Page 1

WORK_ KATHERINE B. SIMSON


A A A A A A A A A A A A A

Academic

01_Urban Landforms University of Illinois at Chicago Fall 2012

02_Extrusion Problems University of Illinois at Chicago Spring 2012

03_Rossi Reproductions University of Illinois at Chicago Fall 2011

04_Rossiville University of Illinois at Chicago Fall 2011

05_Node University of Kentucky Fall 2010

Casa d’abitazione a Milano/Gallaratese, 1970. KS. etate 80/1


NATIONAL ARCHITECTURAL IDEAS COMPETITION NATIONAL MUSEUM OF AFGHANISTAN 2012

useum Perspective

Professional UIC: V-25

06_Beer 04 Sheba, Israel Day Care Center Paul Preissner Architects, Ltd. Fall 2012 07_Bioclimactic European School Paul Preissner Architects, Ltd. Fall 2012 08_National Museum of Afghanistan Paul Preissner Architects, Ltd. Summer 2012 09_Helsinki Central Library Paul Preissner Architects, Ltd. Spring 2012 10_Ballooning Angela Co, Don Kalant, Jr. Collaboration Fall 2010


Urban Landforms Crit: Alexander Eisenschmidt, Stewart Hicks, and Marina Nicollier, Fall 2012 Interior Urbanism Studio in Chicago, IL, Second Year Graduate Studio.

Urban Landforms seeks to develop an architecture that is deeply invested in the city. It rethinks urbanism on the basis of atmosphere not limited to the exterior, it seeks new relationships between program, form and urban location, and it productively rethinks monumentality. Urban Landforms understands the city as a site of architectural invention and a place filled with spatial, organizatioWnal, and programmatic opportunities. This project attempts to capitalize on the dynamics of the city and incorporate the city’s intelligences. Urban Landforms uses the program of the convention center to explore the exchanges and transactions between architecture and the city, and to invent new connections. The site, located in Chicago, the prototypical American city, has produced many urban interiors and small urbanisms. Urban Landforms, the downtown convention center, will become part of Chicago’s system of large architectures. Addressing a program of 1,000,000 square feet, the building explores the relationships between multiple program types: hotel, office, retail, and primarily convention space. The juxtaposition of these program types allows for the invention of new urban event possibilities, thus diversifying the urban fabric.


At right: Photographs taken of a 1’ : 1/4� model. Depicted is the winter garden, the occupiable space beneath the structure of the convention center. The photographs were part of a narrative that followed the main character (seen in top photograph) through the various environments of the urban convention center.

Opposite page: An exterior view of the urban convention center from across the Chicago River (top.) The formal process diagram (bottom) relates built form to geographical type.


Layered Plain

Rolling Hills

Mountain Range

Mt. Everest

Valleys


At right: Photographs taken of a 1’ : 1/4” model. Depicted is the central stair in the urban convention center. This stair takes people through exhibition and retail areas; people are able to interact with large sculptures (top) while circulating upwards to the main convention space.

Opposite page: The evolutionary diagram (top) depicts the elevation of the convention datum above the ground plane. The ground is then activated through “push” and “pull” actions. The section (bottom) demonstrates the outcome of the raised convention datum; the ground plane and the top surface are both occupiable, thus providing added greenspace through the creation of a landform structure within the urban environment.


The original site is split in half by Lake Shore Drive.

The area of the site is lifted up, over Lake Shore Drive, in order to maximize the horizontal area. This plane acts as a horizontal datum within the structure that houses the convention program.

The structure is pushed down to allow for access into the building, as well as creates subterranean programmable space.

The structure is pulled up to allow for views of the city and the lake, as well as to create an occupiable terrain for public use. This creates a constructed mountain within the flat terrain of the urban fabric.

The form of the building is then offset to the interior to create a large volume for the convention program to occupy.


