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After years of disappointment, Martin County ESPA wins recognition, the right to a contract for classified employees When the Martin County school board voted 4-1 at its October 8 meeting to recognize the Martin County Education Support Professionals Association and agreed to bargain with MCESPA on a contract for the district’s classified school employees, the association’s leaders paused briefly to celebrate a milestone they have worked toward for years. For youth services center director Nora Ray, president of MCESPA, the wait has been 23 years. Ray said that throughout those years, “I have been a member of the union and the school district never would recognize us. I have been told many times they never would. “I just want to be treated fairly,” Ray added. “That’s all. Just treat us fairly.” Sonny Vaughan, who works as an HVAC master for Martin County Schools and is vice president of MCESPA, is making his second serious attempt at organizing the district’s classified employees. He said, “I was very involved in the early 2000s, but I got away from it.” Vaughan said his efforts a decade ago ultimately proved disappointing because “it is hard to get people in this community to stand for something. Our classified employees here were told, ‘You don’t need KEA. Whatever KEA gets for the teachers, you’ll get.’

Leaders of the Martin County Education Support Professionals Association (clockwise from left): Glemia Dalton, secretary; Sonny Vaughan, vice president; Connie Brewer, treasurer; and Nora Ray, president.

And they accepted that. Of course, their bosses never told them they wouldn’t get any representation, or that it’s ‘my way or the highway’ and you have no protection in your job.” Vaughan said he got “frustrated with the membership.” Though he and other leaders recruited well at the time and “probably had

the largest sign-up they ever had here,” he said. “If you only get half the people you really can’t get much done. We just didn’t have enough employees sign up and say they would stand up.” By 2010, said KEA UniServ Director Tim Southern, Martin County ESPA, “was a stagnant

local, without leadership or anything going on.” That was when Glemia Dalton “stepped up and said, let’s do this.” Dalton, a transportation dispatcher, bus driver and driver trainer, said, “We had to do something. I didn’t like what was going on. Somebody had to step up.” With Dalton as president; bus driver Connie Brewer as treasurer; Robin Howard as secretary and the late Fred McCoy as vice president, Southern said the local “got active again, and we started talking about contracts and recognition for ESP members.” “We told the board members we wanted a contract like the teachers had,” Dalton said. “We told them we needed it because we weren’t being treated right without it.” Southern added, “It just blossomed from there.” On June 9 of this year, after Dalton had told the group she wanted to stay active but couldn’t continue as president, they met and held elections. Members of MCESPA elected Ray and Vaughn and re-elected Brewer, and then, Southern said, “We set some goals.” Ray said, “We started talking about relationships. And when we left, we had a plan to get to know the members of the school board, and to let them get to know us.” The leaders Please see ‘For Martin County’ on page 4

Boone County ESP president Hamelin secures local’s future by mentoring ‘next generation’ Joe Hamelin, who in nearly eight years as president of the Boone County Classified Employees Association has more than doubled its membership and built a productive working relationship with

Boone County Public Schools management, the Boone County school board and other EA and ESPA groups in northern Kentucky, is not taking any chances with BCCEA’s future; he already has begun to mentor the next generation of association leaders. Heather Shultz, a bus driver Hamelin recruited into leadership in the local last year, is secretary of BCCEA and one of the local’s recruiters. She attended a KEA-led recruitment training workshop with Hamelin last year and now periodically visits with classified school employees at

their work sites to talk with them about the benefits of membership in KEA. Hamelin said the recruiting effort was conceived as part of a KEA membership grant BCCEA applied for and received two years ago. “For a long time BCCEA was perceived as a ‘bus drivers’ local,” Hamelin said. “Most of our members were drivers because we were drivers and it was easiest to recruit drivers. That’s who we worked with. We realized if we were going to really grow we needed to find a way to get into the schools and other work sites to recruit other classified employees.” The KEA grant, which was to have been for one year but, Hamelin said, he “managed to stretch out over two years,” paid for release time for BCCEA Heather Shultz, secretary of the Boone County Classified Employees Association recruiters to make those school (second from left), talked with her mentor, visits and visits to other work sites BCCEA President Joe Hamelin, before the start of the group’s October meeting.

