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The Bruin M a r c h , 2 0 1 5 | K e l l o g g C o mm u n i t y C o l l e g e |

Bracketology

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KNOW THE INS AND OUTS OF THE COLLEGE PLAYOFF SYSTEM March is the month of madness. It is the month of college basketball playoffs. Bracketology, Cinderella stories, and national championships are in the air. - Pg 12

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Who are the Board of Trustees? A NEW MEMBER JOINS THE TEAM

Kellogg Community College was founded in 1956, officially earning the title of a community college in 1970. Ever since being named a community college, a Board of Trustees has been in place, serving as KCC’s policymaking body. - Pg 4

Free community college! ANDREW FIRSTINE guest writer

Who wants free college? Now if that is not an enticing enough question and such a sweet combination of words, then nothing is. College students do not need a show of hands to know just how expensive and tough life can be. Everything from finding a job, having a place to live, the ability to pay for daily expenses, and raising kids makes this a struggle. Then, throw in college tuition, books, supplies, and it can get expensive. President Barack Obama is proposing a new government plan to cover the cost of college tuition. Valerie Strauss, a reporter for the Washington Post, had this to say recently about Obama’s new proposal: “President Obama last month unveiled a plan to offer free community college tuition to students who meet specific criteria,” in what she called “one of his most ambitious, expensive and likely controversial initiatives for the coming year.” “The cost estimate,” the White House said, “would be around $60 billion over 10 years, most of it paid by the federal government but some by states.” The $60 billion dollar plan would provide 75 percent of grants to cover the cost of community college and the states would have to cover the

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remaining 25 percent. The federal government and state governments would be working in partnership to achieve this goal. The new proposal would require community colleges to enhance their current programs, achieve higher graduate rates, and encourage students to keep up with good grades by being more responsible. “If it has anything to do with how much money I’m going to owe when I’m done with college, I would consider learning about it,” said KCC student Marley Munn. Obama said tax increases, in his recent tax proposal, are going to be used as revenue to pay for this proposal. That means people who have capital gains, a tax levied on profits from sale of property or of an investment, as well as large corporations, would largely pay for the proposal. When speaking with Financial Aid Adviser Pernell Gibson in regards to the proposal and what his thoughts are one the matter, he had this to say: “I think that President Obama’s plan to give individuals free community college tuition is a wonderful tool to make available to people who want to further their education beyond high school.” Gibson also stated, “One of the aspects that I believe would have a positive effect is if students receive free tuition. Then they would not need to go

into debt taking out student loans. Often, students are unaware of their loan borrowing total until it is too late.” His concerns can only be considered as speculation because all of the details haven’t been laid out with Obama’s plan, and it isn’t known if students who qualify for this will even be eligible for Pell grant and loans or not. Gibson added, “In any case, this particular plan will affect KCC’s students in a positive way should the plan be utilized to its fullest potential by the students.” If the Free College Tuition proposal does go into effect, as Gibson stated, students can be looking at a debt-free degree and focus on planning their future instead of planning their next student loan payment. Since taking office, President Obama has taken many steps to grow federal support by going as far as doubling the investments in Pell Grants for low income students, implementing college rating programs – which is a rating system among colleges and intuitions to show how they excel in enrolling students from all backgrounds -- and expanding the American Opportunity Tax credit to help individuals and families with the cost of college.

Bots build brains ANORAH SEITA staff writer

Building robots has got to be one of the most exciting activities to be involved in, and middle schoolers now have the opportunity to join a program known as “Bruin Bots.” In this program put on by KCC’s Regional Manufacturing Technology Center (RMTC), kids build robots using advanced versions of Legos and other materials using skills such as engineering and math. Not only is the Bruin Bots a fun and stimulating hobby, it promotes community, leadership teamwork, and helps kids build confidence and character. It also allows youth to be exposed to KCC’s RMTC facility and the Industrial Trades faculty, which may get them interested in pursuing a career in the STEM (science, technology, engineering, math) field. For those involved in robotics club, fall is synonymous with competition

season on a national level. The first robotics challenge is released in September, and students have a few months to build robots with the required components. KCC qualified for states the first of three short years Bruin Bots has existed, and the program coordinator, Kim Andrews-Bingham, only expects the robotics club to keep growing in size and success. She states, “The goal of Bruin Bots is to engage kids in exciting hands on learning in the STEM fields, and get them in the pipeline to those kinds of careers. Many of these careers can be achieved through a KCC education.” December brings the end of the competition season, but those who love robots shouldn’t fret. In the spring, there is a one day a week after-school club available, workshops that teach about robot mechanics, and in the summer, several week-long camps. KCC cares about the community

PHOTO PROVIDED BY KCC

Campers participate in a youth robotics summer camp at KCC’s Regional Manufacturing Technology Center in July

around it and makes a unique effort to support organizations and local schools that are interested in starting their own robotics teams or clubs. Bruin Bots is open to any student in the KCC service area, and robotics camps are open to any student who meets the age requirement. The program considered it especially important for those typically under-

represented in the STEM pipeline to give robotics club a shot, particularly girls and kids of color. And for any adults who are enthusiastic about robots, there are opportunities to become coaches or mentors. Anyone who is interested in participating in a robotics program should contact Kim Andrews-Bingham, at andrewsk@kellogg.edu.


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Honors programs give students an edge HEIDI GARTLEY guest writer

“These programs have allowed me to open more doors than I could even imagine,” exclaimed KCC student, Mitchell Tortelli, when asked about his membership in Phi Theta Kappa (PTK) and the Honors Program. The programs that Tortelli speaks so highly of are two different organizations, but they share the same requirements. Not only that, but each program gives its members an edge above their peers for future opportunities. Joining PTK and/or the Honors Program is the first step in getting ahead of the competition, whether it’s for a scholarship or career. Phi Theta Kappa is an international honor society created specifically for community college students. It only has two requirements to join: complete 12 credit hours and have at least a 3.5 cumulative GPA. Once the criteria have been met, eligible students will be sent an invitation in the mail, along with an application that must be filled out and returned to finalize the process of becoming a member. “Once a member, always a member,” Kellogg PTK advisor, Angie Bess, remarked. She continued by listing the overall “experience,” as well as the “perks and advantages,” as some of the more important reasons to join this elite program.

Tortelli explained that Phi Theta Kappa has “given me exclusive scholarships just for being a member, leadership skills, and great memories.” In other words, joining this program gave him free money, skills that future employers are seeking, and great stories to share. It almost seems too good to be true.

However, it doesn’t end there. There’s another honor society located on KCC’s campus called the Honors Program. This student organization is unique to this community college, but it also allows its members to directly transfer into the honors colleges at Western Michigan University and Albion College. The requirements are almost identical to those of Phi Theta Kappa: complete 12 credit hours; have at least a 3.5 cumulative GPA; finish 4 honors courses/contracts before graduating from KCC. It is even possible to plan those contracts to strategically relate to

Correction “The Art League Lives On,” from the February issue, was written by guest writer Sally May. It was incorrectly attributed to staff writer Lane Collins.

