, not just lying down.” While both improve muscle health, Rolfing® focuses on how the body moves as a whole (system wide). It accomplishes ›››››

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NEW LONDON · HEALTH

PEOPLE, PLACES AND THINGS

this by focusing on fascia — the connective tissue network in the human body. Ida Rolf called it the “organ of posture.” “The idea is that we are working with the three dimensional structure of the body not just a place that hurts,” says McClennen, “while remembering the place that hurts is part of the whole.”

Feel peaceful McClennen’s Rolfing® program starts with a series of 10 sessions in her New London, N.H., office. “The goal of the first three sessions is to open the superficial fascia in the body,” she describes. “The goal of sessions four to seven is to open the deeper layers/core of the body. The goal of sessions eight to 10 is to integrate all of the areas of the body, which we have just differentiated.” Clients can expect the typical session to last an hour and a half for the first 10 sessions. All sessions begin with the client walking around the office while McClennen observes. She looks for tightness patterns in their movements and also asks the individual to notice certain things relating to the session goals. After about five minutes, the client gets on the table and the “work” begins. Although there is a common misconception that Rolfing® is painful, McClennen stresses that this is not so. She asks for feedback throughout the session to ensure applied pressure remains comfortable as too much pain is actually counterproductive to the work. At the end of the session, the walk is repeated, allowing McClennen and the client to observe how Rolfing® has im56

“I feel deep gratitude being able to help so many people,” says Sarah McClennen. pacted movement. “We have a few minutes of discussion about things they can do until the next session, awareness exercises to illuminate their patterns of holding, and how these contribute to their pain and dysfunction,” she says. McClennen has clients ranging from young children to more mature people; athletes to office workers. She believes that anyone can benefit from Rolfing®. “Each person may have different goals but, in the end, no matter what the goals are, they can usually be achieved and there is improvement for everyone,” she says. Her clients agree. “Before I went to Sarah at Feel Peaceful, I was anything but. My left hip was so tight I was only comfortable walking. Standing, sitting

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and even laying down were all uncomfortable. I tried massage, physical therapy and chiropractics; none of them worked for long,” says one client from New London. “My husband suggested I try Rolfing® and Sarah specifically. I won’t say I was better overnight, but after a few months I noticed significant improvement. I continue to see Sarah for minor issues and have never felt better or moved more freely. She is magical!” A Sunapee, N.H., client says, “After a session my body feels taller, stronger and more confident with my feet firmly placed with each step. To my great delight, Rolfing® has replaced my needs for anxiety meds. My feeling of well-being and improved posture is ongoing and experienced in both walking and sitting. After two hip replacement surgeries and several Rolfing® sessions, I am feeling like a new woman at age 80 plus.” “I love watching people change and feel better,” says McClennen. Brianna Marino lives on a small farm in Wilmot with her three children and patient husband. She credits Rolfing ® for allowing her to run a marathon injury free. Paul Howe has been photographing for local publications in the area for more than 40 years. His work has also been in many shows, including photographs in juried shows at the Library Arts Center in Newport and New London Hospital art shows. See more of his work at paulhowephotography.com


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PEOPLE, PLACES AND THINGS

Layers of Gold Conservator Allison Jackson brings the art of gilding to her home in Wilmot, N.H. By Rosanna Eubank Long Photography by Jim Block

WILMOT · LOCAL

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hen walking into an art museum, you are generally there to appreciate the paintings. But what many of us don’t stop to contemplate are the frames of those paintings. Whether we are aware of it or not, frames have the ability to truly make paintings shine. It is Allison Jackson’s profession to make those frames shine. Jackson is the Assistant Frame Conservator at the Harvard Art Museums (formerly the Fogg Museum) and has her own business Allison Jackson Frame Conservation & Gilding. She works on a project-by-project basis for other primarily Bostonarea art institutions as well as for private clients. She recently finished building her own studio at her home in Wilmot, N.H., so she can take on more private work in the New London area. Jackson is a second-generation gilding conservator. She grew up with a gilding studio literally in her backyard in Harvard, Mass. As an adult, Jackson and her mother often collaborate on projects together. Jackson’s father is also a craftsman; he owned his own hardwood flooring company. So Jackson grew up with a proclivity for working with her hands, a familiarity with wood and fine craftsmanship, and surrounded by gilding.