Please see ‘Emerging KEA leader’ on page 5


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KEA needs all its voices, KEA is a unified classified and certified organization for all During my 15 years teaching fourth grade in Madison County I knew every day that I could not hope to do my job without the constant support of the classified employees in my school. We were all part of a team: the bus drivers who bring the children safely to school each day and see them home again; the custodians and maintenance personnel who keep the building clean and safe and warm; the nutritionists and lunch ladies who feed the children hot nutritious meals; the secretaries who keep the records and make the office run smoothly; and the instructional assistants who work alongside us in our classrooms each play an important role in the Stephanie Winkler education of every student. KEA President That is why it is important to me that we take the time to highlight the hard work of KEA’s ESP members, and the hard work they do in every school district in the state for the betterment of their schools and of our association. The stories in this special “ESP focus” issue of KEA News will introduce you to education support professionals who hold leadership positions in their local associations and in KEA. But it is important to remember that there are thousands of other classified school employees who belong to KEA, and whose memberships are just as important as any other. Phyllis Bryant is an instructional assistant at South Todd County Elementary School. She has been a KEA member for a little more than a year, and said she joined because “KEA offers protection.” That is true, but we offer so much more—such as advocacy for professional development for para-educators like Phyllis, and opportunities for her and her peers to attend events like the KEA TALK conference. Phyllis Bryant Instructional assistants need the chance to improve their instructional skills and understanding just as much as teachers do, because they are right there with the students in the classroom, every day. KEA also needs members like Matthew Powell, the custodian at Graves County Middle School. There is no organized local yet for ESPs in Graves County, but Matthew holds the position of KEA representative for his fellow classified school employees there. He attends meetings of the Graves County EA, and talks regularly with his KEA UniServ director, and relays information from KEA to Matthew Powell the other ESPs in his school district. He said, “When someone has a question about a job issue or legal services, I get them in touch with our UniServ director.” Sharon Faul, an instructional assistant in the Danville Independent Schools, reached out to KEA for training to develop her leadership skills and was selected for the first class of KEA Fellows, a group of 24 members who will receive a year of training and mentorship in preparation for leadership roles in the association. Sharon is one of four ESPs in the 2013-2014 Fellows class. The others are Heather Shultz, Boone County; Nora Ray, Martin Sharon Faul County; and Lakilia Bedeau, Paducah Independent. Just as the success of every school and the achievement of its students depends on the contribution of every member of its faculty and staff, the future success of KEA will depend in part on how well we bring together all the members of our association family and raise up the voices of new leaders in every job classification.

Kentucky Education Association

school employees

Decades ago, I was local association president when we organized to advocate for reasonable raises from the school board. Even though I was president of the local association for teachers, we included our classified sisters and brothers in our organizing campaign. That campaign taught me a valuable lesson about the power of all school employees working together toward a common goal. With all employees united, our school board could not help but pay attention to us. We got our raises, not as much as we deserved, but more than we would have gotten if we had not organized. More personally, several of my heroes are education support Mary Ann Blankenship professionals (ESPs), KEA Executive Director which is what the association calls classified school employees. My favorite aunt and another older relative both managed school cafeterias. Not only could they cook; they talked about “their” students as though they had given birth to every one of the students in the schools where they worked. Sadly, in the last year, America has seen the dedication of two more heroic ESPs. Last December in Sandy Hook, CT teacher’s aide Anne Marie Murphy shielded one of her students as bullets rained down on both of them. The student’s parents feel some comfort that their son was not alone when he died. In February, far away from the upper middle class suburb of Sandy Hook, CT, in poor, rural, South Alabama, school bus driver Charles Poland refused to allow a gunman to take his students hostage. Poland said, “It’s my responsibility to keep these kids on the bus. I can’t turn them over to somebody else.” The gunman subsequently killed Mr. Poland. As incredibly sad as these two stories are, they do not surprise me. Last summer I was privileged to join NEA Executive Director John Stocks in visiting schools in eastern Kentucky. As a bus driver drove us up and down the hollers in their area, he was able to identify each family and their needs and their children’s joys. Listening to the cafeteria staff worry about student hunger, there was no question that all the children in the school are theirs. I am incredibly proud that KEA today is a unified organization of all school employees. Among our members, we count classified and certified employees, retired school employees, and college students becoming teachers. KEA’s path to unity was not always a smooth one. But today, we have come to a place in our history when we work together more often than we work against each other.

