Issuu on Google+

2010 

Skills Training in the  Workplace  Report of the ILO/SKILLS‐AP/Japan/DSD  Thailand National Technical Workshop and  Study Programme on Skills Training in the  Workplace DSD, Bangkok, Thailand, 23‐24  March 2010 

Office of Instructor and Training Technology Development  Department of Skills Development  1/1/2010


SKILLS TRAINING IN THE WORKPLACE  Report of the ILO/SKILLS­AP/Japan/DSD Thailand National Technical  Workshop and Study Programme on Skills Training in the Workplace  DSD, Bangkok, Thailand  23­24 March 2010


Foreword  Skills  training  in  the  workplace  are  of  increasing  importance  because  the  enterprise knows the best what type of skilled workers it needs. The Department of  Skills Development (DSD), therefore jointly with the ILO Regional Office for Asia  and  the  Pacific  (ROAP)  organized  the  workshop  on  Skills  Training  in  the  Workplace, on 23­24 March 2010 at the Pakorn Angsusingh Room, DSD building.  The  main  objective  was  to  enhance  knowledge  of  skills  development  in  the  workplace  among  the  employee,  the  employer  and  the  government  through  discussion  and contribution  of  their  experiences  for  benefits  of  the  enterprise  and  workers.  The  Japanese  government  provided  US  $  7,000  support  funding.  Participants  comprised  29  DSD  officials  who  have  been  implementing  the  Skills  Development  Promotion  Act.  B.E.  2545,  8  representatives  from  the  employer  organizations, 10 representatives from the employee organizations and 59 observers  who are the DSD officials, bringing the number of total attendants to 105 persons.  The  workshop  was  the  forum  for presentation  by the  ILO  (ROAP)  experts,  the Japanese expert, representatives from the employer and employee organizations  and DSD executives as well as group discussions covering 11 topics. This report is  the  effort  to  conclude  the  essence  of  all  articles  and  outcomes of  group discussion  with  an  aim  to  promote  effective  implementation  of  the  Skills  Development  Promotion Act, B.E. 2545 at workplaces.  The report has been successfully produced with collaboration contributed by  the Office of Instructor and Training Technology Development and the experts team  of  the  ILO  Regional  Office  for  Asia  and  the  Pacific.  The  Department  of  Skills  Development highly appreciates this contribution. We do hope that the report of the  workshop on “Skills Training  in the Workplace”  will  serve as the  guideline  for all  relevant parties to further promote training at the enterprise level. 

(Mr. Nakorn Silpa­archa)  Department of Skills Development  April 2010


Contents  Foreword………………………………………………………………………  Introduction……………………………………………………………………  Inaugural session………………………………………………………………  Introduction to Skills Development and Competency Based Training……….  Workplace learning –ILO perspective and international trends….…………...  Workplace Learning :Japan case  Skills development in the workplace: how it is operated in Thailand….……..  Training and skills assessment in the workplace…………………………......  Core skills/Key skills in the workplace…………………………………….....  Social dialogue and partnerships to support workplace learning…….…….....  Group discussion: How can workplace learning are supported by  government, workers organizations and employers organizations…………..  Designing teaching, learning and Assessment Resources to Support  Workplace Learning……................................................................................  Training of trainers and assessors­International experiences……….…………  Group Discussion: Training the tra  iner…………………………….....……….  Appendix I: Programme ….…………………………..…………………….....  Appendix II: Background paper ………………………….…………………...  Appendix III: Pictures ……………………………….………………………..  Appendix IV: List of Participants …………………………………………..... 

page  i  1  2  4  6  9  18  20  22  24  30  32  34  35  37  40  53  54


Introduction  Background Report for the opening of the Workshop on Skills Training in the  Workplace on Tuesday, 23 March 2010, at 09.00 hrs. (Mr.Sundot Temswanglert, the  Director, Office of Instructor and Training Technology Development)  On behalf of the workshop organizers and participants on “Skills Training in  the  Workplace”  I  would  like  to  express  my  appreciation  for  the  honour  you  have  kindly come to preside over the opening ceremony of this seminar today.  This  workshop  has  been  planned  for  March  23­24,  2010  by  Department  of  Skills Development jointly with the ILO Asia Pacific Regional Office. The Japanese  government has kindly provided supporting funds. The main objectives are:  1. Promoting knowledge and understanding of benefits that shall be gained by  the tripartite stakeholders who are the employee, employer and particularly  involved  DSD officials with direct responsibility in this matter.  2. Enabling opportunity for tripartite discussion and exchange of view points,  including various workplace training experiences.  The  seminar  themes  and  topics  have  been  designed  with  full  collaboration  from ROAP, aiming to achieve the set objectives. Leading topics for presentation and  discussion are to enhance understanding in skills development and competency based  training,  ILO  perspectives  and  international  trends  with  the  case  study  on  skills  development at enterprise levels from Japan and Thailand. Other relevant presentation  shall cover skills training and job assessment system to promote workplace learning,  training  of  trainers  and  assessors  from  international  experiences  etc.  Apart  from  presentation  by  the  ILO  expert  team,  participants  will  work  in  smaller  group  discussion  for  which  the  outcomes  will  be  presented  at  the  respective  plenary  sessions.  The  expert  and  facilitator  team  comprises  of  the  speakers  from  ROAP,  Japan, DSD executives and executives of the employer and employee organizations.  Conference  interpretation services will be provided to ensure understanding for both  speakers and participants throughout.  The  participants  are  executives  from  the  employer  and  the  employee  congresses,  DSD  executives  from  the  central  office  and  12  regional  skills  development  institutes  including  the  director  of  the  skills  development  division  and  relevant officials and the heads of various DSD sections, totaling 80 persons. They are  however,  categorized  as 50 participants,  20 observers  (DSD  officials)  and  10 of  the  experts,  speakers  and  facilitators  team.  We  will  forward  the  seminar  reports  to  all  attendants in the due time.  I  would  like  now  to  invite  the  Director  General  of  the  Department  of  Skills  Development to kindly address the opening of the Workshop on Skills Training in the  Workplace.


Inaugural Session  Opening  Address  by  Mr.  Nakorn  Silpa­archa,  Director­General  Department  of  Skills  Development  for  National  Workshop  on  Skills  Training  in  the  Workplaceon  Tuesday,  23  March 2010, 09.00 hrs. at Pakorn Angsusingh Room, 10 th Floor, DSD Building. 

