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endary Robert E. Lee, who would become the Confederacy’s topnotch commanding general.

haunches and hold it between his teeth during roll call.

Another regiment in the Army of Northern Virginia wanted to claim Stonewall, Stonewall and the pup became the object of a series wasn’t a of dog-nappings, sneaky crimes that alI learned about trickster admost led to “friendly fire” confrontations Gen. Jackson mired only between the Howitzers and the Louisiana when we visited for his antics. Creoles. The Howitzers got their treahis home in He also was a sured buddy back several times, but the Lexington, Va. fierce fighter Creoles didn’t give up. Finally they made The hospitable who wouldn’t off with the prized pup, and Stonewall folks there alback down. was never heard from again. lowed me to When the accompany Walt cannons and There are a lot of tales that end like this on the house from the Civil War—stories shrouded rifles roared tour, a kindness and the shells in mystery. I acknowledged whizzed and ���������������������������������������������������� with a cool nose to exploded with a �������������� their palms. bang, he wouldn’t take cover. No, he’d bark his head off Thanks to Jackson, the Rebels racked and run this way and that as the Howitup victories in the spring of 1862 when zers changed positions. his army won a series of battles in the �������������� Shenandoah Valley. The soldiers had a real soft spot for their ��������������������������� bitty Stonewall and worried that he’d The Union was trying to gain control ������������������������������������������ get blown away, so this Rebel or that of Richmond, but Jackson prevented ������������������������������������������� reinforcements from getting to the capi- one would scoop him up, carry the pup �������������������������������������������� under his arm or tuck him away in an tal of the Confederacy. The admiration �������������������������������������������� empty ammunition box during the heat and trust the troops had in their general ���������������������������������������������� of battle. helped them stand firm and repulse the LEARN MORE! North. Yapping, darting Stonewall’s reputaCompanion activities can be found at www.mo-nie.com using code: teachmo12. tion grew. Soon he became the stuff of The story goes that one of the regiments legend, and stories about him infiltrated Missouri GLEs: CA R1H, W2B, W2D, W2E, with the Virginia Howitzers got an adW3A; SS 3AI other camps like the dreams of mother’s ditional morale booster from a bouncy, ��������������������������������� shorthaired pup with a black-tipped tail. pie cooling on the windowsill. Alas,

TAILS FROM THE CIVIL WAR

STICKER SHOCK

INVITATION FOR A RARE VISIT

Chapter 4: Stonewall, Pint-sized Spitfire of a Pup PAGE A2

It costs more to stock your pantry when you shop in Missouri PAGE A5

New Mormon temple to open soon, allowing public visits for 2 weeks PAGE A4 Jan. 26, 2012 Volume 2 • Issue 10 75 cents Send your news to gladstonenews@npgco.com

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Cliff Couch’s brand new bionic baby arrived Nov. 14 weighing in at 4.5 pounds. It makes 250 calculations per second, can be controlled by a smartphone app and has awoken muscles that have pretty much had the past three decades off. Couch is the first person in Missouri to be fitted with the BiOM, a prosthesis that uses robotics to replicate the movement of the foot, Achilles tendon and calf muscle. “It’s really a life-changing deal,” he said. “It just feels like my leg’s there again. It’s being PETER YANKOWSKY/Special to Gladstone Dispatch able to do things without thinkRetired U.S. Air Force veteran Cliff Couch stands with his dog, Sissy, behind his Northland home in December. Before receiving about it.” ing the BiOM prosthesis, Couch was unable to do much in his backyard because of the uneven terrain. The BiOM is a bionic FOOT/Page A9 ankle system that uses robotics to replicate the action of the foot, Achilles tendon and calf muscle.

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A2 Gladstone Dispatch

Thursday, Jan. 26, 2012

On the Lanes

��������� ������������� ���� ���������

The following weekly high scores at Gladstone Bowl were submitted by Vicki Bowman. Men High Game Kenny Allen Andy Bischof Jason Cook Jerry Judson Jerry Rine Tim Rueckert Dave Kelley

Men High Series Bob Zollmann Leon Billings Jerry Judston Kenny Allen Vinny Zink Mark Elliott James Johnston

280 279 279 278 277 276 275

Women High Game Vicki Bowman Pam Crawley Carol Burris Kathy Essary Lisa Kufeldt Karla Kliethermes

Women High Series Kathy Essary 663 Karla Kliethermes 659 Willa Russell 639 Vicki Bowman 629 Lynn Crowley 603

255 254 236 235 235 233

Senior Men High Game Jerry Donahue 267 Larry Pagel 257 Don Short 256 Fred Coleman 251 John Deatherage 248 John Shriner 237 Senior Women High Game Sandy Moran 233 Deen Nation 214 Artice Kramer 209 Janice Dyer 206 Patty Pagel 205 Linda Hughes 202

740 739 732 722 712 711 708

Senior Men High Series Jerry Donahue 722 Larry Pagel 714 Gary Poos 654 Ron Holderman 651 Ralph Siegmund 634 Senior Women High Series Kathy Coleman 579 Sandy Moran 564

Marriage Licenses MARRIAGE LICENSES RECORDED IN CLAY COUNTY JAN. 9 TO 13, 2012: ■ RICHARD ALAN EDWARDS, 48, OSKALOOSA, KS, BECKY VILLA ULMER, 47, GLADSTONE; ■ DARREN THOMAS SHAW, 24, LATHROP, PAIGE MONTANA LEPPIN, 22, LATHROP; ■ JACK CURTIS MAYABB, 37, MISSOURI CITY, DUSTY RENEE HAGGARD, 37, MISSOURI CITY; ■ BRIAN KEITH DIVEN, 41, KEARNEY, ANGELIA MARIE LEROUX, 45, KEARNEY; ■ PHILLIP WESLEY CHAPIN, 46,

INDEPENDENCE, LORI ANN HUDSON, 45, OVERLAND PARK, KS; DOMINIQUE XAVIER VIEYRA, 28, KANSAS CITY, CYNTHIA RAE SEIDEL, 32, KANSAS CITY; ROGER ADAM NEKULA, 36, GLADSTONE, STACEY MAE WYMAN, 39, GLADSTONE; MARK DOUGLAS POWERS, 31, SMITHVILLE, HILARY LEIGH RINDT, 25, SMITHVILLE; JAYSON DANIEL LEWIS, 23, KANSAS CITY, MEGAN LEE LOGSTON, 23, KANSAS CITY.