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‘We need voices at the microphones’

KESPA President Nancy Toombs says KEA is doing a good job of identifying and training new ESP leaders Nancy Toombs, president of KEA’s KESPA district, remembers clearly what moved her to become an association leader and an advocate for her classified school employee colleagues. “What made me decide to commit myself completely to the association,” Toombs said, “was that I saw people around me who weren’t being treated fairly. We weren’t getting the pay increases that we thought we deserved. We were being asked to do things that were totally out of what we felt was our realm of expertise. There was no training whatsoever. No professional development. We were being told, ‘This is what you do.’ We never were privy to school board policies. And while we knew we could go to school board meetings, we didn’t know that our voice could actually be heard.” But what galvanized her, and “lit the fire” that has fueled her 28 years in association leadership was KERA. She said, “The Kentucky Education Reform Act was passed in 1990 and by 1992 everything was being implemented. Site-based councils were being formed and we were not being included. There was no place for classified employees on the councils. So I went to my superintendent

and said, ‘What about classified school employees? Why aren’t we there?’ And that is when he told me, ‘You need to lobby. This came down from the state, that site-based councils would have two parents and three teachers. I guess you were an oversight.’” Toombs said Dr. Gayle Ecton, who was then superintendent of Henderson County Schools, told her, “’You need someone to represent you outside of the school system.’ He never would come out and say, ‘you need KESPA,’ but I knew that’s what he meant, and he supported me when I went to attend my first statewide KESPA meeting.” At that first meeting she attended, Toombs said, KESPA president Helen Cottongim asked her to be part of the KESPA lobbying team. Not long after that, Cottongim asked her and some other up-and-coming KESPA members to attend a meeting in Elizabethtown and told her, “I think you’d make a good president.” She said Cottongim was part of a group of KESPA leaders who were “looking for people to run for office, people who would carry on the goals and the mission and the vision that KESPA had for classified school employees.” When Cottongim suggested she run for president, she said, she was “shocked.” But she went back to Henderson and again sought the advice of her superintendent, who encouraged her. In 1994 she was elected president of KESPA for the first time. KESPA was a separate organization, affiliated with NEA but not directly with KEA, until delegates to the 2002 KEA Delegate Assembly voted overwhelmingly to approve an amendment to the KEA constitution that opened the door to membership for classified employees and made KESPA a KEA district association. In the decade since, Toombs said she and other leaders of the KESPA district have worked to help ESP members find their places in KEA leadership, and “to learn to use the many resources and opportunities that KEA and NEA provide to advocate for the specific needs of classified school employees.” KEA is “doing a good job of raising up new voices, and teaching them to step up for what we need in public education,” Toombs added. “But when it comes to specific needs for our job, we still need people who will go to those microphones at the KEA DA and the NEA RA and make sure that the new business items or the legislative agenda items are totally inclusive. That they include classified school employees.” Toombs said that through her involvement in NEA and KEA she has been able to get “high quality professional development and leadership training that just aren’t available to classified school employees in our school districts or anywhere else. Nancy Toombs, who is custodial supervisor at South Heights Elementary “I can’t say enough about how important it is for ESP members School in Henderson and president of KEA’s KESPA district, pulled cafeteria duty during one of the school’s lunch periods recently. Though her job title is to try to take advantage of those opportunities,” she added. “These are opportunities we can only get through NEA and KEA.” “custodian,” Toombs said, she “spends a lot of time working with students.”

KEA NEWS

Volume 50, Issue 2; November 2013 Stephanie Winkler, President; Lisa Petrey-Kirk, Vice President; Mary Ann Blankenship, Executive Director; Charles Main, Editor Periodical postage paid at Louisville, Kentucky. KEA News is published five times a year, in September, November, March, May and July, by the Kentucky Education Association, 401 Capital Avenue, Frankfort, KY 40601. Phone 800231-4532. KEA News is the official publi­cation of KEA and reaches all KEA members. The annual subscription rate to members is $1.50, included in annual dues. The subscription rate to others is $5.

Why should ESP members attend the KEA Delegate Assembly and the NEA R A? “You get the opportunity to travel, and be around people from other parts of the state, in the case of the Delegate Assembly, or from other parts of the country when it comes to NEA meetings like the Representative Assembly. There is no professional development whatever for classified school employees in school districts, but when you get an opportunity to travel to a KEA DA or an NEA RA you get to meet people from other places that do the same jobs you do, and you may learn from them things that they do that you haven’t thought about doing in your own school district. So it’s very much like professional development. And NEA is real good about the trainings that they do when we go away, that we get professional development from them. “I have learned a lot through my adventures away. I’ve learned how to lobby. I have learned about the political arena. I have learned how to bring back information to my members about their rights. I am able to say to my members and to my school district, ‘Here is what it says in the law.’” -- Nancy Toombs, Custodial Supervisor, South Heights Elementary School, Henderson County, and President of KEA’s Kentucky Education Support Professionals Association district.