It  is  indeed  my  great  pleasure  and  honour  to  be  invited  to  preside  over  the  opening of the workshop on skills training in the workplace, jointly organized by the  ILO Asia Pacific Regional Office (ROAP) and the Department of Skills Development  (DSD).  Amidst  globalization  workforces  in  various  enterprises  are  facing  the  challenge  of  new  working  systems  introduced  by  the  free  trade  and  fast  changing  technologies.  This  is  because  many  workplaces  continue  to  employ  workers  with  traditional  skills  for  their  production.  Therefore  skills  development  is  one  of  the  required  factors  to  improve  capacity  of  the  workforce  and  to  enhance  adjustment  towards  the  use  of  new  technology.  Skills  development  at  the  enterprise  level  has  proved  to  be  one  of  the  most  effective  measures  to  improve  worker’s  capacity  as  needed by the company. The employer or the workplace knows the best who should  be  trained,  how  the  training  should  be  and  for  how  long,  and  for  what  specific  purposes etc. More importantly, workplace training can be easily provided due to high  flexibility  without  employee’s  traveling  to  acquire  it  anywhere  else.  Training  schedules  can  be  prepared  for  the  appropriately  chosen  time.  These  evident  benefits  have  been  the  strategic  basis  for  promotion  of  skills  development  at  the  workplace  since  2002.  The  government  adopted  the  Skills  Development  Promotion  Act,  B.E.  2545 and announced the enforcement as of 29 January 2003. Implementation by the  effort of DSD for more than four years by now through promotion of skills training at  various workplaces with different courses including preparation for recruitment, skills  upgrading and training for new jobs, however, indicates room for continual achieving.  The  government  has  introduced  the  incentive  taxation  measure  to  allow  100%  exemption of tax for skills training investment in addition to other benefits prescribed  by  the  Skills  Development  Promotion  Act,  B.E.  2545.  Nevertheless  some  35%  of  enterprises  hiring  100  employees  and  over  are  still  found  lacking  compliances  with  the  compulsory  practice  for  providing  skills  training  to  their  workforce.  Certain  workplaces  are  ignoring  the  law  while  a  portion  of  them  prefer  contribution  to  the  skills development fund rather than workplace training as legally required.  The  aforementioned  problems  are  normal  incidents  at  the  launching  of  state  measurement.  Once  all  stakeholders  realize  how  much  they will  gain in  the  term  of  legal  compliance  benefits  avoidance  will  certainly  reduce.  For  instance,  if  they  foresee  the  positive  image  of  a  corporate  that  upholds  training  commitment  for  workers  with  intention  to  keep  qualified  personnel  while  the  trained  employees  feel  that they are of a higher value.  The workshop on skills development by training in the workplace is therefore  a good opportunity to provide better knowledge and understanding in more details to  both the employer and employee. I do hope that it will be of great tripartite benefits  gaining from exchanges of new ideas toward capacity building for higher productivity 2 


of our  national  workforce  at  the  entrance  of  the  competitive  global  market.  I  would  like  to  express  my  appreciation  to  the  ILO  Asia  Pacific  Regional  Office,  the  expert  team,  the  Japanese  government  who  provides  funding  and  the  Japanese  speaker  to  ensure  enlightenment  of  this  matter  jointly  with  the  Department  of  Skills  Development.  Now  it  is  the  auspicious  moment  for  me  to  announce  the  opening  of  the  successful  workshop on  “Skills Training  in  the  Workplace;  with  my wishing  for  all  achievements. 

Speaking notes for Mr Bill Salter, Director SRO Bangkok  ILO/Japan/DSD National Technical Workshop and Study Programme on Skills Training in  the Workplace DSD, 23­24 March, 2010  On behalf of the ILO Office for Asia and the Pacific, I am pleased to welcome  you to  this National Technical Workshop and Study Programme on Skills Training in  the Workplace.  Let  me  begin  by  expressing  my  thanks  to  the  Department  of  Skills  Development for their efforts in organizing this meeting and to our tripartite partners  for  taking  time  to  attend  this  workshop  and  contribute  to  the  discussions  of    this  important topic of workplace learning.  In  this  increasingly  competitive  nature  of  the  economy  and  world,  the  demographic,  occupational  and  technological  changes  have  changed  the  views  on  education  and  training.  Education  and  training  is  increasingly  seen  as  a  broader  system  involving  not  just  educational  institutions  but  workplaces,  enterprises,  a  variety of  government and community organizations and individuals. These  changes  have  also  meant  that  the  skill  levels  of  the  employees  must  be  continuously  developed, a lifelong learning process. ILO’s Recommendation on Human Resources  Development  No.  195  recognizes  this  and    stressed  that  enterprises  play  an  increasingly  central  role  in  enhancing  the  investment  in  training  and  continuing  workplace­based learning and training since governments cannot at all times provide  all the technical training needed by a nation’s workforce.  A  highly  controversial  issue  frequently  faced  by industries  and  employers  is  skills  mismatch.  Employers  are  often  faced  with  the  problem  of  not  getting  the  workers they need or find that their skills are not appropriate to the job requirements.  One  way  to  address  this  is  to  increase  dialogue  at  all  levels  and  for  employers  to  develop new effective partnerships with training organizations at local levels and also  to  become  involved  at  regional  and  national  policy  levels  to  ensure  that  training  is  relevant.  Employers  can  also  use  this  time  to  help  upgrade  the  skills  of  trainers  in  training organizations by providing  work experience opportunities or other mutually  beneficial arrangements.  The current economic downturn also provides an opportunity for employers to  review  their  approach  to  workplace  learning.  Learning  in  the  workplace  is  always  taking place and it is in the employer’s best interest to ensure that correct things are  learned and that workers can become multi­skilled which will thereby reduce the need  for supervision and increase quality. 3 


The  workplace  is  a  good  place  for  enterprises  to  develop  good  labour­  management  relations  which  can  also  increase  productivity  and  create  decent  work.  Management  and  workers  representatives  must  encourage  the  workers  to  focus  on  self­improvement  which  will  also  enhance  enterprise  performance.  Employers  and  workers  can  address  skills  development  through  a  process  of  social  dialogue  in  the  workplace.  As  a  whole,  the  government,  workers  and  employers  and  society  in  general must create a culture of learning and meeting the challenges of change.  Thailand I am sure, will have rich experiences to present and share. I hope that  this  two­day  workshop  will  provide  everyone  an  opportunity  to  learn  new  developments and discuss views through your active participation.  I wish you all productive deliberations! 