By Chris Stuckenschneider

CHAPTER 4: Stonewall, Pint-Sized Spitfire of a Pup

After the Battle at Shiloh, the South was feeling as low as a bird dog with a head cold. The war wasn’t going as expected, and the loss at Shiloh stripped their sails. The South needed a boost, and they got one. Onto the scene rode a great Southern leader, clear-eyed, purposeful, Major General Thomas Jonathan Jackson, who earned the nickname “Stonewall” at the first battle of Bull Run. He was a general of flawless moral character, respected by all, and held in high esteem by the legendary Robert E. Lee, who would become the Confederacy’s topnotch commanding general.

The little dog sprinted out of nowhere, straight into the hearts of the battleweary men. They named the stray “Stonewall,” even though a gust of wind could have picked him up. The pooch never got very big, but he made a huge impact on the Richmond Howitzers, especially Sgt. John Van Lew McCreery, a kind gent Stonewall adopted as his master. Now Sgt. John was handy-dandy—he could shoe a horse and craft a clock that chimed. Always in need of a project, the Sarge taught Stonewall a trick or two, an entertaining diversion in the downtime between battles. To everyone’s delight, McCreery fashioned a tiny pipe and taught Stonewall to sit straight up on his haunches and hold it between his teeth during roll call.

������������������������������������������������� ����������������������������������������

those tales proved to be Stonewall’s downfall.

Another regiment in the Army of Northern Virginia wanted to claim Stonewall, Stonewall and the pup became the object of a series wasn’t a of dog-nappings, sneaky crimes that alI learned about trickster admost led to “friendly fire” confrontations Gen. Jackson mired only between the Howitzers and the Louisiana when we visited for his antics. Creoles. The Howitzers got their treahis home in He also was a sured buddy back several times, but the Lexington, Va. fierce fighter Creoles didn’t give up. Finally they made The hospitable who wouldn’t off with the prized pup, and Stonewall folks there alback down. was never heard from again. lowed me to When the accompany Walt cannons and There are a lot of tales that end like this on the house from the Civil War—stories shrouded rifles roared tour, a kindness and the shells in mystery. I acknowledged whizzed and ���������������������������������������������������� with a cool nose to exploded with a �������������� their palms. bang, he wouldn’t take cover. No, he’d bark his head off Thanks to Jackson, the Rebels racked and run this way and that as the Howitup victories in the spring of 1862 when zers changed positions. his army won a series of battles in the �������������� ������������� Shenandoah Valley. The soldiers had a real soft spot for their �������������������������� ��������������������������� bitty Stonewall and worried that he’d The Union was trying to gain control ������������������������������������������ get blown away, so this Rebel or that of Richmond, but Jackson prevented ������������������������������������������� reinforcements from getting to the capi- one would scoop him up, carry the pup �������������������������������������������� under his arm or tuck him away in an tal of the Confederacy. The admiration �������������������������������������������� empty ammunition box during the heat and trust the troops had in their general ���������������������������������������������� of battle. helped them stand firm and repulse the LEARN MORE! North. Yapping, darting Stonewall’s reputaCompanion activities can be found at www.mo-nie.com using code: teachmo12. The story goes that one of the regiments tion grew. Soon he became the stuff of legend, and stories about him infiltrated Missouri GLEs: CA R1H, W2B, W2D, W2E, with the Virginia Howitzers got an adW3A; SS 3AI other camps like the dreams of mother’s ditional morale booster from a bouncy, ��������������������������������� shorthaired pup with a black-tipped tail. pie cooling on the windowsill. Alas, �����������������������

Service Notes Air Force Airman Aaron M. Madsen graduated from basic military training at Lackland Air Force Base, San Antonio, Texas. He completed an intensive, eight-week program that included training in mili-

tary discipline and studies, Air Force core values, physical fitness, and basic warfare principles and skills. He is the son of Kara and Jay Madsen of Greenwood and a 2008 graduate of Oak Park High School.

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Gladstone Dispatch A3

Thursday, Jan. 26, 2012

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A4 Gladstone Dispatch

Thursday, Jan. 2, 2012

Display advertising deadline noon Monday 104 N. Main St., Liberty, MO 64068 Jan. 26, 2012 Volume 2 • Issue 10 Publisher Matt Daugherty mdaugherty@npgco.com Ad Director Tracey Mummaw tracey.mummaw@npgco.com Ad Sales Linda Petty lindapetty@npgco.com Circulation Manager Stephanie Cates stephaniecates@npgco.com Managing Editor Amy Neal amyneal@npgco.com Gladstone Dispatch uses recycled paper, plates and ink.

Classified advertising deadline 4 p.m. Tuesday All real estate advertised herein is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise any preferences, limitations or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or intention to make any such preferences, limitations or discrimination. We will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised are available on an equal opportunity basis.

454-9660 Call for classified and display advertising

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Gladstone Dispatch is published weekly by NPG Newspapers, Inc.

Call for delivery

Announcements Gladstone Dispatch charges a fee for engagement, wedding, anniversary, birth and death announcements. Call 454-9660 for rates and submission guidelines. The deadline for these announcements is 10 a.m. Monday the week of publication.

