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October 2017 ISSUU.COM/KCCBRUIN

Bruin Blast Strikes Again

The Bruin Boo

Every new fall semester brings a new Bruin Blast to welcome new students and returning students back after their fun-filled summer adventures. This year’s Bruin Blast was held on Wednesday September 13th by the reflecting pools. One of the main reasons the college holds the event is for... (Page 2)

As the month of October approaches, many people are getting ready for the seasonal spooks. Many stores already have Halloween decorations ready for purchase, and many eager shoppers are more than willing to empty their wallets.

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Encapsulating KCC: ages unearthed DANIEL BAZIE

Staff Writer It’s out with the old and in with the new for KCC’s time capsule. Last October, the old time capsule, which had been sealed away in the Miller Physical Education Building since 1966, was removed prior to the building’s scheduled demolition. Kassie Dunham, librarian and college archivist, was highly involved in the process of removing the old time capsule as well as the planning of a possible new one. Dunham stated that the college decided to do a soft opening first instead of making the process a big spectacle as they were unsure if the capsule’s contents had sustained any damage. She explained that, even with a sealed container, threats such as water somehow making its way into the container are a big worry. Dunham also said that there is always a concern about the contents’ integrity after such a long period of time, so they had to be mindful when opening the capsule and handling its contents. “I think I researched time capsules and opening them for a couple of weeks,” said Dunham, when asked what kind of preparation had to be done before the opening. As the college archivist, she was included in the opening process. Gloves were worn when handling the items being pulled from the capsule and the items were set out and left undisturbed for about a week after the opening.

The items found in the old time capsule–including a fall registration bulletin from 1966, a quarter from 1965, newspaper clippings about the Miller building construction, a KCC dedication brochure from 1962, and several other items­–are currently on

Photo by Daniel Bazie The box of the old time capsule, displayed in the library at KCC’s main campus

display in the library at KCC’s main campus. The display also includes the time capsule box itself. Dunham is currently in the loop on the information about a new time capsule as well, saying that

no concrete decision has been made yet, but there’s a good chance that the new Miller building will indeed include a new time capsule. Dunham stated that they’re considering even putting the new time capsule in an inner wall as a display instead of hiding it away as what was done with the old time capsule. When asked what she personally would like to include in the new time capsule, Dunham expressed hesitation towards including any digital item. She explained that she doesn’t really know what type of technology the world may have in the next fifty to a hundred years, so she’s unable to know if the digital item included in a new time capsule would even be capable of being viewed when the capsule is eventually opened. Dunham elaborated by saying that she wouldn’t want to include a flash drive if future technologies made viewing one an impossibility. She also stated that she would be slow to include newspaper of any sort as well, as it’s quick to degrade in comparison to other options and may not survive the long stretch of time buried in a wall. Dunham believes that there are many things that embody us as Bruins, so it’s difficult to decide, even in a theoretical sense, what one item to choose to preserve for future generations, but she did state that she would like to see a copy of the new book on the college’s history included in the new capsule. Contact Daniel Bazie at bruin@kellogg.edu

MiCC award winner: Heather Morse

JULIA BEFFREY

Guest Writer

Heather Morse is a dental student and president of the Student United Dental Hygiene Association here on campus; she is in charge of planning events, fundraisers, etc. Heather is also heavily involved in the Service Learning program here at KCC. During the last spring and fall semesters, she completed a total of 30 service learning hours. During those hours, Heather worked with populations of people she had never had the pleasure of working with before. She was able to work with the elderly, children, and people with mental or physical disabilities. Heather served at Marian E. Burch Adult Day-

care and the Calhoun Medical Care Facility where she helped make and serve breakfast as well as clean up. She also kept the patients company; played games with them, encouraged them, helped with cooking, arts and crafts, and even exercised with them. The next organization Heather volunteered with was a Head Start Daycare where she and another one of her classmates created lesson plans to teach children about dental health. They found that the children often lacked the help or knowledge at home to take care of their teeth. So, along with their comprehensive lessons, they did Dental Screening, fluoride treatments, and plaque scores for the children to help instill all

the tools they needed to take care of their smiles. Lastly, Heather’s program offered an extra trip for people to go to the Detroit area for a weekend, having to pay for room and board, to help with Mission of Mercy Dental two-day serving event where they serviced anyone and everyone who needed the assistance. This trip happens every two years and it will be taking place this year. Although, Heather is not only involved, but also a president of a group in her dental hygiene program, she still finds any and every opportunity she can to serve and be involved in service learning. Contact Julia Beffrey at bruin@kellogg.edu