Human trafficking seminar scheduled BOB PSALMONDS staff writer

The Healthy Choices Leadership Organization, more commonly known as the HCLO, will be hosting a Human Trafficking Awareness workshop at the Binda Theater on March 12 from 3:30 to 6 PM. Admission is free. The group has made this year’s event educational and engaging, and it will support the Seeds of Success Scholarship Fund. This fund was set up to support in-need KCC students financially and provide other support as they overcome difficulties associated with substance abuse, domestic violence and/or human trafficking. The Healthy Choices Leadership Organization deals with much more than a good diet and exercise. They discuss and teach about the avoidance or common sense usage of alcohol or drugs. The group provides helpful resources for those in need and serves as an advocate for those who can’t stand up for themselves. The HCLO has volunteer opportunities available. Those interested should contact the staff advisor, T.J. Mohl, at mohlt@kellogg.edu.

a future career path, which is what student, Mayra Hurtado, has done. In regards to her current honors course, she stated, “I am working on gathering data on the oral health needs of the Latino/Hispanic community here in Battle Creek.” Already she has gained the life skill of leadership and knowledge outside of the

classroom. Honors contracts are a great opportunity to “take initiative over your own learning,” Terah Zaremba, Dean of Student Services, added. Honors contracts can come in many forms, from additional writing and research to other kinds of special projects. If students want to do one within a certain class, they should make sure they address that professor within the first few weeks of a semester to start discussing the assignment. Also, it’s not a requirement to be part of the Honors Program to complete a contract. Whether it’s done for

the program or the sake of learning more about an interesting subject, it’s important that the student continues to communicate with the professor along the way and ask any questions that may arise. It will likely result in building networking contacts, just like Mitchell Tortelli experienced. Once students have completed the criteria of the Honors Program and/ or Phi Theta Kappa, the only requirement left is to maintain a 3.5 cumulative GPA for the rest of their experience at KCC. When they leave this college and venture into their next chapter of life, having the PTK/Honors Program/Honors contract present on their resume or transcript will ultimately make them “more marketable,” Bess explains. Zaremba encourages students to strive to be a member of one, or even both, of these programs. After joining, they may make the same claim as Tortelli, that it was “the best decision of my college career.” For more information about the Honors Program: contact Student Services, office suite 105 269-565-2004 honorsprogram@kellogg.edu For more information about Phi Theta Kappa: contact bessa@kellogg.edu alphanueta@kellogg.edu

Student Life promotes college experience JOEL HAYWOOD guest writer

Extending education from a two-year college to a four-year university can be a difficult thing. However, Kellogg Community College has a department called Student Life, which makes the undertaking much simpler. Student Life promotes a positive college experience. Like life itself, you cannot go through college without talking to people. That is why they provide programs that focus on social interaction, diversity, and education. They have many student clubs such as International Travels. Madison Seedorff of Western Michigan University says, “If not for international travels, I would not have been able to have seen places like Greece and Germany at the age I’m at. It helped me break away from my group of friends and be more outgoing, which has helped me at WMU.” Student Life does not stop there, though. The department offers many opportunities for students to gain experience in education and diversity, including campus activities, student organizations, and the honors program. Student Life is in charge of all these activities and wants to promote a happy environment that everyone is welcome at. They have bands perform in the café and everyone is welcomed to sit back and have a good time. They also promote a well-rounded education and encourage the students at KCC to take part in co-curricular activities.

Student clubs at KCC offer many ways to branch out in social interaction and diversity. International Travels mentioned above is just one of them. There are many more including the KCC Golf Club, KCC Road Runners, and Film Club. These are just a few examples of what KCC has to offer in what is a fun way to follow something you may be passionate about. Others at KCC may share your interest but you may not know without joining these clubs. This may help you when extending your education to a four year university. Jake Burdette of Western Michigan University says, “KCC helped me a lot when I transferred to Western. The classes I took there helped me be more disciplined when it came to studying which I think helped my grades out here. I mean, there are always better things to do besides homework but I learned at KCC that education is the reason I am at college.” Many students may think that extending education to a four-year university is easy, but a lot of students fail at discipline. Professors at a four-year university may have classes that exceed 300-plus students and may not care for excuses on why an assignment is late. Discipline is key when it comes down to doing homework and studying for classes. No one is looking over the shoulders of these students and making sure these things done. Education is important at KCC and how you learn to study and do homework is important so develop the good habits now before transferring to a four year university.


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Study abroad this summer OLIVIA DAMON & LANE COLLINS guest writer

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staff writer

This upcoming August, KCC professors Michelle Wright and Kevin Barnes will be hosting an International trip for students to Ireland lasting eight days. The class, listed as INTL 210: Irish History and Culture, is an inter-disciplinary in which the enrolled students will be reading Irish literature, learning early and modern Irish history and looking at the connection between the Irish and Americans. “Ireland has a mythical quality to itself,” said Professor Michelle Wright, leading coordinator of the trip. “People are fascinated with the fairytale essence. So many people have Irish blood in them too, it ties them back to their roots.” The cost of the trip includes airfare, accommodations, group meals, and transportation within Ireland. During the trip, there will be a folklorist that the group will meet in Dublin who will tell tales about ancient Irish culture, common myths, and quirky stories that took place during the potato famine. Additionally there will be guided tours of Dublin, Cork and Galway followed by informative visits to the St. Patrick’s Cathedral, Book of Kells, Cobh Heritage and the Cliff of Moher Visitor’s Center. “The class is an academic program,” said Wright, “A student will keep a journal throughout the trip and document the sights visited and historical attributes the tours provide.” A student who enrolls in the course will receive three transferable credits that pertain to global awareness. For students that are in a tighter money crunch there is an alternative trip within the state to Mackinac

Island in June. The course is listed as HIST 290-01, History of Straits of Mackinac, which is directed by both Dr. Ray DeBruler and Wright. This four-day trip introduces the students to the historical aspects of Northern Michigan. In the duration of the trip, students will go on a guided tour of Fort Mackinac with a local archaeologist, learn in-depth about the War of 1812, explore the beauties our state’s islands and peninsulas have to offer during the summer season, and immerse themselves in the culture of Mackinac Island. The cost of the trips do not include personal meals, souvenirs, passport creation, and activities not specified on the class itinerary. The deposit for the Ireland trip is due March 6, while the deposit for the Mackinac trip is due March 31. Summer semester for the 2014-2015 school year registration opens on April 13. For more information on the Ireland trip, visit Wright at her office located in the Severin building, contact Wright at KCC extension 2217, or email her at Wrightm@kellogg.edu. Students can also attend the informative meetings in the Spring Lake Room in the LRC at 10 a.m. on Wednesday, February 25, 5 p.m. on Thursday, February 26, and 1 p.m. on Friday, February 27. For more information on the Mackinac trip, visit Dr. DeBruler at his office located in the Severin building, or contact DeBruler at his KCC extension 2381, or email Debrulerr@kellogg.edu. Be on the watch for upcoming fliers posted throughout main campus about future Information meetings regarding the Mackinac trip.

President Bona is a finalist for Northland Community and Technical College presidency

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BRUIN BEAT Wednesday, March 4

12:00p Chess Club - Weekly Meeting 2:30p The Gathering- Weekly Meeting

Wednesday, March 11th

2:30p The Gathering- Weekly Meeting

Wednesday, March 18th

12:00p Chess Club - Weekly Meeting 2:30p The Gathering- Weekly Meeting 6:30p KCC Board of Trustees Meeting

Friday, March 10th

7:30p - KCC Musical Production Binda Performing Arts Center

March 15th

2:30p The Gathering Tournament Kellogg Room

Wednesday, March 25

12:00p Chess Club - Weekly Meeting 2:30p The Gathering- Weekly Meeting 6:30p KCC Board of Trustees Meeting

Saturday March 28th

8:00a Chicago Trip Beauty and the Beast 2:00p - Men’s Baseball Game Home vs Mott Comm. College

Kellogg Community College’s Arts and Communication Department proudly presents

JOHNATHAN HOGAN guest writer

President Dennis Bona of Kellogg Community College is one of three finalists for a job as president at Northland Community and Technical College (NCTC), a community college with campuses located in East Grand Forks and Thief River Falls, Minnesota. On February 17 Bona was given a tour of both campuses, participating in open forums with staff, faculty, and students of the college. According to a press release posted on NCTC’s website, the candidates were chosen by a committee led by Keith Hanson, president of Anoka-Ramsey Community College and Anoka Technical College. The other candidates are Gerald Giraud, vice president for academic affairs and chief academic officer at Northwest College in Wyoming, a position he’s held since 2012, and Tony Summers, Vice President for student services at Richland College in Texas, where he has worked since 1993. The same press release stated that the Minnesota State Colleges and Universities Board of Trustees is expected to make a final decision at a meeting scheduled for March 18, and that the new President would begin work in July of this year. Bona has been president of Kellogg Community College since 2010. He has worked at KCC since 1981. During that time, he has worked as an industrial welding professor (1981-1986), director of the trades and technology department (1986-1991), Director of the Regional Manufacturing Technology Center (19911999), dean of career and occupational education (1999-2003), and Vice President of Instruction (2003-2010). Bona received his associate’s and bachelor’s degrees from Ferris State University and his master’s and doctoral degrees from Western Michigan University. Last year Bona was put on temporary leave while the Kellogg Community College Board of Trustees investigated accusations that the president had engaged in inappropriate behavior with a KCC employee. The Board failed to find substantial evidence of the accusations, and Bona returned to work. Shortly after the investigation, the Kellogg Faculty Association, the union for faculty at KCC, held a vote of no-confidence against the president. When asked if the investigation had influenced his decision to seek employment outside of KCC, Bona said, “It was certainly in the back of my mind.” He then added, “It’s an opportunity I’m interested in, and it’s an opportunity I would still be interested in regardless of whether or not those events would have occurred a year ago.”

