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KamloopsProject.ca

The Daily News, Kamloops Saturday, October 30, 2010

the KamloopsProject

A FRESH LOOK AT A GREAT COMMUNITY

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s p o o l m Ka roject P the

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f the Kamloops Project did one thing, it was to give Kamloopsians — individually and collectively — a renewed sense of what makes our community a great place in which to live and work. On Oct. 19, close to 600 people took a few moments to snap a picture, write a few words, and email them to us or post them on our Kamloops Project website. At the same time, our Daily News reporters talked with everyday Kamloops residents about what they were doing on that day. The pictures and comments submitted to us present a wonderfully diverse overview of Kamloops. From it, we’re all learning new things about our community. As one contributor put it, “Today I am feeling immense gratitude for living in such a beautiful place as Kamloops.” In this special section, we’re pleased to include many of the pictures and comments submitted to The Kamloops Project, along with stories and photos from our own staff. Space on the printed page has limitations, but you can enjoy all of the submissions at www.kamloopsproject.ca, which we’ve continued to update since Oct. 19. Some acknowledgements are in order: Daily News associate news editor Catherine Litt for conceiving the project and going above and beyond, Jen Poohachoff in our creative department for her amazing website work, city editor Susan Duncan and her reporting and photography team, Rick Major and Melissa Bailey in promotions, Al Guthro and Kevin Dergez in advertising, news editor Mike Cornell for the design of this special section, Pina Belperio, Neetu Shokar and Stacey Jenkins for creating a great website, our publisher Tim Shoults and, of course, the people of Kamloops. — Mel Rothenburger, Editor

A DAILY NEWS SNAPSHOT OF OCT. 19, 2010

• 10 0 1 19 •

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Key to the cover ONE: Ross Outerbridge

A

lot of excellent work is accomplished at Royal Inland Hospital each day. This is made possible mainly by what you don’t see in this image; a large team of nurses and support staff that helps to ensure each patient is treated safely and leaves the hospital with a good outcome. I thought this should somehow be reflected in the Kamloops Project. My camera was mounted on the arthroscopy tower in the OR. It was set to record an image every few minutes as we completed a number of knee surgeries today.

TWO: Rick Joyce

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xploring the high country near Kamloops.

THREE: Sarah Johnston

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t’s easy to forget how fun high school can be.

FOUR: Michael O’Shea

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ow the seed of love in your life and you will be rewarded with incredible love dancing in your heart.

Neil & Helen McLean

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ur 15-year-old mare Satila was waiting for her morning treat. In the South Thompson Valley we grow much produce and our neighbours keep us supplied with apples for her. Her name means “generous one,” but she does not like to share her treats! We were hoping to get a shot of the magpie that regularly sits on Satila’s back, but it must have been otherwise occupied.

FIVE: Hara family

K

ai, 3, and Mika Hara, three months, spent the day at the Tranquille Farms Pumpkin Patch, trying to find that elusive perfect pumpkin. It was a gorgeous day as we walked there and we could only take one that we could carry. After much searching Kai the pirate found the perfect little pumpkin to carry home with him.

SIX: Mary-anne Smith

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ed sky in morning, sailors take warning? Not in Kamloops. It is going to be a glorious fall day today.

Rick Howie

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ot on the heels of the rare Ross’s goose reported by a friend at Stump Lake, I arrived there just after sunrise. As luck would have it, the rare birds were actually snow geese, which are common at the Coast but quite unusual around Kamloops. Nearby, a peregrine falcon added further excitement to the natural world near our great city.

So nice to come home to. For more information call Shelley 250.571.1804 1220 Hugh Allan Dr. KamloopsSeniorsVillage.com

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KamloopsProject.ca

Saturday, October 30, 2010 The Daily News, Kamloops

the KamloopsProject

A DAILY NEWS SNAPSHOT OF OCT. 19, 2010

Shirley Wells

L

aughing Swan Farm owners Ken and Shirley Wells are starting to move plants from outside into the new greenhouse to overwinter. Only in Kamloops would we have started the plant nursery, only in Kamloops would we have built our strawbale home.

Sebastian Campbell

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very Tuesday after school I have the pleasure of taking piano from my piano teacher Daniela O’Fee. Daniela always gives me positive reinforcement in lessons and is a joy to be around. She has a serious but relaxed personality, which makes me feel relaxed and focused during lessons. Today in my lesson I played Goodbye Yellow Brick Road for the first time, and practised my technique. I’ve learned so much from her in a short time and she’s just a wonderful piano teacher and person.

Alexandra Bolduc

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magical moment at the park with my son. There is something special about autumn light. Something like a pure brightness that touches the mysterious lightness of being

Evelyn Pochay

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ifty years ago today. I was in labour with our second child. This morning I phoned our son Kevin and sang him Happy Birthday, a special day today since he has turned a halfcentury. I woke him up as he just got home from Indonesia last night. He thanked me and said he was going back to sleep.

Deborah Fulton

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ere is my friend Monika MacKenzie. We are at the top of Kenna Cartwright Park. There isn’t a better viewpoint to enjoy the scenery of our beautiful city.

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KamloopsProject.ca

The Daily News, Kamloops Saturday, October 30, 2010

the KamloopsProject

A DAILY NEWS SNAPSHOT OF OCT. 19, 2010

Lucille Blunden

W

e usually walk four to five mornings a week. Today I brought my camera to capture our daily ritual! Laurel, Jean and Lucille enjoying a beautiful walk in Aberdeen and a few fellow walkers we encountered along the way. All were happy to be photographed so early in the morning.

Chris Ortner

I

t was one of my favourite columnists who inspired me to send in this picture. Mel said the activity on Oct. 19 did not have to be special, just an ordinary happening in one of your typical days. So I thought, why not? Every morning, my dog Boots and I go for a walk, usually up Peterson Creek. It is close to home, and OFF LEASH. This is a shot looking north, and shows the highway bridge. The canyon up here is gorgeous — we are lucky to have this park right in town.

“John was such a big part

of everyone’s lives. We still

can’t believe

he is gone so soon. Linda Jules

W

e are at the wake. Manny puts the finishing touches on his brother’s grave marker while his son, Clarence, looks on. At the hospital, John thanked us for not crying. We are trying to be brave, but it’s hard; John was such a big part of everyone’s lives. We still can’t believe he is gone so soon.

Ginny Ratsoy & Penny Haggarty

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enny Haggarty, left, and Ginny Ratsoy pose before a midday walk. Although they have interests in academia and books (and other things) in common, the walking, hiking, and snowshoeing they enjoy year round in both urban and rural local settings lend themselves best to the active nature of the Kamloops Project. Their attire suggests they are prepared for a variety of weather conditions as they venture outdoors on Oct. 19.

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KamloopsProject.ca

Saturday, October 30, 2010 The Daily News, Kamloops

the KamloopsProject

S5

A DAILY NEWS SNAPSHOT OF OCT. 19, 2010

Janene Day

H

ere is my cat, Cally. She is enjoying the smells provided by brisk fall air. She loves going outside on her leash. She likes listening to the birds and attempting to catch bugs. Today, I managed to get her outside so she could enjoy the freshly fallen leaves and some warm sunshine.

Ron Bell

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day in Kamloops is just a walk in the park for most locals, but this visitor from Lloydminster (my granddaughter Pyper) makes it a special event with my dog Monty, as they are seldom together. A perfect day, perfect weather and a perfect couple to share it with.

Maggie Van Cott

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646461

am at work today, assisting Brian Rintoul, my employer. Brian has ALS and I am one of his care aides. A normal day is 8 a.m. to 8 p.m., a 12-hour shift. I truly enjoy my job as each day is a new one in regards to my growth mentally, physically and spiritually. It may be unfair to call what I do work as I LOVE what I do. My work involves taking care of Brian as well as helping to keep a busy household running smoothly. Thank you, I hope this gave you a peep-hole view into my workday.


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KamloopsProject.ca

The Daily News, Kamloops Saturday, October 30, 2010

the KamloopsProject

A DAILY NEWS SNAPSHOT OF OCT. 19, 2010

Rhonda Koch

O

n The Way To Work on Oct. 19! Anyone else starting to notice the change in the amount of traffic at the beginning and end of the day? With all of the construction and road maintenance around the city, drivers need to maintain their cool and allow more time to get to their destinations.

murray mitchell/the daily news

Kids today, they “don’t even remember decent prices,” Bob Gowans says of the cattle market. “All they knew was down times.”

'Not an easy industry’ HOME ON THE RANGE: Kamloops rancher watches with satisfaction as prices at auction continue rise

Rita Carlson

T

hese may be last roses from my garden before I scoop leaves around them for their winter bed. Some flowers have succumbed to the cool air already, but a few — like these roses — are at their grandest right now. The long-range forecast is for a harsh winter, but I hope they will survive. Sometimes adversity makes us stronger and brings out the inner beauty.

By CAM FORTEMS Daily News Staff Reporter

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group of 10 heifers was herded into the ring at the Kamloops stockyards for the weekly auction that would see some 1,500 animals paraded through. To the constant chatter of auctioneer Wayne Jordan, rancher Bob Gowans listened and watched the eight men at the centre of the action as they occasionally and nonchalantly flicked a wrist clutching a stack of cards to signal a bid. Prices for the calves as well as cull cattle coming through the auction ring Oct. 19 were good, up as much as 20 per cent from last year. “In 2000 we had prices like this,” said Gowans. “These prices are pretty decent. They’re holding up pretty good.” A decade and more ago, most of the Gowans’ five children were still kids, unaware or unconcerned about the economics of B.C.’s ranching business. “They don’t even remember decent prices,” said Gowans, who runs a herd of 250 breeding cows. “When they started working and realizing the financial part, all they knew was down times.” Gowans was there to hand out cups of coffee emblazoned with the logo of the Canadian Hereford Association, of which he is B.C. president. The association promotes breeding

He noted, to his chagrin, the trend of black cattle fetching a slightly higher price than other colours. Years ago, he said, red animals were favoured by buyers for no particular reason. “Angus is probably the more popular breed — it’s a fad.” Next month, the Campbell Range rancher, who owns the ranch along with his sister-inlaw Mary, will be in the auction theatre watching his own animals weighed and bid upon by the buyers at the centre of the action. Their animals remain on Campbell Range, eating the last of the fall grass, rich due to a wet year. Trained to grade animals since he was enrolled in 4-H at 10 years old, Gowans looked over each animal and the groups up for bid. “In beef you’re looking for your cuts, your meat. You look for an animal with fullness and muscle.” Buzzing and busy

Rancher Bob Gowans holds a coffee cup that advertises the Hereford breed. He’s B.C. president of the Canadian Hereford Association and the group is involved in an ongoing effort to promote the breed.

and production of Hereford cattle. He also handed out a special commemorative knife to ranchers who sell Hereford cattle in the ring. It’s all an effort to promote the breed. And a slight twinge of satisfaction could be seen in Gowans’ face each time a white-faced animal — a sign of Hereford heritage, if not purity — trotted into the ring.