Community submissions Gladstone Dispatch publishes many community submissions free of charge. Information and photos are published on a space-available basis at the sole discretion of the editor. Submissions must be received by 5 p.m. Friday to be considered for the following week’s newspaper. All non-paid content should be sent to gladstonenews@npgco.com or Gladstone Dispatch, 104 N. Main St., Liberty, MO 64068.

Letters to the editor Gladstone Dispatch accepts and publishes letters to the editor on a space-available basis at the sole discretion of the editor. Letters should be no more than 300 words. Material deemed libelous in nature will not be published. The editor reserves the right to reject or edit any letter submitted for clarity, grammar and overall length. All letters must be signed and have a phone number for verification. Name and city location will be published with letters. Letters published do not necessarily reflect the opinion of Gladstone Dispatch or its staff.

Son, neighbor save Dad’s life By Kathy Crawford The Gladstone City Council meeting Monday, Jan. 23, was packed with neighbors and family of a Gladstone teenager and his adult neighbor who received Citizen Commendations for helping save a man’s life. Those involved in the incident said 14-year-old Jared Ravenscroft was home on Halloween night last fall with his parents. A Chiefs game was on the television. Jared’s dad, Robert Ravenscroft, works at the Gladstone Walmart and had fallen asleep in the living chair. He was snoring. It was only when he stopped snoring that his wife and son became concerned. After trying to rouse Robert, checking for a pulse and finding none, Jared went next door to get help from neighbor Luke Whitley while his mother dialed 911. Robert had gone into cardiac arrest in his sleep due to undiagnosed and untreated sleep apnea. When Whitley, who knows CPR, arrived at the Ravenscrofts’ home, he remained calm but got busy trying to save Robert’s life. “Luke put Dad on the floor and cleared the room,” Jared said. Not knowing Robert’s outcome, Whitley moved Jared and his mother to another room then began CPR. Chief Michael Hasty, director of Gladstone Public Safety, said both Jared and Whitley remained calm as they did their parts to begin emergency medical service. Hasty said EMS does not begin with the 911 call or with the dispatcher — it begins with the citizens who are present before the 911 call is made. The first emergency responder to arrive on the scene was Gladstone Public Safety Officer Austin Reiter, and he began helping Whitley. Reiter also received a commendation Monday night. “All of our officers know CPR,” Hasty said. Robert was in a coma for eight days. His core body temperature was lowered the first 24 hours to give his heart a fighting chance at survival. He received about 7,000 total compressions, and about 300 of those were executed before Robert ever left the floor of his home. “The doctor tells me I was dead, and I’m still having trouble getting my mind around that,” Robert said. Hasty said CPR slows down the dying process.

The Kansas City Missouri Temple, 7001 Searcy Creek Parkway in Kansas City North, will be dedicated the first weekend in May. It is the second temple of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in Missouri.

JAN. 9 COUNCIL ACTION The Gladstone City Council approved the following resolutions during its meeting Jan. 9, 2012: ■ Resolution R-12-1: authorizing the city manager to execute a sign-use agreement with the Northridge Neighborhood Group for the use of existing street signs. ■ Resolution R12-2: accepting a proposal from Joe Machens Ford-Lincoln Dealership of Columbia for the purchase of two Ford Police Interceptor all-wheel drive utility vehicles and emergency vehicle equipment for $57,274. ■ Resolution R-123: authorizing of a contract with Blue Nile Contractors not to exceed $330,026 for the Sewer Manhole Rehabilitation Project. ■ Resolution R-124: accepting work under contract with Rand Construction Co. for water plant efficiency upgrades and authorizing final payment of $15,599.25. ■ Resolution R-12-5: authorizing the sale of surplus city property Because he was asleep when he went into cardiac arrest, Robert doesn’t remember any of the activity. However, he said his chest was in a lot of pain when he came out of the coma, probably because of all the compressions. He

to the highest bidder at auction or by sealed bid, and authorizing the donation of surplus items to the Surplus Exchange and Secure the Call Foundation. ■ Resolution R-12-6: authorizing the city manager to amend the 457 Deferred Compensation Plan and Trust Agreement to include the associated HEART Plan amendments (including the Increased Benefit Accrual provision) through ICMA Retirement Corp.

CONTRIBUTED PHOTO

Temple to open to public in April

■ Resolution R-127: authorizing an amendment to the Linden water tower antenna site lease with T-Mobile Central. ■ Resolution R-128: authorizing a contract with Site Rite Construction Co.of Kansas City for the emergency installation of stormwater system improvements not to exceed $33,080 for the Old Pike Stormwater Improvements Project CP1250. ■ Resolution R-12-9: ratifying and approving the purchase of a tract of land located at 605 N.E. 70th St. has since been diagnosed with sleep apnea. Still, the story could have ended differently if two people — a teenager and a neighbor — had not started life-saving measures before emergency responders arrived.

Open house and dedication dates for the Kansas City Missouri Temple have been announced by the First Presidency of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. The public is invited to visit the temple during a two-week open house Saturday, April 7, to Saturday, April 21, excluding Sundays. Free reservations can be made through kansascitymormontemple.org. The temple will be formally dedicated Sunday, May 6, in three sessions broadcast to congregations of the church within the temple district. In conjunction with the dedication, there will be a cultural celebration featuring music and dance on Saturday, May 5. Latter-day Saints temples differ from the church’s meetinghouses or chapels where members meet for Sunday worship services. Temples are considered “houses of the Lord” where Christ’s teachings are reaffirmed through marriage,

baptism and other ordinances that unite families for eternity. In the temple, church members learn more about the purpose of life and strengthen their

commitment to serve Jesus Christ and those around them. The temple will not be open to the public in the future.

