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MICHAEL STERN, Music Director

Presenting our 2020/21

Classical Series

Exceptional Performances of the Worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Greatest Music > SUBSCRIBE BEFORE APRIL 1 <

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CLASSICAL SERIES DEAR FRIENDS, Throughout my tenure in Kansas City, we always have strived to push ourselves beyond past accomplishments. I love that this entire season, coming on the heels of such an eventful celebratory season of multiple anniversaries and new artistic heights, is keeping our passion and ambition squarely focused on the future. There are so many highlights that distinguish our 2020/21 Classical Series, beginning with an expanded roster of wonderfully gifted guest conductors: Michael Francis, Paolo Bortolameolli, Gemma New, Christian Reif and Joshua Weilerstein are all superbly accomplished, and Edo de Waart, one of today’s most distinguished statesmen, who also is making his debut with us. As always, the list of guest artists collaborating with us onstage could not be more exciting. Among marvelous young artists coming to play with us are cellist Zlatomir Fung, recent first-prize winner of the Tchaikovsky Competition; impressive violinist Benjamin Beilman; the multi-talented Conrad Tao, who will be wearing his piano soloist hat; the remarkable pianist Martina Filjak; and the extraordinary concertmaster of the Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra, Noah Bendix-Balgley, who will be playing his own Fidl-Fantazye Klezmer Concerto. They are all rising stars, and they stand right along with the supreme artists who are longtime friends and steadfast partners of the Kansas City Symphony — Jeffrey Kahane, Gil Shaham, Pamela Frank, Jon Kimura Parker and Yefim Bronfman. We also feature two mammoth works for chorus and orchestra: to close out the 2020 Beethoven celebration, his Missa Solemnis, one of the towering achievements of music; and the sprawling and larger-than-life Roméo et Juliette by Hector Berlioz. We have plenty of other music also new to Kansas City audiences, including two world premieres by Gabriel Kahane and British composer Stuart Murray Turnbull, all of it mixed with great music by Schumann, Mahler, Beethoven, Rimsky-Korsakov and so much more. Best of all, this is a season that we never could have presented 15 years ago, and that is very gratifying indeed. See you at the concerts!

Michael Stern | Music Director 2

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WHY SHOULD YOU SUBSCRIBE? FIVE GREAT REASONS to subscribe to the Kansas City Symphony

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ACCESS TO THE BEST RESERVED SEATS Only subscribers have access to the best available reserved seats at the lowest price per concert — a savings of up to $20 per concert. You’ll always have priority over single ticket buyers. Every season, you’ll be given the opportunity to upgrade your season subscription before any new patrons are seated.

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CLASSICAL SERIES R. SCHUMANN Manfred Overture GABRIEL KAHANE Piano Concerto (Kansas City Symphony commission, world premiere)

BRAHMS Symphony No. 1

“I love Brahms’ First Symphony for the power of it … the joy of it.” — Michael Stern, Music Director Photo by Todd Rosenberg

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MASTERWORKS + BR AVO CLASSICAL SERIES OPENING WEEKEND!

STERN CONDUCTS BRAHMS’ FIRST AND SCHUMANN World premiere of Gabriel Kahane’s Piano Concerto FRIDAY and SATURDAY, OCTOBER 9-10 at 8 P.M. SUNDAY, OCTOBER 11 at 2 P.M. Michael Stern, conductor

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Jeffrey Kahane, piano

ur 2020/21 Classical season is full of journeys and discoveries, so go exploring with Music Director Michael Stern as your own personal tour guide for opening weekend! German composers Johannes Brahms and Robert Schumann shared a deep, lifelong connection. As a mentor to Brahms, Schumann was first to recognize his genius and Brahms learned a lot from Schumann. Brahms was an accomplished composer and had written quite a few shorter-format works, but he’d avoided finishing the big one … a symphony. Why? He suffered from terrible writer’s block, and it didn’t help he’d been called the next Beethoven. The comparison terrified him. He finally completed his first symphony at age 43 after nearly two decades working on it. It marked a watershed moment for Brahms with its grand scale and triumphant sound. The first movement is tense and stormy with constant hammer-blows from the timpani; the second is gorgeous

and slow with an exquisite violin solo, which precedes a short, elegant intermezzo. The clouds part way for sunny skies in the last movement as Brahms brings it home with a majestic theme. While Brahms may have been influenced by Beethoven and Schumann, his First Symphony reveals he had developed his own distinct voice — one of true Romantic lyricism, passion and grandeur. Schumann’s Manfred Overture is moody and brooding, an opener that ends softly before the world premiere of Gabriel Kahane’s genre-busting piano concerto played by his father, Jeffrey Kahane. As Stern puts it, “Jeffrey mentors his son Gabe, and Schumann was like a parental figure to Brahms. It’s great music with mentors who have nurtured new voices.”

KANSAS CITY SYMPHONY

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CLASSICAL SERIES STUART MURRAY TURNBULL Odyssey BRAHMS Violin Concerto R. SCHUMANN Symphony No. 4

(world premiere)

INTENSE, DRAMATIC & SENSATIONAL

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MASTERWORKS + OVATION

GIL SHAHAM PLAYS BRAHMS WITH SCHUMANN’S FOURTH FRIDAY and SATURDAY, OCTOBER 30-31 at 8 P.M. SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 1 at 2 P.M. Michael Stern, conductor

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Gil Shaham, violin

ur adventure continues with the second world premiere of the season, aptly called Odyssey. Conductor Michael Stern is on the podium to lead the orchestra in this colorful, twinkling and imaginative showpiece by British composer Stuart Murray Turnbull. You’ll hear delicate dancing from the strings, sparkling mallet lines, intricate woodwind flourishes and shifting rhythms throughout for a refreshing contemporary vibe. Whether a piece was written two months or 200 years ago, good music and good artistry

Photo by Luke Ratray

GIL SHAHAM

is always in style. That is most certainly the case for both Johannes Brahms’ Violin Concerto and Robert Schumann’s Fourth Symphony. One of the foremost violinists of our time, Gil Shaham, returns to Helzberg Hall to play Brahms’ only violin concerto. Steeped in the old-world tradition of great players, Shaham effortlessly articulates swift passages and sings with his instrument. He is ideally suited to play Brahms’ Violin Concerto with its extraordinary melodic runs, breathtaking double-stops and considerable technical demands. Schumann’s Fourth Symphony is an intense, dramatic and sensational tour de force. It has a sheer, focused power that makes you feel invincible. The same motif, or idée fixe, keeps coming back again and again — adding cohesion as well as building suspense for the whole piece. Unexpected twists and turns will keep you on the edge of your seat, from the dark, mysterious first notes to the euphoric finale. KANSAS CITY SYMPHONY

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CLASSICAL SERIES BEETHOVEN Missa Solemnis

“The piece is as if Beethoven extended the _ last movement of the Ninth with the _ same themes of wishing for peace among _ humankind — a message we desperately _ need right now. ” — TK DeWitt, associate principal bassoon

Photo by Eric Williams

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Featuring Your Symphony Chorus BEETHOVEN’S MISSA SOLEMNIS FRIDAY and SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 20-21 at 8 P.M. SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 22 at 2 P.M. Michael Stern, conductor Kansas City Symphony Chorus, Charles Bruffy, chorus director Susanna Phillips, soprano Sean Panikkar, tenor

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Tamara Mumford, mezzo-soprano

Michael Sumuel, bass-baritone

he glorious celebration of Ludwig van Beethoven’s 250th birthday continues with a masterpiece he wrote at the height of his powers — Missa Solemnis. Combining the profound spirituality of a mass with the dramatic spirit of an opera, Beethoven viewed Missa Solemnis as his magnum opus. Your Symphony, Chorus and a quartet of soloists join forces for this divine-yet-daunting work under the baton of Maestro Michael Stern. Opportunities to hear this masterwork live are rare, and in fact, this will be the Kansas City Symphony’s first-ever performance, so you will not want to miss out. Beethoven had an epic vision for his monumental Mass, and the immensity of the piece is hard to grasp without witnessing it firsthand. The soloists and chorus exchange ideas constantly throughout the five-part work.