Gilbert & Sullivan’s Comedic Operetta

March 20, 21, 27, 28 at 7:30 pm march 22, 29 at 3:00 pm Binda Performing Arts Center $10.00 general public $5.00 staff, students, and seniors for seat reservations and info, call (269) 965-4154 KELLOGG COMMUNITY COLLEGE


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Who are the Board of Trustees?

ERIC MCCLURE

guest writer

Kellogg Community College was founded in 1956, officially earning the title of community college in 1970. Ever since being named a community college, a Board of Trustees has been in place, serving as KCC’s policymaking body. The KCC Board of Trustees is a seven member board, all of whom

are elected by the public living within KCC’s taxing district. This district is made up of the “collection of K-12 [school] districts within Calhoun County, as well as smaller parts of other counties, such as Barry and Branch counties,” KCC President Dr. Dennis Bona explained. The KCC Board of Trustees is charged with the task of governing KCC. Although the Board’s primary focus is policymaking, many other

Patrick O’Donnell, the newest trustee as he swears in

things make their way onto the Board’s meeting agendas. The Board “approves the college’s annual budget, bargaining unit contracts, administrative salary structures and hiring,” as well as “determines the college’s tuition rate and when the college will seek millage renewals,” Bona said. Every spring, the Board determines the tuition rate for students for the following year, based on the college’s annual budget, the revenue set aside

PHOTO BY ERIC GREENE

in the state’s budget, as well as revenue collected locally through set millage rates. The addition of new programs or degree opportunities are also voted on by the Board. Amongst all of these functions, one in particular stands out. Bona explained that “the Board of Trustees act as ambassadors of the college to the community. They represent the public and strive to keep the public’s interests in mind.” KCC trustees are approached by students, staff and community members with suggestions and concerns that the trustees bring back to the rest of the Board at their meetings. Creating partnerships within the community is also a major role for KCC trustees. KCC trustees are elected every two years, during the fall general elections of even-numbered years to serve out six-year terms. The requirements for a candidate running for a seat on the KCC Board of Trustees include that the candidate must be a United States citizen, a qualified (at least 18 years old) and registered (resident for at least 30 days) voter in the district that she or he will represent, by the filing deadline for that election. The last election for the Board took place on November 4, 2014. Three seats were up for election, two of which were won by incumbents, while a newcomer took the third seat, changing the make-up of the Board. Trustee Patrick O’Donnell is the

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How to prepare yourself for a new job LOGAN HENKEL guest writer

Getting hired by an employer can be a very positive and very impactful experience. Doing well in an interview and creating a well written resume is part of the key to success when it comes to job hunting. Resumes and interviews are a true science when it comes to presenting yourself in order to make you truly stand out to an employer. With so many people constantly trying to enter the workforce, it can be quite nerve-wracking trying to compete for the chance at getting hired. However, there’s plenty of resources to turn to right here at KCC. Some simple advice from fellow students, professors, and advisors in the Student Services can go a long way. Patrick Casey, the director of Career & Employment Services here at KCC, has some pointers and tips for anyone trying to prepare for a new job. “A resume needs to be focused and direct. Every detail needs to speak to the job you’re applying for. Use industry language and stay relevant,” Casey said. He went on to say that the issue he usually runs into when viewing students’ resumes is that they don’t speak to the student’s strengths. His tip to prevent this is to use the syllabi from certain classes and use the core objectives to help fill out the skills section of your resume. When it came to talking about how to succeed in an interview, Casey went on to say, “Always do your homework. The most important thing prior to going to an interview is to know the company you’re interviewing with. Second, always know yourself because the key is to get that information from the back of your mind to the front of your mind so you’re not always looking for answers.” KCC staff members aren’t the only ones who can

help you prepare for your next job. You can turn to one of the countless number of students who have been through the hiring process. Full-time student and part-time movie theater employee Cassidy Kerr said, “To help get through my interview, I looked up tips online. I also brought a folder that had a copy of my driver’s license, and a copy of my high school transcript in order to really stand out against whoever else I was interviewing against.” Kerr also stated that it’s important to smile and be confident during the interview without being too cocky.

Freshman Rob Blunier says he got his job at a local pizza restaurant because of the fact that his interview went better than he had expected. “I told them I needed money to help pay my way through college, and I told them I’d be one of the best workers they’d ever have.” Blunier also said, “It’s important to wear something nice to an interview, like a button down shirt or some khakis pants in order to look professional.” For more information on how to prepare for a job, contact the Career & Employment Services Office at 269-965-3931, or at jobhelp@kellogg.edu.

PHOTO PROVIDED BY MORGUEFILE


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What to consider when transferring from KCC ELLERIE DEMOSS guest writer

With transferring comes transitions big and small. Whether it be preparing yourself for the change or the process of transferring credits, there are things for community college students to consider if they’re planning to transfer to a four-year university. Locations, finances, and the differences between colleges are helpful factors to keep in mind, or to ask about, because with each start has its own finish line. “Deciding to transfer to a university is the next big step,” stated KCC student Alexis McKendrick, “You have to think about the changes that come with going to a university, such as different living situations, and possibly not having a car. These are small things, but they are important to keep in mind, because they are changes. It’s also the step between taking basic courses and deciding what you want to do, and that naturally requires adjustments.”

If a student has questions, there are sources for them to receive answers. Academic advisors from their current and future colleges, their peers who may have transferred or are planning to, and even online sources are great. Statistics and information about colleges can help a student decide the best possible college for them to transfer to. Certain colleges may accept more transfer students than others, and that may also be a deciding factor for student. According to a Niche website statistic about transferring students, 3,844 students applied to the University of Michigan, and only 1,335 were accepted. U.S. News & World Report, in an article titled “Transfer Students: 8 Things You Need to Know” by Lynn O’Shaughnessy, states, “according to a special report from the National Association for College Admission Counseling, a third of students end up transferring to other colleges or universities. Some of these students are transferring from community

KNOW YOUR Bruin

BOB PSALMONDS staff writer

Hilary Anthony is a graduate of Western Michigan University and a woman of many passions. At the top of that list is her family, church, theater, and teaching. As the part time assistant for Student Life, Monday through Thursday from 8-2:30, she is dedicated to making the student lives better. She’s a pleasant asset to the general Student Services Office and makes a great impression on all she meets. Her husband is an employee of the Harbor Creek School District. She is a devoted mother of two children, one boy and one girl, both of which have also developed a passion for the theater. They had roles in the Franke Center’s production of “Alice in Wonderland” and “The Best Christmas Pageant Ever.” The pride she feels comes ringing through to show her family is at the top. Perhaps only God places higher. Hilary admitted one of the joys of her life is that every other week, the woman is part of the worship team that leads the First Wesleyan Church congregation in singing praise to God. Students and education can also be found on that list of things important to Hilary’s life. The woman views her

Hilary Anthony, Student Life secretary.

job as working for the students, not the college. Just being able to help any KCC student needing assistance brings a feeling of gratitude. Being able to teach is also found there. The woman is a ‘teaching artist’ over at the Education for the Arts in Kalamazoo every Friday. The children get to experience a wide range of cultural experiences that incorporate hands-on and field trips. As an actor and producer, Hilary has been involved with the theater since she was eight years old. Her favorite part was Scout in “To Kill a Mockingbird” at around the age of ten. Five days a week, Hilary goes to the Franke Center for the Arts in Marshall to put in another three hours as producer. The troupe, from young people (including her own two) to older, more experienced adults, is currently working on “Guys and Dolls,” which ran from February 26th until March 1. “This is a big commitment,” Hilary admits, “but allows me to pursue that part of my life. It’s also rewarding to work with young people in a theatrical capacity. I enjoy the fact there are people of all kinds in the theatrical field. She adds that, “Right now, I’m very grateful to work here at KCC in an educational position, be involved in theater productions, and continue working as a teaching artist. My life is very blessed.”