What is gilding? Gilding has a long and rich history of being used to connote wealth and splendor. There is documentation or evidence of its remains in Ancient Chinese, Phoenician and Egyptian cultures. In addition to being the Allison Jackson in her Wilmot studio

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PEOPLE, PLACES AND THINGS

most valuable of metals, gold is unique in its ability to maintain its brilliance as it does not tarnish in air — providing not only a decorative coating but a lasting one as well. The craft of gilding has not considerably changed through the centuries. First gold must be hammered into thin sheets. Before machines, this was done by hand; in fact gold beating is one of the oldest professions. Gold has the exceptional capability to be hammered so thin that it is invisible even under a microscope on end, or if pressed between two fingers it will absorb into the pores. Today these hammered sheets are sold in books with leaves 3 3/8 inch square between tissue paper. The leaf is transferred by use of specific squirrel-hair brushes and is so delicate that a wayward breeze can crumple and render it useless. To apply gold leaf, the gilder wipes the brush along his or her skin to pick up its natural oils, then uses it to pick up the leaf. The gold leaf is applied to a surface that has been meticulously readied. In preparation to receive gold leaf, raw wood is coated with rabbit skin glue followed by gesso — a compound of chalk and glue. In some instances bole (glue and clay that is pigmented in red, yellow, gray or blue) is applied between the gesso layer and the gilding. After gilding the particles can be compressed to create a high shine. It also creates various tonal hues in gilding and when the gold wears away over time, these undertones are seen, creating a need for restoration.

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PEOPLE, PLACES AND THINGS

The task at hand Gilding is found on frames of paintings, mirrors, furniture and other wooden objects. Quite often these historic objects need restoration as a result of degradation over time. As temperature and humidity levels fluctuate with changing seasons, the wooden structures expand and contract, causing cracks in the gesso layer and flaking to the gilded surfaces. Structural problems, ornament loss, flaking, and grimy surfaces are among the issues that Jackson addresses on a daily basis. Jackson acknowledges that the best scenario is for an object to retain its original surface. As a conservator, part of her job is to ensure that her work is reversible and recognizable. Written and photographic documentation is the first step of the process before treatment begins. She distinguishes her work from the original by using different materials for the repairs and alternative methods of gilding that could easily be reversed if necessary, while maintaining the original surface. For instance, before applying a replacement ornament that she has built, she will put a barrier layer between the original work and her own work. Every object is carefully considered before treatment begins, especially when it is necessary to re-gild a work. Jackson became a professional by apprenticeship. She worked with various small, private conservation studios, and credits her knowledge today to learning with multiple conservators and gaining unique experience from each. In 2004 she moved to Hawaii and

apprenticed under a master carpenter for two years. She learned to design and build furniture, and her restoration work included clients such as the Mission House Museums, Kawaiahao Church, and a descendant of Hawaiian Royalty, whose project was restoring the formal dining chairs and throne of King David

WILMOT · LOCAL

Kalakaua and pieces that belonged to Kamehameha the 4th. When she returned to New England in 2006 she joined a project at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston surveying their frame collection, which led to a full-time position in their frame conservation lab. Since then she has maintained a steady stream of projects that has kept her ›››››

Every object is carefully considered before treatment begins. kearsargemagazine.com • Fall 2018 • Kearsarge Magazine

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busy in the finest Boston-area museums, including the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum and the Davis Museum at Wellesley College. Recently, in 2016, she was awarded the Nigel-Seeley Fellowship that took her to Knole House in Kent, England for eight weeks. The National Trust property had been awarded a £20 million ($27 million) grant to rehabilitate the property and build a new conservation lab. A component of Jackson’s task was to establish protocol for treating the gilded objects at one of England’s largest Jacobean country homes.

Old to new Jackson says many of her institutional projects have stemmed from renovations. When a museum is updating or builds a new wing, suddenly it becomes evident that against its brightly painted new walls, the paintings, and especially their frames, need freshening up. Some of these projects for Jackson included the opening of the Art of Americas Wing at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston in the fall of 2010 where she spent years working on hundreds of frames. Likewise, starting in 2012, Jackson spent two years working on frames for the Harvard Art Museums while they were closed for renovations. Jackson was the museum’s first staff frame conservator. The project entailed creating many new frames for historic paintings, with the task of aging them to appear as if they were period and original to the painting. Now Jackson is currently looking forward to moving toward increasing her private clientele and using her new studio in Wilmot. She relishes building relationships with private clients and learning the stories of their artwork’s history and how they acquired them. She appreciates the opportunity 62

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to pass along her knowledge of gilding. She loves examining objects in order to glean any information about their history. Her hope is that the next time you are in a museum you take a moment to appreciate frames as works of art as well. Rosanna Eubank Long has her own art advisory, appraisal and estate services firm: Rosanna Eubank LLC. She majored in art history at Barnard College, Columbia University and has her master’s degree in Decorative Arts, Design History, and Material Culture. She has worked for Christies Auction in Los Angeles and New York City and was a research assistant at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in the American Decorative Arts Department. She lives in New London, N.H., with her husband, three kids, a giant dog, and two normal sized cats.