With huge leaps and dramatic dynamic shifts, impressive vocal stamina is needed for the duration of the piece. The work is equally demanding for the orchestra, including thrilling quick passages for many instruments and some especially difficult parts for the bassoon. Even with all the fiery passion, there are delicate moments like the heavenly violin solo in the Sanctus that will inspire you and fill you with hope and peace. Experiencing this deep, complex work promises to be overwhelming and lifechanging in the best way possible. Perhaps Beethoven described it best at the top of his score: “Von Herzen – möge es wieder zu Herzen gehen!” (From the heart — may it go to the heart!)

KANSAS CITY SYMPHONY

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CLASSICAL SERIES WALTON Johannesburg Festival Overture W.A. MOZART Piano Concerto No. 24 ELGAR Symphony No. 1

hauntingly beautiful

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MASTERWORKS + OVATION

From Darkness into Light MOZART, ELGAR AND WALTON FRIDAY and SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 27-28 at 8 P.M. SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 29 at 2 P.M. Michael Francis, guest conductor I Janice Carissa, piano (Underwritten by Almy Legacy Fund)

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ritish composer Edward Elgar is so much more than “Pomp and Circumstance.” Be here Thanksgiving weekend as conductor Michael Francis leads us on a profound journey through the great masterpiece of Elgar’s First Symphony. Among friends, the witty chap was often the life of the party. Other times, especially after criticism, Elgar suffered from extreme mood swings. His First Symphony reflects these internal highs and lows. From shadowy, furtive passages to joyous optimism, Elgar shares a compelling narrative of the beauty and suffering we all face as part of the human condition. Toward the end, hope emerges as a flicker of light, like a candle in a hurricane, starting in the low strings and expanding to the entire orchestra for a triumphant finale. But first, it’s a wild romp with William Walton’s Johannesburg Festival Overture, commissioned for the South African city’s 70th anniversary celebration. Walton mixes catchy tunes with fun

percussion parts — maracas, castanets and rumba sticks — for this “non-stop gallop.” This jaunty, devil-may-care work is sure to leave you smiling. In contrast, Mozart’s Piano Concerto No. 24 is a darker, brooding work filled with hauntingly beautiful melodies. This advanced concerto calls for the largest orchestra of any Mozart concerto, and the result is a grand, sophisticated piece, showcasing why Mozart is one of the original G.O.A.T. (greatest of all time) composers. Hear 20-year-old piano prodigy Janice Carissa perform this exemplary model of Mozart’s genius.

MICHAEL FRANCIS KANSAS CITY SYMPHONY

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CLASSICAL SERIES MICHAEL IPPOLITO Nocturne RACHMANINOFF Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini R. STRAUSS Ein Heldenleben

Heroic Adventure

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MASTERWORKS + OVATION

A Hero’s Life RACHMANINOFF’S RHAPSODY AND EIN HELDENLEBEN FRIDAY and SATURDAY, JANUARY 15-16, 2021 at 8 P.M. SUNDAY, JANUARY 17, 2021 at 2 P.M. Edo de Waart, guest conductor

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alk about music that will knock your socks off and make your heart sing — this concert led by distinguished conductor Edo de Waart promises to be memorable and life-affirming. Rachmaninoff was a consummate pianist and wrote brilliantly for the instrument. Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini is a winning example of his craft. Of all the 24 variations on the theme, No. 18 is best-known and downright swoon-worthy with its gorgeous, soaring melody. Appearing frequently on “best of ” lists, it also turns up the romance in movies like “Somewhere in Time” and “Groundhog

Photo by Jesse Willems

EDO DE WAART

Jon Kimura Parker, piano

Day.” Canadian pianist Jon Kimura Parker “dazzles” (Salt Lake Tribune) with his performance of this piece. Richard Strauss calls for massive orchestral forces including, count ’em, eight French horns for Ein Heldenleben (A Hero’s Life). He found the sound of horns perfect for the heroic theme in this thrilling and grand masterwork. Right away you’ll hear the hero’s majestic melody, and then we’re off on an adventure. Another section uses a warm and passionate violin solo to depict his wife. Strauss asks the woodwinds and brass to deliver some especially masterful playing throughout the piece, and he quotes many of his earlier works, like Don Juan, Also sprach Zarathustra, Death and Transfiguration, Don Quixote and Till Eulenspiegel within this all-encompassing retrospective. All conflict eventually fades into peaceful solitude, and you’ll leave Helzberg Hall with a renewed sense of serenity. KANSAS CITY SYMPHONY

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CLASSICAL SERIES FRANCK Psyché et Eros BRUCH Violin Concerto PROKOFIEV Excerpts from the Romeo and Juliet Suites

“You can feel the emotion and urgency in the _ story, and we are left in wonder at the magic _ of the sounds we are hearing and where the _ inspiration for something so original and _ beautiful comes from.” — Maria Crosby, cello SUBSCRIBE BEFORE APRIL 1 14

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Prokofiev’s Romeo and Juliet Suites BRUCH’S VIOLIN CONCERTO FRIDAY and SATURDAY, JANUARY 29-30, 2021 at 8 P.M. SUNDAY, JANUARY 31, 2021 at 2 P.M. Michael Stern, conductor

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Pamela Frank, violin

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ove is in the air … along with some despair. Shakespeare’s “Romeo and Juliet” is one of the greatest love stories ever told. Though a tragic tale of woe, its message of love has resonated for centuries. Many have been inspired by this timeless story, and Russian composer Sergei Prokofiev expertly captures the bold feelings of star-crossed young love and fighting families in his Romeo and Juliet Suites. Written for ballet, Prokofiev’s long melodic lines are ideal for dancing while evoking the characters of this famous story. The building turmoil is palpable all the way to the heart-wrenching conclusion. The story’s drama calls for huge orchestral forces. And once you hear the “Dance of

Photo by Chris Lee

PAMELA FRANK

the Knights,” it’s nearly impossible to keep it out of your head — it’s that memorable. If you’ve not heard this quintessential masterpiece live, don’t miss this chance to experience it in the marvelous acoustics of Helzberg Hall. Hearing the Kansas City Symphony play it under the direction of Michael Stern will leave you mesmerized. On the first half, violinist Pamela Frank is back to turn up the passion in Max Bruch’s hyperRomantic First Violin Concerto. A lovely exchange of melodies between soloist and orchestra segues into a beautiful slow movement and wraps with a fast, fiery finish. The finale is exactly the kind of nonstop showstopper that makes you a little giddy as you lean forward in your seat. A short and sensual work by César Franck opens the concert, inspired by the classical mythology of Cupid (Eros) and Psyché. The music is lush, evocative and graceful. As the piece comes to a quiet close, the soft and cozy ending is a perfect interpretation of “they lived happily ever after.” KANSAS CITY SYMPHONY

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CLASSICAL SERIES R. STRAUSS Don Juan TCHAIKOVSKY Rococo Variations KODÁLY Dances of Galánta BARTÓK Miraculous Mandarin Suite