PHOTO BY ALAYNA NAIL

colleges, but many are also seeking to move from one four-year school to another.” This article also offers advice on possible struggles for a transferring student, which include financial aid and course credit information. “It’s important to start with the end in mind,” said KCC student Audrey Merlihan, “to know where you see yourself, and then plan how you’re going to get there. To ask questions, and to remember that you’re not the only student who decided to transfer. Staying focused on what you want to accomplish is a good way to make the transition much easier.” Students who choose to further their education at a four-year university have things to consider, decide and plan for. These might include where they would like to be or what they would like to come. But despite what it may be, it is helpful to have an idea. Despite the direction a student may decide to take, keeping focus on the path will contribute to the transitions that come with transferring.

Students consume digital media KARINA ALLEN guest writer

As more and more people are becoming digitally immersed, digital media usage is recorded and analyzed to predict the future of technology and media. Groups like the Pew Research Center, focusing on the studies of Internet, science and technology, frequently poll and survey subjects about their digital media consumption to show trends and patterns in usage. Digital media is any audio, video, photo, or text content that has been digitally encoded. This can include music, videos, e-books, social networking, and online news sites. Students at KCC are often seen engaging in the digital world, whether it be conducting research in the computer labs, scrolling through Instagram on their phones, or playing YouTube videos on their tablets. It is likely that nearly everybody on campus has used digital media before, and when students are asked about digital media consumption, it is easy to see trends. Every student surveyed informally by this reporter owned a smartphone, a computer or tablet. On a national level, according to a survey conducted by UCAS Media, 82 percent of college students own a smartphone, and at minimum, 20 percent have a tablet. There are many colleges, including Michigan State University, that require students to own a computer, and most, if not all colleges offer Internet access and a way to be immersed in the digital world. Of the eight students interviewed for this article, 88 percent said they used their phones mostly for texting and calling, and then for social media. Every single person interviewed actively used social media, and their primary platform was Facebook. When asked about their friends, most students said that almost all of their Facebook friends were people they knew personally. Lacey Jones, one of the youngest

students interviewed, however, said, “On Instagram and Twitter, I only know about half of my followers.” According to Huffington Post, “33 percent (of teens on Facebook) are friends with people they’ve never met in person. Lacey was one out of the only two teenage students interviewed, but also said that she knew everybody she was friends with on Instagram and Snapchat. All of the students interviewed said that they read or watch the news on their smartphones or computers only, and over half of them find out about current events via Facebook alone. Some users use the CNN app, like Treiona Barlow, and a couple use home pages like Apple or Yahoo to find out about trending topics. Also, over half of the students reported that they check up on the news at least once a day. Walking around campus, students often are seen with headphones in and engaging in audio media. Students use many different sites and apps to do so, but all that were interviewed listen on their computer or smartphone. Services like Spotify, Soundcloud, and Pandora are commonly used, but apps like Beats Music and Songify, used by Cassidy Finkel, are also ways students listen to music. Students at KCC seem to be extremely absorbed in the world of digital media. All students interviewed are engaged in social media, news services, and music sites and apps. Students are spending significant amounts of time using digital media, like Ladarius Livingston and Joshua Burdett who say they spend more than eight hours a day doing so. The question now is, how is this affecting students’ work ethics and personal lives? Is digital media causing us to be closer than ever, or more secluded? Lacey Jones jokes that she uses digital media more when around her family “to avoid conversation,” but will this lead to unhealthy relationships, or larger friend groups?


Feature

6

Working behind the scenes at KCC ANORAH SEITA staff writer

Kellogg Community College is a well-oiled machine, with many seemingly invisible men and women running the show. One of those people who is not so invisible is Russ Bortell, who is an Admissions Representative at KCC, but is better known for his many contributions to the Bruins athletic teams, especially baseball. Currently, he handles recruitment for KCC, visits high schools to talk with students, and conducts orientation, among other things. Bortell has been working as an Admissions Representative for the past two years, although he started the transition from an athletics-based career to an administrative one about 5-6 years ago. Surprisingly, Bortell began working at KCC nearly 28 years ago. His childhood was pretty idyllic, growing up on a farm in Jonesville, Michigan with his parents. He was taught manners, values of right vs. wrong and how to treat others, which contributed to his love of people and coaching. In 1987, a young Bortell was coaching baseball at Pennfield High School. He graduated from Spring Arbor University with a Bachelor’s Degree in education, and was using it to run the in-schoolsuspension program at Pennfield. He loved being able to teach young athletes the game of baseball and aspired to eventually coach at a higher level. A member of KCC’s board of trustees asked him to coach baseball for the Bruins, making his dream a reality.

Over the years, not only did Bortell continue to coach baseball, he also managed the Miller Building, coached volleyball, as well as softball. His coaching legacy echoes on with every season played. The author of this article was coached by a man who learned much of what he knew from Russ Bortell. Small world, huh? Bortell has a passion for sports, clearly, but found that working with admissions has many similarities to a career in coaching and can be satisfying in a different way. The recruitment side of being an

Ashford University. Aside from work, Bortell finds joy in coaching and teaching baseball, officiating various sports, and cracking open a good book. However, work and leisure is not easily distinguishable for him because he truly loves his career. That’s the advice he would give to KCC students and anyone considering a similar career field—get in it because you enjoy working with young adults. You have to have a passion for whatever it is you choose to do.

He was taught manners, values of right vs. wrong and how to treat others, which contributed to his love of people and coaching. Admissions Rep. carries over from coaching, and he enjoys being able to apply the same principals to something a little different. “I love meeting new people through orientation. There’s a lot of variety— no two days are the same,” Bortell says with a smile when asked about the best part of his job. Bortell met his wife Micki at KCC; she was an employee here for 26 years. Together they have one son, Cameron. After playing for the Bruin baseball team and graduating from KCC, he now attends

Russ Bortell, Admissions Representative

PHOTO BY ANORAH SEITA

Choosing the right degree is a big decision BRITTNEY DOWDY & BRIAN MILLER guest writers

For many students community college is the first, if not only, step they will take in pursuing post-secondary education. Earning an associate’s degree is an exciting and rewarding, while at the same time daunting experience. This leads to the question: “Which degree is right for me?” Ellerie DeMoss, a student at Kellogg Community College, states “I knew what I wanted to do, but I didn’t know what major I needed to choose.” Planning to transfer to the University of Nevada in Las Vegas this

the fall to pursue a degree in an art direction, she states matter-of-factly, “I want to open a studio! I mostly used online sources and social media to figure out what I needed to take.” Patrick Casey, Director of Career and Employment Services at Kellogg Community College, said he thinks this process can be simplified and offered his perspective as to how to select a major in three basic steps: first, get a picture of reality; second, identify the market outlook; and finally, eat, breathe, and live the program. For this first critical step, Casey breaks it down into two parts. Begin by identifying your interests and career

Patrick Casey, Director of Career and Employment Services, can be found in the Student Life office.