MAKING SENSE OF INVESTING Chris Brown, AAMS®

Financial Advisor EDWARD JONES 7241 N. Oak Trafficway Gladstone, MO 64118 Office: (816) 436-1450 Cell: (816) 718-6578 Fax: (866) 462-5563 chris.brown@edwardjones.com

Michael Hundt

Financial Advisor EDWARD JONES/GLADSTONE, MO 6317 N. Antioch Road, Suite 2W Gladstone, MO 64119 Office: (816) 454-0067 Fax: (877) 529-0816 michael.hundt@edwardjones.com

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Kyle M. Whalley, AAMS®

Financial Advisor EDWARD JONES 9243 N. Oak Trafficway Kansas City, MO 64155 Office: (816) 468-4180 Cell: (816) 719-9175 Fax: (866) 462-6377 kyle.whalley@edwardjones.com


Gladstone Dispatch A5

Thursday, Jan. 26, 2012

Community Calendar

BETA SIGMA PHI: Beta Sigma Phi, Laureate Gamma Upsilon Chapter, will meet on at 7 p.m. For more info, call 547-6466. SINGLES GROUP: Kosmos Singles is a social group for adults 50 and older. A mixer will be held from 5 to 7 p.m. at Brass Rail, 4940 NE 81st, Kansas City. A dollar donation is requested. For more information, visit www.kosmossingles.com.

CHOIR: The Northland Sweet Adelines meet at 7 p.m. Thursdays at Antioch Community Church, 4805 N.E. Antioch Road, Kansas City North. For more information, contact Peg Simmons at 452-4302 or by email at jpsimford@att.net, or visit www.northlandchorus.org.

RECOVERY: The Recovery Works Dual Recovery Treatment Group meets at Tri-County Mental Health Services from 10 to 11 a.m. on Thursdays. Persons seeking help with mental health issues and substance use problems will find a positive MENTAL HEALTH: Trienvironment. The meetings County Mental Health Serare at the Lebedun Center, vices will have its next pre5844 N.E. Russell Road in sentation from at its office at the Northland Human Ser- Kansas City. For more inforvices Center, 3100 N.E. 83rd mation, contact Tri-County Mental Health Services at St. The topic will be “Differ468-0400 or visit www.trient Healthcare Options at countymhs.org. Golden Living Center: Level II Mental Healthcare, LongTerm Care and Short-Term Rehab to Home.” PresentaRECEPTION: A goodbye tions are offered for groups reception for Charlie Barr, or agencies in Clay County free of charge on older adult interim county administrator and Park, Recreation and issues for older adults, Historic Sites director, will be staff/caregivers of older from 1 to 3 p.m. at the Clay adults. County courthouse, third floor commission hearing BIBLE CAFE: Bible room. Barr is retiring after Café will be held from 25 years of service to Clay 7 to 8 p.m. Thursday at County. First Christian Church in North Kansas City in the FREE MOVIE: First ChrisDCC room of the church, tian Church, 2018 Gentry 2018 Gentry Ave in North Ave in North Kansas City, Kansas City. Participants will offer a free walk-in movie are asked to enter the night beginning at 7 p.m. church through the doors Free popcorn and beverages by the large mailbox. Paswill be available. For more tor Carla Hillyer will be information, call 842-2341. leading discussion on the book of John, so be sure to bring your Bible if you have one. Participants also are ANIMAL FEEDING: The encouraged to bring their own snacks and beverages. next live animal feeding at Child care will be provided. Martha Lafite Thompson Nature Sanctuary will take For more information, call place at 3 p.m. until the ani842-2341.

FRIDAY, JAN. 27

SATURDAY, JAN. 28

mals are done eating. Come watch the snakes, turtles and other animals do what comes natural, eat. There is no fee, but donations are welcome.

DDRB: The Developmental Disabilities Resource Board of Clay County will meet at 6:30 p.m. in the DDRB building, 920 S. Kent, Liberty. For more information, contact the DDRB at 792-5255. MOBILE TOUR: A member of U.S. Congressman Sam Graves’ staff is holding mobile office stops. Graves’ Mobile Office will tour the district giving constituents the opportunity to speak with a member of his staff, including a stop at noon at the Mid-Continent Library’s North Oak branch.

SPOTTER TRAINING: The National Weather Service and Clay County Emergency Management are sponsoring a weather spotter training class from 7 to 9 p.m. at Pleasant Valley Baptist Church.

THURSDAY, FEB. 2

TUESDAY, FEB. 7

SINGLES GROUP: Kosmos Singles is a social group for adults 50 and older. A mixer will be held from 5 to 7 p.m. at Latin Bistro, 6924 N Oak Trafficway, Gladstone. Kosmos will meet in the large room on the left. A dollar donation is requested. For more information, visit www.kosmossingles.com.

ELECTION DAY: Polls will be open for Missouri’s presidential primary election from 6 a.m. to 7 p.m.

jsmith.hairacademy@gmail.com donnashairacademymo.com All work done by students under the supervision of a licensed instructor.

Assembly Of God

Christian Disciples of Christ

LIBERTY FIRST ASSEMBLY OF GOD

FIRST CHRISTIAN CHURCH OF 7 NORTH KANSAS CITY

11 101 N. Forest Ave. Liberty, MO 64068 pastorjeff@liberty-assembly.org

Ph. (816) 781-6633 Jeff Davidson, Pastor

Schedule: Sunday School ................... 9:30 am AM Worship .....................10:30 am Sunday Evening ................. 6:00 pm

NORTHLAND CATHEDRAL

101 NW 99th St. (99th & N. Oak) Kansas City, MO 64155

15

455-2555

J. Lowell Harrup, Senior Pastor Sunday School ............... 9:15 & 10:45 am Morning Worship ............ 9:15 & 10:45 am Sunday Evening ....................... 6:00 pm Wed. Learning Center ................ 6:30 pm