He looked around and saw just a handful of ranchers watching the action, a far cry from years gone by when the B.C. Livestock Producers Association office and theatre were buzzing and busy. “Before BSE (in 2003) seats were full,” he said. “There’s been discouragement. Some people have sent cattle to the sale and haven’t attended.” While he’s always keen to promote Herefords, which his grandfather ran on the Campbell range a century ago, Gowans also thought about his hay crop back home. His daughters and sons are out of the home and he can’t afford a hired man. “It’s not an easy industry now. Most of the boys are working off the place.” Gowans waited patiently for his chance to make presentations, eager to get back home to the work that won’t go away. “I’m hoping to bail hay this afternoon. I’m hoping it won’t last too long,” he said of the auction and presentations.


KamloopsProject.ca

Saturday, October 30, 2010 The Daily News, Kamloops

the KamloopsProject

S7

A DAILY NEWS SNAPSHOT OF OCT. 19, 2010

Mary Kelly

T

oday, as I prepare to can trout, caught over the summer and autumn in Kamloops-area lakes, I once again think of how fortunate I am to live in an area of such bounty. My preserves cupboard is filled with apricots, peaches, plums, pears, applesauce and even wild huckleberries.

Barbara O’Reilly

N

othing very exciting going on here, but then that’s the way it is when you’re retired. I’m just out here on my sundeck reading, enjoying the sunshine and the view. This is where I get to enjoy days like this on the river at the end of Schreiner Street in beautiful Brocklehurst. Take a look at this! Kamloops is a great place to live.

Al Senger

T

oday I was thinking about my family. My family means everything to me! I have had some serious health issues in the last five years and my family has supported me and let me know I am loved as much as I love them. I could not ask for anything more!

Glen Robitaille

I

’m a 92-year-old widower, a happy resident at Ridgeview Lodge on Desmond Street on the North Shore. Every day I think of the wonderful blending of the national-provincial governments and private interests that makes my situation, with new friends and all my needs met, possible. Boredom is not a problem. I have my TV, my computer to contact family, friends and the outside world — and my iPad to challenge my adaptability. Today I emailed the editor suggesting a revision to today’s paper.

Bob Dieno

S

unrise from Laval Crescent, as photographed on Oct. 19

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KamloopsProject.ca

The Daily News, Kamloops Saturday, October 30, 2010

the KamloopsProject

Diana Endean

T

eam Chase has been fundraising for breast cancer research since 2004 and today a local hair salon called Off The Top hosted a Streaking For Cancer Research fundraiser by putting pink streaks in customers’ hair, selling popcorn, hotdogs, pop and cookies. The picture shows some of the customers who got “streaked,� members of Team Chase and the staff from Off The Top who last year raised $750 on behalf of Team Chase for the CIBC Run For the Cure. Fundraising continues until the end of October and it is anticipated they will raise at least that much or more. Way to go girls!

A DAILY NEWS SNAPSHOT OF OCT. 19, 2010

Linda Jean Hannis

L

inda and the family dog Archer relax on the couch after a long day working on Oct 19.

Candy & Linda

B

eautiful day in park. Great feet took us on our five-kilometre walk/run. Actually survived it!

Marlene Freeman

T

he sky was brilliant this crisp morning, rosy-red and blue, as we took the newspaper from the mailbox. The patio looked bare without the hanging baskets and plant pots. The trees are bare. Everything is waiting. Can winter be far off? After checking my blood glucose and taking my insulin, the day began as always with The Daily News and breakfast. Today Tony will be golfing with his pals and I’ll be painting in my art room, then I’m off to a B.C. Art meeting at Parkview centre after lunch. A very normal Tuesday, each doing what we love.

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KamloopsProject.ca

Saturday, October 30, 2010 The Daily News, Kamloops

the KamloopsProject

A DAILY NEWS SNAPSHOT OF OCT. 19, 2010

Petra Reid

D

awson and Dakota on a school field trip to the salmon run. Dawson thought it was boring, you see one fish, you’ve seen them all. Dakota thought it was fun and loved running through the trails.

keith anderson/the daily news

Station No. 1 administrative assistant Marilynn St. Jean answers questions from residents at at the front desk.

'My day is typically full’ KAMLOOPS FIRE AND RESCUE: Halloween tops thoughts and concerns as scary day approaches

By JASON HEWLETT Daily News Staff Reporter

A

s the nights grow long, the days short and the likelihood that little ghosts and goblins will soon take to the streets, it makes sense that Halloween is on Marilynn St. Jean’s mind. But St. Jean, 50, isn’t thinking Halloween because she intends to be out trick or treating. Instead, the administrative assistant for Kamloops Fire and Rescue spent most of Oct. 19 answering questions about that other staple of the season — fireworks. “We’re getting increased calls with questions about fireworks,” said St. Jean, who works out of Station No. 1 in Sahali. Indeed, the majority of the more than 66 phone calls she answered that day had to do with the miniature explosives. Others revolved around another popular fall activity, the outdoor cooking fire. And people aren’t just phoning in their inquiries. Some of St. Jean’s “customers” come to the station to ask questions. She said it’s to the point, especially after 21 years on the job, that she can rattle off the information without thinking about it. Cooking fires are allowed on properties that are an acre or more in size and have a proper fire pit. A fire prevention officer will do a site visit before issuing the $20 permit,

them, and those can be purchased at Fire and Rescue Station No. 1 on Summit Drive or anywhwere that sells fireworks. The trick for St. Jean is to remember that most of the people she’s relaying the information to have never heard it before. Her job is to deliver it in a friendly manner. “I have to try and not be a robot or sound like an automated voice system. I have to treat each person like an individual,” she said. Despite the volume of calls, St. Jean doesn’t just spend her day on the telephone. Ask any of the men and women who work with her and they tell you she is the glue that holds Kamloops Fire and Rescue together. St. Jean smiled at the comment. She said her role is that of a gatherer. On Oct. 19 she compiled information for the upcoming budget and put it into a growing document that Fire Chief Neill Moroz will review and pass on to senior management with the City. simpler tasks

“My job is to make everyone else’s job as easy as possible so they can concentrate on the bigger issues, says Fire and Rescue’s Marilynn St. Jean.

which entitles the holder to three fires a year. No one under the age of 18 should handle fireworks and they must be used outside, in clear, open areas and away from combustible items. Residents must have a permit to use

To do that, St. Jean explored what other municipal fire departments are doing to maintain and improve services without adding costs to taxpayers. Then there are the simpler tasks, such as ordering and paying for supplies, keeping track of what personnel is where and when. When it comes to administration, she scheduled meetings and appointments into a central database that can be downloaded onto their BlackBerries. She also arranged booths and refreshment tables for the department’s upcoming open house. “My day is typically full,” she said. “My job is to make everyone else’s job as easy as possible so they can concentrate on the bigger issues.” And when her day was done, St. Jean headed home, helped her husband with some renovations around the house and took some time out of her day to relax.

Pat McManus

T

uesday. I get up, go through my usual routine of getting ready for work, have my shower, sit down to breakfast and read the paper. I see my husband has made the headlines again. This one is not as positive as many articles in past issues, but that’s OK because all is well with my soul. I live in a great country and a great community where I am free to worship and praise my God. I am allowed freedom of speech. I have a job, one that I love, and most important I have someone who loves me. I live with a free spirit and truth in my heart. Hate and anger are not in my vocabulary. What a wonderful life.

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KamloopsProject.ca

The Daily News, Kamloops Saturday, October 30, 2010

the KamloopsProject

A DAILY NEWS SNAPSHOT OF OCT. 19, 2010

Barb Coates

I

love the downtown area. It is the friendly people, the store owners and the atmosphere. Every day is a great walk downtown. What an awesome place Kamloops is. It is the trails, the outdoors, the people and yet not far to get out to the hills and grasslands.

David Charbonneau

H

ey, I think my muffler is shot.

“ Barb and I regularly hike

the hills of Batchelor North and Lac du Bois. Wendy Falsetta Leigh Byrd

H

ere is a picture of me preparing to lay our new flooring. We’ve kept our days busy completing our renovation after work and on weekends. My wife is pregnant and she has been a great help in doing what she is able to before baby comes!

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have attached a picture of my neighbour and good friend, Barb Wheatley and I during our hike this afternoon. Barb and I regularly hike the hills of Batchelor North and Lac du Bois. Today we looked forward to a hike after work as it was such a gorgeous, sunny autumn day to enjoy the view and landscape of our beautiful city.

660 Kingston Avenue 250.376.5781 • www.winroc.com


KamloopsProject.ca

Saturday, October 30, 2010 The Daily News, Kamloops

the KamloopsProject

S11

A DAILY NEWS SNAPSHOT OF OCT. 19, 2010

Jill Byrd

M

y mom and I had fun raking all the leaves in her backyard. There were so many! It brought back memories of when I was a child and we used to take turns sitting in the wheelbarrow full of leaves and going for rides!

Coralie Brinkworth

A

t the Mortgage Centre, it’s not just all work and no play! All it takes is a little food temptation and we find the time to break away from our busy day. Every Tuesday we enjoy delicious, homemade muffins from Coralie, but today, we also celebrate Susan Borne’s birthday with chocolate cake as well. Hmmm, let’s see when the next office birthday will be…

Bob Scheer

T

wo Kamloops residents Bill English, left, and Bob Scheer, prepare to enjoy a day at the Kamloops Model Aeroplane Society Airfield. The Spitfire and Harvard were soon arcing through the fall sky. Fine weather and a pair of radio-controled Second World War models were a perfect combination for a great day at the field. Excellent facilities and an ideal climate permit year-round flying.

Jim Harrison

I

t’s another day at the office, arriving at 6:45 a.m. to learn that a scheduled guest has bailed as a guest on the Jim Harrison Show. What to do? Who might be available? What’s relevant? Phone someone about the BC Rail case? What about NDP Attorney General’s critic Leonard Krog about the sudden guilty pleas in the case? He has other commitments but still makes time for me . . . Time to toss out the original interview questions and come up with some new ones for Mr. Krog. It’s what makes radio fun!

Patti LeDuke

T

his is a picture of three little boys taking their first Sea Turtle swimming lesson at Westsyde pool with Michelle Drummond. The time is 3:15 p.m., Oct. 19. The boys come every Tuesday.

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KamloopsProject.ca

The Daily News, Kamloops Saturday, October 30, 2010

the KamloopsProject

A DAILY NEWS SNAPSHOT OF OCT. 19, 2010

Mary MacIntosh

M

ary enjoys the river view on Oct. 19 as she looks for bears.

mike youds/the daily news

Tk’emlups Indian Band member Sonny Leonard represents the band at the Kamloops Exhibition Association office.

'A sense of heritage’ Roy & Doris McNutt

W

e are long-time Valleyview residents and we spent this beautiful sunny day harvesting the last of our garden, which produces enough organic vegetables to supply family and friends. We have resided in Kamloops since 1951.

Stan Baric

T

he railway has always played an important part in the development of the City of Kamloops and in recognition of the achievements to some of those responsible, Canadian Pacific has named a railway station along Lorne St “Cheng” as illustrated by the attached photo.