PHOTO BY ALAYNA NAIL

goals. Find areas where the two overlap and narrow down the list of majors, and then explore those majors. Speak to the instructors and students currently on that major track at the school you will be attending. Get an idea of how much work will be necessary to achieve success in the program, and then decide if you are willing to put forth that amount of effort. If so, then get an idea of what jobs in that field will entail. Speak to people who currently work in that area to reach an understanding of the day to day requirements your future position will most likely require. If you decide that this particular field is interesting and you are both willing and able to do the work, then begin the enrollment process. However, Casey warns, if you can’t meet any of the requirements or aren’t willing to complete any of the tasks associated with the major, don’t waste your time or money; move on and find something else. For example, if touching people and being around sickness bothers you, then pursuing a degree in nursing is probably not a good idea, and he would advise you to examine other options. Once you have determined the degree that holds your interest, it is a good idea to get an impression of the job outlook in that field. Casey suggests beginning your search locally. If the local outlook is poor then you need to decide if you are willing to relocate or consider changing majors all-together. For Battle Creek, the highest demand positions that an associate’s degree would qualify you for include: manufacturing and industrial trades, nursing, and information technology (Source: Burning Glass).

Another good idea is contacting human resources officers and hiring managers and inquiring about what qualifications they are specifically looking for. Nathan Smeltzer, a Branch Manager for a local bank, stated that when applying for a position at his branch, “a degree of any kind, shows me what you are passionate about.” He went on to say that if your degree is especially suited to the job you are applying for, it can only help. However, an art history major applying for an officer’s position may not garner the same consideration. “Once you have done the research and selected your major, get involved,” Casey says. “Don’t simply go to class and earn the grade, but rather surround yourself in the field and be active.” For example, if information technology is your major, then it would be a good idea to be involved in the IT department on campus, or join a programmers club. Find something to keep yourself active and submersed in the major field you have decided on. “People that are in a position of hiring look for credentials- what do you have that enhances a companies’ opportunity to deliver service, make a product, and increase value to shareholders,” states Casey. He goes on to explain that when considering an applicant, the one who has some personal experience in the field will almost always earn the position over the student who simply attended class. One last piece of advice from Mr. Casey is that specialization equals demand. The more specifically you define your career goals and the more specialized you make your degree, the more likely it will translate you into higher demand and a higher salary.


Opinion

Who are the Board of Trustees? - cont. from pg 4

newest member on the KCC Board of Trustees. A native of Battle Creek and graduate of Lakeview High School, KCC and Siena Heights University, O’Donnell currently works for CTS Telecom, as well as having served as a precinct delegate for over 16 years. “As a former KCC student, I hope to bring my experience in the workforce back to KCC and help to maintain the standards that KCC had while I was a student,” O’Donnell said. O’Donnell also serves as a Boy Scout leader and hopes that he can help increase leadership skills in the community. “I feel the challenges for youth, especially with leadership skills. I hope that I can bring my experiences as a leader to the table and offer support to those wishing to improve their leadership ability, or maybe even run for an office someday,” O’Donnell said. The remainder of the KCC Board of Trustees is made up of the following members: Steve Claywell, a Battle Creek native and graduate of Battle Creek Central High School, serves as the board chair. Claywell has served in the United States Navy, is a Desert Storm veteran, and is the Business Manager and Financial Secretary for the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers Local 445 in Battle Creek. He also sits on the KCC Foundation Board. Vice Chair, Jill Booth, a graduate of Kalamazoo College and the University of Michigan Law School, currently works for the Trial Court Services for the Michigan Supreme Court as a Management Analyst. Booth is also a State Bar Association of Michigan member, Calhoun County Bar Association member, as well as a member of Phi Beta Kappa. Reba Harrington serves as the board secretary. A graduate of the University of Toledo, Golden Gate University, and J.D. Capital University of Law School, Harrington currently serves as a federal attorney at the Federal Center in Battle Creek. She is also a retired United States Air Force officer, has served on the United Way Board of Directors, and is a published playwright and author. Treasurer Matthew Davis is a native of Marshall, as well as a graduate of Marshall High School, Miami University and North Carolina University. Davis currently is a realtor and member of the Battle Creek Area Association of Realtors. He also is a former member of the Marshall City Council. Julie Camp-Seifke of East Leroy serves as a trustee. A graduate of Bellevue High School, KCC and Western Michigan University, Camp Seifke previously served as a Calhoun County commissioner for four years, as well as a Michigan Works! CEO Board member. Trustee Jonathan Byrd is a native of Marshall and a graduate of Marshall High School, KCC, and Olivet College. Byrd currently serves as the Legislative Director for the Michigan Laborer’s District Council, as well as a Tomorrow’s Political Leaders Fellow through Michigan State University’s Institute for Public Policy and Social Research. He has also previously served as the Chair of the Calhoun County Democratic Party and worked in the Michigan Senate.

Although each KCC trustee has his or her own reasons as to what led them to run for a seat on the Board, many have several things in common that drew them to KCC. The desire to become a part of something that had such an important place in the community, for instance. “Education is extremely important for all of the communities within Calhoun County. Because of that, KCC is a real jewel for all of our communities,” Davis said. Others, such as KCC alumni Camp Seifke, Byrd, and O’Donnell, have more personal reasons for feeling the passion to get involved. “I was a Gold Key scholar at KCC. I was also very active on campus during my time at the college. I believed that I had a fresh perspective and wanted to take the opportunity to give back to KCC. The scholarship that KCC gave me is what allowed for the opportunities that I have now,” Byrd said. Something else that many of the KCC trustees can agree on is what makes their service worthwhile. “Graduation is the best part about doing what we do. It’s the culmination of lots of hard work and it means something for not just the graduates, but for entire families. We are able to tangibly see that we are helping people. That’s what makes us feel like we are making a real difference,” Davis said. The respect that fellow KCC trustees have for each other and the excellent staff and employees that work at KCC are reasons why many trustees made the decision to serve. The KCC Board of Trustees can seem like an abstract concept. However, the KCC trustees say they hope that people realize that the reason they are here is because they are working for them. “Even if students don’t see us on campus, we are always being updated and informed at and in-between meetings of what’s happening on campus. We constantly are asking ourselves, what are we doing today to make sure the institution is better off tomorrow?” Camp Seifke said. “There are so many different factors that go into our recommendations and decisions. It is much more than a simple yes or no vote. The community is always a stakeholder in our decision making.” The KCC Board of Trustees encourages students, staff, employees and community members to take the opportunities to share questions, suggestions and concerns with them, as well as simply having some positive interaction with trustees. “Being on the Board of Trustees isn’t a paid position. None of us are here for that. We are elected officials, here to represent the community as a whole and to assure that higher education is available to everyone. The Board gives a lot of time and passion for that cause,” Byrd said. The KCC Board of Trustees meets regularly on the third Wednesday of every month at 6:30 p.m. in Room 301A, Roll Health and Administration Building, 450 North Avenue, Battle Creek, MI, 49017. For more information, visit www.kellogg.edu/ about/administration/board-oftrustees.

7

Letterpress field trip to the Book Arts Center

PHOTO BY VICKI VANAMEYDEN

As part of the GRDE 204 Typography and Typesetting course, 15 KCC Graphic Design students visited the Kalamazoo Book Arts Center on February 3. Director Jeff Abshear discussed the history of typesetting and printing. Here he demonstrates the mechanics of typesetting with lead type.

CHICAGO TRIP│BEAUTY AND THE BEAST

March 28 Students $35 Non-Students $45 Cost includes transportation to and from Chicago and a ticket to see Beauty and the Beast. Depart KCC at 8:00 AM. Show starts at 2:00 PM at the Cadillac Palace Theatre, downtown Chicago. Time allotted for lunch and dinner, not included in the cost. To purchase tickets and receive additional information, please stop by the Student Life Office.