&

expressive

romantic

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MASTERWORKS + OVATION Strauss’ Don Juan

TCHAIKOVSKY AND THE MIRACULOUS MANDARIN SUITE FRIDAY and SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 5-6, 2021 at 8 P.M. SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2021 at 2 P.M. Paolo Bortolameolli, guest conductor

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op onto this exhilarating rollercoaster ride to witness musical revolution and heroic gestures, plus the rise and fall of idealisms. A 24-year-old Richard Strauss burst onto the scene with his groundbreaking tone poem Don Juan. It’s the first time he casts himself as the central character of the story, which he also did a decade later in Ein Heldenleben (A Hero’s Life). Strauss was a pioneer in the way he pushed the boundaries of harmonic language, rhythmic invention and theatrical energy. As conductor Paolo Bortolameolli leads the orchestra in the unmistakable opening melody, you’ll hear why the piece was an instant success, and why it’s been a repertoire staple ever since. Piotr Ilych Tchaikovsky’s Rococo Variations is incredibly expressive and Romantic in spirit. He uses a conventional theme with variations but cleverly blends various styles and eras resulting in an innovative and thoroughly delightful piece.

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Zlatomir Fung, cello

Soloist Zlatomir Fung is the youngest cellist ever to win first prize at the 2019 Tchaikovsky Competition at age 20, and we’re thrilled to showcase his talents with this charming composition. Hungarian composers and lifelong friends Zoltán Kodály and Béla Bartók each have their own distinct style. Kodály’s Dances of Galánta presents a nostalgic, joyful view, and it features a wicked-awesome clarinet solo as well as some zingy string playing. It’s also an instance where Kodály incorporated native folk songs into his music. Bartók’s Miraculous Mandarin Suite depicts the scandalous tale of a woman inviting men into a brothel so her cohorts can rob them. While the story doesn’t end well, the music has that wow factor. It is vivid, chaotic and full of special effects — string harmonics, woodwind trills, trombone slides and wild percussion sounds. When all these energies come together, it’s absolutely electrifying. KANSAS CITY SYMPHONY

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CLASSICAL SERIES GABRIELLA SMITH Field Guide SIBELIUS Violin Concerto SAINT-SAËNS Symphony No. 3, “Organ”

MAGNIFICENT ORCHESTRAL COLORS

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MASTERWORKS + BR AVO

SAINT-SAËNS’ ORGAN SYMPHONY FRIDAY and SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 19-20, 2021 at 8 P.M. SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 21, 2021 at 2 P.M. Gemma New, guest conductor Benjamin Beilman, violin

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Jan Kraybill, organ

his program will warm your heart. We’re firing up the Julia Irene Kauffman Casavant Organ to reprise Camille SaintSaëns’ “Organ” Symphony with Grammy® Award-nominated and local organ superstar Jan Kraybill at the bench. While our 2015 Grammy-nominated album garnered high praise, nothing compares to hearing this exultant work live in Helzberg Hall. Saint-Saëns’ Third is quintessential 19th-century French music with its rounded fullness, magnificent orchestral colors and ethereal textures. From the soft sparkle of the third movement to the triumphant organ blast in the finale, this symphony will blow you away. With his “dreamy lyricism and heated intensity” (New York Times) Benjamin Beilman displays his passion and technical merits in Sibelius’ Violin Concerto as guest conductor Gemma New leads us on a warmhearted journey of transformation. Much like the Saint-Saëns, the Sibelius opens with plenty of soulsearching and concludes with an impressive and challenging finale.

From exotic, irresistible bird songs and frog calls to steadily growing and propulsive sound layers, Gabriella Smith’s Field Guide combines natural and urban grooves to morph Helzberg Hall into part jungle and part bird sanctuary. Or in the words of conductor New, “It’s fun; it’s cool.”

Photo by Roy Cox

GEMMA NEW KANSAS CITY SYMPHONY

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CLASSICAL SERIES MacDOWELL Piano Concerto No. 2 MAHLER Symphony No. 5

TRIUMPH of the human spirit

Photo by Todd Rosenberg

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MASTERWORKS + OVATION Ambition and Anguish to Power and Beauty

MAHLER’S FIFTH AND MACDOWELL’S PIANO CONCERTO NO. 2 FRIDAY and SATURDAY, MARCH 26-27, 2021 at 8 P.M. SUNDAY, MARCH 28, 2021 at 2 P.M. Michael Stern, conductor

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Martina Filjak, piano

merican composer Edward MacDowell is best-known for a sweet little piano tune called “To a Wild Rose” and his Second Piano Concerto, which is a downright formidable beast. In the latter, MacDowell demands virtuosity from the soloist much like the Romanticera concertos of Grieg, Liszt and Tchaikovsky. With her “brilliant and imaginative playing” (New York Times), Martina Filjak is just the keyboard whiz to tackle this ambitious work. Starting in a daydream, the piece soon gives way to stunning, showy passages and a lively middle section. The last movement requires tremendous technique and unrelenting passion with its huge orchestral climaxes, highspirited fireworks and massive ending, which will whet your appetite for the grandness of the program’s second half. Speaking of big, Gustav Mahler believed a symphony should contain the entire world, and his epic Fifth Symphony comes about as close as any. Mahler’s masterpiece is a

spectacular, transformational event that spans the full spectrum of emotions. From deep anguish to intense joy, what prevails is a complete triumph of the human spirit. Nestled between movements is the intimate and indescribably beautiful “Adagietto” with just wistful strings and gentle harp alone. Many say this was Mahler’s love letter to his wife, presented as delicately and sensitively as a whisper. And for the final movement, as the last notes sound, your heart may burst from pure happiness. You simply cannot miss this transcendent experience with Michael Stern and your Kansas City Symphony.

Photo by Martina Filjak

MARTINA FILJAK KANSAS CITY SYMPHONY

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CLASSICAL SERIES JOAN TOWER Tambor W.A. MOZART Clarinet Concerto STRAVINSKY Pétrouchka

“Playful, delicate, and boisterous ... a piece _ that is iconic to the clarinet, it brilliantly _ displays all that the instrument can do.” — Raymond Santos, clarinet

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MASTERWORKS + BR AVO Stravinsky’s Pétrouchka and Joan Tower

MOZART’S CLARINET CONCERTO FRIDAY and SATURDAY, APRIL 9-10, 2021 at 8 P.M. SUNDAY, APRIL 11, 2021 at 2 P.M. Christian Reif, guest conductor

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ur hometown musicians take center stage in a program full of rhythmic drive, virtuosity and graceful lyricism. Mozart’s Clarinet Concerto is known across the world as a timeless musical masterpiece. Brilliantly displaying all the instrument can do, the Kansas City Symphony’s own Principal Clarinet Raymond Santos brings his “impassioned” playing (Kansas City Star) to Mozart’s iconic work. It begins happily with peppy arpeggiated lines, continues with the famous slow middle movement with exquisite swooping melodies, and finishes with a bubbly and bright ending like a glass of champagne. “Tambor” is Spanish for drum, and Grammy® Award-winning composer Joan Tower’s title could not be more fitting. Shining a spotlight on the percussion section, Tambor is a whirlwind of rhythmic energy and color. Driving timpani beats, cymbal crashes and lots of other percussion special effects make for a thrilling opener. Stravinsky is also known for the originality of his rhythms, often layering them on top of each other to create distinctive pulsating patterns. In Pétrouchka, Stravinsky

Raymond Santos, clarinet

concocts a feast for the senses with animated rhythms and melodies along with unconventional instrument combos. Originally written for ballet, the music’s natural lilt makes it easy to imagine dancers moving across the stage as the folktale progresses from scene to scene. The story starts at a winter carnival where a magician brings three puppets to life and a jealous love triangle develops. The clown puppet, Pétrouchka, adores the ballerina, but she likes the other puppet. Ultimately, Pétrouchka loses in a deadly fight and comes back to haunt everyone as a ghost. Every instrument family has a solo in this exciting kaleidoscope of sound, resulting in a stunning showpiece for orchestra.