At right: Photographs taken of a 1’ : 1/4� model. Depicted is the main convention space. The ceiling surface is articulated with a series of glowing tube lights, thus creating an artificial sky that glows above the main stair. The interior of this artificial landform is a series of layered, artificial environments.

Opposite page: Plans of the urban convention center. The ground floor plan (bottom) cuts through the central stair and the main auditorium. The reflected ceiling plan is shown over the winter garden. The plan showing the occupiable surface (top) also cuts through the typical hotel and office floors, which surround the main atrium space above the convention level.


Extrusion Problems Crit: Andrew Zago, Sarah Blankenbaker, and Grant Gibson, Spring 2012 Exploring Formal Strategies of Extrusion for the Design of an Art Museum, First Year Graduate Studio.

The Futura font was used to drive this project, which is based on the process of the extrusion. Forms were generated from the extrusion of letters. Initially the letters were confined to extrusion in the XYZ planes, which restricted the resultant forms to orthogonal characteristics. Gradually, the letters were extruded in more obscure angles, thus blurring the letter forms and creating more abstract forms. The techniques of cropping and filleting were employed to further progress the forms and erode the initial typography that was used. New formal possibilities result from the process of extrusion, cropping, and filleting; the process determines the formal result. Contextual pressures and subjective desires have less influence on the form, thus pushing it past the point of normalcy. The resultant forms are not characterized by the shapes of letters, but exist as new, ambiguous shapes.

At right: A technical analysis of the letters A, Q, Y in the Futura font. Opposite page: A paper section model of the extruded letters A, Q, Y that demonstrates the effects of the extrusion on the section of the form.


At right: 3D printed model of the final museum form, which was a result of the letters U, C, J, G being extruded in non-orthogonal directions, then cropped. The resultant form had qualities of the knot mathematical model, thus affecting the circulation of the interior environment.

Opposite page: An evolutionary diagram (top) that demonstrates the processes of extrusion and cropping that led to the formation of the final building form. The set of six plans (bottom), beginning with the ground floor plan (top, left) and continuing upwards (clockwise.)


At right, opposite page: Photographs taken of a large section model of final museum form. The model was constructed out of bristol paper. Environmental effects created by the extrusion (changes in materiality, intersecting spaces) were explored using this modeling technique.


A A A A A A A A A A A A A

Il monumento di segrate, 1965. KS.

Casa d’abitazione a Milano/Gallaratese, 1970. KS. etate 80/1

etate 80/2

I H G

Pile foundation for lightness with theatre, 1980.

F

KS.

E Il cubo di cuneo, 1962. KS.

C

etate 80/3

etate 80/4

A

Rossi Reproductions Crit: Kelly Bair, Paul Preissner, Fall 2011 Critical Drawing Exercise, First Year Graduate Studio. Le cabine dell’Elba, 1975. KS.

etate 80/5

La casa dello studente di Chieti, 1976. KS. etate 80/6

etate 80/5

Drawing Set 1: the copy. A reproduction of Aldo Rossi’s set of 12 drawings from the Summer of 1980. Adherence to Rossi’s precise use (or misuse) of perspective, repetitive elements, and shading types. Through the act of copying the work of Rossi, a true understanding of his drawing technique is achieved. Drawing Set 2: the simulacra. Aldo Rossi’s precise use of perspective, repetition, and irregularity allows one to infer what exists on the opposite side of each drawing from the Summer of 1980. A worm’s eye perspective view reveals the reverse side of each image.

Le case sul Ticino, 1975. KS.

etate 80/7

Il portico di Modena, 1977. KS. etate 80/8

Drawing Set 3: the interpretation. Although Aldo Rossi’s work was pre digital and seemingly lacks the complexity of curved surfaces, he had a strong interest in that process of design. Drawing no. 01/12 is used as a shell in which the interior is manipulated using digital techniques. The result is a rectilinear exterior with a curvilinear interior; both communicate Rossi’s emphasis on repetition and irregularity.

Le case di Bergamo, 1979. KS.