KELLOGG COMMUNITY COLLEGE Student Life


Opinion

8

The Graduate’s final lessons: preparing to move on BOB PSALMONDS staff writer

I filed my two graduation forms the other day. It scares me in some ways. In the fall I will need to be going to one of my four-year transfer options. All three are almost an hour or more outside the Battle Creek area thus more traveling expense and time, forget the weather concerns. There is so much left to do I’m losing track of some of it. A few of the questions swirling around in my head are “Will I find enough money to cover the bills or will I have to give up on my dream?” or “Who do I ask the numeral questions I have to know to navigate this part of my future?” The list of things I need to get completed seems endless. For one, I need to get all the transcripts and information to each of the colleges. For some, this is as simple as sending

a transcript from KCC’s Registrar’s Office. For me, it also means a number of earlier schools, various credits earned from military career fields, and over half a dozen CLEP or SAT exams. That translates to a lot of things to keep track of, request, and pay for. I have a full schedule of fifteen credit hours this semester. Even so, I have to take two more this summer just to actually earn the second degree, an Associate of Science. In point of fact, I will be walking across the stage with the summer graduating class but not receive my second degree until August. At first, the Manager for Graduation and Transfer denied my application. She was using the 2011 Degree requirement sheet which listed a course not being offered until at least the fall semester. After discussing the issue with my professor, Ryan Flathau, I sent in an email request they

use one of the newer Degree course requirement lists, which Bobbie J. Brawley gladly did. Though I still need two classes, the new ones are at least offered this summer. Of course, I got curious about some of the side issues of graduation. For instance, what did she mean by Honors braids? I have a decent GPA, which means I get the Dean’s Honor tassel, but that isn’t the same thing at all. She explained the requirement to get this hard to earn and too rarely sought after award requires a person do four Honors Contracts. An Honors Contract must be completed under the direction of a teacher connected to a course you’re taking during that semester. They evaluate your progress and confirm to the Student Services when the terms of the contract have been met. I decided to try earning the cord just for the challenge of it. Hey,

no one ever said I was sane. This week is the Graduation Blitz. I will definitely stop at the tables to find out anything new or requirements I might have missed. Today was the PTK Scholarship meeting. Hopefully those who missed today will catch the one later this week. Add in the fact I’ve scheduled a meeting with Bobbie this afternoon and I’m hopefully well ahead of the time curve for my graduation. Even with all that past learning and a dual degree, actually crossing a stage for graduation is a new experience for me. I’ll will make many mistakes before I get there and learn many valuable lessons. Preparing to move to that next step in my education might be just as much a learning experience as the coursework itself. I guess I’ll find out.

Hazy lines of Hazing: exploring the darker side of sports MARY EMINGTON sports editor

Hazing has been a problem that has plagued sports for years. Incoming players go through the most horrifying things to become part of a team. In today’s society these dealings should never be accepted. In collegiate athletics studies, it has been found that more than half of the athletes and participants in college athletic organizations have been hazed. It has also been found that since the year 1970, at least one death has occurred every year due to hazing. Hazing, by definition, is the imposition of strenuous, often humiliating, tasks as part of a program of rigorous physical training and initiation. Humiliating is a perfect word of choice. Teams have deeply ground traditions for initiation to their programs. In order to accept someone, some teams feel that they need to humiliate their future teammates. That these new initiates have to go through what they went through, or that they have to pull their weight because they are the newbies of the team. The states have more of an input on penalties than the college institutions. In the US only 44

states have anti-hazing laws. These laws are subject to different qualifications depending on the state and different punishments. In some states legal actions, including criminal record, jail time and/or fines are found. Other times, civil lawsuits can be filed against the hazer. When I went to the NCAA website I couldn’t find any repercussions for athletes, coaches, or athletic departments who participated in hazing from the NCAA. What I did find was that it was up to the institution to delegate how they approach the subject. As a student athlete myself, I find this a little discomforting. I’d like to know that there are some finite rules and penalties for those that push hazing on a team. I also realize that depending on the institution, the rules may be more lax than what they may have at another. The NCAA did have a handbook on how to approach hazing at schools and what should be done by coaches, captains, and athletic directors. Their guidelines are applauded, but that’s all they are—guidelines. With the number of individuals claiming to have been subjected to hazing rising to more than half of the participants, I’d like to see the NCAA put in better regulations. Individuals who are hazed can sometimes be scarred for life. Teams may think they are building

team unity by ordering teammates to complete actions such as being forced to strip and run naked around campus. Other examples of hazing that have been confirmed are forced haircuts, whipping by belts, forced the student into shoplifting, excessive drinking initiations and others. These so called “rituals” are downright demeaning and traumatizing. For many years the victims have reported having nightmares about hazing, and mental problems later on. Many institutions feel that without these “traditions” the culture of their programs will be lost. If personally victimizing teammates is the culture of a school, why should it be kept around? Hazing doesn’t give your team a tradition; it only gives them a disturbing definition. Team unity isn’t built through derision; it is built through trust, integrity, and pride. In this day and age, it sickens me to hear about such reports of hazing. Teams should be more focused on the goal of becoming a family and winning the big title. If hazing is part of the culture of sports, maybe it’s time to start redefining our ideas on what sports should be and what they should accomplish.

April dates April 13 Summer Registration Opens

Courses are currently viewable online.

Deadline for Student Art Show The art show will be held at the Art Center of Battle Creek.


Opinion

9

Finding the artist within all of us BOB PSALMONDS staff writer

Within each and every one of us is an artist struggling to get out. Sound crazy or not, it’s true. The question each of us should ask is “What media do I use?” or “What do I find that makes my heart sing and how can I do the same thing?” Even I have often cut myself down as not having any artistic talent, since I rarely saw writing as an “art form.” The last few years have proven this only partially correct. I have found some of the media used in the art classes very frustrating to use and impossible to master (for me, anyway). On the other hand, through hard work and the frequent bald spots or gray hairs on many instructors’ heads, there are things I can present to the world at large as decent pieces of art. Of course, this only proves that with a lot more time and effort, I could become a decent artist in that area. A perfect example was watching those around me making lovely, delicate or

artistically designed ceramic homework assignments as I repeatedly made my clay scream in pain. Pete Williams heard me often wail that my skills stank. Then I found masks with heavy layers of clay that displayed an off-center sense of reality. The same could be said of the various photography and visual imagery I have completed. A fun one was the “Earth Installation” assignment given out last year. In truth, we are all talented in some part of our lives and daily existence. The obvious ones are painters, sculptors, and such we all see with work displayed in museums. Though these are all beautiful, it is a small fraction of what is really created or possible. There’s the maestro that makes the music float like golden notes across the score sheet of your mind and heart. It is often said a gifted musician is an “Artist.” The written field is not viewed as artistic by many unless the person creates poetry and other heart touching verbal imagery, but is a real art form. Their ability is

in causing the words to come to life and dance inside the readers mind like an alternate reality. Let’s get beyond even these definitions of an “Artist.” Know anyone who can turn simple fixings into a gourmet meal. They can make a dessert so delicious, you forget about weight, sharing, and cost. I mean those flaky baklava got me every time I pass the bakery. Check out the engineer who builds a masterpiece of architectural beauty so sturdy yet so delicately framed it takes your breath away. We all have those individuals on our contact list that can fix any computer issue, write a new game, or create computer generated images as realistic as a photograph. Also, let’s not forget such people as our mechanics, financial experts, and the dozens of other abilities applied on a daily basis around the world. Then, there’s our greatest gift and challenge as creators - our children. Some of the greatest masterpieces we will ever show the world are members of the next

PHOTO BY BOB PSALMONDS

The personal works of the author, Bob Psalmonds

generation. Who are the artists here? Teachers who make a true and lasting imprint on their lives and the world’s future. There are medical fields and a variety of other influences these delicate jewels will come into contact with that will give a polished shine or damaged surface to every facet of their developing lives. Of course, the parents are usually a big part of this creative process, definitely before and hopefully after their birth. Trial and error with a lot of failures is a given but none of us should ever give

up on this one for they are our greatest treasures. Finally, each of us creates and affects the environment around us every day. We make or add to the love, happiness, and beauty or cause harm with anger, hatred, and destructive habits. It has been said that giving reason for a passing stranger to smile might change the results of their entire day. If this is true, just imagine how much beauty and happiness you can create. Let that artist out and begin today.