TK’EMLUPS INDIAN BAND: Community coming together a reminder of what matters the most

By MIKE YOUDS Daily News Staff Reporter

F

amily — family being a communitywide concern — was uppermost in Sonny Leonard’s mind as he arrived before work at Kamloops Exhibition Association Oct. 19. A member of the Tk’emlups Indian Band, he was part of the circle grieving the death of John Jules, a respected keeper of the cultural flame. He offered his condolences to Jules’ parents, Clarence and Delores. “The community,” he began over a coffee at Winners, the KXA café. “How they deal with the loss of a loved one. How they grieve. How they help each other through sad times.” The emotions carried him back to an issue that has long troubled him as a band member and status Indian, whose destiny is governed by a statute enacted in the 19th century. His summation: “How democracy erodes community.” Typical of a system imposed from above without cultural understanding, the democratic system of electing chief and council hasn’t been a good fit with the traditional hereditary model of ancestral times, he believes. Instead of co-operation and sharing, he sees division, distortion and resentment. “It’s not healthy,” he said. Those are broad and far-reaching ideas with which to start a day as the band’s representative at the KXA office, particularly con-

his mixed background, his native-ness. “Everybody has a mixed background,” he noted, referring to human migration in the broadest sense. “It comes from here,” he added, pointing to his heart. “It’s not your colour; it’s how you treat each other.” That’s how he views Secwepemc culture, not as the outcome of a secret ballot but as the embodiment of mutual caring for one another. “Traditional ceremonies for the loss of a loved one bring the community close together. The singing and drumming of our Shuswap nation bring a sense of heritage missing in everyday practice. “It’s not just the (TIB), it’s everywhere in North America on both sides of the border. Everyone has their own problems. There has been no transition from the traditional system and everyone’s fighting for part of the money. They’ve lost sight of where they come from.” Even the popular powwow circuit, as seen in the flourish of the Kamloopa Powwow, is driven in part by the purse, he noted. Everyone’s in a hurry. Everyone’s out for a buck. DeaRth of opportunity

“Everybody has a mixed background,” says Sonny Leonard. “It’s not your colour, it’s how you treat each other.”

sidering the band’s unresolved dispute with the non-profit association. Leonard is an electrician but, pushing 60, he can’t find work in the trades. He has two more months in his KXA job and hopes to bridge to another TIB position. Yes, sobering thoughts, yet grief often reminds the grieving of fundamentals in life. He feels alienated by those who question

One means of bridging past and present might be an elders’ committee that could oversee — provide sober second thought for — band councils. He sees a dearth of opportunity for Secwepemc youth and a crying need for a healthy gathering place for them. Economically, communities on both sides of the river need to take advantage of tourism opportunities, he said. Mount Paul could become a drawing card with the lift and viewpoint facilities once envisioned. There is a synergy in communities, like families, coming together. “If the City of Kamloops and the KIB got together they could put in something spectacular that would provide spinoffs on both sides of the river … There’s got to be something better for the nieces and nephews coming up.”


KamloopsProject.ca

Saturday, October 30, 2010 The Daily News, Kamloops

the KamloopsProject

S13

A DAILY NEWS SNAPSHOT OF OCT. 19, 2010

Vince Cavaliere

H

ere is Vince Cavaliere and Laura Hewitt hard at work on the launch of the new Team Cavaliere website.

Zachary Adam Hannis

Z

achary plays on his computer. He’s playing World of Warcraft, his favourite game.

Sandi Wideman

T

“started We

our day with thanks

for the beautiful sunrise over

the North Thompson on a crisp fall

day.

Terry Murphy

W

e started our day with thanks, for the beautiful sunrise over the North Thompson on a crisp fall day, the blessings we’ve had in Kamloops, the friends and acquaintances we’ve made, the opportunities to help others and the freedom to enjoy all that Kamloops has to offer. Today will be a mixed bag of preparation for the winter to come, giving to others, planning, organizing, reading, and maybe a favourite TV show or two. The picture was taken at 7:01 a.m.

his picture was taken at our little park in Pine View Valley. With 3 guys and 1 gal, looks like she’s teaching them something or telling them off!

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KamloopsProject.ca

The Daily News, Kamloops Saturday, October 30, 2010

the KamloopsProject

A DAILY NEWS SNAPSHOT OF OCT. 19, 2010

Ken Middleton

A

fter a long day (started work at 4:30 a.m.), I relaxed on my wharf on Paul Lake for half an hour before dinner. It was a warm (12 C) and sunny day today; a wonderful autumn day.

Andrea Fraser

I

was thinking about my wedding day Sunday July 22, 2001. My husband was so scared the weather was going to be bad as it was raining that morning, but by the time we got married, the sun came out and the afternoon and evening were beautiful. We were blessed with nine years of marriage before my husband suddenly passed just six weeks ago.

Joan Parker

A

group of Kamloops Scrabble enthusiasts meets weekly throughout the cooler months. Coincidentally, the first game of the fall session of ‘Soup & Scrabble’ took place on Oct. 19. Since this is the day that the Kamloops Project was asking for submissions, we thought we’d include ‘our day!’ Those attending this session were (left to right) Joan, Lynn, Linda and Cecile.

J.M. Anderson

I

am a home-bound senior who doesn’t do much of the actual fall labour, but am responsible to see that it is done. In the backyard is a monstrous horse chestnut tree that is 40 to 50 feet tall. I hired a handyman to rake the fall leaves and pods. He came up with eight large garbage cans full and took them to the recycling station on Tuesday. There are still more to fall and I would like to get rid of the tree, except it is a wonderful shade tree for the house in our hot summer and will be there next Oct. 19.

Andy Machin

A

t night the wild animals of the Kamloops savanna come to the watering hole.

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KamloopsProject.ca

Saturday, October 30, 2010 The Daily News, Kamloops

the KamloopsProject

S15

A DAILY NEWS SNAPSHOT OF OCT. 19, 2010

Kamloops Tennis Club

B

ubble Up! Volunteers from the Kamloops Tennis Club strain to straighten out a section of the winter bubble that will cover five of the courts, giving the players the luxury of being able to play tennis all winter. Kamloops is one of a handful of cities in the B.C. Interior that boasts yearround play. Over 50 people showed up to lend a helping hand.

Carol Morgenthaler

E

very Tuesday at West Pines Villas a group of ladies meets for coffee, a lot of laughs and chat. Here we are enjoying each other’s company.

Olga Noakes

T

“It was a

beautiful fall day

and we are thankful

to live where we do and be able to

he trails along the North and South Thompson Rivers are beautiful at any time of the year, especially in the fall when the leaves are at their peak. Hiking on the trails in Kamloops offers fresh air and the opportunity to appreciate our beautiful city. Communing with nature, especially when the breeze is calm and the water reflective, soothes the soul. Get outdoors and enjoy Kamloops. It’s our slice of paradise.

Leigh Moore

T

oday, my daughter brought her kindergarten class to our farm for a visit. They picked pumpkins, minipumpkins, ornamental squash and apples. They also went for a hayride, played on the swings and slide, enjoyed feeding the chickens and seeing the Highland cattle with their long hair and big horns. It was a beautiful fall day and we are thankful to live where we do and to be able to share it.

share it.

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KamloopsProject.ca

The Daily News, Kamloops Saturday, October 30, 2010

the KamloopsProject

A DAILY NEWS SNAPSHOT OF OCT. 19, 2010

Cynthia Davis

A

fter reading about how to help an injured crow six years ago and finding out that dry dog food is good for them, I have been throwing a couple handfuls on the garage roof to the crows each morning (around 8 a.m.) ever since that time. It has been such a privilege and an honour to get to know perhaps the fourth generation of this wonderfully intelligent family of crows. Now, approximately 16 crow cousins and relatives show up each morning for their snacks!

murray mitchell/the daily news

Lynn MacKenzie visits with Ray Hoffman in a palliative care room at Marjorie Willoughby Snowden Memorial Hospice Home.

'A shy chatterbox’

HOSPICE HOUSE: A soft voice and gentle touch show patients that somebody really does care By CAM FORTEMS Daily News Staff Reporter

T

Mae Maxfield

T

oday I have taken a photo of a wooden white-tailed deer in our backyard. We received this little deer on our 53rd anniversary. We are true campers all our lives, so what did we decide to do on that day? Camped, yesseree. That is why we moved to Kamloops many years ago. We love the lifestyle. Our kids grew up here and were happy in their childhood. We all still have acquaintances in this this town. It used to be a one-horse town but now it is many horses.

here is a name outside the door. Sometimes that’s all. At other times the room is full of flowers and photographs of family. On Oct. 19, when Lynn MacKenzie walked into one of nine occupied rooms at Marjorie Willoughby Snowden Memorial Hospice Home, the elderly woman on the bed was unable to speak or open her eyes. Inside the room were two photographs, one of the woman taken years ago and another of her family. While visitors are frequently here, in the early afternoon the patient was alone. MacKenzie, who calls herself “a shy chatterbox,” took her hand and began to talk. “I just sat and stroked her hair and rested my hand on her shoulder,” MacKenzie said. “She fluttered her eyes. I knew she had a puppy and told her the puppy would miss her when she was gone.” The volunteer said she thought about the woman’s life, as best she could through the two photographs. “We don’t get much information. Some rooms are filled with lots of pictures and knick-knacks. She just has a few. I just talked about what kind of life she led. I wondered about her family, her children and grandchildren.” She chatted briefly when the woman’s two daughters and niece arrived and then left to

check on others. MacKenzie came by HandiDART from Brocklehurst to the hospice home in Lower Sahali, as she does each Tuesday for a fourhour volunteer shift. She walked through the front doors, said hi to Sue at the front desk and did her rounds. There is always a job to do, whether it’s helping with laundry, cleaning or cooking. But the most important job is talking. “I did a walk through to see who’s here, and who passed since I was last here. I go in and say good morning and check on their status. I talk to them if they’re able. Others, I sit with them.” The hospice volunteer first came to the Marjorie Snowden house two years ago, when her longtime partner spent two final days here after a long stint in hospital. MacKenzie, who lives on a disability pension, worked in hospitals and care homes for years. She uses her experience and compassion to help people who are dying. ‘I feel very peaceful’

“We don’t get much information,” Lynn MacKenzie says of her duties at hospice house. “I just talked about what kind of life she led. I wondered about her family, her children and grandchildren.”

“I feel very peaceful when I come here. I wasn’t able to be with my parents when they died. They’re in Nova Scotia. Hospice gave a lot to me since my partner died. It’s a small way of giving something back.” MacKenzie chatted to the comatose woman today, unconcerned that she is unable to speak. “The point that changed my life was when a lady I’d been nursing came out of a coma,” she said of her past career as an aide. “She knew who I was. She knew my voice and knew my touch.” Today she tried to check in on each patient and help out where needed. MacKenzie said her daughter and friends sometimes wonder why she would want to spend time with people who are dying. “She says, ‘Mom, it’s morbid.’ “I tell her I believe in what I’m doing and I find it therapeutic.”