La scuola di Broni, 1978. KS.

etate 80/9

etate 80/10

At right: Drawing Set 1. Opposite page: Drawing Set 2 (left) and Drawing Set 3 (right).

01

Teatro Veneziano, 1979.

KS. etate 80/11

Porta a Venezia, 1980. KS. etate 80/12


A A A A A A A A A A A A A

Il monumento di segrate, 1965. KS.

Il monumento di segrate, 1965. KS.

one a Milano/Gallaratese, 1970.

A A A A A A A A A A A A A

A A A A A A A A A A A A A

Casa d’abitazione a Milano/Gallaratese, 1970. KS.

etate 80/2 etate 80/2

etate 80/1

CasaCasa d’abitazione a Milano/Gallaratese, 1970.1970. d’abitazione a Milano/Gallaratese, KS. KS.

Casa d’abitazione a Milano/Gallaratese, 1970. KS.

etateetate 80/180/1

etate 80/1

_01

_01

SCALE 01_SMALL

_02

_02

I Pile foundation for lightness with theatre, 1980.

Pile foundation for lightness with theatre, 1980.

KS.

KS.

H

SCALE 03_LARGE

G F

_03

_03

_04

_04

E

bo di cuneo, 1962.

C

Il cubo di cuneo, 1962. KS.

e 80/3 etate 80/4

Le cabine dell’Elba, 1975. KS.

0/5

Le cabine dell’Elba, 1975. KS. La casa dello studente di Chieti, 1976. KS. etate 80/6

A

etate 80/5

SCALE 02_MEDIUM

Casa d’abitazione a Milano/Gallaratese, 1970. KS.

etate 80/4 etate 80/3

PROCESS DIAGRAM_AXON

etate 80/1

PROCESS DIAGRAM_SECTION

SCALE 01_SMALL

01_SINGLE INTERSECTION

SCALE 03_LARGE

02_MULTIPLE INTERSECTIONS

SCALE 02_MEDIUM

03_MERGED INTERSECTION

La casa dello studente di Chieti, 1976. KS. etate 80/6

EXPLODED LAYERS

LAYER 07_PLAN

SECTION 01

SECTION 05

SECTION 02

SECTION 06

LAYER 06_PLAN

LAYER 05_PLAN

LAYER 04_PLAN

SECTION 03

SECTION 07

SECTION 04

SECTION 08

LAYER 03_PLAN

Le case sul Ticino, 1975. KS.

etate 80/7

LAYER 02_PLAN

Le case sul Ticino, 1975. KS.

08 07 06 05

Il portico di Modena, 1977. KS.

etate 80/7

etate 80/8

LAYER 01_PLAN

LAYER 07_PLAN SECTION 01

LAYER 06_PLAN

SECTION 02 LAYER 05_PLAN

LAYER 04_PLAN SECTION 03

LAYER 03_PLAN

SECTION 04 LAYER 02_PLAN

Le case di Bergamo, 1979. KS.

La scuola di Broni, 1978. KS.

etate 80/9

etate 80/10

La scuola di Broni, 1978. KS.

04 03 02 01

etate 80/10 LAYER 01_PLAN

Porta a Venezia, 1980. KS. etate 80/12

02

Teatro Veneziano, 1979.

KS.

etate 80/11

Porta a Venezia, 1980. Teatro Veneziano, 1979. KS. etate 80/12

KS. etate 80/11

03


2

3

4

Rossiville Crit: Kelly Bair, Paul Preissner, Fall 2011

1

5

Critical Drawing Exercise, First Year Graduate Studio. 6

The proposal. In a town composed of Aldo Rossi’s archetypical forms, an elementary school must be designed. Based upon Rossi’s design processes and the surface constructions from drawing problem no. 03, the school addresses interior and exterior conditions at multiple scales. In the design for the elementary school, program is inserted in and around perforations that form when two surfaces intersect. These perforations serve as spaces for access, as well as places for programmatic interaction.