What are you teaching the next generation? JESSIE SCHNEIDER staff writer

Even at the age of 4, children are tainted by the stereotypes of the world. They are already quick to shout through their unfiltered mouths the rights and wrongs they have been taught. Any new pre-school ballet girl in my class is quick to point out that “boys don’t dance” as soon as her little eyes land on the boys in black ballet shoes that also attend. I gently correct her by saying that anyone can dance and that we are all here to learn. But every time this happens it eats away at me more and more. How does this little 4-year-old girl already know that boys doing ballet isn’t a social norm? Another time while teaching, a little ballerina noticed that I had hair on my arms and defiantly stated “You have hair on your arms! You must be a boy!” Again I corrected her mistake, saying that grownups have hair on their arms, even girl grownups. But these stereotypes are not just mistakes of

PHOTO BY JESSIE SCHNEIDER

Children of all ages are influenced by the thoughts and actions of their role models.

little children. Kids didn’t just make them up. Most likely they heard a parent or another adult mutter it without thinking. It’s a dangerous game though because aiding the continuation of these social norms shape the way people act, what they like, and how they feel about themselves.

People generally go out of their way to stay within this invisible guidelines. For example many women shave their arms because somewhere along the way somebody decided that women shouldn’t have hairy arms. But where did that come from? It is most definitely the opposite

of how many people naturally are. Why do women have to go out of their way to make themselves unnatural or just simply feel bad about themselves if they don’t fit the “hair-free” standard? People are even forced to avoid things they are passionate

about just because it is a taboo for them to like such a thing. Say a man likes cake decorating: he is automatically deemed feminine and sensitive. So that rough tough man with a passion for frosting art will skip going to culinary school and instead go to college on his football scholarship

to save his reputation. Boom. A possibly world famous baker that could have made cupcakes for the president’s birthday is lost to mankind just because of a silly stereotype. These standards are so ingrained in society that it may be nearly impossible to reverse their effects. But if people learn to accept others no matter what they like on the inside or look like on the outside, I believe that the general population will be happier. If we have the man passionate about cupcakes making cupcakes and the women passionate about football playing football, we will have better tasting cupcakes and more touchdowns. The reversal stats with the youngest generation. People need to teach their children to chase whatever dreams they have and to let others chase their own dreams. So watch what you say around pure impressionable minds and maybe, just maybe, someday people will feel comfortable in their own skin just the way God made them.


10

Opinion

Who fouled whom: sports from the non-jock’s eye BOB PSALMONDS staff writer

A friend loves basketball and watches the professional games every chance he gets. The other day, I decided to sit and see what the excitement was all about. To be honest, it seemed to be pretty illogical to me. The players getting the penalties were always the ones being hurt the worst. For example, the yellow shirted team had the ball and was bouncing the thing across the floor to the other end. It was passed back and forth with force and what had to be a lot of practiced moves. Suddenly, the one who had just caught the basketball charges in to make a basket. A man standing under the backboard and net got a knee to the face as the charging giant leapt into the air and slams the ball into the ring with a resounding noise that made the thing vibrate violently. That is, until the player hung from it like it was a jungle gym. The crowd cheered wildly as the star got back slaps and high fives from his teammates. The red shirted player, now even redder from the split lip and bloody nose, slowly untangled himself from

the crowded bleachers and, with a few teammates assistance, limped back to his own side of the gym. I looked at my friend and said “He just about killed that guy. Why didn’t they call a penalty on that big bully?” “Well, first off, it’s called a foul, not a penalty. That’s a hockey term. Secondly, the guy hadn’t set his feet prior to contact. Both had been in motion, hence no foul. Besides,” Les said with a chuckle as he cheered the yellow shirts making another basket, “if the guy can’t take a little physical contact, he shouldn’t be out on the court.” I thought about this as we watched some halftime cheerleaders twisting and grinding to the music. Since hockey and football seem to have contact just as rough all the time, I guess that made sense. In the final quarter of play, I’d watched the screen as a redshirt reached around a yellow shirt to dislodge the ball. I saw a little contact about the wrist but I figured that was nothing since the guy knocked into the bleachers was still in the locker room for medical attention. I mean, there was no blood, both were still standing and still fighting hard to claim the ball.

Except yellow shirt had looked at the umpire with a pained and wounded expression on his face. A whistle blew shrilly and play had again stopped (This seemed an all too common occurrence in this sport). “Foul on 35. Two free throws!” As they went to one end of the gym and half of them alternated under the net for some reason, I looked to Les for an explanation again. “He made illegal contact with the guy with the ball by hitting him on the wrist. That’s why they gave him the two free throws at the foul line. If he misses the ball, the players try to get the rebound.” He’d acted like this explained everything clearly. Confused even worse, I’d said “What contact? There was no blood, no one got knocked to the ground, or even remotely injured. I thought you said contact was part of the game?” Looking at me like I was an idiot, Les exclaims “That’s part of the rules. No interfering with the player who has the ball. It’s clear you have no idea how the game is played. Why don’t you go find a good book to read and let me enjoy the game in peace?” Thinking his suggestion had been a

good one, I’d left him yelling loudly at the screen about how poorly the yellow shirts were playing compared to thirty seconds ago. Just out of spite, I hoped that his team lost their game. I found some good science fiction on my shelf, but I didn’t open it up. Les, though said in such a poor manner, had been completely right. I didn’t know enough about basketball to be so judgmental and negative. Sitting down at the computer instead, I Googled the sport and spent over an hour reviewing the game. After mulling over what I’d learned, the sport was not nearly as simple or easy to play as I thought. A great player had to have a lot of skill and drive since practice was a necessity. Then I’d envisioned me in those yellow or red shirts and baggy shorts. Not a chance, I thought, with a soft laugh and shake of my head. The science in that book had more contact with my reality then basketball. Closing the door to block out Les’s continued screams over a referee’s bad call on another game he’d found, I’d sighed and opened my book to read about the next great galactic war.

Are you a cartoonist? The Bruin newspaper is in need of your skills. If you find a fancy in drawing cartoons that are relatable to college life, send in an example of what a comic strip of yours would look like. The main requirement is that the comic is appropriate for a campus setting and that you can meet the deadlines for each month’s edition of the paper. You can email a photo copy of at least one comic strip to bruin@kellogg.edu. By the end of March we will let you know if your cartoon will be featured regularly.


Sports

11

Opening the diamonds: Let’s play ball MARY EMINGTON sports editor

Though snow may be on the ground and plows are frequently seen driving down the slick streets one thing about spring has already started. The Kellogg Community College Softball and Baseball teams have begun practice and games getting in the swing of their season. Over the winter both teams have put in endless hours of practice working to perfect their double plays, curves, and swings. They have built up strength in the weight room and are ready to take on some competition. Hoping to find some sunshine and grass both teams went south for a spring trip. The baseball team was the first to start their season with a week of

games in Louisiana at the end of February. The Lady Bruins waited a few more weeks to take their spring trip to Florida. There, the women played 10 games. The baseball team has set their goals high this year to follow their winning traditions. This spring the team has set a heavy weighted schedule with plenty top notch teams to play. “We expect to compete for a league championship, qualify for the regional tourney, and hopefully make it to the World Series! We also expect to extend our run of being recognized as an NJCAA-All Academic team” Coach Eric Laskovy. The team currently has five players who have committed to 4-year schools to continue their baseball and academic careers: Alex Goodwin- Western Michigan University, Tyler Bradner- Oakland

It may be cold at Bailey Park, but the Bruins baseball and softball teams are ready to go.

PHOTO BY MARY EMINGTON

University, Benny Clark- Indiana Tech, Travis BolinDavenport University, and Seth Johnson- Grand Valley State University. Coach Laskovy expects several other players to also committee. Many are being heavily recruited heading into the season. The softball team also has a few individuals on the hunt for a commit to a four-year institution. Brooke Edmonds has already signed to Cleary University as the Lady Bruins head into their season. The Bruins are looking to raise the bar this season and see a banner put up for their team in the Miller Building gymnasium. There goals are to reach a conference championship, a state championship, a regional championship, and a national championship birth. Some team strengths given by head coach Darrick Brown included: Top five hitters producing a lot of damage—all 5 should hit over .400 with plenty of power and home run potential. Batters 6-9 are solid as well so we should score a lot of runs. Pitching is another strength the Lady Bruins produced. “We have 3 solid pitchers in Vantilburg, Seita, and Craun. They really complement each other and all 3 are used to throwing a lot of innings,” stated Coach Brown. This team is looking to continue towards its success of last season. Hoping to overcome a smaller roster of 14 women they are looking forward to the tough competition of the league. “The toughest teams will be Lansing, Muskegon, and Kalamazoo in my opinion,” Coach Brown voiced. “The league will be very competitive, especially at the top.” Home openers for the season are March 21 for the Lady Bruins against Grand Rapids Community College and March 28 for the baseball team against Mott Community College. Both teams play at Bailey Park.