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WH Y WE LO VE IT H ERE • REAL ES TAT E S E C T I ON


WHY WE L OV E IT HERE • REAL ESTATE SECTION

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WHY WE LOVE IT HERE

Real Estate

Lake Sunapee Dreaming From local realtors to online options, there’s always a way to enjoy the Lake Sunapee/Kearsarge area. By Alicia Morse and Laura Jean Whitcomb

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irbnb was founded in 2008 by two roommates who couldn’t pay their monthly rent on their San Francisco apartment. They set up an air mattress in the living room and offered it as a bed and breakfast, sparking the business idea: a website which offered short-term living quarters for those who were unable to book a hotel. The idea quickly expanded to include vacationers — individuals, couples and families who wanted to explore a city or area. While online rentals grow in popularity, the option doesn’t always appeal to everyone. Fortunately, most Kearsarge/ Lake Sunapee real estate agents list rentals, both short-term and long-term. Better Homes and Gardens in New London offers, for example, a Sunapee rental available during ski season, January to March, or a Blodgett Landing home in Newbury that may be rented for $250/night with two-night minimum. Sunapee Getaways, now part of Relax & Co, has been offering vacation rentals to folks since 1986. They provide services — like pre-qualifying homeowners and renters, management of property during rental, and rental cleaning — to make everyone feel comfortable throughout the entire process. “There are many benefits of

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going through a reputable rental company or realtor that specializes in vacation rentals,” says Meredith Moran, vice president of rentals and guest relations expert. “Consider it ‘one-stop shopping’ since you can peruse a greater inventory of rentals, receive objective advice regarding your options, and let the realtor deal with the paperwork, plus while you are at your rental you will always have someone to call in case of emergency and someone who will advocate for you should the need arise.” Current client Emily Baldwin describes Relax & Co’s service. “I started using them to rent out my lake house to others when they were still called Sunapee Getaways,” she says. “I was much more comfortable using them than listing my property on Airbnb since I was living in New Jersey and knew that I would not be able to handle any last-minute emergencies that came up…and they do come up. My renters have had issues like the freezer warming up to a leaky shower to the well pump shutting down. Relax & Co’s 24-hour team always took care of things immediately, which meant that my renters were still happy and I was not awakened in the middle of the night as I was not in the position to help them anyway.”

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You can rent a lake house in Newbury.

Buying a vacation home Like many Bostonians, Alicia and Matt Morse love living and working in the city, but they longed to own a second home in the country. They funded regular weekend breaks by renting out their apartment in Boston and quickly realized the income generating potential that a well-

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You may think that you need to be a millionaire to afford a vacation home on Lake Sunapee — or be lucky enough to inherit a family cottage passed down over the years — but enterprising individuals have found creative ways to afford their dream vacation home. located vacation home could create. They spent months analyzing what makes a successful vacation area and finally honed in on the incredible attraction that the Lake Sunapee area generates for vacations. The stunning lake scenery, mountain skiing,

breathtaking hiking, top golfing and fall foliage are a natural draw for outdoor adventurers and vacationers looking to enjoy fresh air and fun activities. This is what makes the market for second homes around Kearsarge so interesting, particularly for those considering starting their

WHY WE L OV E IT HERE • REAL ESTATE SECTION

own bed and breakfast or vacation rental business. Equally important is a financial projection. “While the mortgage is a fixed outgoing, the income can fluctuate wildly, particularly with seasonal vacation rental homes,” she says. “However, if you compare the possible income from an annual rental with a short-term vacation rental using Airbnb or HomeAway, it can be an eye opener. Vacation rentals generally command more income in one week than the same property generates in a month from a long-term renter. However, there are some extra outgoing costs that vacation rentals incur, such as cleaning and marketing, which all have to be taken into account.” Having decided the “where” and the “how”, the next step for Matt and Alicia was to find a suitable property. They enlisted the help of buying agent Deane Geddes at Coldwell Banker Lifestyles and selling agent Pamela Perkins at Four Seasons SIR. Geddes became an invaluable source of information about the area and helped the couple draw up a list of potential properties. They found a house they liked which was not on the market so they decided to write a letter to the owners inquiring if they knew of anyone in that neighborhood who might be willing to sell. While double checking the mailing address on their sealed envelope, they discovered the property was listed for sale four hours earlier. They couldn’t believe the odds, and the house that they picked out as their ideal choice became their Newbury vacation home. ›››››

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Real Estate

“We love the fact that we can actually afford to have two places — a city place that’s paid for by renting out our lake house, and a vacation home in a prime vacation area which we can use ourselves when it’s not rented out,” says Alicia. “If you want in on vacation home ownership, be sure to research your chosen area, use local specialists and contractors, be patient and never give up!”