At right: The evolutionary diagram (top) on the site. The ground plane is copied in the vertical direction, then “push” and “pull” actions raise and lower the building form to allow for access and the creation of exterior spaces. A formal matrix (below) demonstrates possible perforation types. Opposite page: A series of plans (top) of the elementary school, viewed from ground to top (left to right). An interior render (middle) of the main entrance stair, which acts as an object within the large entrance lobby. An exterior elevation (bottom) depicts changes in transparency that occur across the facade as a result of the facade perforation system.


1 2 3 4 5 6 7

Gym/Multi-Purpose Core Circulation Stair Outdoor Recreation Space Main Entrance Stair Main Offices Gallery Perforation Above Playground 8 Large Classrooms 9 Small Classrooms 10 Bathroom 11 Rooftop Outdoor Recreation Space

10 2

7

2

9

2

5

3

8

9

8

9

6

8

11

11 10

8 9 9 8 8

1

4

9


Node Crit: Eric Carcamo, Rives Rash, Fall 2011 Architectural studio that focused on the design of small scale objects, Fourth Year Undergraduate. Project designed with Don Kalant, Jr.

Product design is a field that has a natural relationship to architecture. In this toy/machine/product design studio, there was complete freedom of choice in design development and process. For this project, the propelling force was the use of magnetic attraction. Magnetic attraction is typically linear in organization, therefore the goal of this design was to break out of that confining parameter. By developing a system of “dumb” components (have constant, fixed polarities and are made of a rigid material) and “smart” components (have constant polarities, yet made of a highly flexible material) it became possible to break away from a simple, linear organization. Through the combined use of these two categories of components, highly complex systems can be created. This project made use of advanced techniques in fabrication. The “dumb” components were produced on a 3-D printer, as well as cast in resin from custom molds. The “smart” components were all cast in a 40 shore rubber from custom molds. Once cured, the components are able to securely hold magnets in place.

At right: The “smart” components (top) with their corresponding 3D printed molds, and the “dumb” components (middle, bottom) with their corresponding rubber molds. Opposite page: A matrix (top) that illustrates the dimensions and specifications for each component. A series of photographs (bottom) that demonstrate the strength of the connections between the components. The endless possibilities for component aggregation allow them to be deployed in multiple scenarios.


NODE

COMPONENTS_specifications

S

NODE_top

COMPONENTS_connections

NODE_bottom

NODE_connection 1.25”

1.25” 1.00”

1.00”

.375”

.375”

1.25”

NODE_connection

1.50”

1.50”

.375”

.375”

ATTRACTOR_top 4.00”

NODE_NODE

NODE_NODE

.375”

SMALL_arm

SMALL_connection

SMALL_connection 1.00”

1.00”

4.00”

1.00”

.00”

1.00” NODE_S,M,L .375”

M

.375”

.375”

MEDIUM_arm

MEDIUM_connection

MEDIUM_connection 1.00”

5.50”

NODE_S,M,L 1.00”

1.00”

.375”

.375”

.375”

NODE_BEND

L

LARGE_arm

LARGE_connection

LARGE_connection 1.00”

7.00”

ATTRACTOR_bottom

4.00”

1.00”

1.00” ATTRACTOR_ATTRACTOR .375”

.375”

.375”

BEND

.375” BEND_arm

BEND_connection

4.00” 3.00”

BEND_connection 1.00”

.375”

1.00”

.375”

HAIR

NODE_HAIR HAIR_top

HAIR_bottom

HAIR_side

0.75”

.125”

.125”

NODE_ATTRACTOR

ATTRACTOR_connection 0.50”

0.75”

.375”

.375”

0.75”

ATTRACTOR Toy {Machine} -- Rives + Carcamo Studio Fall 2010 University of Kentucky, College of Design

Nodular Attraction

don kalant_katherine simson


Beer Sheba, Israel Day Care Center Paul Preissner Architects Design Team Competition proposal for a Day Care Center in Beer Sheba, Israel for Adults with Developmental Intellectual Disabilities, 2012.