KamloopsProject.ca

Saturday, October 30, 2010 The Daily News, Kamloops

the KamloopsProject

S17

A DAILY NEWS SNAPSHOT OF OCT. 19, 2010

Dan Perry

I

t’s sunrise on our backyard. Julie’s gone to a meeting. The dog has come in and the cat has gone out. Leah and Jaime are ready for school. What will happen today doesn’t seem to depend on how it started and we really won’t know how it ends until later. Carpe Diem.

Eduardo Cuggia

S

even years ago I discovered Kamloops, so I’ve lived 79 years without knowing there was a place that so much resembles paradise. At 86, I am grateful to God for giving me the reflexes to enjoy beautiful rides on my motorbike on those fantastic mountain roads. When I mount my bike and I pass by those beautiful farms, it gives me memories of the Argentinean gauchos (cowboys) whom I‘ve seen during my childhood.

We are able to provide

opportunities for students to be part of a team.

Maureen Stark

M

y son Jeff Stark, a Grade 12 student, plays football for the Valleyview Vikings senior football team. This dedicated group of players practises four days a week and games are scheduled for Fridays (or Saturdays). They practise hard and play even harder. Valleyview secondary fields both a junior team and a senior team. With the support of the Booster Club, a dedicated group of coaches and parents who volunteer their time, we are able to provide opportunities for students to be part of a team.

Tammy Young

A

thletes practising for the podium at River City Gymnastics in Valleyview on Oct. 19. These girls worked hard building their muscles and their skills, all while demonstrating for their four-legged furry friends. They understand that developing physical literacy is important for everyone; even animals. Way to go girls! They wanted this moment documented for the future. Who knows! Kamloops is an awesome sport town!

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S18

KamloopsProject.ca

The Daily News, Kamloops Saturday, October 30, 2010

the KamloopsProject

A DAILY NEWS SNAPSHOT OF OCT. 19, 2010

Bernadette Siracky

T

he attached picture is of a young woman named Mary who is working at the Kamloops Food Bank sorting produce. Mary is a member of the Katimavik program and will be with us until early November.

mike youds/the daily news

Brian Britton, technical director for Western Canada Theatre, is part technician, part magician, in charge of setup and take-down.

'Where I want to be’

WESTERN CANADA THEATRE: Technical director takes everything in stride as opening night looms Alex Watt & Megan Witham-Carroll

O

n this fall day we are feeling particularly lucky for friendship!

Roger Lee Hannis

R

oger gets ready to play ennis on Oct 19, 2010.

By MIKE YOUDS Daily News Staff Reporter

H

e arrived in Kamloops with just a pack, laptop and guitar, but Brian Britton has much more on his back one year later. In a dressing room tucked off a corridor at the rear of Sagebrush Theatre, Britton coolly sipped a coffee, showing no sign of the pressure that might be expected of a technical director for theatre productions. It was the day before dress rehearsal for Shirley Valentine, Western Canada Theatre’s opening mainstage production of the season. Even before Britton could speak, two other WCT employees were before him with matters of preparation, so he ducked into the dressing room, just off the beaten path, to focus. Formerly tech director of the Blyth Festival in Ontario, Britton, 25, came to Kamloops to take up his new responsibilities. He apprenticed at the Grand Theatre in London, Ont., after studying at Sheridan College and cutting his teeth as head of sound aboard a cruise ship. Since high school he has had his eye on the technical side of theatre after an initial interest in acting; now he’s exactly where he wants to be. That doesn’t mean he intends to stand still creatively. The technical director manages stage productions behind the scenes before, during

more,” he said. On top of his WCT duties, he supported this summer’s X Fest productions of Rocky Horror Show and Twelfth Night. Next summer he’ll lend similar background support to the 2011 Western Canada Summer Games. “As far as being in Kamloops, I’ve never wanted to stay somewhere so much in my life,” he said, complimenting his newfound home. With 36 hours until curtain call, Britton’s a grinning picture of confidence. A working set, complete with technical adviser, has arrived from Toronto for Shirley Valentine. “I sort of like to step back at this point and look at the whole picture of where we are.” The TD is a team leader, not unlike a contractor who oversees sub-trades on a construction project, ensuring everything falls into place at the right time and functions smoothly. “It’s one of the best things about the industry, the fact that it is so collaborative rather than riding on the back of one person. “The thing that keeps me going is a firm belief in why we’re here. We have to tell a story and we’re here to serve the show.” Onus is on him

“The biggest thing is attitude,” says WCT technical director Brian Britton. “If you’ve got a good attitude, that’s so much better to work with. It’s just so much easier to get the job done.”

and after shows. The TD is part technician, part magician, in charge of setup, take-down and — all going well — the seamless performances in between. It’s not really magic, of course. It merely looks that way. “Now, as technical director in Kamloops, I’ve been able to spread my wings a lot

True, the onus is on him to find a fix if something goes wrong, but he remembers a golden rule from his apprentice days: “It’s never the fault of the person who has to run it. It’s the fault of the person who had to build it. “The biggest thing is attitude. If you’ve got a good attitude, that’s so much better to work with. It’s just so much easier to get the job done.” Occasionally he’ll slip away with his guitar for a quieter moment in the dressing room at the back of the theatre. “My parents always taught me to learn new things,” he said. “I’m exactly where I want to be, but I’m still learning, still looking.


KamloopsProject.ca

Saturday, October 30, 2010 The Daily News, Kamloops

the KamloopsProject

S19

A DAILY NEWS SNAPSHOT OF OCT. 19, 2010

Eric Schweizer

Bart Cummins

O

P

n a sunny, warm, beautiful day like today is there anything better to do than walk the dog? Which is what I did in the mid-afternoon along the North Thompson in Westsyde. You can’t beat the Kamloops weather.

art of my Tuesday night was spent teaching an intro to digital photography course through TRU’s Continuing Studies department. Pictured here in a second-floor hallway of the Science Building are happy pixel makers Rhonda (left), Johnny, Ian and Nicole. The quartet have come a long way since the course started in late-September and always bring a bounty of enthusiasm, creativity and insight to each class. I’m proud to have them as students and to have met them as people.

M.J. Bruno

W

hat a nice day Oct. 19 turned out to be. Some of the trees are trying to hang on to green leaves before winter takes hold, giving us a false sense of security that the nice weather will continue for days and weeks to come. The former being more likely than the latter, perhaps . . . then again perhaps not — as we do live in Kamloops.

Nancy Levesque

T

his is TRU’s new House of Learning. It will be a wonderful place for students, faculty and the Kamloops community to come together. I’m proud of the design by the architects — so much light and open spaces, and features such as the four-storey living wall and the Barber BC Centre assembly hall. I’m sure the building’s partners — library, First Nations, Teaching and Learning, Math and Writing Centres — will discover new opportunities for collaboration and outreach on campus.

Lifeguard Club

T

he JR Lifeguard Club, photographed Tuesday afternoon, with coach Meghan Todd at Westsyde Pool.

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KamloopsProject.ca

The Daily News, Kamloops Saturday, October 30, 2010

the KamloopsProject

A DAILY NEWS SNAPSHOT OF OCT. 19, 2010

Elvina Botrakoff

T

his picture is of me crocheting an afghan. My younger sister Noranda (who was extremely talented, even though she struggled with MS most of her life) started making this afghan for her son, who always liked Scooby Doo. Noranda developed colon cancer and liver cancer and became extremely ill before she could complete this project. Sadly, she passed away on May 5 of this year. I have volunteered to finish a few of the projects she had started, which included two baby blankets for her grandson who was born a month and a half after she died. Completing this afghan and the others makes me feel closer to my dear sister.

Registered nurse Crystal Fayers stands ready at her work station on the neonatal intensive care unit at Royal Inland Hospital. Below right, Fayers uses her gentle and caring touch to check the pulse of a premature baby.

'They grow on you’

NEONATAL INTENSIVE CARE: Like native leader she mourns, nurse Crystal Fayers toils behind scenes By MICHELE YOUNG Daily News Staff Reporter

T

here’s always something new — the best kind of new — in registered nurse Crystal Fayers’ job. She works in the neonatal intensive care unit at RIH. Has for five

years. The 50-year-old nurse has worked at the hospital since 1984, mostly on the maternity

ward but also dabbling in other parts of the hospital. She always returned to the third floor where, in recent years, one wing has been dedicated to elderly patients in long-term or palliative care, while another wing houses mothers and infants. At first, Fayers thought having people at the beginnings and ends of their lives on the same floor was a mismatch. Now she believes it’s an appropriate fit.

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KamloopsProject.ca

Saturday, October 30, 2010 The Daily News, Kamloops

the KamloopsProject

keith anderson/the daily news

S21

A DAILY NEWS SNAPSHOT OF OCT. 19, 2010

Even in the NICU, where babies born before they should be are closely watched, fed and cared for, has its share of ups and downs. “When it’s happy, it’s really happy. And when it’s sad, it’s really sad,” she said as she tended a premature baby. “I love that part of my job — the full range.” On this Tuesday morning, she helped new parents Kris Swain and Julie Brydon with their 12-day-old son, Xavier, who came on Oct. 7 instead of Nov. 13 like he was supposed to. “There’s a little burp. Perfect. Good job, mommy,” Fayers encouraged Brydon as she patted him on the back during feeding. “He’s doing pretty good, he’s got good co-ordination with suck, swallow, breathe.” Swain noticed a small, hard bump on the babe’s right temple. Fayers explained how the head bones haven’t all fused yet, then ran a finger over the spot. “Keep an eye on it, mention it to the doctor,” she said. Fayers confessed when she’s at work, she doesn’t think much about her own kids. Well, except now that Jeff and Kevin are 23 and 21, respectively, she’s thinking about the next generation. “I think about being a grandmother,” she said, looking at Swain as he bent over his preemie son. But when she hinted to her sons, they sent her photos of puppies. Her son now has one and she and her husband have a littermate. The dogs will do for now. And she still has those babies she tends to every day — newborns who need her and her colleagues to help them thrive. “They just grow on you,” she said.

Naomi Pickrem

N

othing else happens on TV in John Pickrem’s household during the month of October. It’s major league baseball playoffs and World Series time!

Jan Hubbard

T

oday our daughter, Shannon Hubbard, is heading to Vancouver for a project with B.C. Lotteries. As a systems administrator in the IT department, she will be working on the conversion of the server computers from Richmond to the new location in Burnaby. She dons a pink, regulation certified hard hat and WCB approved steeltoed skater shoes, both purchased here in Kamloops, lending a little fashion and femininity to the construction site.

‘a little funny looking’

“Sometimes they’re a little funny looking. But after two days of taking care of them, I think, how could I ever have thought that?” By the time the babies leave — after days, weeks or even months of being in the unit — their departure is a bittersweet moment. “You’re glad for the family but at the same time, you kind of bond with the babies,” she said. “Lots of times there’s tears when they leave.” In no other department where she’s worked has she awakened in the middle of the night and called in to see how a patient is doing. But she has checked in on her babies. On a floor where there is so much life, the staff still have to deal with death. Fayers puts herself in the place of the mothers when an infant is lost. “I cry. Oh yeah. And I don’t have any problem crying with parents, in front of parents. I would think they would think that’s normal,” she said. She feared death for a long time, until she lost her dad to cancer in 2000. “I’ve just come to see death as normal. It happens to everybody,” she said. “You can survive and life does go on.”