Online and offline

Jim Block

Local businesses have capitalized on the rental market as well. Tiff and Carolyn Stanley built a two-story tree house in Newbury that they rent out by advertising locally, through online sites like Airbnb and glampinghub.com, and through their own website (tiffhill.com). Autumn Harvest Farm in Grafton, N.H., offers a bed and breakfast

Alicia and Matt Morse actively market their Lake Sunapee house through HomeAway and Airbnb and work hard to get those all-important positive reviews. It’s something to consider if you have a property you’d like to rent. If you are looking for a vacation rental, you can combine the best of both worlds: use both online and offline methods, meaning locate a rental property online and then deal directly with the rental company or real estate agent offline. “For potential renters looking to spend time in the lovely Lake Sunapee region, Relax & Co offers the opportunity to relax,” says Jim Bruss, president. “We have built our company on the belief that visitors to our region should not have to worry about the day-to-day hassles they deal with at home. Our

listing on Airbnb for a family or group to rent the entire upstairs of the LeBlanc’s home, which includes three bedrooms, a shared bath and a shared living/breakfast room space. “I got the listing up after Thanksgiving last year and we were booked every weekend and some weekdays from the weekend before New Years through the end of March. It helped our farm get through the winter,” Suzanne LeBlanc says. “Since then we've had two to three bookings each month.” Early morning guests inspired a breakfast buffet at the café, which has been popular with local residents as well. The only downfall, says Suzanne: “lots of laundry and cleaning! If it continues this summer, I might be able to pay to have a cleaning person full time — but I will still have laundry!”

Jim Block

You can rent a two-story treehouse.

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WH Y WE LO VE IT H ERE • REAL ES TAT E S E C T I ON


WEB

Jim Block

relaxandcompany.com lakesunapeehouse.com bhgmilestone.com/rentals cblifestylesre.com fourseasonssir.com/newlondon autumnharvestnh.com/bnb tiffhill.com

Concierge Services department can handle literally every need — from grocery shopping to pet sitting to catering to child care — you name it, we can do it.”

You can stay at a farm in Grafton, N. H.

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Real Estate (Home Improvement)

Custom Glass Shop

Family-owned American Plate Glass can solve any glass problem — from replacement windows to custom showers to new glass for an old cabinet. By Allison Rogers Furbish Photography by Leigh Ann Root

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hen Charlestown, N.H., native Mindy Scott and her husband Doug bought the American Plate Glass Company five years ago, they joined an exclusive group of people. “We’re only the fourth owners in a hundred years. It’s pretty cool,” Doug says. Not only that, but it’s the oldest glass company in the state “by far,” Doug says, and he’s heard rumors that it may be one of oldest in the country. “I’m proud to own a business that’s been around that long and family owned.”

“If I wouldn’t put it in my own house, I won’t put it in someone else’s,” Mindy Scott says. “That’s the standard that has kept this glass company going: personal attention from hands-on owners who love what we do.” Owners Mindy and Doug Scott 72

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WH Y WE LO VE IT H ERE • REAL ES TAT E S E C T I ON


American Plate Glass was founded in 1926 in Claremont, N. H.

History American Plate Glass is located on Pleasant Street in Claremont, N.H., in a 1800s house turned monument company and then glass store. The business was founded in 1926 by George Trepanier, Sr. For decades, trains would pull up right outside the shop carrying cases of glass precut to basic window sizes, Doug says. Trepanier hired local kids to unload the cardboard and wooden crates, and “that would be the

inventory.” Today, he says, they don’t stock lots of precut glass — instead they buy big sheets and cut them down to the customer’s specifications right there in the shop. During World War II, Trepanier was one of the only U.S. distributors for wire glass, Mindy says. Wire glass had been the only available safety glass, she says, but it was next to impossible to get due to wartime limitations on metals. “George was an entrepreneur and he looked

WHY WE L OV E IT HERE • REAL ESTATE SECTION

outside the country to get it,” she says. The glass was shipped from overseas and carried by train right to American Plate Glass — from where Trepanier distributed it nationally. Trepanier eventually sold the business to his son, George Jr., who along with his wife Linda ran the business successfully until retiring in 1999. They sold it to Leigh and Linda Kelk, Canadians who enjoyed vacationing ›››››

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Real Estate (Home Improvement)

in Sunapee, N.H., and bought the business as a way to stay in the area, Doug says.