8:30 am .......................Traditional Service 10:00 am ...............Sunday School-All Ages 11:00 am .... Praise & Worship-Contemporary

2018 Gentry St. NKCMO 64116 (816) 842-2341 www.loveourchurch.org

LIBERTY CHRISTIAN CHURCH

10

(DISCIPLES OF CHRIST) 427 East Kansas • 781-3621

New Song

newsongkc.org

An Open & Affirming Church Worship & Children’s Activities: Sunday mornings at 8:30 & 10:30 8600 NE Sam Ray Road Kansas City, MO (816) 407-7756

NARFE: The National Active & Retired Federal Employee’s Association Platte/Clay Chapter 2256 will hold its monthly meeting at 10 a.m. at Wexford Place, 6500 N. Cosby in Kansas City North. Christopher Cox will present a program on the Atkins-Johnson Farm and future museum. All current or retired federal employees

20

TENTH CHURCH OF CHRIST, SCIENTIST, KANSAS CITY 3400 NE 82nd St. • KCMO 64119

Episcopal

METRO BAPTIST CHURCH

GRACE EPISCOPAL CHURCH

Sunday services .............10:30am & 6:00pm Wednesday evening ......................7:00pm

It may be a rare occurrence, but grocery prices in Missouri rose to more than the national average in the final quarter of 2011. And the USDA says prices will continue to go up this calendar year. The American Farm Bureau tracks grocery prices in their Market Basket Survey. It’s a review of 16 agriculture products frequently purchased by U.S. households. Missouri generally trends under the national average. But in the fourth quarter of 2011, the price of those 16 items in Missouri rose by $2.69 to a total of $52.01. The national average of those items declined $3.89 to a total of $49.23. “It’s very unusual for Missouri prices to trend higher than the national average on this quarterly ... survey,” said Diane Olson, director of promotion and education for the Missouri Farm Bureau. “There really is not an explanation that I can offer on that, because it’s just so unusual that our prices are higher.” Breaking down the basket, five of the six meat items were up in price in Missouri during the last three months

of 2011. That includes shaved deli ham, bacon, sirloin tip roast, boneless chicken breast, and ground chuck. All were higher in price. Of that meat group, chicken breasts were the price leader. “The poultry producers are not stocking as many chickens in their chicken houses, and so the end product is not as available,” said Olsen. According to the USDA, feed prices and the world wide demand for American meat products, especially beef, is driving meat prices higher, although the American Farm Bureau fourth quarter market basket survey found a decline in all meat prices on a national average. Also up in Missouri were russet potatoes, salad mix, grated sharp cheddar cheese, butter, orange juice and bread. Declining in price in Missouri were flour, whole milk and Red Delicious apples. Overall, market basket prices in Missouri were $4.14 higher at the end of 2011 than at the end of 2010. While it’s possible that Missouri may see lower grocery prices than the national average in the months to come, the USDA says don’t look for prices over all to go down soon. The department is calling for overall grocery price inflation of 3 to 4 percent in the coming year.

THURSDAY, FEB. 9 BETA SIGMA PHI: Beta Sigma Phi, Laureate Gamma Upsilon Chapter, will meet on at 7 p.m. For more info, call 547-6466.

Friendly, Caring Excellent Dentistry

ROBERT G. MARX, D.D.S. NEW PATIENTS ALWAYS WELCOME!

And Associates General Dentistry

452-2000

5708 N. Broadway • Gladstone

Methodist 1

MEADOWBROOK UNITED METHODIST CHURCH

2800 NE 64 Street, Gladstone, MO 64119 453-5735

www www.robertgmarxdds.com robertgmarxdds co

Church Directory

Trevor Dancer, Pastor

Morning Worshiip ..................... 9:30 am Sunday School ...............8:30 & 10:30 am www.meadowbrookumc.org EARLY CHILDHOOD CENTER 452-6595

35

GOOD SHEPHERD UNITED METHODIST CHURCH 9

291

9

15

9555 N. Oak Trafficway Kansas City, MO 64155

At the corner of N. Oak and 96th Street

Baptist

web site: metrobaptistchurch.com Pastor: Dr. Rick Shrader Traditional Music and Choir Expository Biblical Preaching

Missouri News Horizon

20

(816) 734-2216 ext. 204

Christian Science 8

2

SCHOOL EMPLOYEES: The Clay/Platte Area Retired School Employees Association will meet at 1:30 p.m. at the Kansas City North Community Center, 3930 N.E. Antioch Road. The program “We’re Going Nuts” will be presented by Bobbie Lynch Hawks, an association member. Members are asked to bring canned food donations for the food pantry.

By Dick Aldrich

Rev. David Culver New Traditions Worship........ 8:30 am Sunday School ................... 9:30 am Traditional Worship ............10:50 am Alfa Y Omega Iglesia Cristiana Discipulos de Cristo Servicio los Domingos a las 6:00 pm

Sunday Services ......................10:30 am Sunday School ........................10:30 am Wed Evening Testimonial Meeting .. 7:00 pm Reading Room open to the public Call for hours and location ..........455-0443

3400 NE 80th Street, Kansas City, MO 64119 (816) 746-8388

MONDAY, FEB. 6

FRIDAY, FEB. 3

Independently Owned MATRIX C.R.A.F.T. School Classes are starting every month and we now offer Financial Aid to those who qualify!! 816.532.3334

NAWS: The Northland Animal Welfare Society will meet at 6 p.m. at the Zona Rosa Community Room, 8600 NW 86th St. in Kansas City North. Volunteer opportunities at the new spay/neuter clinic and other upcoming events for animal-loving people will be discussed. For more information, visit www.pcnaws.org or call 830-7759.

TUESDAY, JAN. 31

Donna’s Academy of Hair Design

Call for more information and to set up a tour!

are invited to attend. For additional information, call Ethlyn McCleave at 4543491.