MiCC Award Winner, Heather Morse by Julia Beffrey

Photo by Julia Beffrey


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October 2017

Campus News

The Bruin Blast strikes again on KCC’s campuses AMANDA ELLIOT Every new fall semester brings a new Bruin Blast to welcome new students and returning students back after their fun-filled summer adventures. This year’s Bruin Blast was held on Wednesday, September 13th , by the reflecting pools. One of the main reasons the college holds the event is for the students to have fun! “It allows students to connect with companies, charities, internships, community resources, and Registered Student Organizations, our student clubs,” says Drew Hutchinson, KCC’s Student Life manager, who is in charge of putting together this event each year. Hutchinson celebrated his third anniversary at Kellogg Community College on Friday September 22nd, making this his third Bruin Blast he has put together. There were many attractions to explore at the Bruin Blast, from games to dancing, free lunch to prizes; there was something for everyone. There were several tables set up displaying the different opportunities Drew listed above, “We send out invite letters

to the community,” Drew explained; “the tables are first come first serve.” When addressing the success of the event, Drew believes it was a good one. He mentioned a lot of student participation, such as club sign-ups. “We had more sign-ups for clubs than ever - the book club needed a second sign-up sheet,” Hutchinson stated. The event included a variety of activities for students and community members. The public was allowed to walk around and take advantage of useful resources lined up along the tables–even free flu shots! Students with their K-ID were given a free shirt, free lunch, and giveaway drawing slips. The event included a blow-up obstacle race, glove boxing in a bounce house ring, and human bowling. After speaking with students, these larger games were proven to be a lot of fun. The population turnout was successful and the feedback shows students and staff alike seemed to really enjoy their time there, whether or not it was their first time attending. Mary Smith, a KCC student says her favorite part of the event was being able to see everyone

mazing turnout at the 2017 Bruin Blast held near the reflecting pools

Friendly boxing match between two students

Staff Writer

there and the awesome weather. She explained how her first Bruin Blast she attended had to be indoors due to bad weather. Another KCC student, Stephanie Kartheu, enjoyed the games, won a rubber ducky, and even showed off some dance moves during the event. Kartheu mentioned, “My only complaint is some things I couldn’t do without a friend,” referring to the bigger games, such games needed a companion to participate. Mario Velez, a first time Bruin Blast attendee, says his first Bruin Blast was super fun. He was manning the game making club table and said he had a great turn out for people wanting to do more. Donna Malaski, Manager for Academic Advising, was on her third year of working Bruin Blasts. Her favorite part of the event was seeing everyone having fun and out of their element. KCC student, Cody Carter has been working the Magic: The Gathering booth for four years now and stated that he enjoys the times spent there, especially when they get to play Magic. Contact Amanda Elliot at bruin@kellogg.edu

Drew Hutchinson lines up his throw to ring a rubber ducky.

Photo by Amanda Elliot

Bruins give back JULIA BEFFREY

Staff Writer Bruins Give Back is back! The Service Learning office organizes service days, called Bruins Give Back, once a month, three times a semester. Anyone and everyone can sign up; staff, faculty, students, and community members. The event starts around 9a.m. and ends at noon with a quick survey from us to help us continually improve the bond between our students and our community. We rarely go to the same place each semester in hopes to get students connected to community partners they have never worked with or even heard of before. The dates this year will all be on Fridays; September 29, October 27, and December 1. Last year, during the final Bruins Give Back of the year, we were working in our KCC YES Community Garden, which is located behind the library. We prepped it for the upcoming summer gardening season by pulling weeds and placing soil and mulch. We had a few people walking in and out of the project day, but there was a total of five women who stayed the whole time–some of whom had never gardened before. As a result, all of the weeding was finished and we had new soil in the beds and on the ground where it was needed. Overall, it was a good testimony of many hands make light work. The more people that sign up makes more we can do for them and our community. Keep an eye out for dates and sign up in the Service Learning tab on the main page of the KCC website under the Academics folder. The link to the signup sheet will be in the Special Service Event tab. Contact Julia Beffrey at bruin@kellogg.edu

GO BRUINS!

BRUIN Staff

Editor

Yasmeen Qahwash

Graphic Editors Noah Murray Lucas Neujahr

Advisors

Drew Hutchinson Penny Rose Thomas Webster

Editorial Policy The KCC Bruin is a free student publication produced monthly by Kellogg Community College students during the fall and spring semesters. The KCC Bruin welcomes letters to the editor from members of the College and the community. Letters must be signed and submitted with a current telephone number or email address. All letters become property of the Bruin and may be edited for clarity and length. By-lined opinion columns represent the opinion of the writer and do not necessarily represent the views of the Bruin staff or the College. Letters may be submitted by mail to: KCC Bruin student newspaper, c/o Kellogg Community College, 450 North Ave., Battle Creek, Mich. 49017. Letters may also be submitted at all three KCC sites. At the Battle Creek site, letters may be dropped off in the English Department on the 4th floor of the C Building; the College Life Office in the Student Center; or the student newspaper office. At the Grahl and Fehsenfeld Centers, letters may be submitted at the information desks. The Bruin office is located in room 202 of the OITC Building. The staff can be reached at (269) 965-3931, Ext. 2630 or e-mail the Bruin editor at bruin@kellogg.edu