Brooke Edmonds MARY EMINGTON sports editor

Life after Kellogg Community College is hard for some to imagine. For individuals that attend KCC because it is close to home, moving onto another college could bring challenges of making new friends, finding a new place to live, and an obvious change in settings and expectations. One athlete was not only ready to see her life beyond Kellogg, but is now excited to continue on her journey to success at another institution. Brooke Edmonds has found her home after KCC. Brooke grew up loving the game of softball. Her dad, Dave Edmonds, played often at the ball fields so Brooke grew up surrounded by the game. Brought up in this environment it was only a matter of time before Brooke started playing ball herself. She got involved in t-ball and little league while she was young waiting until the day where she could play on a higher level team. This turned into an opportunity to play softball at the high school level. Brooke played four years at Hartford High School. She also had the opportunity to play on a travel ball team called Torco where her skills were honed against higher competition. When asked what her favorite parts about softball are she responded

and resounding, “Team bonding and defense!” Brooke left Hartford High School to continue her academic career, but the passion for softball still had hold of her heart. After a year, Brooke got into contact with Coach Darrick Brown of the softball team here at Kellogg Community College. She fit right into the team helping them to their second appearance in the regional playoffs. Brooke batted number nine in the lineup helping herself to a batting average of .258, 13 RBI’s, and 19 runs. On defense Brooke played a little of outfield and infield boosting the Lady Bruin’s defensive effort with a fielding percentage of .813. “I loved my first year. The girls were great. We made it to the tournament which KCC hasn’t done in forever,” said Edmonds. “I improved on many skills, mainly hitting.” The fans and teams at KCC weren’t the only ones to take notice of Edmonds’ admirable statistics. Another team saw her stats and realized that this player could be a great asset to their team. Seeing that she had the potential to play at a four-year institution, Brooke contacted Cleary University, with the help of Coach Brown. On December 9, Brooke visited the school and fell in love. Edmonds stated, “It’s a small school

Brooke Edmonds signs her letter of intent to Cleary University in the presence of her parents.

and I love the small environment feel. The coach made me feel very welcomed. I liked him a lot, the way he interacted with me and made me feel like I was at home at Cleary.” With a few follow up talks and some time spent discussing the options with her family Brooke decided to sign with Cleary. She was bouncing around trying to find what to major in and decided upon Business. With Cleary being a school that specializes in business, she realized that it was a good fit for her. On February 7, Brooke signed her letter of intent to play softball at Cleary University. “It’s funny. I always walk recruits to

PHOTO BY MARY EMINGTON

the “Where they are now” wall in the Miller Building. There are no softball players, so I tell recruits that it’s going to change. Brooke is the first recruit from my first class to commit and I am so proud and happy it’s her. She is the ultimate utility player. She can play multiple positions which made her attractive to Kellogg,” said Coach Brown. Edmonds has plans to improve her game for this year as well. Her goals are to hit more consistently and be dominant on defense. She would like to thank her parents Dave and Michelle Edmonds and all of her coaches for supporting her through this journey.


Sports

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March Madness Bracketology MARY EMINGTON

NCAA DIVISION I BASKETBALL TOURNAMENT BRACKET

sports editor

March is the month of madness. It is the month of college basketball playoffs. Bracketology, Cinderella stories, and national championships are in the air. For those who are new to the world of basketball and their playoffs, the system works as thus: the playoff system is a single elimination tournament. 68 teams are selected to participate in this contest. It is separated into stages, the play in game, the field of 64, the field of 32, the sweet 16, the elite eight, the final 4, and the national championship game. The teams are each given a region in the Midwest, South, East or West regions of the bracket. Each region of the bracket is separated into 16 seeds. Number 1 plays number 16, number 2 plays number 15 and so on. The four teams in the First Four round of the tournament participate in play-in games the day before the round of 64 begins. In 2014, the winners of these games were given either a ranking of 16, 12, or 11. So in essence, if one of these teams were to actually win the national championship, they would have played one more game than the rest of the teams. In the bracket, the highest seed is the number one seed in a predesignated region. The one seed technically has the easiest route to the championship game. They start by playing the lowest seed in the region and always play a seed ranked beneath them unless they make it to the final four and play another 1 seed from another region. The winners advance each round until they make it to the round of the final four. There they play the winner of the other bracket regions: Midwest winner plays the West winner and the South winner plays the East winner. Then the winners of those two games play in the national championship. This system allows for all sorts of Cinderella stories to happen. Although the path is rigorous for lower ranked teams, there is still a possibility for them to be the national champion. They must beat higher ranked teams

1st Round

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Editorial Policy

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Fill out the bracket above or fill yours out online at ncaa.com/interactive-bracket/basketball-men/ from other conferences and possibly their own on their way to victory. Each team that participates in the tournament is selected by the selection committee. 32 of the selected teams are given automatic bids for winning their conference tournament. The other 36 teams are chosen on Selection Sunday. The Selection Show takes place March 15th on CBS. A ten member committee choses the rest of the teams for the tournament. These committee members are

Alayna Nail Kristen Pierce

Athletic Directors and Conference Commissioners from various division one teams. Normally teams that were ranked in the top 25 season poll get a bid into the tournament and others are selected based on strength of schedule and winning record. A lot of individuals participate in filling out prediction brackets for the tournament. Once Selection Sunday is over, people decide who they think will win each game and fill out a “mock” tournament bracket hoping

that their selections are as close to perfect as possible. If one enters a “pool” different point values are given to each game selected correctly. In lots of pools additional rules are made such as more points going to individuals that selected the correct championship winner and such. March 17th kicks off the First Four round on truTV. The whole tournament will be air on four channels: CBS truTV, TNT, and TBS. The National Championship game airs on April 6th.

Basketball Review MARY EMINGTON Staff Writers

Graphics Editors

Jessie Schneider

3/28-29 [Dates]

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BRUIN Staff Editor

4th Round

Sports Editor

Mary Emington

Lane Collins Bobby Psalmonds Anorah Seita

Advisors

Drew Hutchinson Penny Rose Thomas Webster

The KCC Bruin is a free student publication produced monthly by Kellogg Community College students during the fall and spring semesters. The KCC Bruin welcomes letters to the editor from members of the College and the community. Letters must be signed and submitted with a current telephone number or email address. All letters become property of the Bruin and may be edited for clarity and length. By-lined opinion columns represent the opinion of the writer and do not necessarily represent the views of the Bruin staff or the College. Letters may be submitted by mail to: KCC Bruin student newspaper, c/o Kellogg Community College, 450 North Ave., Battle Creek, Mich. 49017. Letters may also be submitted at all three KCC sites. At the Battle Creek site, letters may be dropped off in the English Department on the 4th floor of the C Building; the College Life Office in the Student Center; or the student newspaper office. At the Grahl and Fehsenfeld Centers, letters may be submitted at the information desks. The Bruin office is located in room 202 in the Ohm Technology Building. The staff can be reached at (269)565-2634, Ext. 2634 or e-mail the Bruin editor at bruin@kellogg.edu.

sports editor

The men and women basketball teams are coming to a close. As of February 14, the men had a record of 3-18 and 2-10 in the league. The women had a record of 8-12 and 7-5 in the league. Lead scores for the Bruins were Joe Glover averaging 15.7 points per game, Anquas Bennet with 10.2, and Curtis Trigg with 10.2. For the women, Kayla Freeman and Alexis Bratigam led the way. Freeman scored 17.2 points per game and Bratgam scored 16.8. Both teams hoped to make it to the NJCAA Tournament championships which started on the 3rd of March. The MCCAA State Championships were held on the 28th of February.

March 2015  
March 2015  
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