Owner number four Fourteen years to the day later, Doug and Mindy purchased American Plate Glass from the Kelks. This year they celebrate five years since they made the leap. With close to $1 million in sales annually, American Plate Glass has nearly doubled in sales since Mindy and Doug took over. “Showers are our bread and butter,” Mindy says. Where wire glass and singlepane window glass were the core of the business at its founding, today the Scotts live on fancy showers. “We do a ton of frameless showers,” Doug says. “It amazes me to this day how many of those we do. We put in hundreds a year” — sometimes five or more in one house. They also re-glaze old windows, and sell and install insulated glass windows and vinyl replacement windows, doors and screen doors, aluminum frame storefront windows and doors, and vanity and gym mirrors. They do high-end custom windows, glass railings, and glass tabletops. Doug has recently started etching glass by hand, creating a new door for Whelan Engineering featuring their logo, and replacing the curved, etched glass in a historic door in Woodstock, Vt. He also enjoys taking on historic projects like the restoration of a 1700s farmhouse in Bradford, N.H., with old windows that need to be re-glazed. The Scotts prioritize doing business locally and regionally — whether it’s a reciprocal rela74

The team: Joey Carter, Doug Scott and William Brooks

tionship with LaValley Building Supply across the street or their partnerships with the Massachusetts-based National Vinyl for consumer windows (“They have a lifetime guarantee in a disposable world,” Mindy says), Maine-based Sigco for insulated glass, or Boston-based Karas & Karas, which provides their flat and tempered glass. “As much as we can do business in town, we do,” Mindy says. And when they can’t, they try to keep it domestic.

Exceptional customer service Mindy and Scott hadn’t always dreamed of owning a glass company. “If you had told me six years ago that I’d be sitting here talking to you, I’d have laughed in your face,” Mindy says. She came to the business after a 21-year teaching career, all but one year at Claremont’s Stevens High School. Doug had done a variety of jobs over the years, including working

Kearsarge Magazine • Fall 2018 • kearsargemagazine.com

as a blacksmith before joining American Plate Glass as a glazier and installer in 2001. When the opportunity came to purchase the business in 2013, the pair jumped on it. “My husband’s dream was to own his own business,” Mindy says. She continued working at the school for the first year, doing the business books on the side. “But we were growing pretty quick,” Doug says — doubling sales within two years to about $1 million. In 2014 they purchased Woodstock Glass Works in Woodstock, Vt., which Mindy says gave them added financial strength. Today she acts as chief executive, while Doug plays the role of chief operating officer, working outside the shop with clients, contractors and their two-person crew. “I get to work with my best friend,” Mindy says. They’ve made some changes to the business model over the

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years to lighten the load — no more 16-hour days for Doug — that have increased profits even as they’ve brought sales down to a more manageable level. “I like the mom-and-pop shop aspect of it. We’ve expanded a little bit, but not a huge amount,” says Doug. “We wanted to keep everything affordable. And we’re big on customer service — it keeps people coming back.” Allison Rogers Furbish is a freelance writer and nonprofit communications professional with a passion for sharing stories about the people and places that make our region vibrant. An Upper Valley native, Allison enjoys the quiet life with her husband and kids in Canaan, N.H. Leigh Ann Root is a freelance writer, photographer and yoga instructor. She teaches yoga throughout the Lake Sunapee region. Her traveling yoga business is Sunapee Yoga Company, sunapeeyogacompany.com. Leigh Ann lives in Newbury, N. H., with her husband, Jonathan and two children, Parker and Joleigh.

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S P ECIAL AD VER T IS ING S E C T I ON


SPE C I AL ADVER TISING SECTION

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N I Y STA

G E TH

E AM

N M TU

U A L AL

in a P o

N | n o i t a t i l i ab h e R | s c i d e a p ho t r O 241 Elm Street | Claremont | VRH.org | 603-542-7666


P.O. Box 1482 Grantham, NH 03753

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Kearsarge Magazine fall 2018  

Get ready for cooler weather and gorgeous colors with the fall issue of Kearsarge Magazine! Lake Sunapee, NH, businesses, people and landsca...

Kearsarge Magazine fall 2018  

Get ready for cooler weather and gorgeous colors with the fall issue of Kearsarge Magazine! Lake Sunapee, NH, businesses, people and landsca...

Profile for kearsarge
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