Introduction  to  Skills  Development  and  Competency  Based  Training;  (by  Mr. Ray Grannall)  This topic will cover 3 areas for discussion which are:  1.  ILO policy and concept on prioritization of workplace learning.  2.  Questions  on  the  state  roles  to  promote  workplace  learning  through  cooperation  between  the  public  sector,  employer  and  employee  organizations.  3.  Introduction  of  competency  based  training;  a  case  study  from  Philipines  where the government center plays the leading role.  The framework under the ILO Recommendation No. 195, 2004 focuses on the  role  of  employer  to  conduct  workplace  training  and  promote  learning  opportunity  which is not new but needs official promotion. Trainings are generally observed as the  role of education institutes without realization of what workers can learn everyday at  the workplace.  The  ILO  Asia  Pacific  Regional  Office  covers  33  regional  member  states  is  promoting  workplace  learning  and  training  under  the  national  legal  framework  on  social protection, child labour and skills development with inclusion of the disabled.  Each country can set priority of this matter within the national action plans. ILO has  launched this programme in January 2010 for a continual phase of 3 years.  The  ROAP  programme  for  skills  development  and  employment  opportunity  focuses on the national system to provide formal trainings, promotion of competency  based training and enhancement of employability in each country. Workplace learning  is very important, especially in the informal economy and employment where people  needs  self  development  for  higher  quality  living.  In  the  formal  sector  with  various  labour markets it is not evident how the trained persons are employed. We are trying  to  improve  employability  for  the  trained  workforce  in  this  region  to  ensure  hiring  opportunity without miss matching. This will as  well  includes the disabled for skills  development and employment opportunity.  Several  countries  in  ROAP  constituency  are  sharing  problems  of  underemployment  and  unemployed  while  shortage  of  skilled  workers  is  still  found due  to  mismatched  training.  Two  years  ago  we  organized  a  training  in  Korea  where  many  countries  considered how to satisfy employer’s and employee’s needs by proper skills training. 4 


Lacking required facilitators and trainers with certain skills and experiences in certain  fields  is  really  a  serious  problem  faced  by  some  workplace  trainings  while  the  classroom  situation  is  better  equipped.  However  our  commitment  is  to  promote  capacity of workplace training. In Thailand vocational training is still regarded as the  role  of  vocational  schools  and  collages,  and  perhaps  not  by  the  ministry  of    labour.  This  has  caused uncertainty  whether  vocational  trainings  can  be  provided  externally  although  it  is  quite  possible  with  gaining  benefits.  Nevertheless  cooperation  from  several parties is needed to ensure the standard of classroom learning. At present there  is a study covering these there issues in line with the first priority to establish training  organizations.  Integrated  efforts  are  made  by  several  ministries  i.e.  the  ministry  of  education,  labour,  agriculture, public  health  and  sports  so that  required  trainings  are  properly provided to ensure employment for trainees. Education improvement is made  by communication and exchanges of ideas among various training organizations and  workplaces.  Competency  based  training  is  to  be  conducted  by  the  workplace.  More  importantly  the  government  must  put  the  national  policy  on  skills  development  in  coherence  with  the  national  development  framework  to  ensure  employment  linkage  and realization of training benefits. Regarding these three issues questions should be  raised on the role of government, the employer and employee  in training. Dialogues  are needed to ensure clear understanding among the three parties since it is impossible  that  trainings  provided  by  the  government  would  perfectly  suit  the  need  of  the  employer.  Effective  cooperation is as  well  required  from the  employer  in  providing  various skills trainings.  Thailand  is  one  of  the  countries  that  observe  such  practice.  Singapore  concentrates  on  ensuring  that  each  individual  acquires  at  least  one  needed  skill  to  enter  the  labour  market.  The  government  must  at  least  provide  literacy  and  numeration skills to all citizen as a basic employability standard. The next question is  on  preparation  for  approximately  10% of  the  population  who  are disabled.  Thailand  has  disabled  persons  of  a  substantial  figure.  Whether  it  is  possible  to  offer  them  employment  opportunity  without  discrimination.  Many  studies  have  revealed  that  once being hired the disabled are among the best employees. They want to keep their  jobs  and prove  that  they  are  as  able  as  their  non­disabled  colleagues.  This  matter  is  very important for this region, specifically at the time of economic crisis.  The  government must play the  leading role with certain  initiatives to operate  new training as well as retraining for laid off workers. Cooperation with other parties  are required if the government is not handling all things by itself. Certification may be  given  for  competency  based  trainings  adhered  to assessment  benchmarks  to  identify  level of obtained skills. At present several governments may ignore skills assessment  or certification while some recognize how important it is and take active involvement.  Therefore  the  government,  the  employer  and  employee  organizations  should  jointly  consider how workplace trainings and learning be promoted for higher effectiveness  through tripartite relations and partnership.  There  is  a  case  study  at  the  Philippines  training  center  which  provide  competency  based  skills  training  in  various  fields  to  ensure  qualified  performing  capacity for certain jobs. This includes safety awareness. The assessment procedure is  mainly to identify needed capacity and skills and is applicable for several occupations  in various industrial sectors. In Australia trainings are organized as packages while in  Phillipines they are rules and regulations of trainings. There are hundreds of manuals 5 


on standardized knowledge and skills pertaining required competency based trainings  to ensure communication ability, team working, quality services for clients in the case  of  restaurants  etc.  Lists  of  required  qualifications  are  composed  in  details  of  15  packages. Some are of promoting standards while the others identify integrated skills  of  certain  competency  standards.  They  are  not  cirriculums  to  launch  training  according to specified phases of skills development for which assessment is required  for certification.  Vocational  trainings  for  women  in  Phillipines,  for  instance,  cooking,  restaurant  services  and  other  specific  works  are  provided  with  well  –  planned  guidelines  to  identify  each  trainee’s  capacity  attached  with  monitoring  charts.  If  applicants  can  prove  that  they  have  acquired  certain  skills  they  will  be  granted  exemption for training. There is neither teacher nor student, but a facilitator to handle  learning charts, lessons and learning resources. Trainings can be provided by a trainer  or  working  colleagues  to  enable  theoretical  learning  alongside  skills  acquiring.  If  assessment  is  required  the  trainer  or  facilitator  will  serve  as  an  assessor  who  will  prepare  questionnaires  or  operational  tests  with,  may  be,  three  measuring  criteria.  Those  who  pass  such  a  test  will  receive  competency  certification.  But  there  is  no  failing as in the case of classroom examination for those who have to come back for  another  test.  Such  a  practice  avails  opportunity  for  trainees  to  attend  trainings  for  specific  skills  whenever  it  is  needed.  There  are  also  workshop  facilities  to  provide  special trainings in certain sectors, i.e. in the case where a group of six workers face  the  same  problems  in  their  working  lines. The  enterprise  will  then  send  them  to  get  training  from  a  learning  center  or  any  training  organization  as  it  is  possible.  Or  otherwise  required  training  will  be provided  at  that  particular  working  site.  The  one  who has a better competency base may learn faster than those who have not. Trainees  of course start training  at the different  level of competency. We will  further discuss  this matter more in details. 

Workplace Learning – ILO perspective and international trends.  (by Mrs. Camela I. Torres).  Importance of workplace learning  At present changing technology does effect work performing approaches with  higher  complexity.  This  requires  continual  learning  for  the  enterprise,  employer  and  employee to catch up with and properly handle all facing changes. Such learning must  also responds to training needs of the industry with flexibility and versatility.  The following factors mark successes of learning organizations:  1. Commitment toward workplace training and learning to promote and  enhance training for workers and to maintain the trained workforce.  2. Integrated learning approaches to support production and businesses  by  formal  workplace  trainings  equipped  with  records  keeping  and  partnership  with  education and training organizations.  3. Literacy and numeration education as required by workers for which  the learning process is more important than testing and it should be properly provided  by the workplace.  4. Management process to respond to industrial needs with managerial  commitment to ensure learning and skills development for workers. 6 


Learning management  Systems  and  learning  structures  must  be  set  up  alongside  resources  development equipped with  supporting activities, new  skill training programmes  and  initiatives. Specific cooperation with various agencies should be acquired to conduct  workplace learning with planning for assessment.  Partnership for learning  It  is  crucial  to  ensure  quality  leaning  and  skill  training  under  the  TVET  training system to meet the needs and standards of the labour market. Partnership for  learning is also  important  for  promotion of services  development  of  new  markets  as  well as researches leading to better innovation. 