The day care center proposal is meant to house 80 adults with developmental intellectual disabilities. The project is expected is to completed in three phases, therefore the planning had to allow for gradual construction of units. The units were to be categorized into two mother groups: the nursing mother group (larger) and the therapeutic mother group (small.) The aggregation and orientation of the mother group units allowed for different types of patient-caretaker interaction. The small towers of the units acted as light wells, thus adding to an interior environment of health and wellness.

At right: A formal diagram (top) that explains the positioning of the light wells in relation to the rest of the unit geometry. The light well’s orientation (middle) allows light to filter through the interior environment. Opposite page: Exterior rendering (top), ground plan (middle), and elevation (bottom) that illustrate the aggregation of the mother group units into a small community.

100 sq. m


Bioclimactic European School Paul Preissner Architects Design Team Competition proposal for a Bioclimactic European School in Crete, Greece, 2012.

The ambition for this project is to develop an architecture that ends the current phase of architectural iconography; a project that is not idol, nor symbol, nor performance art. The architecture of the buildings uses modest means, and clear communication between structure, material and volume to produce an effortless project of design which straddles architecture, art, and object design. Each building is built around a designed waffle slab supported by a perimeter of column trees, each leaning at slightly different angles to offer a more natural effect. The building then uses the clear and profound volume as a palate to express personality through the design of a large patterned facade system which incorporates glazing, tiling, and energyproducing materials into a singular identity. Each building is designed to provide hard, blunt edges to the exterior of the site, while curving at the center plaza to exact a change in atmosphere and invite interaction between the schools. While the general design of each building is similar, there are specific design differences based on the explicit purpose of each (administration, kindergarten, primary, and secondary.)

At right: Exterior renderings (top, middle, bottom) of the four school buildings, which create a plaza space in their intersection for the interaction of parents, students, and faculty. Opposite page: The four ground plans (top), seen in their orientation on the site. The west elevation (middle, left) and east elevation (middle, right) depict the grouping of the four buildings around a central space. The interior spaces (bottom) are articulated with a series of slanted columns.

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PROGRAM A-111

A-100

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A-104 A-105

A-107

S-106

A-101

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S-105 PROGRAM S-100 S-101A S-101B

RECEPTION OFFICE STORAGE

12

3 13 15

DEPUTY HEAD TEACHER OFFICE DEPUTY HEAD TEACHER OFFICE DEPUTY HEAD TEACHER OFFICE

8

S-108 COPIER ROOM - ARCHIVES ADMIN WAITING ROOM

25

S-109

STAFF RESTROOMS

8

S-110

VISITORS RESTROOMS

8

S-111

MULTI-PURPOSE HALL

290

S-112

CANTEEN RESTROOMS

55

S-114

THEATRE

125

S-115

THEATRE STORAGE

16

S-116

POOL

160

POOL STORAGE SPORTS STORAGE BOYS + GIRLS LOCKER ROOM

RESTROOMS WOMEN

15

MEN

15

21

35

A-107

ARCHIVES

A-108

PREMISE MANAGER'S OFFICE

25

A-109

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT OFFICE

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STORAGE

35

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MECHANICAL

35

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VICE DIRECTOR'S OFFICE

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ADMIINSTRATION BUILDING (PLAN)

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11

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12

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14

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STAFF ROOM/OFFICE

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ADMIN RECEPTION

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INDOOR GYMNASIUM

208

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ELECTROMECHANICAL GEAR ROOM

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ELECTROMECHANICAL GEAR ROOM

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GENERAL STORAGE

100

P121

GYMNASTICS STORAGE

20

P122

DISABLED TOILET

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PUPIL RESTROOMS P123 P124 P125 P126 P127

BOYS GIRLS VISITORS TOILET VISITORS TOILET THEATRE STAGE

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BACKSTAGE

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EAST SITE ELEVATION

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RECEPTION - WELCOME AREA HALL (MULTI-PURPOSE USE)

AREA (m2)

15 100

G102

DINING ROOM

50

G103

CLASSROOM

55

G104

CLASSROOM

55

G105

QUIET ROOM / NAPPING AREA

40

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HEAD TEACHER

15

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GENERAL TEACHING RESOURCES STORAGE

15

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BOILER ROOM

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National Museum of Afghanistan Paul Preissner Architects Design Team Competition proposal for the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan, Kabul, Afghanistan, 2012.