ISSN 0164-3959 Postmaster: Send address changes to KEA News, 401 Capital Avenue, Frankfort, KY 40601

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Kentucky Education Association


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Raise your hands, KEA members No one sees the impact of school funding cuts on students and on their own pocketbooks more than KEA members. Whether it’s a lack of textbook funds, no professional development, creeping class sizes, or reduced take-home pay, every day you suffer from the state’s unwillingness to fund public schools adequately. Over the next few months, KEA members

across the state will organize locally around school funding issues, to send the message clearly to the Kentucky General Assembly that “enough is enough.” We’re asking lawmakers, all educators, parents, and the community to “raise your hand” in support of public schools. More information is available at www.KEA.org and on the “Raise Your Hand Kentucky” page on Facebook.

For Martin County ESPA, ‘trust wasn’t the issue’ Continued from page 1

contacted members of the board and asked them out to lunch, or to dinner, to “just talk about who we were, and what we wanted, and why.” Brewer said, “They were very supportive. I was shocked at that.” Dalton agreed. “They were supportive. And in the end, they finally did vote to recognize us.” The hardest part of the plan turned out to be getting on the agenda for a school board meeting. Ray went to the office of Martin County schools superintendent Steve Meadows and asked to be put on the agenda “for three months in a row,” she said. Then she spoke to the chairman of the school board. She approached him after a meeting and asked how to get on the agenda. “He said, ‘you have to speak to the superintendent,’ who was standing right next to me,” Ray said. “And the superintendent said, ‘You have to talk to me.’ So I pushed him for an appointment and we met two days later in his office.” Ray said in that meeting Meadows “said he didn’t want us to be KEA. He asked, ‘Do

you really need it? Don’t you feel you can trust me? Do you not feel I will treat you fairly?’” Ray said she asked Meadows, “What if you’re not here tomorrow. What if we have to go back to square one with someone new? It’s not about trust. It’s about security.’ But he kept saying, ‘You don’t need a contract. You can trust me. You can come to me.’” Dalton said, “I told him the same thing Nora did. I said, ‘We have to look to the future. It’s not just about now. We have to look at, when you’re gone, who is going to be in there? We have to be ready for the future.’ And he actually said he understood that.” As a result of that meeting, MCESPA got a place on the agenda for the October 8 meeting of the school board. Connie Brewer spoke for the group and the board debated the question for 30 minutes. During the debate Martin County EA president Tom Setzer went to the mike to say, “I want it on the record that MCEA supports this,” Southern said, and added, “Finally, [board member]

Donetta Harless said, ‘Let’s go ahead and recognize them. Let’s make a motion tonight.’ So Gary Ball made the motion and the board approved it.” The final vote was 4-1, with only the board chair voting against the motion. Ray said, “The next day I was told by two board members, ‘Don’t let us down. We voted for this for you all. Don’t let us down.’” Martin County ESPA’s leaders now are preparing to bargain the first contract for classified school employees in the district’s history. Southern said there remains “a lot of work to be done, but we’ve made that first big step. And the classified employees in this county are noticing. They’re getting excited.” Vaughan, the MCESPA vice president, said, “Maybe now this will light a fire under some of those who have been content to sit on their hands for so long. You can cry about your wages, cry about your working conditions, but the only way you’re going to change them is to have a voice. We are that voice.”

Emerging KEA Leader Heather Shultz hopes to give other ESP members the chances she has been given Continued from page 1

to recruit new members. “I think you can call it a success,” Hamelin said, with typical humor. “We promised 50 new members in our grant application and we delivered 150.” Hamelin said Shultz played a key role in that recruitment effort and, “If she chooses to go that route, she will make a good leader of this local when her time comes.” In April of this year, Hamelin nominated Shultz for the NEA ESP Leaders for Tomorrow program, and she was accepted for the 20132014 class. Leaders for Tomorrow is a threesession training program held over a period of eight months, to train current and future ESP leaders in the “attitudes, skills, and knowledge that will enhance their ability to be visible, vocal advocates at the local, state, and national levels of the NEA.” Shultz already has attended two of those sessions, in Minneapolis, MN, in July and earlier this month in Washington, DC. Her final training will be next March at the NEA ESP National Conference in San Francisco. In September, Shulz learned that she was named a member of the inaugural class of the KEA Fellows, a new program created by KEA President Stephanie Winkler and Vice President Lisa Petrey-Kirk to identify, nurture and train emerging association leaders. Shultz said Hamelin “has supported and encouraged me every step of the way. He has listened to my ideas and has helped me learn. He makes a weekly encouragement call to me and he encourages me to attend any professional development I can, that will help me improve my leadership skills.”