Tom Dickinson

F

or the last 20 years my wife and I have been working to develop a facility for TRU that would support education and research in Wells Gray Provincial Park. Today the project moved ahead when I took colleagues to visit the site. We planned the construction of cabins to house students and designed a wastewater disposal system.

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KamloopsProject.ca

The Daily News, Kamloops Saturday, October 30, 2010

the KamloopsProject

A DAILY NEWS SNAPSHOT OF OCT. 19, 2010

Aquafit class

I

n this photograph, taken Oct.19 at 9 a.m. at the Tournament Capital Centre pool, are from left to right, Pat Clark, Diane Aspinall and Donna Grubb. Today we are participating in the Aquafit class, but sometimes if we feel energetic, we swim a few laps. Afterwards we go for coffee (husbands may or may not be included).

Murray Adams

I

work at the Kamloops Y Preschool with my partner, Linda. Today we were making applesauce. The children were excited and loved turning the handle on the apple peeler. They all brought an apple from home and were anticipating making and tasting the applesauce. They thought it was fun to see the long peel made from the peeler. One child called it “an apple snake!” Once all the apples were peeled, we added some sugar and cinnamon. The smell of the applesauce cooking prompted many conversations among themselves. We tasted the applesauce and some children even had seconds!

Sally Haywood-Farmer

T

oday I changed my view at work. Instead of looking out the big window from my desk at Extension Services, North Kamloops Public Library, I crossed the parking lot and looked back and way up. I was able to see the entire big red crane that looms high above the construction site at Library Square. The big base of that same crane sits crablike on a wooden stand very close to the window, overpowering my view. I often see construction workers attaching cables to slings of lumber. Where does all that wood go? Ah, it’s good to learn what’s over your roof!

Phil Verne Churchill

W

hen I looked out my front window this morning to this glorious vista, I felt very blessed to live where I do — in the interior of Beautiful B.C. That lovely big linden tree, which helps keep our house cool in the summer, has just had a trim and shape. The bluejays and nutcrackers sit in that tree and try to get my attention, so I will “hop to it” and get the peanuts out the door. Sometimes the jays come in and help themselves. I’m very glad we live in Dufferin, surrounded by such wonderful nature.

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KamloopsProject.ca

Saturday, October 30, 2010 The Daily News, Kamloops

the KamloopsProject

A DAILY NEWS SNAPSHOT OF OCT. 19, 2010

Barbara Strudwick

Y

ou’ve probably heard the phrase ‘the last rose of summer.’ Well, how about the last rose of autumn? Here are my beautiful mid-October roses, buds and all, which were still growing in my garden despite the few frosty mornings we’ve had recently. I picked them, and brought them inside where we could all enjoy their beautiful colours and fragrance.

robert koopmans/the daily news

Kate Grant makes herself comfortable in the warm sunshine Oct. 19. “The more clean time I have, the more confidence I have.”

'I have a purpose’

ASK WELLNESS CENTRE: She was mired in misery, now Kate Grant’s got her sights set on a better life By ROBERT KOOPMANS Daily News Staff Reporter

H

aving a reason to get out of bed is valuable, especially when such purpose has long been missing. Kate Grant, 27, woke up on Oct. 19 and took what she hopes will be another step closer to a goal of a TRU business education, and a life that requires her to get up every day. Eighteen months ago, Grant was mired in a kind of miserable nothingness. She was drinking heavily, doing drugs and suffering at the hands of an abusive boyfriend, the same man who got her addicted in the first place. “I stayed at home a long time. I wasn’t doing anything, just drinking. By the time I realized it was too late, it was way too late. I was just rock bottom.” Today, however, she showed up for duty at ASK Wellness Centre’s Social Enterprise program, a life-skills development course designed to get young people at risk on a solid course. Participants learn skills crucial to success in any workplace — basic things many might take for granted, including being on time,

having the right attitude, working hard, and being healthy. “I haven’t worked for a while, I want to get in a routine of getting up every day, going to work. I need to learn a routine, I just wanted to get on a routine, to get up everyday. Just to be working again, I guess.” Every day starts with breakfast they all cook together in the centre’s kitchen. “A healthy start,” she said. Afterwards, the participants work at any number of jobs that come through the centre’s door. The program includes volunteer work for people who can’t do the tasks themselves. “Today we’ve helped a family move some of their stuff from a storage unit to their new home,” she said. “And we went grocery shopping.” They’ve also loaded cases of water bound for the Kamloops Food Bank. “When it is (for) the community, it makes you feel good. It is just a rewarding feeling to help somebody,” she said. Relapsed once

At 27, Kate Grant has already had more than her share of trouble. Thanks to an ASK Wellness life-skills development course, she has a new focus and looks forward to helping herself and others.

She relapsed once in the past year, but got past the booze again and back into working for her future. “I feel like I’m doing something now, I have a purpose. I’m not just staying at home. “When you are down that low, you get used to having no confidence. I just feel better about myself now. “I’ve had a full day (today). I just feel more useful.” Eighteen months ago, she could never have imagined being where she is now. “The more clean time I have, the more confidence I have in myself. It’s a process. “I just want people to know, no matter how far down you are, you can get out of it.”

Richard Gough

O

ct. 19 was a perfect day to go and see one of the wonders of the natural world. Just a short drive from Kamloops is the Adams River salmon run. Mary Kaye Gough and Annikki Laakso view the spawing beds on the river. Kamloops residents are very lucky to have this event so close to home.

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S24

KamloopsProject.ca

The Daily News, Kamloops Saturday, October 30, 2010

the KamloopsProject

A DAILY NEWS SNAPSHOT OF OCT. 19, 2010

Dorothy & Frank Lahola, Pat & Jack Molyneux

F

Debbie Bostock

riends Pat, Jack, Dorothy and Frank get together to show off the fruits of their labours. We have been gardening on Glenview Avenue since the early 1960s. Almost 50 years later, we are still pickling and canning fruit and vegetables from our gardens. The kids have left the block, but have fond memories of picking strawberries for their corn flakes and eating real tomatoes ripe and warm from the Kamloops sun. You can’t beat that!

T

his is Cooper, he has just learned to sit on his own and is enjoying the lovely fall weather in the backyard.

Cheryllee McKenny

T

he Bookmobile that travels all around the Kamloops area is one of my Tuesday activities that I participated in today. It has been coming to the Rayleigh area for many years and gives us an opportunity to get books when we wouldn’t be able to get to the library. I never miss the Bookmobile as my daughters are avid readers and have grown up with the librarians on the bus.

Brian Puidia Mitchell

I

meditate twice a day — most frequently inside the house in a quiet place but sometimes outside. The actual practice I follow is called Centering Prayer. It’s a Christian contemplative practice and its intent is to “be still and know that I am God.” In addition to learning to let go during the actual practice we also learn to let go more easily during times of agitation or conflict during the day — choosing to respond rather than react — which brings a more gentle and positive energy into one’s self and the world.

Dale Brandt

M

y grandson, Gabriel strikes a reflective pose as he studies Obi, one of my cats. After he studied her, he told me that she has green eyes and mine are brown. “And mine,” I asked. He looked at me very intently and said, “Green.” (Most guess blue). Observant little boy!

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KamloopsProject.ca

Saturday, October 30, 2010 The Daily News, Kamloops

the KamloopsProject

A DAILY NEWS SNAPSHOT OF OCT. 19, 2010

Terry Phillips

M

murray mitchell/the daily news

The climbing bars are Hannah Stone’s favourite in the playground at Juniper elementary, where she’s a student in Mrs. Hill’s class.

'We just keep going’

JUNIPER ELEMENTARY: Busy day in Mrs. Hill’s class had little Hannah Stone tuckered out, ready for bed By SUSAN DUNCAN Daily News City Editor

W

hen six-year-old Hannah Stone woke up on Oct. 19, she was really tired. “I had a big yawn.” But her day got better from there. “You know what my little sister said to me at breakfast, she said, ‘you actually look cute with that clip in your hair’,” Hannah recalled with a big smile. The Grade 1 student in Mrs. Hill’s class at Juniper elementary was excited about being profiled in the Kamloops Project documentary. She dressed herself in the pink sweatshirt and jeans her mom picked out for her and was driven to school. She arrived “kind of late, but kind of on time” — at least on time enough to play with some felt markers before class began. There was a note on the board to read, too. “Good morning, boys and girls. We are going to the salmon run tomorrow. Wear your mittens. Love Mrs. Hill.” Hannah’s teacher had a busy day planned for her students. By 11 a.m., Hannah had studied spelling words, read — she chose a book on salmon — played some in-class games because little kids must move, had a snack, gone out for recess and then worked on math. “We fit a lot into a day,” laughed her teacher. “We’re very busy and we just keep going.” In math, Hannah is learning to recognize

theme ran through many of the Tuesday lessons to complement the upcoming visit to the Adams Lake sockeye run. At 11 a.m., it was time for music class, which Hannah was eager to attend. “I like to learn how to read music notes.” She also likes to read. Across the room she spotted a book with a beautiful butterfly on it. She sounded out the title. “But-ter-fly.” “Is that a Monarch butterfly?” she asked. “I caught a Monarch butterfly before, but my net was too small and my mommy told me we should let it go before its wings got hurt.” During lunch, Hannah played with her two friends from the other Grade 1 class, Tarynn and Trishna. She had been anticipating lunch break all morning because “it’s her favourite thing to do.” She played on the bridge, giggling as she ran across it and then swung upside down on the monkey bars. Careful. “Oh, I’m not going to get hurt. I’ve done it before,” she said dismissively. ‘almost a toddler’

“I like to learn how to read music notes,” says six-year-old Hannah Stone. She’s also learning to recognize numbers up to 20, going forward and backward.

numbers up to 20, going forward and backward. She also played a snakes and ladders game but with a salmon theme. A salmon

In the afternoon, Hannah and her classmates learned about the salmon run and what would be expected of them on their field trip. She said she was excited to see the salmon and the spawning grounds. After school, it was time to put on her rainbow-striped swimsuit and head to the Y for lessons with her mom and two little sisters, Sydney, 3, and Caitlin who is “almost a toddler.” Before she goes to bed, Hannah said she would do her home reading. “I will read for mommy because I don’t have any aunties left at my house.” She was also hoping to play Webkinz on the computer for a little while. Before she climbed into bed, she might give her family’s black lab, Lucy, who “was born on a farm,” a final pat. This was a happy day for Hannah. When she closed her eyes, she was snug in her bed surrounded by love.

y husband and I retired to Kamloops from the Lower ‘RAIN’land in September 2003, after conducting a thorough research of the entire province to find our retirement home. We are now fortunate to live in a home that offers us a 1,000-acre backyard as our home abuts Petersen Creek Park, together with a magnificent 180-degreeview of the city of Kamloops. We have set up a bench on the perimeter of our property, where we can sit, relax and enjoy the view of this fabulous city we now call home.