33 H wy.

TODAY, JAN. 26

Groceries cost more in Missouri

8

23

2

Sunday Worship ..............8:00, 9:30 & 11:00 am Children’s Sunday School.................9:30 & 11:00 am

Liberty 11

10 18

3

291

www.gswired.org 1

Childcare Provided. Casual Dress The coffee’s hot, the music rocks and the message is real.

69 Hwy.

210

6 19 7

520 S. Hwy. 291 www.graceepiscopalliberty.org

Non-Denominational

Presbyterian

Holy Eucharist (Rite I) ................ 8:00 am Education Hour ........................ 9:00 am Holy Eucharist (Rite II) ..............10:15 am The Rev. Susan McCann, Rector

THE HARMONY VINEYARD 600 NE 46th Street Kansas City, MO 64116

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH OF LIBERTY

3

781-6262

Sunday Service ..............8:30am-10:00am ............................... 10:30am-12:15pm Wednesday Service ....Meal begins at 6:15pm .........................Classes start at 7:00pm

(Children’s Ministry Provided) Call About Home Groups

19

587-8898 John Brown, Pastor

18

138 Main

Sunday School .......................9-9:45 am Traditional Worship ..................10:00 am Nursery Provided • 781-6528

NORTHMINSTER PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH

6 1441 NE Englewood Rd. Sunday Service ....................... 10:30 am Sunday School ..........................9:15 am Rev. Seth Wheeler Childcare Available www.northminsterkc.org 453-2545


A6 Gladstone Dispatch

classified CALL

Thursday, January 26, 2012

816.454.9660

FAX

816.414.3340

Classifieds DEADLINE 4PM TUESDAY


Thursday, January 26, 2012

classified

Gladstone Dispatch A7


A8 Gladstone Dispatch

classified

Thursday, January 26, 2012


Gladstone Dispatch A9

Thursday, Jan. 26, 2012

Chamber honors business work by Jesus Lopez-Gomez Last Wednesday, Jan. 19, the Gladstone Area Chamber of Commerce recognized some of the Northland’s greatest benefactors at its annual awards ceremony. Held at the Hilton in Kansas City North, the event honors the efforts of chamber members, as well as local businesses, for their contributions to Gladstone. The event closed by awarding the 12th annual Joe Wally Spirit award to former mayor Les Smith. The chamber gave its New Construction Award to a staple of national commerce and culinary tradition: McDonald’s. The new storefront on North Oak Trafficway was recognized for not only its aesthetic achievements but its environmentally conscious design that incorporates features such as LED lighting. “We’re really happy to be in Gladstone,” said Manager Jim Wagy. “My father built the old McDonald’s in 1970, and we’ve been looking for a new location for a while now. I think we’ve got a good one.” Gladstone Dodge received the Renovation Award in recognition of its new building and renewed landscaping. The city of Gladstone was honored as the Business of the Year for the support its staff provides the chamber at events. “Employees of this business serve on the Board of Directors, Bluesfest and Gladfest planning committees, Friday Fright Night and are involved in every possible function the chamber produces,” Sid Robbins said. Golf Tournament Co-Chair Trish Herzog was named Member of the Year. She was recognized for her willingness as a first-year member to assume a leadership position — and a successful one at that — as chairperson of the tournament, Herzog was responsible for acquiring several thousands of dollars in donations. The Chairman’s Choice Award was given to a member who had made herself available for a variety of chamber projects: Shelly True. Member of the Year went to Gary Lint, who was recognized for his intensity in scouting for new members as well as his friendliness toward guests in the role of ambassador. Next, Robbins called on incoming Chairman of the Board Vinnie Vaccaro for the passing of the gavel, in which the two passed an over-sized emblem of justice to signify the passing of responsibilities. “I’m truly humbled,” Vaccaro said. “This is the best chamber north of the river. I look forward to a great year.” Others recognized included: • Bluesfest Co-chairs: Hobart Mason and Chad Nichols; • Golf Tournament Chairs: Staci Streich, Trish Herzog and Vinnie Vaccaro;

• Gladfest Co-chairs: Shelly True and Jinny Kyle; • Awards Celebration Cochairs: Mary Cross and Anita Newsom; • Chamber volunteers: Bud and Marilyn Ahnefield, Wayne Beer, Tony Conforti, Mary Cross, John Garner, Richard King, Jinny Kyle, Kathy Nelson, Anita Newsom, Freddie Nichos, Mary Olshefski, Kevin Phillips, Jim and Mary Roy, Carol Rudi, Jeana Tetzlaff and Shelly True; • Retiring board members: Bill Arbuckle and Ken Honeck; • Ambassador of the Year: Staci Streich

Joe Wally Spirit Award

Before Robbins introduced Smith with the Joe Wally Spirit Award, he brought forth the 11 recipients of the award who had preceded Smith. Among them was last year’s winner, Mark Tomes. “I’m not nearly as involved with the city as Les,” Tomes said. “Mine has been in scouting, the soccer league and working with the schools like St. Pius X. Scouting is at the core, though.” Through Tomes’ leadership, a scholarship program was established to grant about $10,000 worth of financial aid to students. “(Gladstone) is a really friendly community,” Tomes said. “It’s run efficiently. They do it right. You gotta give praise to (Smith) for that. He’s really done a great job.” Smith, on the other hand, prefers to defer the acclaim. “First and foremost, it takes a lot of people to make things happen,” Smith said. “I’ve been a small part of everything.” However, Smith’s career details achievements that have been the very opposite of small. Since the first time he was elected to the City Council in 1984, he has served on a number of committees including the Gladstone Economic Betterment Council and the Gladstone Planning Committee. He has done everything from work in Parks and Recreation to serve as chairman of the board for the chamber. Smith retired last summer from his third term as mayor. While in this position, through a divided council, he provided the leadership for the Gladstone on the Move initiative and ensured the success of several ballot initiatives that would improve the safety and infrastructure of Gladstone. Nevertheless, Smith insisted on sharing his spotlight if others insisted on lending it to him. During his speech, he spoke reverentially of the city workers who lent their efforts to his ideas. “People like me get the awards, while people like them do the work,” Smith said. Smith has moved from Gladstone to be with his family in Mission, Kan., where his wife serves as city administrator. He also is the owner of Gladstone Bowl and an adviser for the chamber.