Photo by Jenny Wheat

RAYMOND SANTOS KANSAS CITY SYMPHONY

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CLASSICAL SERIES BERLIOZ Roméo et Juliette

WHERE INFATUATION & TRAGEDY COEXIST

Photo by Eric Williams

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MASTERWORKS + OVATION

BERLIOZ’S ROMÉO ET JULIETTE FRIDAY and SATURDAY, MAY 21-22, 2021 at 8 P.M. SUNDAY, MAY 23, 2021 at 2 P.M. Michael Stern, conductor Kansas City Symphony Chorus, Charles Bruffy, chorus director Clara Osowski, mezzo-soprano

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enturies before Wi-Fi and Netflix, you had to leave the house to watch a drama. Shakespeare hadn’t caught on in France until a traveling troupe brought his plays to Paris in 1827. French composer Hector Berlioz hit the jackpot seeing “Hamlet” and “Romeo and Juliet” in the same week. Berlioz became an instant fan, largely due to the attractive Irish actress, Harriet Smithson, portraying Juliet. He obsessively wrote her love letters, sent flowers and stalked her performances, but she avoided him. Years later they finally met after a performance of his Symphonie fantastique, a piece inspired by his unrequited love for her, and actually married in 1833. By the time Berlioz finished his genre-bending Roméo et Juliette in 1839, their relationship was over. Yet his affinity for Shakespeare continued the rest of his life, inspiring many of his major works. The story of Romeo and Juliet is still appealing today for the same reasons it appealed to Berlioz. It’s sexy, violent and heartbreaking —

where infatuation and tragedy coexist. These themes could not be more alluring for Berlioz, a die-hard Romantic-era composer. A masterful hybrid of an opera and a symphony, Roméo et Juliette is big, dramatic and packed with extreme emotions. In a unique twist, Berlioz uses instruments to represent Romeo and Juliet instead of vocalists. Romeo’s displeasure with the rival families is conveyed by an epic trombone solo. In the balcony scene, Berlioz captures the stillness of the night and the breathlessness of adolescent love with a theme introduced by the cellos. It’s incredibly intimate before the inevitable sadness. In a nod to Beethoven’s Ninth, Berlioz reserves much of the singing for a powerful choral finale. Be here to experience Berlioz’s extravagant French Romanticism in this large-scale musical interpretation of the ill-fated lovers’ story. It’ll be the choral and orchestral event of the spring!

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CLASSICAL SERIES STILL Poem for Orchestra GERSHWIN Piano Concerto in F SHOSTAKOVICH Symphony No. 5

“A performance of the Concerto in F is a great _chance to re-experience the magic we all felt _the first time we heard the Rhapsody in Blue, _with all-new melodies and harmonies to _fall in love with.” — John Klinghammer, clarinet

Photo by Lauren Farmer

CONRAD TAO

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MASTERWORKS + BR AVO

GERSHWIN’S PIANO CONCERTO WITH SHOSTAKOVICH’S FIFTH FRIDAY and SATURDAY, JUNE 4-5, 2021 at 8 P.M. SUNDAY, JUNE 6, 2021 at 2 P.M. Joshua Weilerstein, guest conductor

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erspective. Unique to every person, and often the beauty of interpreting art and music. For Dmitri Shostakovich, keen perspective probably saved his life. He wrote his Fifth Symphony in 1937 at the height of Stalin’s purges when Russian life was especially terrifying. Anyone who breathed even a hint of opposition was arrested, imprisoned, tortured or executed. Stalin had deemed Shostakovich’s previous works too modern and complex to be communist, so it became literally a matter of life and death to appease the merciless ruler. With Shostakovich’s next major work, he added an apologetic note titled, “A Soviet Artist’s Creative Response to Just Criticism,” and made sure to mention the work had a “joyous, optimistic” finale. The regime ate it up. The public liked it too. The result is powerful music — unsettling, sensitive and conflicted. And the unanswered question remains … was he a devoted Soviet or secretive rebel? There are some hints the symphony’s finale was “forced rejoicing.” From delicate playfulness to an

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Conrad Tao, piano

earth-shattering climax of blazing sound, guest conductor Joshua Weilerstein leads the Kansas City Symphony in this masterwork that will resonate with you long after the last note sounds. The first half also explores perspective with William Grant Still and George Gershwin — both leading American composers but with drastically different styles and human experiences. In 1944, Still returned from serving in World War II, while just two decades earlier, in 1925, Gershwin was living the Roaring Twenties lifestyle. Still’s Poem for Orchestra imagines the world’s spiritual rebirth after the devastation of war. Its final chord lingers with a hopeful outlook. The prodigiously talented guest Conrad Tao will paint a carefree dreamscape with Gershwin’s Piano Concerto in F, featuring the composer’s signature stylings, syncopated rhythms and catchy melodies à la American in Paris and Rhapsody in Blue. It’s the Gershwin you know and love from Broadway and Hollywood! KANSAS CITY SYMPHONY

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CLASSICAL SERIES MARTINŮ Memorial to Lidice BENDIX-BALGLEY Fidl-Fantazye: A Klezmer Concerto BEETHOVEN Symphony No. 3, “Eroica”

Photo by Nikolaj Lund

NOAH BENDIX-BALGLEY

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MASTERWORKS + BR AVO

BEETHOVEN’S “EROICA”

FRIDAY and SATURDAY, JUNE 18-19, 2021 at 8 P.M. SUNDAY, JUNE 20, 2021 at 2 P.M. Michael Stern, conductor

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Noah Bendix-Balgley, violin

he most ubiquitous name in classical music is Ludwig van Beethoven — for good reason. Among his monumental nine symphonies, the “Eroica” (Heroic) Symphony was composed at a time in Beethoven’s life when themes of fearlessness and overcoming challenges were everpresent in his music. It was at this time when he was diagnosed with progressive hearing loss, and perhaps the weight of his own mortality and frailty prompted his prolific creativity. “Eroica” is a deeply emotional work inspired by the ideals of liberty, unity and the rights of humankind. Beethoven originally dedicated the symphony to Napoleon Bonaparte because he thought Napoleon represented the future and a democratic way of thinking. But when Napoleon declared himself emperor of France in 1804, Beethoven was disgusted. Thankfully he didn’t discard the music. Instead, he scratched out the dedication with a knife, leaving a gaping hole in the paper but preserving this timeless symphony. Conductor Michael Stern leads your Kansas City Symphony

on this vivid orchestral adventure traversing an epic battle, somber funeral march and playful middle section on the way to a breathtaking, victorious finale. The concert begins with Czech composer Bohuslav Martinů’s searing Memorial to Lidice, which commemorates a Czech village that was razed and its residents massacred by the Nazis. While stately and hymn-like, palpable tension builds in the short work. A resilient spirit eventually prevails with shimmering strings, rich woodwind tones and vibrant brass chords. Rounding out the program will be the Kansas City premiere of Fidl-Fantazye by multi-talented violinist Noah Bendix-Balgley. In addition to composing, he also balances roles as concertmaster for the Berlin Philharmonic, soloist, chamber musician and klezmer fiddler. Sometimes called “Old Country” music, klezmer is a style derived from Jewish and folk music traditions in Eastern Europe. In his own Fidl-Fantazye: A Klezmer Concerto, BendixBalgley promises fun, fast fiddlin’ that will be far from ordinary! KANSAS CITY SYMPHONY

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CLASSICAL SERIES BARBER Medeaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Meditation and Dance of Vengeance BEETHOVEN Piano Concerto No. 3 RIMSKY-KORSAKOV Scheherazade

colorful stories SUBSCRIBE BEFORE APRIL 1 30

(816) 471-0400 / KCSYMPHONY.ORG


MASTERWORKS + OVATION SEASON FINALE: SCHEHERAZADE!