Benefits of partnership  1. Economic gains: increasing productivity and competitive advantages.  2. Social gains: social and cultural development for educated population.  3. Creation of roadmap for long term public services.  4. Promotion of new and improving agencies and effective processes to endure  working effectiveness.  5. Sharing of best practices.  6. Driving for reform in the business sector.  7. Launching of various TVET policies.  Examples of ILO research projects.  Challenges  against  small  enterprise’s  traditional  learning  and  training:  implementation of public policy.  Amidst  increasing  global  competition  workplace  learning  become  more  important for survival of small enterprises. Continual skills development is required to  enhance productivity of the international standards, value added products and opening  of  new  markets.  External  trainers  must  be  looked  for  to  ensure  the  most  effective  training provided to all personnel.  The surveys conducted in 2006 revealed that 70% of enterprises in Mauritius  gained 70% of learning at the workplace. State enterprises indicated that 30% of them  learned 90% of required knowledge at the workplace.  In  Thailand  surveys  found  70%  of  informal  on  the  job  learning  among  operators, 50% for supervisors and 20% for management.  The  said  survey  also  indicated  gradual  changing  of  perspective  on  learning  from the traditional models to on the job training where the learner gains valuable and  practical experiences. Therefore working reorganization always focuses on workplace  learning  to  serve  various  needs  depending  on  several  factors,  including  technology,  product,  competitive  strategies  and  especially  the  size  of  each  enterprise.  Research  outcomes  reveal  that  larger  enterprises  utilize  formal  trainings  with  clear  structure.  For instance,  approximately 22% of  larger enterprises  in  Mauritius rely  upon  formal  learning and training while only 5% of small enterprises provide workplace training.


Study on HPWO (High Performance Work Organizations)  Research  outcomes  highlight  trust  between  management  and  workers  as  the  most  important  factor.  Continual  learning  for  employees  needs  cooperation  and  partnership among all concerned parties. The public sector must enhance the coverage  policy  encompassing  training  and  learning  needs  to  strengthen  capacity  of  the  employer organization, employees and  workers with due consideration  of the size  of  each enterprise.  Examples of workplace learning  1.  Malaysia (Human Resource Development Fund (HRDF) )  There  is  a  fund  formed  by  contribution  of  salary  check  off  at  1%  from  companies hiring 10 employees and over. This fund enables the maximum return  of 75% for training expenditure (not more than the paid contribution) which meets  the approval procedure.  2.  Singapore (Skills Development Fund)  The fund is set up by contribution from salary check off at 1%. It provides up  to  30  –  70%  of  training  expenditure.  However  certified  skills  trainings  are  more  important than SDF since they can expand company trainings.  3.  Fiji (Training and Productivity Authority of Fiji (TPAF) )  The fund is set up by the employer contribution of 1% . Workers are allowed  to  claim  for  reimbursement  of  90%  maximum.  Larger  enterprises  make  more  claims  than  SMEs.  All  training  expenditures  are  covered  by  TPAF  without  support from the public sector.  4.  New Zealand Industry Training Programme (ITO)  There  are  more  than  40  ITOs  which  support  needs  assessment  for  company  trainings.  Contracts  are  signed  with  training  partners  for  workplace  learning,  internally or externally.  5.  United Kingdom (Sector Skills Councils)  It  started  as  the  national  ITOs  covering  various  industrial  sectors  prior  to  becoming  the  Sector  Skills  Councils.  Each  council  is  responsible  to  identify  needed competency and promote specific industrial trainings.  6.  Germany Dual System  It  composes  of  theoretical  learning  in  collages  and  on  the  job  training  at  workplaces. Many countries adopt the dual system as part of the national training  procedure.  7.  UK Trade Union Learning Programme.  The training project which set up by TUC is supported by the public funding.  The objective  is  to  promote  worker participation  in  learning,  especially  for  basic  skills training.  8.  Finland’s Training Programme.  It  is  mainly  competency  based  training  for  adults  comprised  with  20%  of  theoretical learning and 80% of workplace training.


9.  SME Training in Spain  Informal  training  is  provided  by  workers  with  reducing  workload  to  their  colleagues.  10. Sweden Advanced Vocational Training (AVT)  The  key  content  is  to  provide  analytical  skills  under  the  organized  system  to  handle  assigned  duty  and  responsibility.  This  approach  needs  high  level  supervision with required facility provided by the enterprise. 

Workplace Learning : Japan case.  Mr.  Nobuo  MATSUBARA,  Deputy­Director,  Overseas  Cooperation  Division,  Human  Resources Development  Bureau, Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare of Japan.  Human Resources Development Promotion Law  Japan has  adopted  the law on  promotion  of labour  capacity development  for  employees  in  various  organizations.  The  HRD  Promotion  Law  enacted  by  the  Ministry  of  Health,  Labour  and  Welfare  of  Japan  prescribes  for  human  resources  development requirement as follows:  Section 4:  Responsibility of the concerned parties which requires that:  The employer shall;  1.provide needed occupational training for employees,  2.provide  necessary  supports  to  enable  worker’s  opportunity  on  acquiring education, training or occupational tests etc.  The government and local government shall;  1.promote  human  resources  development  projects  organized  by  the  employer, 2.promote  vocational  education  and  trainings  (VET)  with  skills  assessment in various industrial sectors.  Section 6 :  Role of the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare of Japan  which are for;  Implementation  of  the  basic  plans  on  human  resources  development  by  providing  useful  suggestions  to  relevant  employer  organization;  ensuring  that  vocational trainings are conducted and supported by other measures to enhance skills  development for workers involved.  With suggestions given by the Labour Policy Council supports are provided to  various concerned organizations and persons including:  Supports for the employer which are;  1.  Funding  Type  a  :  The  Technical  and  Vocational  Education  and  Trainings  (TVET)  provided  by  the  employer  are  entitled  for  supporting  funds  provided  that  such  trainings are of; 9 


1)  definite objectives of vocational training,  2)  company’s internal HRD plans,  3)  Off­The  Job  Training  (OJT)  for  a  period  of  over  10  hours.The  funding  carries following conditions;  3.1)  accounting  for  one  fourth  of  necessary  expenditure  for  training  (one third for SME) and,  3.2)  accounting for one founth of wages throughout the training period  (one third for SME)  Type b. : Measurements to allow the employer to carry out various activities  including:  1.  permission  on  leave  for  the  employee  (more  than  one  month)  to  acquire skills development,  2. requirement on vocational skills testing for employees.  2.  Certified vocational trainings  The  aforementioned  law  also  provides  supports  to  the  employer  to  ensure  workplace  vocational  trainings  under  various  conditions  which can  be  concluded  as  follows:  1)  The  set  up  vocational  training  must  be  concurrent  to  the  required  criteria comprising of course title, duration, operating agency etc.  2)  One  third  of  the  occurring  expenditure  shall  be  subsidized  by  the  national and local government funding (two third is by contribution).  3) There were 1,254 private enterprise entitled for supporting funds for  various TVET courses in the budgetary year 2006.