Feature

October 2017

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Computer table in the KCC library GAVIN COTTON Staff Writer

Have you ever wanted a computer screen as big as a coffee table? Well, that’s just what the library at KCC has for everyone to use. The coffee table sized computer has a variety of programs for students to try out and use for fun and productivity alike. Programs for classes such as Astronomy, Chemistry, and Anatomy are just a few examples of the usefulness of this machine. While its main focus for the students is, of course, the entertainment aspect, it also contains games like Fruit Ninja, Cut the Rope, Chess, and many more fun games for students to play and challenge each other for fun. It also includes a Kindle e-reader for

some very large font reading for everyone’s favorite books. The table was added to the campus in January of 2015. Its main purpose is to help students be able to use the massive touch screen to help with their studies and research while also being a fun entertainment tool for some breaks from the books. The librarian at KCC’s library, Kathryn Dunham, states that it is “pretty hit or miss” in terms of popularity throughout the day. So right now may be the opportunity to experience this amazing device and everything it has to offer. Contact Gavin Cotton at bruin@kellogg.edu KCC student, Landon Bernloehr, playing Fruit Ninja on the computer table.

Come down to the Bruin Boo ANDREW MARSDEN Staff Writer

As the month of October approaches, many people are getting ready for the seasonal spooks. Many stores already have Halloween decorations ready for purchase, and many eager shoppers are more than willing to empty their wallets. Our very own KCC is getting ready as well. The Bruin Boo event is on the way, bringing candy and fun to all those involved. Many of the students and faculty will have stations set up for attendees of the event. There will be all sorts of family-friendly fun from activities, to games, and even trick-or-treating. “It’s nice to see all of the students and employees throw one big event,” said

Simon Thalmann, one of the event’s organizers, “It’s a team effort, a huge collaboration.” All sorts of groups are expected to have stations set up, from the dentists to the welders. With last year’s turnout being a staggering 2,000 people, even more people are expected to attend this year. Soon, the whole campus will start to buzz with excitement for the upcoming Halloween season. Be sure to come down to KCC for the Bruin Boo! The event is scheduled to take place all throughout the campus on October 26, from 6:30pm-8:00pm Contact Andrew Marsden at bruin@kellogg.edu

Photo by Gavin Cotton

Letters to the Editor It seems that the baby-boomer generation has a bone to pick with the millennials. Our airways, presses, cables and heaven knows what are filled with detestable statements directed toward our generation. These comments, while aplenty, are generally untrue in my opinion. Here is a list of a few false accusations and how to combat them. Young people lack the “rugged determination” of past generations. This is one of the most common statements made by the older generations - referring to millennials tendencies to “jobhop.” However, this is a concept that was associated with the old west when cowhands and fortune seekers would take odd jobs for a week or so and move on to the next. The old west is often romanticized for its “rugged determination.” Millennials get everything handed to them. Our elders believe that millennials were given all we ever wanted. I see this as false. The Recession of 2008 saw to that; many people lost their homes or financial security. My family was not exempt from this; we struggled for many years and sacrifices were made as I’m sure many other families experienced as well. The younger generation does not believe in Individualism. This is a favorite for older people to say. Most may believe that millennials support forced cohesion 100% and lack any sign of individuality. This view is so fictional that it should win a literary award. The core of millennial society rests in freedom and choice. Millennials strongly believe that everyone is his or her own person that bleeds through in every major outlet. This is seen in video games, movies, novels, and in our speech. The individual has become such a romanticized thing one place it almost in the same school as the knights, adventurers, and cowboys. The baby boomer generation tend to believe that millennials are a void of leaders; the ones who claim to be leaders are more than a bunch of word slingers who say a lot but do little. We need to end this. This is what we do - we become leaders though action. We act responsible, respectful, grateful, civilized, and maybe even a little heroic. We pick up after each other, we are kind to each other, and we truly respect each other even if people believe different than us. Most importantly, we must not give in to failure. Our generation has great potential since the Turn of the Century; to truly right the wrong, we must not waste it.