Troy & Elizabeth Armstrong

J

ack is our dog; he is a black Lab/chowchow cross and is a huge part of our lives. Jack is our first dog and he chose us when he was six weeks old and continues to be pawraised by three orange senior citizen cats. In a week he will be four and celebrating his birthday. Jack enjoys car rides, new stuffed toys and befriending every person and creature that he sees. Jack is kind, gentle, full of energy and special to us that a photo of him for this Day of Kamloops would be a legacy of his life, too.

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KamloopsProject.ca

The Daily News, Kamloops Saturday, October 30, 2010

the KamloopsProject

A DAILY NEWS SNAPSHOT OF OCT. 19, 2010

Diane Parker

O

ur Valley Girlz started laying eggs only two weeks ago. But they must have realized the importance of the Kamloops Project, because today was their first three-egg day.

George Ewert

I

t’s such a beautiful day today that I thought I would take my 1954 Chevy hardtop for a drive. A bit of cleaning first. Think I will cruise to the Adams River to watch the spawning salmon. It’s hard to beat a day in October cruising in my classic car.

Dr. Dave Sedgman

T

his is a picture of a young osprey, one of my patients at the B.C. Wildlife Park that I have just examined on my regular one per week ‘vet day.’ He has a wing injury that is slowly healing. Currently, he can fly at shoulder height for a 100 feet or so. We hope to release him next spring. What am I thinking about today? I am concerned that the current gaming funding cutbacks to non-profit organizations such as ours will have a major impact on our ability to provide rehabilitation care to the wild animals brought to us by the citizens of this region.

Claire Fortems

F

irst I went to school. I’m in Grade 2 at Aberdeen elementary. We learned about Leo the lion stuff; like beginning; middle and after. At reading our book boxes I got one level higher and now I’m at the last level. After that there’s nothing; you just keep reading the last level. Mrs. Switzer puts in new books when it’s a new season and all the kids are allowed to read them at centres and stuff. We did math and journal. I thought it was really fun because I got a playdate after school with my friend Madeline. We ate up all the Girl Guide cookies. When my dad got home he wanted cookies but there was none left. On my spelling practice with my mom I got everything right; except the word first.

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KamloopsProject.ca

Saturday, October 30, 2010 The Daily News, Kamloops

the KamloopsProject

S27

A DAILY NEWS SNAPSHOT OF OCT. 19, 2010

Denis Walsh

M

y partner and I like running in the early morning along the banks of the South Thompson River just a few steps from the downtown centre. Running through the beautiful Riverside Park, passing Pioneer Park and winding along the river bank to Yacht Club is a wonderful way to start a day in the city. Kamloops is the best place to live in Canada.

Hardy Grey

E

very October a half ton of horse chestnuts fall in my yard. Droves of kids used to descend on my lawn collecting conkers in pockets, bags and wagonloads! I guess the fad has faded...now itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s all up to me.

Greg Reid

B

â&#x20AC;&#x153;After the

tour we warmed up

by a fire

and enjoyed a snack with our

ackyard grape harvest of 2010 . . . not a very good year for yield, as abundant pests (powdery mildew and white fly) affected the plants significantly. Still, the frost held off long enough to get the last of the grapes ripe enough for picking. Ask me this time next year for a taste of Kamloops!

Jodi Fisher

T

oday, my son Aidan and his preschool class (Country Day Montessori) had a trip to Thistle Farm to take a tour of the farm and pick out a pumpkin. It was quite a chilly morning but the kids all enjoyed running through the fields and learning about the farm equipment. After the tour we warmed up by a fire and enjoyed a snack with our friends.

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KamloopsProject.ca

The Daily News, Kamloops Saturday, October 30, 2010

the KamloopsProject

A DAILY NEWS SNAPSHOT OF OCT. 19, 2010

K. Marquette

F

our Directions Storefront School is a simple school, but it is an experience. We are greeted by coffee, breakfast, and the feeling of home. The day is spent with friends, teachers and workers who care about us with respect and love. Lunch is always fun, homemade, and delicious. Today, Indian tacos! We are proud aboriginal people and we stand proudly in front of the symbol of the Four Directions — body, mind, spirit and emotion — that directs us to live a balanced life.

Bev Graham

M

alcolm is one of Berwick on the Park’s in-house

artists.

Jennifer Cacaci

S

outh Kamloops secondary school student Cicyetkwu Dunstan creates art for the Kamloops - Alive With Colour 2011 calendar project.

Janice Cochran

Jim Moorhead

T

oday I reflected on what a wonderful city we live in and how a city can make a citizen feel important. I submitted an online request to have a practice board installed at the tennis court in Rae-Mor park in Rayleigh, and it was delivered. Today my grandson Cooper and I enjoyed time using it.

O

n Oct. 19 I nervously watched my 17-year-old daughter get her first tattoo. I’ve never been a fan of tattoos, especially the ones that consume your entire arm or back, but so many teens are getting ink done these days that I reluctantly allowed her to get one. She chose two Japanese characters. The top character ‘shin’ means trust, the bottom character ‘rai’ means reliability. Together they form the word ‘shinrai’ which means ‘faith.’

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S28


KamloopsProject.ca

Saturday, October 30, 2010 The Daily News, Kamloops

the KamloopsProject

A DAILY NEWS SNAPSHOT OF OCT. 19, 2010

Steve McCauley

I

ROBERT KOOPMANS/the daily news

Westsyde secondary vice-principal Gordon Cumming walks the empty hallways of the school.

'What a great school’ WESTSYDE SECONDARY: New vice-principal tackles challenges and reaps rewards that come with job

By ROBERT KOOPMANS Daily News Staff Reporter

T

he tall boy with arms as thick as a CFL linebacker makes one thing perfectly clear — he won’t punch first, but if someone swings at him, well, no promises. “I’ll swing back,” he tells Gordon Cumming, vice-principal at Westsyde secondary, his quiet deep voice tinged with defiance. The teen towers over Cumming as they stand and chat outside his office. Cumming smiles and sends the boy on his way, hopeful the bravado will prove to be nothing more. He realizes there are no guarantees. Last year Cumming worked with much younger students. He was vice-principal at Lloyd George elementary and his charges tramped through his office with little-kid problems. This year he’s working with young adults whose issues are far more grown. So far today, Cumming has listened to — and helped students work through — numerous “social” conflicts and issues involving friends, as well as the not-so-friendly. He has also seized a cellphone from a student who whipped it out in class, talked the linebacker teen (hopefully) from the edge of violence, chatted with numerous parents and helped a new student settle in to her classes. It is 11:30 a.m. What will the rest of the day bring? At least one surprise, he figures.

move from elementary schools where he has spent his career so far to a much larger secondary school. There are more teachers, staff and students and at the start of the year, he knew nothing of them and they knew nothing of him. Now, he knows the teachers and staff and has made huge inroads into learning the names of the 700 or so students. His regular strolls take him around the hallways, through Gordon Gore Hall where alumni successes are highlighted for all to see, and out to the smokers’ pit near Bebek Road. “They are my character kids (the smokers) — I love them.” Balancing work and life in a way that won’t see either suffer is becoming one of his growing concerns. His youngest daughter is home sick with the flu and he can’t stop thinking about how she’s doing. Later, his other daughter needs a ride home from choir practice, because his wife is working late.

would like to tell you why my son John is so important to me. We share a lot of the same interests like hiking, fishing and rock hounding. John also resides in Kamloops with his beloved family, his wife Kari and two boys, Brenden and Christian. They too share our interests. John is also interested in photography — his collection of pictures will attest to that. John, his family and I have taken up a new hobby this past summer which is sturgeon fishing. Here is a photo of John with a fiveand-half-foot sturgeon he caught in the Fraser River near Lillooet.

Transition going well

Vice-principal Gordon Cumming chats with a student at Westsyde secondary. “When I drove to work (on Oct. 19), instead of being nervous, I was excited,” he says. “What is the day going to bring.”

“(The job) keeps me engaged,” he says, joking how lunchtime for him comes when the end-of-the-day bell rings at 2:55 p.m. “I look forward to every day when I come here, I don’t know what I will do or learn.” It wasn’t an easy decision for Cumming to

And he hopes to get out for a swim — likely not before 9 p.m. — to at least try to keep a grip on his fitness and keep the hope for another triathlon or marathon alive. The fact that he can again ponder other aspects of life is a sign the transition from the little pond to a larger one is going well. Six weeks ago, when school started, Cumming was nervous as he drove to work. The days were long and all consuming as he grappled with change. “When I drove to work (on Oct. 19), instead of being nervous, I was excited. What is the day going to bring? He knows that while the school is different, the population is what he has always found students to be — young people with good hearts and solid heads. “I was also thinking, what a great school we have. It’s probably what’s made the change pretty easy, too. “Westsyde is an awesome high school.”

Tara Gostelow

I

was thinking, “Thank goodness the photographer let me put on mascara before this shot was taken.” As a news reporter for Radio NL 610 AM, I was just on my way to the Kamloops Courthouse to cover some trials and proceedings. As the newbie in B.C.’s hardest working newsroom, I better not slack off — not yet, anyway.

S29


S30

KamloopsProject.ca

The Daily News, Kamloops Saturday, October 30, 2010

the KamloopsProject

A DAILY NEWS SNAPSHOT OF OCT. 19, 2010

Jean Blakey

G

ood friends and good fun. Afternoon ladies curling and a great time was had by all.

Erin Vieira

T

his is my husband Jamie Vieira as he leaves our home in Aberdeen to bicyclecommute to his office downtown. He bike commutes from April to November. He gets daily fresh air and exercise, saves money on fuel, and decreases his carbon footprint.

Jackie G.

L

“Inspired

Tanja Anderson

B

to learn not only

about

Canada,

ike on every other day, the small, chocolate-coloured bear appeared in our yard. Not like every other day, he was climbing over the fence three metres away from the house. As we watched from our window, the small bear very entertainingly turned himself around, one leg at a time, so he could climb down the fence backwards. After managing to climb down the fence he rambled down the hill into our lower field where he was met by our dog. Soon after, the bear was on his back two legs hissing at my dog, who was attempting to bite him in the bum. It took a small roast and a promise of a walk to convince her to leave the bear alone.

en’s social studies project on Canadian provinces and territories inspired him and his sister Raili to use their computerized globe to learn not only about our home in Canada, but about many other exciting places on our planet.

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KamloopsProject.ca

Saturday, October 30, 2010 The Daily News, Kamloops

the KamloopsProject

S31

A DAILY NEWS SNAPSHOT OF OCT. 19, 2010

Fred & Ans Kirwin

I

Lisa Dunkley

made sandwiches, because we are off to the golf course. It is going to be a beautiful day, so Rivershore here we come! We are also going green! Our teetimes are 45 minutes apart, but we’ll go in one vehicle. One of us, unfortunately will have to practise longer.

T

oday Tina Donald, the fisheries co-ordinator at Simpcw First Nations, came to talk to us about salmon, as this is a historic year for the salmon run. The kids at Children’s Circle Daycare were excited to listen to Tina talk about the amazing fish and have all their questions answered. After learning about salmon; Tina gave the children a cutout of salmon to colour and then make into hats. It was a special day to commemorate a special event that is happening in our community.