BEETHOVEN’S THIRD PIANO CONCERTO FRIDAY and SATURDAY, JUNE 25-26, 2021 at 8 P.M. SUNDAY, JUNE 27, 2021 at 2 P.M. Michael Stern, conductor

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Yefim Bronfman, piano

t’s season finale time, people! We’re throwing a big party, and you’re all invited. For our celebration, we’ll have you know that we’ve already received RSVPs from a couple of strong female characters and one of the greatest pianists of our time. Trust us, this is going to be fabulous. Pianist Yefim Bronfman, or just “Fima” to many, has been playing Beethoven’s concertos since he was a teen, and that lifetime of experience is evident every time he sits at the bench. As one reviewer puts it, “Listening to Bronfman play Beethoven is like being in a crowded room when suddenly a profound conversationalist begins to speak and everyone just steps back to listen with rapt attention” (Chicago Sun Times). It’ll be a thrill to witness his artistry and athleticism as he takes on Beethoven’s Third Concerto, which is packed with the red-hot passion and fury forever linked to Beethoven. As for leading ladies, Medea and Scheherazade are two fabled women who used their wits to survive. American composer Samuel Barber’s study

of Medea came about from his earlier ballet suite of the same name. This mythical story of a sorceress betrayed by her husband has a bunch of twists and turns, much like the increasing intensity of the music, which culminates in a frenzied dance. Then, it’s time for last call. Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov’s Scheherazade remains one of the most adored and most programmed works in the orchestral repertoire. The Russian composer, inspired by the fanciful “Tales of the Arabian Nights,” described Scheherazade as a narrative of “varied fairytale wonders.” The solo violin, representing Scheherazade, weaves these colorful stories into a grand tapestry of sound.

Photo by Dario Acosta

YEFIM BRONFMAN KANSAS CITY SYMPHONY

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CLASSICAL SERIES CLASSICAL SERIES OPENING WEEKEND!

1

STERN CONDUCTS BRAHMS’ FIRST AND SCHUMANN

R. SCHUMANN Manfred Overture GABRIEL KAHANE Piano Concerto (Kansas City Symphony commission, world premiere) BRAHMS Symphony No. 1

2

GIL SHAHAM PLAYS BRAHMS WITH SCHUMANN’S FOURTH

STUART MURRAY TURNBULL Odyssey (world premiere) BRAHMS Violin Concerto R. SCHUMANN Symphony No. 4

3

FEATURING YOUR SYMPHONY CHORUS

4

FROM DARKNESS INTO LIGHT

5 6 7 8

BEETHOVEN’S MISSA SOLEMNIS

MOZART, ELGAR AND WALTON

BEETHOVEN Missa Solemnis

WALTON Johannesburg Festival Overture W.A. MOZART Piano Concerto No. 24 ELGAR Symphony No. 1

A HERO’S LIFE

MICHAEL IPPOLITO Nocturne RACHMANINOFF Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini R. STRAUSS Ein Heldenleben

PROKOFIEV’S ROMEO AND JULIET SUITES

FRANCK Psyché et Eros BRUCH Violin Concerto PROKOFIEV Excerpts from the Romeo and Juliet Suites

RACHMANINOFF’S RHAPSODY AND EIN HELDENLEBEN

BRUCH’S VIOLIN CONCERTO TCHAIKOVSKY AND THE MIRACULOUS MANDARIN SUITE

R. STRAUSS Don Juan TCHAIKOVSKY Rococo Variations KODÁLY Dances of Galánta BARTÓK Miraculous Mandarin Suite

SAINT-SAËNS’ ORGAN SYMPHONY

GABRIELLA SMITH Field Guide SIBELIUS Violin Concerto SAINT-SAËNS Symphony No. 3, “Organ”

STRAUSS’ DON JUAN

AMBITION, POWER AND BEAUTY

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MAHLER’S FIFTH AND MACDOWELL’S PIANO CONCERTO NO. 2

MACDOWELL Piano Concerto No. 2 MAHLER Symphony No. 5

STRAVINSKY’S PÉTROUCHKA AND

JOAN TOWER Tambor W.A. MOZART Clarinet Concerto STRAVINSKY Pétrouchka

TOWER 10 JOAN MOZART’S CLARINET CONCERTO

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BERLIOZ’S ROMÉO ET JULIETTE BERLIOZ Roméo et Juliette

12

GERSHWIN’S PIANO CONCERTO WITH SHOSTAKOVICH’S FIFTH

STILL Poem for Orchestra GERSHWIN Piano Concerto in F SHOSTAKOVICH Symphony No. 5

13

BEETHOVEN’S “EROICA”

MARTINŮ Memorial to Lidice NOAH BENDIX-BALGLEY Fidl-Fantazye: A Klezmer Concerto BEETHOVEN Symphony No. 3, “Eroica”

SEASON FINALE: SCHEHERAZADE!

THIRD 14 BEETHOVEN’S PIANO CONCERTO

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BARBER Medea’s Meditation and Dance of Vengeance BEETHOVEN Piano Concerto No. 3 RIMSKY-KORSAKOV Scheherazade

(816) 471-0400 / KCSYMPHONY.ORG


SUBSCRIBE BEFORE APRIL 1 BRAVO 7 CONCERTS MICHAEL STERN, conductor JEFFREY KAHANE, piano

OVATION 7 CONCERTS

Oct. 9-11

Oct. 9-11

MICHAEL STERN, conductor GIL SHAHAM, violin MICHAEL STERN, conductor KANSAS CITY SYMPHONY CHORUS, CHARLES BRUFFY, chorus director SUSANNA PHILLIPS, soprano TAMARA MUMFORD, mezzo-soprano SEAN PANIKKAR, tenor MICHAEL SUMUEL, bass-baritone

Oct. 30-Nov. 1

Nov. 20-22

EDO DE WAART, guest conductor JON KIMURA PARKER, piano

MICHAEL STERN, conductor NOAH BENDIX-BALGLEY, violin

MICHAEL STERN, conductor YEFIM BRONFMAN, piano

Jan. 15-17, 2021

Jan. 15-17, 2021

Jan. 29-31, 2021

Feb. 19-21, 2021

Feb. 5-7, 2021

Feb. 19-21, 2021

March 26-28, 2021

April 9-11, 2021

March 26-28, 2021

April 9-11, 2021

MICHAEL STERN, conductor KANSAS CITY SYMPHONY CHORUS, CHARLES BRUFFY, chorus director CLARA OSOWSKI, mezzo-soprano Additional soloists to be announced JOSHUA WEILERSTEIN, guest conductor CONRAD TAO, piano