The competition proposal for the National Museum of Afghanistan reconsiders the method of the museum, which is dedicated to collections of historic artifacts and archeological evidence of past cultural moments. By allowing for the collection to be endlessly linear, and removing the separations between items in an era, eras in a past, and pasts within a culture, the museum incorporates a significant number of breakthroughs.

INTERNATIONAL ARCHITECTURAL IDEAS COMPETITION NATIONAL MUSEUM OF AFGHANISTAN 2012 Aerial Museum Perspective

UIC: V-25

As a member of the design team, my responsibilities ranged from initial formal strategies to program placement and circulation routes. I completed much of the organizational diagramming, which illustrated the concept of an uninterrupted circulation route that traveled throughout the museum collections. These diagrams led into the realization of the technical drawings.

At right: Exterior renderings (top, bottom) of the building and its facade. Interior rendering (middle) of museum collections; the sculpture stands adjacent to the main circulation routes. Opposite page: Circulation routes diagrams (top), which illustrate the ground floor, basement, and emergency circulation routes. These diagrams are realized in the final plans (bottom, left). The circulation INTERNATIONAL ARCHITECTURAL IDEAS COMPETITION NATIONAL MUSEUM OF AFGHANISTAN 2012 paths are integral to the museum experience, as seen Main Exhibition Hall Perspective in the interior render (bottom, right.)

MoD

Private Property

MoD

Mahmod Tarzi High School

To Afshar

School High ng To Dehmaza

Guard Tower

2F To

Afsh

ar

To

National Institute For Archaeology

High Sch ool Deh maz ang

BM-3 N=3814100.67m E=511082.19m Z=1831.87m

Apricot Almond To Afshar

School High ng To Dehmaza

Peach

2F Guard Tower

= 90.82m

0

Distance

0

MoD AIR FORCE

2 gro inch und pip to es und gar den er

Area B = 34,498m2 BM-5 N=3814070.74m E=510947.34m Z=1832.03m

1F

Pool

water pump house

2 inch pipes under ground to pool

1F Police Office

er

0

0

0

Damaged Building

s und den pipe gar to

2 inchund gro

BM-4A N=3814051.57m E=511046.70m Z=1832.04m

Area A = 16,000m2

1F

BM-2 N=3814034.12m E=511106.04m Z=1832.00m ang

Railway Locomotives

1F

water pump (GWL = 11m)

ground under

pressure tank

cable

Container Royal Automobiles

power

BM-6A N=3813967.65m E=510878.31m Z=1835.01m

BM-6 N=3813961.37m E=510968.87m Container Z=1832.92m 1F

1F Damaged Building

Nabi

Asphalt

Road

ce =

90.82

Train

1F

m Power

Over

under

ground

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Head

Line(Volta

ge High

BM-7 N=3813933.55m E=510979.72m Z=1832.94m

2F

W.C BM-1 N=3813954.00m E=511067.00m Z=1832.58m

1F

Container

Asphalt

3phase)

power

cable

under

2F Guard Tower

ground

To Sharak

Haji

Nabi

ng To Dehmaza

Road

Darul Aman Palace

Power

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Head

Line (Low

Voltage

3phase)

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5

10

20

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Haji

ng To Dehmaza

pipes

To Gule

0

Distan

To Sharak

water

Department of Museology and Dining room 1F

2F

Animal Clinic

0

6.61m ce=17 Distan Aman To Darul School High To Afshar

1F

n

Underground pressure tank house with old dry well water is taken from nearby well . Power supply for well pump : HP3 220V 17Amp