-Timothy Hall


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Feature

October 2017

Having fun locally this Halloween season YASMEEN QAHWASH

Staff Writer

It’s that time of year again. The leaves are changing colors, the air is getting cooler, and Halloween is getting closer! Haunted houses, corn mazes, and hay rides are in full swing. If you are someone who loves a good thrill, here are some local places, try checking out these popular attractions this fall season. Binder Park Zoo’s well-known “The Great ZooBoo” is back for some family-friendly Halloween fun. To kick off the ZooBoo, the annual Community Pumpkin Carve will be held on Tuesday, October 14, from 4-7 p.m. The zoo will supply all of the pumpkins and tools that you will need, as well as the cleaning. Looking for more than just a trick-or-treat trail? Check out Haunted Africa – a haunted safari that takes participants through portions of Wild Africa on Friday and Saturday nights. The Great ZooBoo is held from October 15-30 and is closed on Mondays and Tuesdays. Their hours are 5-8 p.m. on Wednesday through Friday, and 1-8 p.m. on Saturday and Sunday. Fear the Farm is another Halloween favorite here in Battle Creek. Fear the Farm is a Zombie hunt for people of all ages (children under 13 years of age must be accompanied by an adult). The challenge is to help save the farm from the Zombie apocalypse by gathering up a team and riding through the trails on military trucks featuring mounted paintball guns to shoot the zombies with. They also offer a Thunder Dome, a one-on-one paintball dual for you and your

friends. These are held on every Friday, Saturday, and Sunday through November 1st. On Fridays and Saturdays, they are open from 6p.m.-midnight and 6-10 p.m. on Sundays. For a more fall-themed and kid-friendly event, take a trip to Gull Meadows Farms where there

is a variety of fall-inspired activities that kids and adults will enjoy such as the apple barn and bakery, petting farm, apple orchard, pumpkin patch, wagon rides, corn maze and many family activities located in Pumpkin Lane. Their market hours are Monday through Friday 9a.m.-7p.m., Saturday 9a.m.-6p.m.,

“Raster” by Matt Headley Satamor College

and Sunday 10a.m.-5p.m. Their activity hours are Saturday 10a.m.-6p.m., Sunday 10a.m.-5p.m., and 4-7p.m. on weekdays. If you’re the type of person who loves haunted houses, be sure to take on Jackson Underworld 3-Story Extreme Haunted House. This attraction was named The Best Haunted House of 2014 by Click On Detroit, it is also rated one of the largest and scariest of haunted houses in the U.S., taking approximately 45 minutes to walk through. They are open Thursday through Sunday through October 12, and every day from October 13 through November 1. Their hours are 7-11 p.m. Sunday through Thursday, 7p.m.-1a.m. on October 10th and 11th, 6 p.m.-1 a.m. Fridays and Saturdays from October 17 through November 1. Psycho Ward and Nightmares is one of Michigan’s Top 10 Haunts, ranked by MLive. Here, they offer three different attractions. These include Psycho Ward Infected, Nightmares Freak Show and Zombie Revenge Firing Range. Ultimately offering a place packed full of terrifying clowns, zombies, and the living dead, these attractions are not recommended for children younger than 12 years of age. They are open on Fridays and Saturdays through October 18, and Thursdays through Saturdays from October 23 through November 1. Fridays and Saturdays are open from 7:30p.m. to 11p.m., and 7:30p.m. to 10p.m. on Thursdays, October 23 and October 30. Be safe, and happy Halloween, Bruins! Contact Yasmeen Qahwash at bruin@kellogg.edu

Volleyball Reports YASMEEN QAHWASH

Staff Writer

Our KCC lady Bruins took on Grand Rapids Community College at a home game on September 12. GRCC took home the victory, but not without a hard fight. Emily Delmotte came out with 11 kills, 2 solo blocks and 4 assistant blocks. Rose Tecumseh had 12 kills, 2 solo blocks, 5 assistant blocks and 2 aces. Cameron Haley had a whopping 36 digs 5 aces and 3 kills. And Hannah Landis came out with 12 kills, 2 blocks and 9 digs overall. “Great match by both teams. Very proud of the ladies tonight. Good, funny match to be a part of and will help us get better moving forward,” stated Head Coach Tom VanWienen. The girls’ overall record is now 8-2 and their conference record is 4-2. Go Bruins! Our lady bruin volleyball team went head to head against Muskegon Community College on home turf on September 14. Although our lady bruins did not come out of this one with a one, they gave MCC a run for their money, making their overall record 8-3 and their conference record 4-3. “Just didn’t have it this evening. We lacked the energy needed to beat a top level team like Muskegon. We will regroup and prepare for next week,” Head Coach Tom VanWienen commented. Go Bruins! Contact Yasmeen Qahwash at bruin@kellogg.edu

October 2017  

October 2017 Kellogg Community College Bruin Newspaper.

October 2017  

October 2017 Kellogg Community College Bruin Newspaper.

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