Nov. 27-29

Feb. 5-7, 2021

MICHAEL STERN, conductor MARTINA FILJAK, piano

CHRISTIAN REIF, guest conductor RAYMOND SANTOS, clarinet

Nov. 27-29

Jan. 29-31, 2021

PAOLO BORTOLAMEOLLI, guest conductor ZLATOMIR FUNG, cello GEMMA NEW, guest conductor BENJAMIN BEILMAN, violin JAN KRAYBILL, organ

Oct. 30-Nov. 1

Nov. 20-22

MICHAEL FRANCIS, guest conductor JANICE CARISSA, piano (Underwritten by Almy Legacy Fund)

MICHAEL STERN, conductor PAMELA FRANK, violin

MASTERWORKS 14 CONCERTS

June 4-6, 2021

May 21-23, 2021

May 21-23, 2021

May 31-June 2, 2019

June 4-6, 2021

June 18-20, 2021

June 18-20, 2021

June 25-27, 2021

June 25-27, 2021

KANSAS CITY SYMPHONY

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HOLIDAY CONCERTS

CLASSICAL SERIES

HANDEL’S MESSIAH

FRIDAY and SATURDAY, DECEMBER 4-5 at 8 P.M. SUNDAY, DECEMBER 6 at 2 P.M. Patrick Dupré Quigley, guest conductor Kansas City Symphony Chorus, Charles Bruffy, chorus director Joélle Harvey, soprano Aryeh Nussbaum Cohen, countertenor Andrew Owens, tenor Douglas Williams, bass-baritone

Hallelujah! The power of nearly 200 instruments and voices combined with the impeccable acoustics of Helzberg Hall provides a triumphant experience of Handel’s majestic choral masterpiece. The Symphony and Symphony Chorus invite you and yours to experience Handel’s glorious Messiah — the perfect way to kick off your holiday season.

HOLIDAYS with KENNY G WEDNESDAY and THURSDAY, DECEMBER 9-10 at 8 P.M.

Jason Seber, David T. Beals III Associate Conductor

Take a joyous ride through the smooth sounds of jazz with the one and only Kenny G this holiday season. Enjoy all of your Kenny G favorites, including music from his first Christmas album, “Miracles: The Holiday Album,” which ranks among the bestselling Yuletide albums ever recorded.

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(816) 471-0400 / KCSYMPHONY.ORG


ADD HOLIDAY CONCERTS NOW WITH YOUR SUBSCRIPTION ORDER!

CHRISTMAS FESTIVAL

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 18 at 8 P.M. SATURDAY, DECEMBER 19 at 1 P.M. and 7 P.M. SUNDAY, DECEMBER 20 at 2 P.M. and 7 P.M. MONDAY, DECEMBER 21 at 7 P.M. Jason Seber, David T. Beals III Associate Conductor Kansas City Symphony Chorus, Charles Bruffy, chorus director Capathia Jenkins, vocals Allegro Children’s Choir, Christy Elsner, founder and artistic director

Kansas City’s grandest holiday concert returns. The Symphony and Symphony Chorus present stunning musical arrangements of cherished Christmas carols, songs of the season and an exciting guest vocalist for a healthy dose of Christmas cheer. Plus, an early visit from Santa!

FILM + LIVE ORCHESTRA

HOME ALONE

TUESDAY and WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 22-23 at 7 P.M. THURSDAY, DECEMBER 24 at 11 A.M. Jason Seber, David T. Beals III Associate Conductor

A true holiday favorite, this comedy classic features renowned composer John Williams’ charming and delightful score performed live by your Kansas City Symphony. Macaulay Culkin stars as Kevin McCallister, an 8-year-old boy who is accidentally left behind when his family leaves for Christmas vacation, and who must defend his home against two bungling thieves. Hilarious and heart-warming, “Home Alone” is holiday fun for the entire family!

ORDER WITH YOUR SUBSCRIPTION RENEWAL NOW KANSAS CITY SYMPHONY

35


SPECIAL PRESENTATIONS STAR WARS: RETURN OF THE JEDI IN CONCERT

ORDER TODAY FOR BEST SEATS

WEDNESDAY, THURSDAY and FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 9-11 at 7:30 P.M. SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 13 at 3 P.M.

Jason Seber, David T. Beals III Associate Conductor

Luke Skywalker heads a mission to rescue Han Solo from the clutches of Jabba the Hutt and faces Darth Vader one last time. Experience “Return of the Jedi” in this remarkable concert event, featuring your Kansas City Symphony performing John Williams’ iconic score live as the complete film is shown on a giant screen in Helzberg Hall.

RICHARD MARX with the KANSAS CITY SYMPHONY THURSDAY, OCTOBER 1 at 7:30 P.M.

Jason Seber, David T. Beals III Associate Conductor

The ’80s pop rocker Richard Marx joins your Kansas City Symphony to perform exciting orchestral arrangements drawn from his incredible catalog of hits. From “Endless Summer Nights” and “Right Here Waiting” to “Don’t Mean Nothing” and “Hold On to the Nights,” you’ll savor all of the Richard Marx songs that topped the charts. A special pre-show meet and greet package is also available for $100. RICHARD MARX

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(816) 471-0400 / KCSYMPHONY.ORG

CALL (816) 471-0400 for details on the RICHARD MARX MEET & GREET package!


ORDER WITH YOUR SUBSCRIPTION RENEWAL NOW SILENT FILM + LIVE ORGAN

DR. JEKYLL & MR. HYDE THURSDAY, OCTOBER 29 at 7 P.M. Dorothy Papadakos, organ

Celebrate a spine-tingling Halloween in Helzberg Hall, if you dare, as the Julia Irene Kauffman Casavant Organ provides the soundtrack for this restored version of the 1920 silent classic “Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde.” Starring legendary leading man John Barrymore in the notorious title roles, this eerie screen adaptation of Robert Louis Stevenson’s classic tale is a perfectly fun and ghoulish way to spend a spooky night at the Kauffman Center.

(Please note: the Kansas City Symphony does not perform during this presentation.)

ORDER TODAY FOR BEST SEATS

FRIDAY, JANUARY 8, 2021 at 7 P.M. SATURDAY, JANUARY 9, 2021 at 7 P.M. SUNDAY, JANUARY 10, 2021 at 3 P.M. Jason Seber, David T. Beals III Associate Conductor

This action-packed adventure starring Jeff Goldblum pits man against prehistoric predators in the ultimate battle for survival. Featuring stunning imagery and groundbreaking special effects, this epic film is sheer movie magic 65 million years in the making. Now you can experience the original “Jurassic Park” as never before, projected in HD with your Kansas City Symphony performing John Williams’ iconic score live to the entire movie. Welcome … to “Jurassic Park”! KANSAS CITY SYMPHONY

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THURSDAY and FRIDAY, JANUARY 21-22, 2021 at 7 P.M. SATURDAY and SUNDAY, JANUARY 23-24, 2021 at 3 P.M. Relive the magic of Harry’s sixth year at Hogwarts™ School of Witchcraft and Wizardry, set to the live soundtrack performed by your Kansas City Symphony. Watch Harry become a wiz at potions, win Felix Felicis and uncover the meaning of Horcruxes. You’ve never seen the complete film quite like this!

(s20)

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(816) 471-0400 / KCSYMPHONY.ORG

(s20)


SPECIAL PRESENTATIONS ORDER WITH YOUR SUBSCRIPTION RENEWAL NOW FILM + LIVE ORCHESTRA

THE PRINCESS BRIDE

FRIDAY and SATURDAY, MAY 7-8, 2021 at 8 P.M. SUNDAY, MAY 9, 2021 at 3 P.M.