As she prepares for a possible leadership role in the association, Shultz said, she will try to follow Hamelin’s example. “Joe is a very strong and knowledgeable leader of the association,” she said. “Joe takes the time to listen and encourage anyone wishing to be involved. If you are willing to be involved he does all he can to help and teach you. Joe has persuaded Heather Shultz (left), secretary of Boone County Classified Employees so many ESPs Association, shared a joke with another member at BCCEA’s October meeting. by persistence, patience, and to build my own relationships with the people dedication. He Joe has built relationships with. I will work has a knack for building relationships with just about everyone who crosses his path. Because to keep the relationships that he has with he listens to them. He listens to their issues, the board of education in place.” She added concern, and needs. Joe has built relationships that she intends to “develop my role in KEA with superintendents, principals, teachers, slowly,” and to “strive to work with others in and ESPs. His actions prove he cares.” the association, who are stronger in areas If she gets the chance to take a I am not.” Ultimately, she said, she wants leadership role in her local, Shultz said, she to “help teach classes at the conferences, will concentrate on continuing the work that to educate and inform other members.” Hamelin has done. She said, “I am working

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Kathy Hobbs, first ESP elected chair of a KEA standing committee, says, ‘When you have a passion for something, anything is possible’ Kathy Hobbs never expected to find herself the chair of one of KEA’s four standing committees. Hobbs, an instructional assistant at College View Middle School in Daviess County, first was elected to fill the unexpired term of the KESPA district representative on the Compliance/Constitution Committee in 2008. She was elected to her first full term on the committee in 2009. This year, after five years on the committee, Hobbs became the first ESP member to be elected chair of a KEA standing committee. “In my experience,” said Hobbs, who has represented KESPA on two other committees, “Compliance/Constitution is definitely the hardest working committee. But it is also the best group of people. I think the people on that committee understand the importance of what we do, and they take it seriously and work hard. We are in charge of registration and records for the Delegate Assembly and for conducting the elections of all statewide KEA officers, and we have the power to set the tone for a lot of what goes on in KEA.” She said her election to the chair of the committee “shows that if you have a passion—and I have a passion for KEA, there is no doubt—you can learn so much from the things and people around you if you take advantage of the opportunities you are given.” Hobbs never really set out to become a school employee in the first place. At 19, she was studying to be a surgical tech when illness forced her to take a semester off from school. During that time away she met and married her husband, started a family and “never got around to going back to my surgical tech program.” Five years later, when her son entered kindergarten at Ohio County High School,

which included grades K-12, she began volunteering there, “as a lot of mothers do.” Hobbs said the principal approached her one day and said, “’We’ve got a couple of difficult students that we are not sure what to do with.’ That’s when I should have run. Instead, I began spending big parts of my day working with them, kind of following them from class to class and helping them get through parts of the day that they weren’t real comfortable

with. I worked with the little guys in the morning and then in the afternoon I went upstairs and worked with a couple of high school students.” Five years into that job, Hobbs said, she decided she wanted her children to go to school in Daviess County where she was raised, so in 1990 she applied for and got a job as a teacher’s assistant in a selfcontained EBD unit at Burns Middle School. In 2000 Hobbs went to the Daviess County bus garage to attend an organizing meeting for KESPA, the Kentucky Education Support Professionals Association. The organizers were Betty Watson, long-time KESPA Executive

Director and Nancy Toombs, the Henderson County school custodial supervisor who has been president of KESPA since 1994. Hobbs was ready to hear their message. “I grew up in a union household” Hobbs said. “I married a union pipefitter. And there had been so many days when I got home from school and said, ‘There has got to be something for us. The teachers have their organization. There has to be something for us, to have out there to protect us.’ Because more and more issues were being put on assistants at that time.” Hobbs said, “Before I knew it, I was president of Daviess County KESPA.” She attended her first KEA Delegate Assembly and NEA Representative Assembly in 2001. The following year, she was in Louisville when delegates to the 2002 Delegate Assembly approved the amendment to the KEA constitution that brought KESPA into KEA and made classified school employees eligible for full KEA membership. “Then,” she said, “A whole new battle began. Inclusion happened. It is there. We are all KEA members now. Moving forward, we had to work at making sure that a KEA member was a KEA member, no matter what they did in the school. We had to make sure that KEA was a family. ESPs want to be valued. We have opinions. We want to be part of the system. We want to be on the committees. We want to help make decisions for students. We work with them directly.” Hobbs said there are still “battles to be fought in the legislature, like getting a place for ESPs on site-based school councils, but I think everything is moving forward. The EAs are more than willing to include us and help grow membership. It’s up to us to seize the opportunities.”