10 


Example : The Employment Insurance System of Japan. 

Unemployment  Benefits.etc 

Detail of benefits 

Two types of  services  Detail of  services 

Fund  ­contributors (Equity)  Chair by employers and  employees 12/1000  ­some by the treasury 

(Purpose) To establish employment and promote  reemployment in cases where a worker lost and  income source by losing employment, where  difficulties were ousted for worker to continue  employment, or where worker voluntarily received  education training for occupations 

­Job applicants’ benefits – benefit for the unemployed  ­Employment promotion benefit­ benefit for those reemploy early  ­Education Training benefit­benefit for those voluntary receiving education/  training  ­Continue employment benefit­ benefit for those continuously employed  Fund  ­contributors  Employers only  3/1000 

(Purpose) Preventing unemployment correcting the  employment and enhancing employment opportunities,  and developing and enhancing worker abilities. 

1. Services for Employment Stabilization  ­support for employers  ­support for reemployment of employment applicants with and high urgency such  as the middle aged and elderly, etc.  ­support for employment of the youth and the females relating children  2. Service for HRD  ­Improvement of vocational training facilities  ­support of training for workers and job seekers  ­support for educational training provided by employers (sub aidless, etc.)  ­Promotion of the vocational ability evaluation system

Various expenditure covered by the employer for TVET can be concluded as shown  in the following chart. 

11 


Present trends of internal trainings by enterprises in Japan  Studies and researches on HRD in 2008 organized by the Ministry of Health,  Labour and Welfare of Japan covering 7,879 state enterprises and  19,869persons  revealed that :  1.  State  enterprise’s  HRD  policy  mainly  focuses  on  “Cooperation  and  responsibility”  “driving  by  the  production  line”  and  “targets  for  every  worker”. 2.  Self­development  is  a  part  of  occupational  development  and  promotion.  3.  70% of state enterprises are facing HRD problems.  4.  Problems  concerning  skills  transfer  due  to  retirement  of  the  workforce during the baby­boom era.  5.  Approximately  76.6%  of  businesses  have  to  provide  off­the  job  trainings for permanent employees.  6. Approximately  59.4%  of  businesses  operate  on­the  job  trainings  systematically for permanent employees in the budgetary year 2007.  7.  HRD  programmes  for  permanent  employees  are  recognized  as  “organization’s  responsibility”  by  64.2%  of  the  respondent  enterprises;  whereas 35.9% regarded them as “each employee’s responsibility”.  8.  Regarding  VET  programmes  for  permanent  employees  66.8%  of  respondent  enterprises  indicated  that  “Head  office  plays  the  leading  role”  while 33.2% of them identified “Line management” for leading role.  9.  Approximately  74.4%  of  enterprises  focused  on  “On­the  Job  Training” to provide VET programmes for permanent employees.  10. Approximately 54.4% of the companies (56.4% in 2006) focused on  “internal VET” to provide trainings for permanent employees whereas 45.6%  (43.7% in 2006) mainly provided for “external VET by other organizations.”  11. Among  the  90%  of  reporting  businesses  by  which  required  competency was  indicated  46.3%  (previously  41.5%) of  them  said  that  “we  informed our employees” while 42.2% (previously 45.4%) said “we informed  our employees at a certain level.”  12. Competency  assessment  was  conducted  by  60.3%  of  reporting  businesses.  13. For  qualification  certifying  (by  several  alternatives)  the  surveys  indicated  that  55.3%  used  “skills  testing”  as  the  judging  standards,  34.6%  mentioned “certification issued by the public  sector” and 33.3% pointed out  that  “certification  was  approved  and  issued  by  organizations  in  the  private  sector.”  14. Regarding  acknowledgement  on  required  competency  25.6%  of  permanent  employees  told  that  “we  have  been  sufficiently  informed”  while  51.9% said that “we  have been informed at a certain  level” which  indicated  that  as  many  as  77.5%  of  the  employees  were  informed  about  jobs  requirement.  15. There were 79.2% of businesses (previously 79.7%) saying that “we  have provided supports” for self­development of permanent employees.

12 


Designs to support workplace learning and resources for assessment  The figure below illustrates required vocational competency in various areas. 

Competency  is  a  composition  of  skills  and  knowledge  for  which  workers  acquire  from  training  and  working  experiences  plus  continual  development.  It  is  assessable  and  indispensable  for  all  workers,  for  instance,  positive  working  attitude,  motivation,  good  personality,  loyalty  to  organization  and  value.  We  can  enhance  capability  and  competency  for  all  workers  through  training  and  development  which  enable required vocational outcomes.  Competency assessment is a mean to indicate knowledge and skills earned by  a worker through training and workplace learning.  In  Japan  the  required  basic  competency  is  composed  of  basic  knowledge,  calculation ability, communication skills, team working and problem solving etc.

13 


14


15


16


17


Skills development in the workplace: how it is operated in Thailand.  (by M.L. Puntrik Smiti, Deputy Director General, Department of Skills Development,  Thailand).  The Thai government has announced the national policy on skills development  adhering  to  the  10 th  National  Economic  and  Social  Development  Plan  (2007­2010)  with following strategies for implementation:  1.  Enhancing  development for  all  Thai  people  and  the  society  at  large as  the  intellectual and learning nation.  2.  Enhancing  competency  and  skills  development  to  support  national  competitive advantages with increasing knowledge and skills.  3.  Creating  learning  and  training  systems  to  ensure  effective  productivity  based on thinking, analyzing,  creating, problem solving,  decision making, team  work  and ethical standards to enable adjustment toward modern technology and culture of  learning society.  The  government  announces  the  policy  “to  develop  and  train  workers  of  all  levels for required skills and standards determined by technology changing and needs  of  labour  markets  which  shall  be  possible  by  upgraded  capacity  of  skills  training  institutes and centers nationwide. Increasing participation of the private sector shall be  promoted  through  workplace  learning  with  integrated  skills  training  by  cooperation  between the public education institutes and the private sector”. Lifelong learning shall  be highlighted.  Worker development plans of the Ministry of Labour.  1. Recruitment and employment services as required by the labour market.  2.  Capacity  and  competency  enhancement  for  workforce  development  in  response to labour market demands.  3. Updating labour market information system.  The law on skills development  The  Labour  Development  Promotion  Act,  B.E.  2545  (2002)  promotes  workplace  participation  in  skills  development  by  prescribing  taxation  incentive  and  other benefits to support business owners.  Skills development by enterprise in Thailand.  1. At present:  ­ Trainings by the company (internal and external).  ­  Jointly  organized  trainings  with  the  public  agencies,  i.e.  Department  of  Skills Development, Department of Industrial Promotion.  ­ Jointly provided trainings with educational institutes such as Office of the  Vocational Education Committee.  ­ Jointly organized trainings with the employer council­employee congress.  2. Supports provided by the government.  ­ Funding, trainers and curriculums.  ­ Tax benefits as prescribed by the Skills Development Promotion Act, B.E.  2545. 18 