Mel Rothenburger

I

t’s 10:15 a.m. This is Richard. This is my truck. Richard is the mechanic at Jay’s Service. My 1955 International Harvester has been on the hoist at Jay’s for six years — Richard believes if a thing is worth doing well, you shouldn’t rush it. My truck has a lot of sentimental value because it belonged to Ben Rothenburger, my dad. He and brother Bernie used to haul a lot of things in it, including horses (yes, horses), when they owned and operated Wendego Lodge on Tranquille Lake. I’d like to restore it to its former glory and am optimistic Richard will get it running next year.

Jennifer Taylor Paravantes

B

lackberries make me think of my grandfather. He’d pull on his oldest pair of jeans and an old sweat shirt that left at least six inches of wrist exposed to brambles. He’d show me how I could reach the juiciest berries with my long reach. I would complain about the scratches and eventually wander off to explore, leaving him behind. I miss him. I don’t think I’d mind the scratches so much now.

Leanne Stewart

W

ent for a walk in Riverside Park today to enjoy the sights and sounds of fall. It reminded me of what I love about this place. We get to watch the seasons transform from one to the other. Just a few short weeks ago, during the summer, we wandered through the park listening to the many sights and sounds of summer. Today it was a serene scene.

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S32

KamloopsProject.ca

The Daily News, Kamloops Saturday, October 30, 2010

the KamloopsProject

A DAILY NEWS SNAPSHOT OF OCT. 19, 2010

Doug Bushchau

D

oug cuts up moose meat after a successful hunting season.

murray mitchell/the daily news

Pat Richardson, standing, visits with friends at Desert Gardens. From left, Iris Wachter, Florence Blancher and Jean Clark.

'I like to do my share’ Don Whyte

D

on enjoys his morning coffee and the Kamloops Daily News. A favourite pastime of the retired.

Felicity Klassen

I

pulled flowers from the flowerpots in front of my Westsyde home on Oct. 19, 2010.

DESERT GARDENS: Volunteering, memories and friends make for a good life in Kamloops

By SUSAN DUNCAN Daily News City Editor

H

er apartment was neat as a pin. Her laundry was washed and folded. Her computer was warmed up and ready to go. This was a day to get things done for retiree Pat Richardson. Getting those jobs out of the way meant she had the next few hours to work on something she does at least a little of each day — volunteering. “I really like volunteering. I’ve been retired for 15 years and I’ve done quite a lot of things on a volunteer basis.” Nowadays, much of her time is taken up with work on strata council business for Desert Gardens complex where she lives. “I like it because I like to know what’s going on where I live. I also like to do my share and somebody’s got to do it,” she said. “You also meet wonderful people when you volunteer.” A favourite task is the December Operation Rednose fundraiser for Pacific Sports. Her affinity for that work comes from her love of sports. When she was a teacher and then a counsellor for 30 years at Kam High, she coached or served as a teacher-sponsor for teams. Now she watches. “I’m a heck of a spectator. I go to the Devils and Angels games (she’s sticking with those old Kam High names). I watch the TRU

teams. I go to the Blazers and I’m a fan of the Lions and Canucks. I just love watching sports.” But on Oct. 19, there were no sports on the agenda. Instead, she headed downstairs to set up tables for the dinner party offered at Desert Gardens every Tuesday and Thursday. “Where else do you get a served dinner for $10 in this town and they put on a good dinner.” She had one sad task to do first. She had spotted an obituary in the newspaper for a former teacher and she wanted to send emails to mutual acquaintances to let them know of their friend’s passing. There was something else in Richardson’s thoughts this day. “I have been really moved by that Chilean mine rescue and I just can’t get it out of my mind. I just think it’s a wonderful miracle.” A personal interest also took up some of her day. She is the family historian and she is in the midst of retyping an interview with a relative from the summer. ‘that’s fascinating’

Much of Pat Richardson’s time is taken up with work on Desert Gardens strata council business. “I really like volunteering,” she says. “I’ve done quite a lot of things on a volunteer basis.”

She spent considerable time in the spring looking through her aunts’ diaries and she was thinking about those stories as well. “I’m trying to understand what it was like to be a prairie farm kid in the ’20s, ’30s and ’40s. That’s fascinating.” She also talked about coming across a scribbler her mother kept notes in when she was 13 years old. Her mother actually diarized her life from age 13 to 92. “In this scribbler there was a copy of a letter to a pen pal in Australia about what life was like on the farm and also about her very first trip to Winnipeg where there were street cars, electric lights, big cafes and The Hudson’s Bay department store. Those were the highlights for her.” This was a typical day for Pat Richardson, one filled with memories, household chores, volunteer work and, at the end of it all, a served dinner in the company of friends.


KamloopsProject.ca

Saturday, October 30, 2010 The Daily News, Kamloops

the KamloopsProject

S33

A DAILY NEWS SNAPSHOT OF OCT. 19, 2010

Linda Williams

I

Kamloops SPCA

am a paper clutter person. Without my valuable information on all these small papers, I feel somewhat lost. I enter my workspace at home and think . . . “Oh, I must do something with this assortment of papers” and quickly scan through them. The email/home addresses, passwords, usernames “no..no..no.” Other information on subjects I am interested in . . . “they cannot go either.” And although I have moved into cyberspace with no problem, I still need my small pieces of paper that so clutter my desk.

I

was thinking how happy I was to have the dog room open to the public once again. There is nothing like puppy love. Dogs are the only things on Earth that will love you more than they love themselves.

Jenny John

N

ot many people can have such two different days as I have just had, on TV both yesterday and today, but today, THE DAY, was such a special time. I attended a council meeting to be honoured with the most beautiful photograph of Kamloops presented by Mayor Peter Milobar and council. To be at a loss for words is rarely said of me, but that is how I felt. After 10 years in this great city, I consider it my home and this picture now confirms it! My award last month is shared with all the hundreds of volunteers, no matter the level, here and beyond. Thank you all.

Jacquie Brugger

T

oday I am thinking about the public education system and how I hope we continue to offer our future adult population a chance to learn in a safe and nurturing environment. These children are our future. Today I feel privileged to be a part of their lives. Elizabeth, future chef; Isaac, future pro hockey player; Jessica, future teacher; Samantha, future actress; Hannah, future piano teacher; Jaydan, future food industry worker; Nakayla, future veterinarian; Jordon, future welder; Tyla, future nurse; Adam, future pro dirt biker; Cydney, future hospital worker; Noah, future chef; Katelyn, future teacher; Meghan, future veterinarian; Mrs. Brugger, future senior citizen!

KAMLOOPS ORAL & MAXILLOFACIAL SURGERY CENTRE Dr. Bob Rishiraj • JAW SURGERY • EXTRACTIONS • IMPLANTS • BONE GRAFTING • PATHOLOGY BIOPSIES & TREATMENT

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S34

KamloopsProject.ca

The Daily News, Kamloops Saturday, October 30, 2010

the KamloopsProject

A DAILY NEWS SNAPSHOT OF OCT. 19, 2010

Lee Morris

O

ff leash, healthy and happy in the hills surrounding Kamloops! Oct. 19, 2010 . . . signed, Lee and Spur!

Kristina Bradley

I

spent my entire minor hockey career in Kamloops and spent countless hours at Brock Arena working and playing hard. This season, it is rewarding to see my son Jake take up the game for the first time. He has fallen in love with hockey and has an ear to ear grin on his face when he is on the ice.

Lindsey Clare

R

aking leaves with my niece in our backyard turned into a shower of autumn splendor.

“The trails

have been a constant

place of

friendship, support and wellness.

Libby O’Donnell

W

here are we? The same place we have been every Tuesday (and Thursday) morning for more than 13 years . . . rain, snow, heat or cold, we are running in the hills of Kamloops. As life ebbs and flows; as the seasons come and they go, the trails have been a constant place of friendship, support and wellness. This morning, in the glow of our headlamps, we celebrate the gift of our community, the beauty of our Kamloops, and the richness of our lives. Janice, Kate, Libby (missing Lynda today).

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KamloopsProject.ca

Saturday, October 30, 2010 The Daily News, Kamloops

the KamloopsProject

A DAILY NEWS SNAPSHOT OF OCT. 19, 2010

Fredi the dog

H

keith anderson/the daily news

At 24, Keith Leung is one of the youngest employees at the airport. “There’s a good balance between all the duties I have to do.”

'I’m a problem-solver’ KAMLOOPS AIRPORT: Young technician not afraid to lean on veterans as he learns tricks of the trade

By JASON HEWLETT Daily News Staff Reporter

A

s one of the youngest people employed at Kamloops Airport, the big thing on 24-year-old Keith Leung’s mind is failure. Not failure of the oh-no-I’mgoing-to-lose-my-job variety, he said. Instead, the airport’s projects and planning technician is mindful of mistakes that will help him learn, improve and reduce the chance of the error happening again. “So I can change. So I can get up and go again. So I can do it right the next time,” he said. Leung had ample opportunity to learn from the time he started work at 7:30 a.m. until when he finished at about 4:30 p.m. on Oct. 19. The first half of his morning was spent taking staff from the Department of Fisheries and Oceans onto the airport dike. His job, one of many throughout the day, was to act as an escort while the DFO inspected trees and vegetation. “They were there to make sure the trees were cut the right way etcetera,” he said. Then it was back across the tarmac to meet with contractors building a new wash bay, where he discussed how water would be fed to the structure. “Seeing as it’s a car wash, it’s going to need a lot of water,” said Leung.

About 30 per cent of his day is spent walking around the airport, talking with staff in the terminal and making sure the runway is clear of debris. Even something a small as a rogue bolt loose on the tarmac can cause an airplane to crash, he said. Leung also runs back and forth between offices belonging to the various air carriers. If there’s too much glare coming through one window, he replaces the malfunctioning blind. If the room is too hot, he gets someone to adjust the furnace. “I’m a problem-solver,” he said. “Everything is very different.” The remaining 70 per cent of his time is spent sitting at a desk in the airport management building, where he works on spreadsheets and computer-aided design programs. A major part of his work is adjusting Fulton Field’s airport operations manual. Safety procedures are constantly being updated to ensure the operation runs as safely and smoothly as possible, he said.

i. My name is Fredi and I am a very special girl. I was born in Chingshui, Taiwan, in 1998. I was a stray dog, but one day I found my Ma in October of that same year. Now I have been living in Kamloops since 2000. As you can see I am very happy to sit on my porch — key word “my.” Neighbours I know (like Dennis, Louise, and Pam and Snoopy) and also those I don’t know often walk by, smile and say hello to me. Every single day I sit on my porch and wait patiently for Jack the Cookie Man to run by and spoil me silly with snausages, for neighbour-kin Fred to give me a pat, and for Tony to also to share a treat or two. Cheers from Fredi (as submitted by Wendy Krauza).

‘A good balance’

Kamloops Airport projects and planning technician Keith Leung looks over plans and makes changes as he sees fit. He says he learns what he can from the people who are experts at what they do.