Treat yyour taste buds in Excelsior Springs!

Saturday, Feb. 4 S 1-5 pm

Tickets $10 (limited to 300 participants)

Cliff Couch compares a his Renegade prosthetic, left, to his BiOM. After receiving the new battery-operated leg, which uses electro-mechanic components to normalize the user’s gait, Couch has had to relearn how to do many activities he had become accustomed to doing without an ankle after a below-the-knee amputation at age 20.

PETER YANKOWSKY/ Special to Gladstone Dispatch

FOOT: New users experience 3 ‘wows’ He lives with his wife, Tina, and 16-year-old At 20, Couch decided to daughter, Holly, a sophomake a career out of the more at Winnetonka High Air Force. But just before School. a two-year assignment in Germany, the aircraft fuel ◆ ◆ ◆ systems mechanic was in a motorcycle accident that Couch’s first prosthesis severely injured his right was a hollow balsa wood foot. leg with a rubber foot that Doctors worked for sev- “did nothing.” “It allowed me to walk eral weeks to save the foot before asking Couch to and stand,” he said. In the past 28 years, choose between a series of reconstruction surgeries or Couch has gone through an amputation four inches a series of other legs as one below the knee. He had 24 device wears out or new hours to decide. technology comes on the He chose amputation — market. Each one has given one operation, one scar — him a bit more mobility, effectively choosing retire- but he said the improvement. He told the doctor at ment with his most recent a physical evaluation a year leg, the BiOM, had been later that he wanted to con- the most dramatic. Tim McCarthy, president tinue his military career, but the paperwork came and CEO of BiOM maker back saying he was on the iWalk, described tradiretirement list. tional prosthetics as “just a Couch was told that if the hardware component that U.S. had been at war, the will return some amount Air Force would have found of energy that you place him a desk job, delaying into the foot to provide his retirement until the that 50 percent function. end of the conflict. What the BiOM has done As it was, his military has closed that gap, and service came to an end in now we’re normalized.” 1984 after C o u c h three years, estimates he four months can do 85 and five percent of days. what any“Here I was one without 20 years old a lower-limb and walking amputation can do around with — includa retirement ing driving ide nt i f ic a Cliff Couch, BiOM user tion card,” a stick shift Couch said. — and in “People would ask me, ‘Did the other 15 percent are all you fake that?’” of the activities he hasn’t He returned to St. Joseph, ever wanted to do. where he had grown up, “You’re not disabled,” he but found his job pros- said about being an ampupects limited in his home- tee. “You’re re-enabled in a town. In the Air Force he different direction. I barely had been trained to work consider myself disabled. on top-of-the-line fighter I’m missing a leg, but I don’t let anything slow me planes. “Not everyone has one in down.” That sentiment is what their garage,” Couch said, so he moved to the North- iWalk’s McCarthy strives land and made himself at for. His vision for his company is to offer a product home. These days he works for portfolio of “functional to the Platte County Board of wear robots” to turn disServices, driving develop- abilities into ability and to mentally disabled clients to normalize function for the their jobs. users. Continued from Page A1

“The farther I ran, the fast I ran. It was like remembering what it was like to have an ankle again.”

When Couch first tried out the BiOM, he said he realized right away he wasn’t bobbing with it as he stood. Then he started to walk, and then to run. “The farther I ran, the faster I ran,” he said. “It was like remembering what it was like to have an ankle again.” On the way home he cried as he thought about how long he had been without an ankle and what it was like to have one again. McCarthy said Cliff’s reaction was common. Three “wows” hit new users of the BiOM, McCarthy said. The first is when the prosthesis is first tuned to the user’s gait and they feel the power of the device, which combines hardware, software and electromechanic components. The second is when they leave the lab and go home and move around in their home environment. The third is when they take off the BiOM and switch back to whatever conventional prosthesis they had been using. A number of soldiers who have had a below-the-knee amputation after serving in Iraq or Afghanistan have received a BiOM, and Couch said he was glad there was now an option available to amputees in the military that would allow them to continue their service. “Prosthetic innovation has traditionally, or historically, always occurred during wartime,” McCarthy said. “Prosthetic care is one of the three areas of medicine that makes fairly substantial improvements during combat, and it’s principally because of the nature of combat-related injuries.” The cost of Couch’s BiOM, which iWalk literature puts in the $50,000 range, was shared by the

Department of Defense and Veterans Affairs. The BiOM is being redeployed with U.S. soldiers, but the prosthetic is not combat ready because of durability, battery life and energy source concerns, McCarthy said. But it is ready for stocking-footed strolls around the house, going up and down the basement steps, hitting the dance floor, a trip to the bowling alley or a game of basketball at the Gladstone Community Center. Couch as tested all of these activities with the BiOM and chronicled his experiences on Facebook under the name Kansas City’s First Bionic Man after getting the prosthesis from his “leg man,” Ken Kessler at Kansas City Artificial Limbs in Independence. Couch has been able to get up to nine hours out of a battery charge, but he said he always has a spare battery with him just in case. “When the battery dies in the leg, it’s like you’re walking down the street and step in a mud puddle and have five pounds of mud stuck to your leg,” he said. Couch had hoped to be able to run a 5K this spring, but he said that goal had to be pushed back to give him more time to get used to using some of his muscles. “It’s going to take longer to get my body in shape than I thought it would,” he said. Instead, he’ll focus on other projects as April showers give way to May flowers. With the BiOM, he walked all around his backyard for the first time since moving in five years earlier. After surveying the property, he decided he would clean up the yard once winter is over.