­  Full  reimbursement  for  training  expenditure  as  prescribed  by  the  aforementioned Act.  ­ Migrant skilled workers or experts are allowed for hiring as trainers.  ­ Exemption of import tax and VAT for training machinery and equipments.  Enterprises covered by Skills Development Promotion Act, B.E. 2545.  It  is  required  that  enterprise  hiring  100  employees  and  over  shall  provide  training for at least 50% of their workforce annually, according to the calendar year. If  trainings  have  not  been  organized  or  met  the  required  proportion  the  respective  enterprise shall make contribution to the labour skills development fund at the rate of  1%  of  wages  entitled  by  workers  for  whom  trainings  are  not  provided  as  legally  required. The enterprises which are obliged to make the said contribution shall submit  the payment form within March of the following year.  Supporting roles of the employer organization.  Promoting  working  capacity�� of  employees  by  having  them  attend  trainings  in  various  new  courses.  Providing  budget  to  support  capacity  building  courses  for  personnel of all levels.  Supporting roles of the employee organization.  Promoting employee’s participation in various capacity building courses while  having  its  representatives  attend  meetings  on  curriculum  discussion.  Acquiring  budgets to support various projects.  Training and employment systems.  Skills development at the enterprise level in Thailand composes of:  1.  Vocational  guidance  within  the  framework  of  the  Department  of  Employment.  2.  Vocational  training  systems  under  the  guidelines  provided  by  the  Department of Skills Development equipped with the manuals to satisfy needs of the  new entrants as well as those who want to upgrade their skills.  3. Training assessment verified by certification.  4.  Skills  testing  for  required  standards  by  measurement  of  knowledge,  skills  and working attitude according to the national standards or a specific standard verified  by certification.  Entrance to the employment system  1. Through the workplace training to secure employment.  2. Through training systems jointly organized with the workplace.  3.  Through  employment  services  provided  by  the  Department  of  Skills  Development.  4. Through direct entrance to the labour market.

19 


Training and skills assessment in the workplace.  (Mr. Ray Grannall: Regional Senior Specialist for Skills Development for Asia Pacific  Region)  Workplace Learning  Workplace  learning  can  be  provided  and  improved  at  all  times  with  proper  promoting  facilities.  If  both  the  employee  and  employer  appreciate  its  benefits  they  can effectively promote workplace learning.  Effective management of workplace learning  1.  Planning  for  effective  management  of  workplace  learning  equipped  with  assessment tools on learning progress.  2.  Organizing  tests  for  verification/certification  to  increase  employee’s  satisfaction.  Workplace  learning  will  enhance  employee’s  self  respect  and  confidence  while reducing  dissatisfaction  caused  by  workings  in  general  since  it  will  help  solve  facing  problems,  improving  services  for  customers  and  create  self­satisfaction  etc.  Good practices are observed  in the cases  of Toyota,  Mc  Donald and  Quantas where  workplace learning  is  entitled  for  certification.  Testing  is  required  for  verification  as  they are truly learning organizations.  Example of workplace learning management.  1.  Employees  are  firstly  assigned  to  work  on  the  easier  production  line  and  gradually  shifted  to  handle  more  difficult  job  with  increasing  complexity.  They  will  learn from working with the more experienced colleagues.  2.  Employees  are  working  as  a  team  and  learning  together.  In  Japan  the  Quality  Circle  (QC)  model  is  a  tool  for  group  learning  to  enable  discussion  and  experiences  sharing  among  team  members  on  how  to  improve  working  processes  to  improve productivity. Some organizations assign the more experienced workers to act  as trainers or mentors to support the others. In certain cases employees wear different  colour uniforms to identify their status; for instance, the assigned trainers are wearing  uniform.  3. Organizing short training courses  in the  workplace. For  instance, when  the  company  buys  a  new  machine  the  sale  representative  will  give  trainings  on  machine  operation equipped with working manuals and discussion on various working stages.  There  will  be  a  place  to  keep  all  those  documents  which  are  accessible  by  all  operators. 4. E­Learning sources are provided to facilitate additional self­learning by  concerned employees.  Workplace learning development  Creation  of  new  methodology  to  develop  workplace  learning  system  should  base upon following considerations:  1.  Study  working  models  and  procedure  from  supervisor’s  information  to  prepare the work operation chart, boards on working suggestion, manuals etc. There  should  be  a  space  to  collect  required  manuals  and  books  accessible  by  concerned  workers to support problems finding and solving.

20 


2. Identify required working skills and competency by training needs analysis,  including  attitude  toward  each  specific  position  so  that  the  employee  can  properly  adapt self­learning approaches.  3. Development  of  basic  skills are  very  crucial  so that  employees  can  further  increase their competency on top of basic literacy and numeration skills.  4.  Encourage  self­learning  through  several  means  to  promote  workplace  learning which include;  4.1. to name the employee of the month or the year,  4.2.to  provide  various  communication  media  i.e.  books,  VDO,  periodical  publication,  computerization  to  employees  for  updating  news  on  industrial  innovation,  4.3.  to  enable  employee  participation  in  various  industrial  seminars  and  trainings to ensure continual self­development,  4.4.  supervisors  are  not  always  good  trainers,  thus  assessment  on  training  capacity  is  required  as  well  as  providing  for  sufficient  and  modern  training  equipment,  4.5.  idea  sharing  among  employees  on  how  to  improve  workplace  learning  process which is the all time education to ensure need satisfaction trainings.  5.  Provide  training  for  supervisors  since,  according  to  the  speaker’s  observation on practices found in many countries, the supervisors are expected to  perform as effective  trainers for their sub­ordinates and mentors  for the new  comers  for which good communication and knowledge transferring skills are a must.  6. Rotation of positions and workplaces in the Pacific Iseland region is for a 3  year term for which planning to ensure linkages and the over all organization missions  are  required.  Proper  rotation  is  of  great  benefits  without  which  (i.e.  from  the  accounting section to an absolute irrelevant job) failure will come.  7. Study from various sources to develop proper learning models;  7.1.  site  visits  to  a  neighbouring  company  of  similar  businesses  but  might be of different training strategies,  7.2. studying  from various text books.  8.  Workplace  learning  assessment  can  be  done  in  different  ways  i.e.  by  a  critical  incident  report,  two­way  questionings,  evaluation  questionnaires,  false  findings,  group  discussion,  observation  and  test  project.  The  last  one  encompasses  testing of several skills and works well in many countries. Toyota, for instant, utilizes  this model for assessment of external trainings provided by other organizations.  Records  must  be  kept  for  every  stage  of  working  procedure  to  assess  workplace learning, perhaps in the form of VDO, for double checking which will  be  of  a  great  value  for  setting  a  national  standard.  Mainly  the  required  monitoring  process  and  certification  for  an  enterprise  is  carried  out  by  the  external  qualified  assessor or agency.  9.  Partnership  between  the  company  and  the  training  organization  must  be  established  to  ensure  identifying  of  training  needs  and  competency  gap  so  that  the  proper  courses  can  be  developed  by  the  latter.  Both  parties  must  share  all  required  working details for the best cooperation to ensure good learning and trainings for the  employees.