“As you wish…” Fencing, fighting, revenge, giants, monsters, chases, escapes, true love and miracles. “The Princess Bride” is one of the best fantasy films of all time. Experience the cult classic like never before as your Kansas City Symphony performs the entire score live for Mother’s Day weekend. Peter Falk narrates this romantic tale about the beautiful maiden, Buttercup, and her one true love, a young farm hand named Westley who must save her before she is forced to marry the horrible Prince Humperdinck. Directed by Rob Reiner, “Princess Bride” (1987) features an all-star cast including Robyn Wright, Cary Elwes, Wallace Shawn, Mandy Patinkin, Chris Sarandon, Billy Crystal, Carol Kane, Christopher Guest, Fred Savage and André the Giant. And for the first time, composer Mark Knopfler’s unforgettable score has been specially arranged for symphony orchestra. Missing this cinematic concert experience would be inconceivable! In the words of Miracle Max, “Have fun stormin’ the castle!” © The Princess Bride Limited. All Rights Reserved.

KANSAS CITY SYMPHONY

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(816) 471-0400 / KCSYMPHONY.ORG Programs and seating assignments subject to change.

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803

804

805

806

BB AA

G

F E D

131

132

133

134

135

136

130

131

130

720

FF EE

CC

205

204

203

305

305

302

202

304

304

301

201

204

GGG

GGG

415

414

413

412

411

13

5

6

13

7

13

8

GG

613

612

611

610

609

608

607

606

605

604

603

601 602

AAA

410

409

408

407

406

405

404

403

402

401

204

203

128

BB

802 801

GGG 620

619 618

617 616 615

614

N 5 / UPPER GRAND TIER RIGH T GGG

206

205

209

208

207

SECT

201 202

135

133

13

13

13

5

13

6

13

7

13

6

13

9

BBB

0 608

415

414

413

412

411

410

409

408

407

406

SECTIO

C

303

303

B

206

210

209

209

208

208

207

207

206

205

205

A 39

38

302

37

36

35

38

37

36

35

34

33

32

31

30

301

40

39

38

C

39

38

37

36

35

34

33

37

36

35

34

32

31

30

34

33

32

31

30

29

28

27

26

25

24

23

22

33

32

31

30 29

28

27

26

25

29

28

27

26

25

24

23

22

21

24

23

22

21

20

29

28

27

26

25

24

23

22

21

20

19 19

20

19

405

132

18 18

19

18

404

131

17 17

18

17

403

133

16 16

21

20

SEC. 5

17

16

402

210

AAA

132

15 15

16

15

401

134

14 14

15

14

81 614

611 612

610

605 606 607

609

601 602 603 604

608

608

EE

DD 415 414

414

413

413

412

412

411

411

410

410

409

409

404

403

A

13 13

CHORAL SEATS 14

13

9 806

805 804

803

0 62 619

618 617

616 615

607

607

604

609

606

606

604

404

405

405

406

406

407

407

408

408

MEZZANI

DD

EE

135

12

12 13

12

/ LOWER GRAND TIER RIGHT ION 4

605

605

603

613

613

612 611 604

604

610

603

603

603

602

602

601

NE RIGHT

602

B

11 11 12

11

203

10

9

11

202

9

10

10

201

8

10

9

8

80

1 80

A AA 614 613

612 611

610

610

609

609 608

607 606

601

605

601

BB 415 414

408 409 410

408 409 410

405 406 407

404 403 402

404

403 401 402

403

401

BB

CC

213

213

212

212

211 210

211

402

7

6

9

8

7

8

13

6

13

7

13

8

13

9

13

0

14

A AA 4 80

3

80

2

80

411 412 409 410 405 406 407 408

401

AA 213

213

212

212

211

211

210

209

208

207

6

5

8

7

6

206

206

5

4

7

6

5

204

4

3

5

4

203

3

2

4

3

80

134

7

13

8

13

9

13

4

5

EEE DDD

ER

CCC

NT

SEC. 3

2

1 2

3

2

807

CEN 5 / UP PER GRAND TIER

N N 4 CE ER / MID DLE GRAND TI

3 / LOWE R GRAND

E R C TIE

CC

ION

IO

N

411 412 413 414 415

CT

CT

IO

4

MEZZ RIGHT CENTER (RC)

SEC. 1 411 412 413

SE

SE

CT

SE

MEZZANINE CENTER PARTERRE

UPPER ORCHESTRA

ORCHESTRA

SEC. 2 406 407 403 404 405 401 402

4

MEZZ LEFT CENTER (LC)

SEC. 1 SEC. 2

SEC. 3 1

A B 1

C 1

D

D

HELZBERG HALL, Kauffman Center for the Performing Arts SELECT A SEATING AREA


CIRCLE YOUR PREFERRED SEATING SECTION CLASSICAL SERIES: MASTERWORKS PARTERRE (14 concerts) FRI X $1,102 SAT

X

SUN

X

BRAVO (7 concerts) FRI

X

SAT

X

SUN

X

UPPER ORCH.

MEZZ LC/ RC/SEC 1

ORCH.

$1,011 $906 $1,102 $1,011 $906 $1,102 $1,011 $906

PARTERRE

$612 $612 $612

OVATION (7 concerts) FRI

X

SAT

X

SUN

X

PARTERRE

$612 $612 $612

UPPER ORCH.

MEZZ LC/ RC/SEC 1

ORCH.

$556 $556 $556 UPPER ORCH.

$927 $927 $927

$507 $507 $507

$514 $514 $514

ORCH.

$556 $556 $556

$507 $507 $507

MEZZ LC/ RC/SEC 1

$514 $514 $514

MEZZ CENTER

SEC. 2

SEC. 3

SEC. 4

SEC. 5

$703 $703 $703

$563 $563 $563

$423 $423 $423

$297 $297 $297

SEC. 2

SEC. 3

SEC. 4

SEC. 5

$493 $493 $493

$402 $402 $402

$318 $318 $318

$241 $241 $241

$171 $171 $171

MEZZ CENTER

SEC. 2

SEC. 3

SEC. 4

SEC. 5

$402 $402 $402

$318 $318 $318

$241 $241 $241

$171 $171 $171

$871 $871 $871

MEZZ CENTER

$493 $493 $493

= = =

= = =

= = =

TOTAL $

# PACKAGES

ADD ON HOLIDAY AND SPECIAL CONCERTS WITH YOUR SUBSCRIPTION PURCHASE HOLIDAY CONCERTS: PARTERRE

UPPER ORCH.

ORCH.

ALL MEZZ. CTR. SEC

SEC. 1

SEC. 2

SEC. 3

SEC. 4

SEC. 5

(DAY/ TIME)

MESSIAH ADULT

X

$85

$80

$60

$65

$55

$45

$40

$35

$30

=

(

)

MESSIAH YOUTH

X

$55

$52

$40

$42

$38

$30

$25

$20

$20

=

(

)

KENNY G

X

$99

$90

$85

$85

$75

$65

$55

$50

$45

=

(

)

XMAS FEST. ADULT

X

$90

$85

$70

$78

$60

$50

$45

$40

$35

=

(

)

XMAS FEST. YOUTH

X

$60

$55

$45

$50

$40

$35

$30

$25

$20

=

(

)

“HOME ALONE” ADULT

X

$85

$80

$65

$75

$70

$50

$60

$45

$40

=

(

)

“HOME ALONE” YOUTH

X

$50

$48

$38

$45

$40

$30

$35

$28

$25

=

(

)

TOTAL

$

# TICKETS

* Subscribers receive a $5 per adult ticket discount on most special and holiday concert tickets when purchased with a subscription. * Sunday, December 20, 2 p.m. Christmas Festival not available for add-on.