You’ll Love Our Valentine’s Day

SPECIAL PASTA for

TWO with Meatballs or Sausage served with Garlic Bread, Side Salad & Medium Drink

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lsior businesses n Exce ! w o t wn Sa o d 5 mp le de s at 1 lectable chocolate treat Begin the tour at the

Hall of Waters Visitor Ctr. 201 E. Broadway, downtown Excelsior Springs and receive a carry bag for all your goodies!

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~Italian Deli & Pasta~

6100 NE Antioch Rd. Gladstone, MO 64119 (816) 459-9500 Fax (816) 459-7029


A10 Gladstone Dispatch

Thursday, Jan. 26, 2012

Business Notes education, information, communication, advocacy and networking.

SERVPRO, a disaster recovery and restoration franchise company, jumped up four notches on the Entrepreneur Franchise 500 ranking this year, moving to the No. 4 spot in 2012 from the No. 8 spot in 2011. This year’s results make SERVPRO No. 1 in the cleanup and restora-

Good citizenship

CONTRIBUTED PHOTO

Over the past three years, Citizens Bank & Trust has donated $13,500 divided among three north Missouri food banks, including Harvesters Community Food Network. Here, Suzy Strohm, center, vice president of community banking, accompanied by Rob McCaslin, senior vice president of commercial banking, presents this year’s donation to Jamie Roach, major gifts manager for Harvesters. Although most of the bank’s locations conduct annual holiday food drives supporting local food pantries, 90 percent of these pantries also receive supplies from Harvesters or another regional food bank. The donated funds come from not mailing traditional holiday greetings and gifts to clients and vendors. This year, the bank also emailed more than 18,000 of its clients asking them to support one of the three major organizations serving north Missouri.

Complete Automotive Repair – Foreign & Domestic 6300 N.W. Bell Road, Parkville, MO 64152

Phone: (816) 587-6094 FAX: (816) 587-6358 chucksparkvillegarage.com

Park Lawn Northland Chapel “Family owned since 1922” I-35 & M291 Highway Park Lawn offers a complete funeral service and beautiful, quality metal casket for only

$5,495.00

Save Hundreds of Dollars – 60 months, interest free.

Easy budget plan freezes the price. Protect your insurance, savings and investments.

Services Include: All Professional Services Use of Motor Equipment Professional Staff Skilled Attendants Serving All Cemeteries Beautiful Facilities, Convenient Location, Ample Off-Street Parking, Uncompromised Service. On Call 24 Hours Per Day.

Call Don Brassfield for an appointment

816-781-8228

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tion industry for the ninth care giving to meet the speconsecutive year, according cific needs of each client, to a press release. and she does it all with a SERVPRO has a North- true servant’s heart.” Verizon’s 2011 financial land office at 727 NE 76th Dougherty was selected grant commitments totaled St. in Gladstone. from nominees from more $112,500 to assist a variety than 300 franchisees across of nonprofit agencies in Kristin Dougherty the United States. She was the Kansas City area. Sev- was the recipient of the given with a certificate, enteen domestic violence National Caregiver of the inscribed glass plaque and organizations are support- Year award at the annual a monetary award. She has ed through these grants, Senior Helpers conference more than 10 years of careincluding Synergy Services in New Orleans. Local fran- giving experience in hospiin the Northland. chise owners Keith and tal, facility and home enviThe outreach efforts Melissa Moran accepted ronments. She continues included cash grants, the award on behalf of to hone her skills by comemployee matches and their employee. pleting training modules HopeLine donations of “Kristin exhibits the through Senior Helpers used cell phones. Funding precise characteristics and University, including her comes from the Verizon work ethic that the Senior most recent “Senior Gems Foundation and the Hope- Helpers reputation is built Dementia” training. Line program from Verizon upon,” Melissa Moran said. Senior Helpers is a priCONTRIBUTED PHOTO Wireless. “She is reliable, diligent, vate-duty home care com- Kristin Dougherty and Senior Helpers co-owner Melissa Moran At Kansas City’s 12 com- flexible in adapting her pany. show off Dougherty’s National Caregiver of the Year award. pany-owned retail stores and through prepaid mail options, metro-area residents donate no-longerW W W. K I N D R E D C H E V R O L E T O L D S . C O M 8 1 6 - 5 3 2 - 0 9 0 0 used phones and accesso“Only 8-minutes north of Metro North Mall on 169 Hwy!” ries to the HopeLine program.

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W W W. K I N D R E D C H E V R O L E T O L D S . C O M 8 1 6 - 5 3 2 - 0 9 0 0

R O Y W YAT T C H R I S T I A N M AT T H E W S T E R RY S H I N A B A R G E R B E R N I E W E S T 8 1 6 - 5 3 2 - 0 9 0 0 R O Y W YAT T C H R I S T I A N M AT T H E W S B E R N I E W E S T

Ken Mickey, Media Services account manager, has been appointed to the Northland Medical Ma nager ’s Board of D i re c tor s. M ic ke y will represent the Ken Mickey views of the other business partners to the board as a business partner member-at-large. He also will help plan the annual Northland Symposium. Mickey has been in the records and information industry for 17 years and has been involved with both the Northland and Greater Kansas City Medical Managers associations for a number of years. He serves on the Education Committee for GKCMMA. “I’m honored to have been asked to join the board. I’ve been involved with NMM for a number of years, and it’s a great organization,” Mickey said. The purpose of NMM is to enhance health care administration and delivery in the Northland and surrounding areas through a program of active participation in leadership and professional development,


Jan. 26, 2012 Gladstone Dispatch