21 


Core skills/Key skills in the workplace.  (Ms. Camela I. Torres).  The important skills are knowledge and competency which ensure job security  and  advancement  for  employees  who  are  equipped  with  ability  to  handle  changing  situations and enter the labour market with confidence.  Acquired  skills  are  widely  applicable  to  both  working  responsibility  and  relationship with peers. It is as well the ability to enhance effectiveness of employees  either at the individual level or in the teamwork. If it helps solve working problems it  indicates  as  well  that  the  employee  possesses  required  general  living  skills  which  enable his adjustment to face changes in the future. However the most important thing  is  how  to  compose  all  required  skills  into  models  of  workplace  human  resource  development.  Guidelines for major skills development  Such guidelines comprises of skills in various areas namely:  ­  Globalization with emerging economic models.  ­  Pressure for continual learning.  ­  Needs for job security, capability and advancement.  ­  Needs to increase competitive advantages.  Examples of core skills required by the employer from the employee.  ­  Transparent and accountable responsibility.  ­  Quality determination for core works to enhance productivity.  ­  Ability to help the others (peers).  ­  Think and act as a business man.  ­  Upholding honesty, ethics and making good examples.  ­  Self­realization,  accept  the  others  as  they  are,  understanding  people  and  environment differences.  Various terms used to name skills  Core skills are named differently. Many people are confusing by the use of the  terms “important skill” and “needed skill” as well as other words such as basic skill,  skill  in  wider  perspective,  basic  competency,  basic  expertise,  general  skill,  life  skill,  social skill etc. Actually these words are of the same content but they are used in the  context  of  different  countries.  Followings  are  example  from  some  countries,  including:  1. In Australia the term “core competency” covers ability to;  ­ collect, analyze and mange data system,  ­ communicate ideas,  ­ plan and manage activities,  ­ work as a team,  ­ utilize mathmetic technics,  ­ solve problems,  ­ use technology and computerization.  2. In the United Kingdom “core skill” covers:  ­ personal communication skill, 22 


­ personal ability in work learning,  ­ skills in numeration and calculation,  ­ problem solving,  ­ the use of information technology (IT),  ­ working with the others.  3. In Singapore the term “working skill” is used with  details such as:  ­ ability to read and write,  ­ problem solving,  ­ communication,  ­ cooperation with management,  ­ life­long learning,  ­ think globally,  ­ self­reliance with living skills relevant to work.  4. In the United State the term “know how” is used for  working ability such as:  ­ working with the others,  ­ working as a team,  ­ IT compentency.  Three major models of important skills  The  study  carried  out  by  a  company  in  the  developed  country  reveals  that  important skills are of the 3 following characteristics, namely:  1. The core competencies covering communication, team work, planning and  management with transparency and accountability, creativity,  recognizing with  ability  to catch up with technology.  2.  Ability  in  management  which  includes  leadership  and  working  competency.  3.  Value  and  attitude  which  includes  honesty,  moral,  professionalism,  recognition of personal and environment differences.  The  aforementioned  examples  indicate  that  oftenly  used  skills  are  analytical  thinking,  ability  to  solve  problems,  creativity,  communication  skills,  access  to  information, working as a team, technological skills, self­learning, understanding  of  environment,  people  and  social  diversity.  All  of  these  skills  are  of  great  important for the working world in the future.  Training  conceptualization  has  been  changed  to  focus  on  learning  society  which welcomes new approaches to acquire knowledge and learning. Focus is now on  learning and training to learn  for which learners can set  up their own goals  while  the trainer serves as a facilitator to support the learning process which is more flexible  with a wider scope i.e. learning from other people and organizations where and when  it is possible. The conclusion is that the most important skill an employee acquires  from learning and development is what enables him/her to work and live in the  society of globalization.  With different working  process in each  business sector  the  respective  employer  must  indicate  what  are  the  core  skills  required  for  his/her  operation. 23 


Additional information presented by Mr. Nobuo Matsubara.  Mr. Nobuo Matsubara participated in the ILO conference in Geneva, in 2008  as the representative from a member state. The conference discussed many important  concepts on core skills from which one could write a dictionary.  In  sum  it  is  “the  basic  preparation  for  working”  which  partially  gained  from  basic  education,  secondary and tertiary education respectively. Some skills are also earned by external  learning as  well  as  from  trainings and  workplace  learning.  But  most of  all  it  is  from  life­long learning.  Additional information presented by Ms. Pitcha Wattanalukkee.  Skills development at the workplace level is quite possible by the employer’s  arrangement.  Problems,  if  there  might  be,  can  be  solved  by  the  supports  from  the  government.  The  Mall  Group  has  organized  “Training  the  Trainers”  jointly  with  the  Department of Skills Development. However the business must be able to identify its  needs, what skills employees should acquire and at what level etc. For the Mall Group  the  required  core  skills  are  quality  services  for  customers,  supervisors’  training  and  workplace  trainings  for  employees.  The  company  organizes  the  external  education  center  for  its  employees  with  supports  from  the  Ratchaphat  Suan  Dusit  University.  The  over  all  objectives  are  not  solely  to  develop  businesses  of the  Mall  Group,  but  also for human resource development purposes of the country at large. 