SPECIAL CONCERTS: PARTERRE UPPER ORCH.

ORCH.

ALL MEZZ. CTR. SEC

SEC. 1

SEC. 2

SEC. 3

SEC. 4

(DAY/ TIME)

SEC. 5

“STAR WARS/JEDI”

X

$90

$85

$75

$85

$72

$50

$60

$45

$40

=

(

)

“STAR WARS/JEDI" YOUTH

X

$70

$68

$52

$68

$58

$40

$48

$36

$32

=

(

)

RICHARD MARX

X

$99

$90

$85

$85

$75

$65

$55

$50

$45

=

(

)

“JEKYLL & HYDE”

X

$60

$55

$40

$55

$45

$35

$40

$30

$25

=

“JEKYLL & HYDE” YOUTH

X

$40

$38

$25

$38

$28

$20

$25

$18

$15

=

“JURASSIC PARK”

X

$85

$80

$65

$75

$70

$50

$60

$45

$40

=

(

)

“JURASSIC PARK” YOUTH

X

$50

$48

$38

$45

$40

$30

$35

$28

$25

=

(

)

“HARRY POTTER VI”

X

$90

$85

$75

$85

$72

$50

$60

$45

$40

=

(

)

“HARRY POTTER VI” YOUTH

X

$70

$68

$55

$68

$60

$40

$48

$36

$32

=

(

)

“PRINCESS BRIDE”

X

$85

$80

$65

$75

$70

$50

$60

$45

$40

=

(

)

“PRINCESS BRIDE” YOUTH

X

$50

$48

$38

$45

$40

$30

$35

$28

$25

=

(

)

# TICKETS PLEASE NOTE: Our Symphony Family Series concerts are perfect for children ages 4 and older. TOTAL $ Children ages 8 and older are also welcome to attend our Classical and Pops Series performances.


ORDER FORM, continued (page 2) MAILING INFORMATION LAST NAME

FIRST NAME

ADDRESS CITY

STATE

DAY PHONE

ZIP

EVENING PHONE

EMAIL

1 COMPLETE SECTIONS 1-4 and TOTAL AT THE END (#5) ORDER INFORMATION PREFERRED SEATING SECTION (You will be contacted once seats are assigned for new orders and add-on concerts.) SYMPHONY POPS SUBSCRIPTIONS

# OF PACKAGES

TOTAL

SYMPHONY FAMILY SUBSCRIPTIONS

# OF PACKAGES

TOTAL

HOLIDAY ADD-ONS

# OF TICKETS

TOTAL

SPECIAL CONCERT ADD-ONS

# OF TICKETS

TOTAL

1 TICKET TOTAL

2 TICKETING/FACILITY FEE There is a $3 per ticket ticketing and facility fee added to every order. For example, for each Pops or Family subscription, a $12 ticketing/facility fee would apply, etc.

2 # OF TICKETS

X $3 EACH = FEE TOTAL

3 PARKING Parking in the Arts District garage at the Kauffman Center for the Performing Arts is available for $10 per concert. Valet parking is available for $18 per concert in advance. SUBSCRIPTION PARKING (SERIES AND DAY A # OF CONCERTS

)

X $10 or $18 EACH

= TOTAL

4 ADD ON CONCERT PARKING  “STAR WARS: RETURN OF THE JEDI” RICHARD MARX “DR. JEKYLL & MR. HYDE” B # OF CONCERTS

HANDEL’S MESSIAH KENNY G CHRISTMAS FESTIVAL “HOME ALONE” X $10 or $18 EACH

“JURASSIC PARK”  “HARRY POTTER AND THE HALF BLOOD PRINCE”  “PRINCESS BRIDE” = TOTAL

3 ADD SECTIONS A & B FOR YOUR PARKING TOTAL

DONATION

Ticket sales cover about 30 percent of the cost of our world-class orchestra. Your contribution supports transformative musical experiences for children, families and the entire community, and may be taxdeductible. With a gift of at least $100, you will receive an invitation for two to the annual Contributors’ Concert, a special concert for our donors. Thank you for your generous support.

4 CONTRIBUTION TOTAL

42

5

ADD SECTIONS 1-4 FOR YOUR ORDER GRAND TOTAL

(816) 471-0400 / KCSYMPHONY.ORG


SUBSCRIBE BEFORE APRIL 1

QUESTIONS? Call the Box Office at (816) 471-0400 ORDER FORM, continued (page 3)

4 WAYS TO SUBMIT YOUR ORDER ONLINE

MAIL

KCSYMPHONY.ORG PHONE

(816) 471-0400 M-F 10 A.M. to 5 P.M.

Kansas City Symphony P.O. Box 879425 Kansas City, MO 64187

IN PERSON

The Symphony Box Office is located at 1703 Wyandotte, Suite 200, in downtown Kansas City’s Crossroads Arts District. Box Office hours are Monday through Friday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Respond before APRIL 1 to secure your season subscription. Programs and seating assignments subject to change. PAYMENT INFORMATION  CHECK (payable to Kansas City Symphony)  CREDIT CARD  VISA

 MASTERCARD

 AMERICAN EXPRESS

 DISCOVER

NAME ON CARD BILLING ADDRESS ACCOUNT NUMBER EXPIRATION

CVV SIGNATURE

 LIMELIGHT KC EMPLOYER SHARE COMPANY COMPANY NAME DEPARTMENT / EMPLOYEE ID

PARKING INFORMATION ARTS DISTRICT GARAGE Parking is available for $10 in the 1,000-car Arts District garage at the Kauffman Center for the Performing Arts, offering convenience and shelter from inclement weather. Charging stations for electric cars are available in the garage on level three, located on the north wall of the garage. Accessible parking is available on a first come, first serve basis. We advise patrons needing an accessible parking space to arrive early. Purchase your parking in advance by submitting your order with your season subscription ticket order, visiting kcsymphony.org or calling the Box Office at (816) 471-0400. Annual fund donors of $5,000 or more are eligible to receive complimentary parking for the Symphony 2020/21 season. VALET Valet parking at the Kauffman Center is available for $18 in advance ($20 day of performance.) For your convenience, the drop-off lane is located on the south side of the Kauffman Center, accessed from Broadway. Purchase valet parking in advance by submitting your order with your season subscription ticket order, visiting kcsymphony.org or calling the Box Office at (816) 471-0400. Annual fund donors of $50,000 or more are eligible to receive complimentary valet parking for the Symphony 2020/21 season. STREET PARKING In the Crossroads Arts District, where the Kauffman Center is located, there are numerous surface parking lots available for Symphony events. Parking spaces also are available throughout the area, including free street parking along Central, Wyandotte and Baltimore streets, plus 17th, 18th and 19th Streets.

KANSAS CITY SYMPHONY

43


DETAILS INSIDE!

(816) 471-0400 / kcsymphony.org

CLASSICAL PERFORMANCES

Photo by Eric Williams

1703 Wyandotte Street, Suite 200 Kansas City, MO 64108

SUBSCRIBE BEFORE APRIL 1

Non Profit Org. U.S. Postage PAID Kansas City, MO Permit No. 3642

Profile for KCSymphony

Kansas City Symphony Classical Season Brochure 2020-21 Season  

Subscribe to the Kansas City Symphony Classical Series and select between two 7-concert series or subscribe to the entire season and enjoy 1...

Kansas City Symphony Classical Season Brochure 2020-21 Season  

Subscribe to the Kansas City Symphony Classical Series and select between two 7-concert series or subscribe to the entire season and enjoy 1...

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