Container

Damaged Building

1F

l Ama

Kitchen

Administration 1F Office

Daru

1F Damaged Building

Volleyball Field

Corn Field

To

Damaged Building

Damaged Building

Corn Field

To

BM-4 N=3814015.32m E=511019.94m Z=1832.04m

1F

Deh maz

1F

50M

UIC: V-


Visitor

Admin

Admin

Ground Floor Circulation

Basement Circulation

Loading

Emergency Evacuation Emergency Vehicle

Visitor Admin

Lecture Hall

Library

Temporary Gallery

Gallery

Temporary Gallery

Temporary Gallery

Temporary Exhibtion Storage

Lift

Exhibition Public Space Exhibition Support Storage

Loading WC

Staff Room

Admin

Collections Department

Loading

Crating/Uncrating

Exhibition Preparation

Exit

Conservation + Supplies

Storage

Circulation Section

INTERNATIONAL ARCHITECTURAL IDEAS COMPETITION NATIONAL MUSEUM OF AFGHANISTAN 2012 Circulation Diagrams / Emergency Plan

2

UIC: V-25

3

G

F H

C E

B I

G117 G101

G102

G100

G118

G104 D

G116

G115

G103

G110

c d

G100

ENTRY / FOYER

290 m 2

G101

CLOAKROOM

35 m 2

RESTROOMS

120 m 2

G102

b G111

a

G105

G114 G109 G113 A

G108

G103

MECHANICAL / JANITORIAL

40 m 2

G104

EMERGENCY / FIRST AID

8m 2

G105

EXPANSION GALLERY SPACE

325 m 2

G106

CAFE

G107

LIBRARY

G108

LECTURE HALL

G109

TEMPORARY EXHIBITION GALLERY

150 m 2

G110

INNER COURTYARD / SEATING AREA

340 m 2

G111

MAIN HALL

700 m 2

G112

PERMANENT COLLECTION GALLERIES

1900 m 2

325 m 2 120 m 2 95 m 2

C

STONE AGE

A: B

G106

G107 G112 A

BRONZE AGE

175 m 2

ARCHAEMENID

165 m 2

D:

GREAT KUSHANS

205m 2

E:

EARLY ISLAM

205m 2

F:

TIMURID DYNASTY

205m 2

G:

ETHNOLOGY COLLECTION

210m 2

H:

CONTEMPORARY

210m 2

I:

TEMPORARY EXHIBITION GALLERIES

G114

TEMPORARY STORAGE

45 m 2

JANITORIAL

20 m 2

G116

0

5

10

Ground Floor Plan - Scale: 1:500

450 m 2

A

150 m 2

B

150 m 2

C

150 m 2

RESTROOMS

30 m 2

G117

STORAGE

20 m 2

G118

RESTROOMS

30 m 2

40

80

UIC: V-25 3

INTERNATIONAL ARCHITECTURAL IDEAS COMPETITION NATIONAL MUSEUM OF AFGHANISTAN 2012

2

20

75 m 2

EXPANSION SPACE

G113

G115

pt

200m 2

B: C:

06

B111

E

D C

B103

B

B104

A

B112

B102

c

B105

d

B100

B101 B110

b

B109

a B122

B106

B100

ADMINISTRATION RECEPTION

22 m 2

B101

CONFERENCE / TRUSTEES ROOM

39 m 2

B102

CENTRAL IT ROOM

36 m 2

B103

OFFICE SUPPLY AND PUBLICATIONS STORAGE

49 m 2

B104

VARIOUS DEPARTMENTS

110 m 2

A: FINANCE DEPARTMENT

27 m 2

B: MARKETING / COMMUNICATION DEPARTMENT

27 m 2

B108

B117

B107

B116

B124 B120 B119

B118

27 m 2 30 m 2

E: EXHIBITION DEPARTMENT

B121 B123

27 m 2

C: EDUCATION DEPARTMENT D: MEMEBRSHIP / DEVELOPMENT

B113

B111

B115

B114

0

5

INTERNATIONAL ARCHITECTURAL IDEAS COMPETITION NATIONAL MUSEUM OF AFGHANISTAN 2012

10

20

40

B105

DIRECTORATE

60 m 2

B106

COLLECTIONS DEPARTMENT

164 m 2

B107

STAFF ROOM + KITCHENETTE

B108

RESTROOMS

B109

RESTROOMS

75 m 2

B110

NON-PUBLIC (ADMINISTRATIVE) COURTYARD

196 m 2

88 m 2 74 m 2

B111

COLLECTIONS STORAGE

1325 m 2

B112

COLLECTIONS STORAGE

3600 m 2

B113

LOADING

130 m 2

B114

SERVICE YARD

B115

CRATING / UNCRATING

117 m 2

B116

SHIPPING OFFICE

53 53 m 2

B117

OBJECT INSPECTION

53 m 2

B118

EXHIBITION PREPARATION

B119

RESTROOMS

24 m 2

B120

CONSERVATION / RESTORATION LAB + CONSERVATION MATERIALS SUPPLY

75 m 2

B121

DIRTY / WET WORKSHOP

50 m 2

75 m 2

B122

SECURITY CONTROL ROOM

51 m 2

B123

CASES STORAGE

57 m 2

B124

MECHANICAL

398 m 2

80

15


Helsinki Central Library /the NEW FRIEND Paul Preissner Architects Design Team Competition proposal for the Helsinki Central Library, Helsinki, Finland, 2012.

The design for the Helsinki Central Library incorporated multiple programmatic spaces, besides the library programs: restaurant, cafe, bookstore, conference space, and sauna. The incorporation of public programs within the library creates a space of activity and community focus. The building’s form references an artificial landform through its mountain characteristics, thus adding to the city of Helsinki’s image. The peaks of the “mountains” lend themselves to be places for public gathering and offer views of the surrounding urban fabric.

At right: Exterior renderings (top, middle, bottom) of the building form, illustrating the peaks and the graphic stripes that indicate material change. Opposite page: (Clockwise from top left) Building plans, interior rendering of main lobby, view from sauna out to the city, Interior rendering of main circulation space, building elevations, and building sections.

SITE PLAN SCALE 1:2000


PLAN / LEVEL +1 SCALE 1:200

PLAN / LEVEL GROUND(ENTRY) SCALE 1:200

PLAN / LEVEL B1 SCALE 1:200

SECTION A SCALE 1:200

SECTION B SCALE 1:200

SECTION C

SECTION D

SCALE 1:200

SCALE 1:200

EAST ELEV SCALE 1:200

FILM COATED GLASS GLAZED CERAMIC TILE MATTE CERAMIC TILE

WEST ELEV SCALE 1:200

NORTH ELEV SCALE 1:200

SOUTH ELEV SCALE 1:200


Ballooning Fabricated with Angela Co, Don Kalant, Fall 2010 Installation for the New Faculty Show as the LOT Gallery, Lexington, KY.

Ballooning was designed by Angela Co, Lecturer at the University of Kentucky College of Design for the New Faculty Show at the LOT gallery in Lexington, KY. I assisted in fabricating the balloons over a three week period; the process involved seaming metallized thermal plastic using an iron and wax paper. A series of tufting and seaming techniques allowed the balloons to be inflatable, as well as structural. Once inflated, the metallized thermal plastic is electrically charged, thus allowing the balloons to be responsive to touch, etc. The process that was used in the creation of Ballooning was extremely low-tech, however it created a very high-tech result. This project, along with the entire New Faculty Show, commented on the current pressure for designers to develop both creative and economical design practices in a constantly changing society that is based on globalization and technological transformations.

At right, opposite page: Images on the balloons on display and being interacted with at the LOT Gallery.


Comprehensive Portfolio  

Academic and Professional Work 2011-2012

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