Candidates for KEA office must declare by January 15 Delegates to the 142nd KEA Delegate Assembly April 2-4, 2014, will vote in elections for two statewide KEA offices. The delegates will elect a KEA Ethnic Minority Director at Large and one of two NEA State Directors. Any active member of KEA who meets the eligibility criteria may run for one of these seats, and must declare

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candidacy in writing on the official candidate filing form no later than January 15, 2014. To receive a copy of the form, contact the Compliance/ Constitution Committee through its staff liaison, Mary Ruble, Assistant Executive Director, at KEA headquarters in Frankfort, either by email to mary. ruble@kea.org or by calling (800) 231-4532.

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6 Smith-Wilson Award nominations due by February 21 You can help KEA identify and recognize outstanding individuals or groups encouraging cultural diversity and tolerance in Kentucky schools by nominating them for the Lucy Harth Smith-Atwood S. Wilson Award for Human and Civil Rights in Education. The KEA Smith-Wilson Award is presented to an individual or group for continuing work in the area of multicultural education, contributions to the advancement of educational opportunities for minorities, contributions to the availability of multicultural educational materials, contributions in the areas of innovative and creative

strategies to advance and develop leadership opportunities for gender equitable and culturally diverse populations and leadership in the field of human relations. Nominations for the 2014 Smith-Wilson Award will be accepted until February 21, 2014. To begin the nomination process, contact the member of the KEA Diversity Committee in your area. A list of the KEA Diversity Committee members and the Smith-Wilson nomination form can be found on the KEA website at www.kea.org. For additional information, contact Bridget Brown at KEA headquarters in Frankfort by calling (800) 231-4532.

Diversity lesson plan entries due at KEA February 21 Four KEA members will be awarded $200 scholarships at the Smith-Wilson Award Breakfast for submitting the winning entries in the KEA Diversity Lesson Plan Contest, administered annually by the KEA Diversity Committee. The deadline for submission of entries is February 21, 2014. All entries must be submitted to Bridget S. Brown at KEA, 401 Capitol Avenue, Frankfort, Kentucky 40601. The KEA Diversity

Lesson Plan Contest entry form and format requirements are available on the KEA website at www.kea.org. By entering the KEA Diversity Committee Lesson Plan Contest, you consent to the publication of your lesson plan submission if selected as a winning entry. The winning lesson plan entries will be posted on the members-only section of the KEA website following the KEA Delegate Assembly.

Nominations for election of Kentucky delegates to 2014 NEA Representative Assembly in Denver are due at KEA by January 15 Active KEA members who are interested in attending the 2014 NEA RA may nominate themselves to be elected as delegates. Active members will elect state delegates in an online election scheduled for March 1-30, 2014, at www.kea.org. (Retired and student members will choose their delegates to the RA in separate elections.) Nominees will run and be elected in either the “East” or “West” region. Your region is determined by the county where you work. You may run and vote only in the appropriate region. Members who wish to run in the delegate election should complete the nomination form

below and return it to KEA by Wednesday, January 15, 2014, at 5:00 pm (EST). Only the official nomination form (whether the original or a copy) will be accepted. You must limit the biographical information you provide to 25 words or less. KEA reserves the right to edit the information you submit for spelling and grammar, and will include on the election ballot only the first 25 words of any submission. You may submit a photo with your nomination form, but that is not required. If you choose to submit a photo, a regular paper photo is acceptable; a photo submitted electronically

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should be submitted in JPEG format. Properly completed forms may be submitted any one of three ways: via fax to 502-6968915; via e-mail to KEA-NEA-Delegate@kea. org; or via regular mail to Kentucky Education Association, ATTN: NEA Delegate Election, 401 Capitol Avenue, Frankfort, Kentucky 40601. All nomination forms must be received at KEA by the deadline. Forms received after the deadline will not be accepted. More information is available at www.KEA.org, including the East and West region lists, the KEA policy on stipends for delegates and an electronic form you can complete in order to nominate yourself online.

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