“There’s a good balance between all the duties I have to do.” But the best part of Leung’s day is working with the airport’s experienced staff. He has been at Fulton Field for three years. He said everyone he works with has been there longer. That’s why he’s always sticking his nose into their business, learning and absorbing whatever information he can from the people who are experts. Leung said that’s how he’s learned as much as he has about the airport. “I want to be everywhere and be nosey, to get my face into everything,” he said. “There are so many people with experience here with so many different types of background.” After work, Leung joined a group of friends and went for a hike, unwinding from a project-filled day.

Charlie Bruce

S

everal days a week I have the pleasure of starting the morning at the YM/YWCA with a workout. What a pleasure it is to be greeted by such friendly, smiling faces by so many members of the Y staff. Their energy and enthusiasm helps take the edge off what can sometimes be a challenging workout.

S35


KamloopsProject.ca

The Daily News, Kamloops Saturday, October 30, 2010

the KamloopsProject Julia Wells

A

A DAILY NEWS SNAPSHOT OF OCT. 19, 2010

Mike Thomas

s the sun hovers above the horizon and a beautiful fall day comes to a close, I am in my garden thinking about my mother-in-law, Gail. My perennials need tidying up before the snow falls, but I can’t bring myself to cut down flowers that are still bravely blooming. Gail, whose own perennial garden I can only aspire to, is battling cancer with a strength and grace that humbles me. I gaze at the flowers still proudly displaying their breathtaking colours. I will leave them . . . and think of Gail.

R

unning with friends. Enjoying a beautiful fall evening and unwinding from a long day with the Kamloops Ridge Runners.

Laura MacRae

I

spent the whole day painting my kitchen!

Angela Veltri

H

ere’s a photo highlighting the pumpkins grown through the Gardengate Training program. This is a non-profit, three-acre organic garden that provides volunteer and skill development training for people with mental illness right in the heart of Brocklehurst. The program donates hundreds of pounds of produce to local food banks and charities.

Kamloops’ Green Hotel • pool, hot tub, sauna & work out facility • on site cold beer & wine store • ORA Restaurant Lounge on site P: 250.828.6660 • TF: 1.800.665.6674 1250 Rogers Way, Kamloops, B.C.

www.kamloopstownelodge.ca

646588

S36


KamloopsProject.ca

Saturday, October 30, 2010 The Daily News, Kamloops

the KamloopsProject

S37

A DAILY NEWS SNAPSHOT OF OCT. 19, 2010

Krista Halland

T

he students of Arthur Stevenson elementary spent the day at the Adams River salmon run. Here, the Grade 7 class enjoys the beautiful sunshine and the marvels of Mother Nature. The children enjoyed their field trip and were continually amazed at the number of fish and their determination to reach their destination to spawn.

Gordon Gore

R

ylee Arthur, 4, giggles at her image in the carnival mirror at the BIG Little Science Centre. Rylee was accompanied by her mom and sister, who were along on a class visit by Pam Berndt’s class at South Sa-Hali elementary.

Rick Fadden

R

etirement in Kamloops can’t get better than this as I sink my putt on the 18th hole at Rivershore Estates to complete my 105th round of the year.

T “ My husband

Lois McAlary

and I went to the

Tournament Capital Centre

so he could take part in the

VIP program.

his morning my husband and I went to the Tournament Capital Centre so he could take part in a session of the Vascular Improvement Program. A joint effort of the City and Interior Health, the VIP provides skillbuilding and information sessions to those recovering from strokes and heart problems. In the picture, Eric has his weekly goals and his current blood pressure numbers checked by Sheila Domino, RN, clinical co-ordinator of the VIP, left, and Danielle Harkes, kinesiologist, exercise co-ordinator from the City of Kamloops.

Priceless just got a price.

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Zimmer Autosport Mercedes-Benz Ltd, 695C Laval Crescent, 250.374.1103, www.zimmerautosport.com © 2010 Mercedes-Benz Canada Inc. *Lease and finance offers based on a new 2011 GLK 350 4MATIC™ / ML 350 BlueTEC AVANTGARDE available only through Mercedes-Benz Financial on approved credit for a limited time. Lease example based on $458 / $768 (excluding taxes) per month for 48 / 36 months. Down payment or equivalent trade of $7,300 / $8,914 plus first monthly payment and security deposit of $500 / $800 and applicable taxes due at lease inception. MSRP starting at $43,500 / $63,900. A.P.R. of 4.9% / 3.9% applies. Total obligation is $29,784 / $37,362. Finance example based on 60 / 60-month term at an A.P.R. of 2.9% / 1.9% and an MSRP of $43,500 / $63,900. Monthly payment is $703 / $1,014 (excluding taxes) with $6,715 / $8,309 down payment or equivalent trade in. Cost of borrowing is $2,959 / $2,845 for a total obligation of $48,884 / $69,164. 18,000 km/year allowance ($0.20 / $0.25/km for excess kilometers applies). **Freight/PDI of $1,995, Dealer Admin fee of $299 and air-conditioning levy of $100 are now included in the down payment and total price. License, insurance, registration, taxes, “green” levy taxes (if applicable) and fees levied on the manufacturer (if charged by the dealer) and PPSA are extra. Additional provincial-specific fees, taxes and charges may be extra. Dealer may lease or finance for less. Offer may change without notice and cannot be combined with any other offers. See your authorized MercedesBenz dealer for details or call the Mercedes-Benz Customer Relations Centre at 1-800-387-0100. 1Only available as a stand alone option. 2Only available as part of an option package. D#30729


KamloopsProject.ca

The Daily News, Kamloops Saturday, October 30, 2010

the KamloopsProject

A DAILY NEWS SNAPSHOT OF OCT. 19, 2010

Maryann Neville

I

Manjari Ortiz

love Kamloops! Here I am working in my car and loving it — but don’t forget it’s Tuesday, so it’s a pretty quiet night.

T

oday I tackled potato harvesting mission, it was a good harvest and I am happy with the results. I love potatoes, they are loyal, they always win over the weeds and become strong, almost selfsufficient. There was still warmth in the air . . . the last little bit before winter settles in . . . and I can’t help but wish summers were longer. Overall a good day and feeling grateful to life for giving me my family and friends.

Kate Parker

V

isiting the local pumpkin patch in Kamloops

Patsy Bourassa

T

RU residential construction students are building the 2011 Training House in Aberdeen Highlands. They aim to be at lock-up by the end of November. These 15 students will add a real homebuilding experience to their resumes once the house is complete next spring. The great October weather is facilitating the outdoor work under the able supervision of TRU Instructor Hank Bangma.

Michaela Jyrkkanen

M

y best friend Michelle and I got our braces off at the same time in the same office. What are the odds? Considering that we got them on months apart it’s pretty special. We’re in Grade 9 now and have been friends since Grade 1. I have a feeling that we will have many more years to come.

K AMLOOPS 962A Laval Crescent

2 5 0 . 3 7 2 . 10 0 8 o r 1 . 8 6 6 . 3 7 2 . 10 0 8

M o n d a y – Fr i d a y

9 – 6

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9 – 5

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646105

S38


KamloopsProject.ca

Saturday, October 30, 2010 The Daily News, Kamloops

the KamloopsProject

A DAILY NEWS SNAPSHOT OF OCT. 19, 2010

Gisele Machin

I

keith anderson/the daily news

Kamloops Funeral Home director John Moore contemplates a busy day ahead inside the chapel on Oct. 19.

'I have a strong faith’ KAMLOOPS FUNERAL HOME: For a family man who deals with people in crisis, work is a special calling

By MICHELE YOUNG Daily News Staff Reporter

I

t’s a quiet day at the Kamloops Funeral Home — almost a welcome respite after a week of hectic activity. When it’s quiet like this, funeral director John Moore makes the morning coffee, stocks shelves, cleans and does whatever other odd jobs need doing. He’ll do anything but mow the lawn. He draws the line at cutting the grass. “I really enjoy what I do. I have a passion for what I do,” he said. When a family comes in to make funeral arrangements, he takes them into a room to sit down and deal with everything from the death certificate and registration with B.C. Vital Statistics to what will happen for the funeral ceremony to the obituary. Then it’s over to the Dogwood room to look at caskets, urns and headstones. He also does embalming in the room downstairs that’s set up with the proper table, medical instruments and fluids. It’s a job he has aspired to since he was a teenager. He was 16 when his grandfather died. He went to the open-casket funeral in Prince George where his last memory of his grandfather’s face was marred by bright-red lipstick and rouge-striped cheeks. “They made him look like a clown,” Moore said.

That’s when he began thinking about being a funeral director. “I kept it to myself for a long time,” he said. But after working at other business in Vancouver, he got started at the Kamloops Funeral Home in 2003. His wife, Shannon, wasn’t surprised or bothered. “I met her when I was 18. She knew I wanted to get into this,” said Moore, 43. His kids (Cordell, now 20, Courtney, 18 and Corissa, 14), family and friends — well, their reactions varied. “Some thought it was creepy, some thought it was neat, some thought it was morbid.” He saw his first dead person on Day 1 of the job. It took a couple of minutes to get used to being around a body. He didn’t do an embalming for a while, until he was licensed.

’d like to share the photos of my sister Jackie Mitchell and myself Gisele Machin taken today. Each Tuesday and Thursday my sister and I get together for a good walk (about one hour 45 minutes). This is a special time of the week for us both as it gives us the opportunity to connect and also allows us to get some fitness in at the same time. We have been doing this for several years now and it’s a wonderful time together. Today was a special day because of the Kamloops Project event.

dealing with death

A crucifix hangs on a wall inside the Kamloops Funeral Home, where director John Moore has worked with families since 2003. “Do I shed a tear? Of course. I am human,” he says.

Despite working in a business that deals with death, Moore said he’s not hardened. “You’re still sensitive to the family,” he said. “It’s a special calling. It calls you, to do this job. I believe this is what I was meant to do.” It is difficult, though, some days — especially with children. “I find kids are hard, especially when you’ve got kids the same age.” He keeps his composure on the job, feeling he must hold it together to be professional and to help the families. “Do I shed a tear? Of course. I am a human being,” he said. But he doesn’t break down. Despite his field of work, he doesn’t get philosophical about death. “I know it’s going to happen,” said Moore. “I live my life day by day. I just work. I don’t really dwell on it.” And when it wears on him, he has his Pentecostal beliefs to sustain him. “I have a strong faith.”

Ronnie Bouvier

Y

ou know the old saying a picture is worth 1,000 words? Well that is what this picture of my nephew James and I is worth to me. I look at this picture and smile, swell up with pride and I am filled with joy. It reminds me how lucky I am to have such a caring nephew in my life. Every time I see this picture it can bring a smile to my face because I know James will always be there for his Auntie. That is how I started my day today, looking at this picture and feeling great.

S39


KamloopsProject.ca

The Daily News, Kamloops Saturday, October 30, 2010

the KamloopsProject

A special supplement by the daily news

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Kamloops Project  

A user driven project detailing a moment of time in Kamloops BC Canada.

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