Social dialogue and partnership to support workplace learning  (Mr. Ray Grannal: Regional Senior Advisor on Skills Development, ILO ROAP)  Partnership  in  organizing  workplace  skills  training  has  been  observed  among  enterprises  worldwide,  starting  from  person  to  person,  among  organizations  and  between the company and training organization. Records are kept with announcement  of  such  partnership  which  leads  to  discussion  on  setting  up  the  working  structure.  Partnership  in  trainings  enables  arrangement  of  various  programmes  to  serve  the  needs  of  both  employers  and  employees.  Moreover  it  encourages  the  competency  assessment in lines with and comparable to the required national standard systems.  However  the  remark  is  that  activities  are  booming  at  the  time  government  supports are still available. But they are evidently slow down or faded out at the end  of  state  supports.  Such  a  trend  disrupts  continual  or  sustainable  skills  development  efforts. Therefore partnership in trainings has become the solution to the said problem  with  practices  in  many  models  i.e.  the  jointly  organized  programmes  by  the  local  training institute or the chamber of commerce and the company in a specific business  line. Such joint efforts  may be for  a temporary training. But  its sustainability will  be  of extreme benefits for labour skills development.  Large  corporations  in  general  are  not  willing  to  provide  training  for  a  large  group  of  students.  In  such  a  case  partnership  will  make  it  possible,  i.e.  the  joint  programmes  between  Toyota  Australia  and  the  local  collages  and  “The  Training  Institute  for  Training”.  Through  this  partnership  programme  students  of  the  last  2  years  of  certain  courses  will  get  training  from  the  institute.  Then  Toyota  comes  to  recruit  new  employees  from  those  trainees.  This  is  the  way  to  avoid  training  burden  for a large group of students while it enables selection for recruitment.

24 


Social dialogue and partnerships to support workplace learning  (Mr. Dragan Radic, Senior Specialist on Workers’ Activities, ILO SRO­Bangkok)  The  answer  of  why  employers  should  invest  on  skills  development  for  their  employees is that the workforce with higher skills enhances higher productivity with a  higher  return  to  the  business.  Skills  development  for  workers  require  1)  a  lifelong  learning  process;  2)  workplace  learning.  Many  definitions  are  given  for  the  meaning  of  skill.  According  to  the  speaker  (Mr.  Radic)  the  skill  comprises  of  knowledge,  ability, attitude and  willingness to use  them all for  working i.e. communication  skill,  specific technical knowledge and self adjustment.  Lifelong  learning  has  been  observed  in  many  countries  as  a  must  for  all  people.  Amidst  globalization  no  longer  that  classroom  learning  with  testing  and  examination  is  the  only  model  to  acquire  knowledge.  Several  reasons  are  justifying  lifelong learning. They are:  1.  In  the  working  world  knowledge  acquired  from  classroom  learning  is  not  sufficient. It needs additional learning at the workplace.  2. At present as well as in the future learning is required to meet the need of  global  economy  with  continual  technology  advancement.  Skills  certainly  need  improvement to ensure working ability. Lifelong learning is the only mean to acquire  modern skills of various innovation.  3.  There  should  be  public  policies  adopted  by  the  concerned  authority  on  lifelong learning from joint planning efforts for furthering implementation.  4.  Lifelong  learning  is  personal  responsibility  while  workplace  learning  is  possibly  taken  as  the  employer’s  responsibility  to  promote  the  required  practices.  Lifelong  learning  is  truly  an  individual  duty  and  responsibility.  It  is  not  possible for the employer to ensure lifelong learning for the employee.  Workplace learning has been widely argued for which sector of the business  it is most important; whether it should be for shareholders, customers or employees.  Mr. Dragan Radic considers that it is most important for the employees since quality  of products or productivity is the outcome of employee’s performance. Good quality  products  satisfy  the  customers  and  bring  back  high  economic  returns.  Therefore  enterprises are required not only to change machinery, partners or product designs but  also to develop worker’s skills which include technical competency and other abilities  such as languages, learning capacity, self  adjustment and problem solving etc. All  of  these  indicate  importance  of  workplace  learning  as  a  mechanism  to  ensure  competitive advantages in the market place.  How to manage workplace learning with successes  1. Regular contacts between the company and the union must be maintained to  ensure full cooperation from employees.  2. There must be training plans in harmony with the company policy adhering  with  training  guidelines  and  strategies.  The  employer  is  generally  aiming  for  a  short 25 


term outcome of fast and good gaining. Therefore workplace trainings should be well  justified for business gains.  3. Researches conducted in Asia, Australia, New Zealand and Europe to study  training  benefits  reveal  that  workplace  training  has  increased  productivity  by  5­6%  accompanying with long term benefits.  4. The employer should have positive attitude for trainings with trusts in those  trained employees that they will be able to better achieve the targets, otherwise there  must be a plan for continual trainings.  5.  Performance  assessment  should  be  conducted  while  training  incentive  should be introduced to enhance working commitment and appreciation of self value  and work satisfaction.  6.  If  the  employer  fails  to  recognize  training  significance  business  outcomes  may  not  be  up  to  the  required  targets  and  cannot  catch  up  with  the  competitor  who  favors trainings for the workforce.  Despite all benefits why the employer continues to ignore workplace trainings  1.  High  cost  and  time  consuming  in  terms  of  budget  and  working  hours  to  design training courses.  2. It is costly to contract external organizations for trainings as well as causing  problems to find workers to replace those who have been sent for trainings.  3. SMEs are not able to cover training costs. The government should adopt a  promotion measure to ensure trainings for SME employees.  4.  Lacking  information  on  trainings  (organized  by  which  organization,  what  about the cost, which are better between internal and external trainings?)  5.  The  employer,  especially  in  the  case  of  SMEs  is  afraid  of  wasteful  investment if the trained employees resign after trainings.  Proposals to the government for workplace training supports  When  asked  who  should  be  responsible  for  HRD  cost  the  answer  is  the  government  should  provide  basic  skills  for  lifelong  learning  to  employees.  State  revenues  acquired  from  people  taxation  should  be  allocated  to  provide  basic  knowledge to all citizens otherwise it indicates failure in education administration by  the  government.  The  workers  should  be  supported  to  participate  in  trainings.  Education  loans  should  be  provided  by  the  fund  to  promote  trainings  to  ensure  continual learning for workers. The employer plays the important role in this matter.  But the most important player  is each  individual. Since employees are indispensable  for business doings their trainings will certainly be beneficial for business prosperity  and the national development as a whole.

26 


Social dialogue and partnerships to support workplace learning  (Mr. Pong­Sul Ahn, Senior Specialist on Workers’ Activities, ILO SRO­Bangkok)  The union is responsible to organize learning activities on the employee side.  Partnership with  local authority, the employer councils  and other organizations  is  as  follows:  1.  In  Singapore  the  trade  union  movement  organized  trainings  to  young  workers  during  the  time  of  economic  slow  down.  It  took  place  through  tripartite  cooperation which was a strategy to solve the then facing problems.  2.  In  Sri  Lanka  after  the  tsunami  disaster  workers  organized  themselves  and  launched trainings for workers. The unions monitored and assessed training outcomes  through the labour organization center. Efforts were contributed from several sectors,  for instance, the  group of 10 unions which  are ILO members. Each of them sent 80  participants  to  the  training,  totally  800  trainees.  Out  of  this  group  200  trainees  attended the training  for trainers courses of short and long terms in  various fields as  were then required. After trainings those trained employees extended the knowledge  gained  by  mobilizing  local  people  to  discuss  solutions  for  problems  faced  by  the  community at that time. They also mobilized training funds and eventually established  partnership  among  various  organizations.  After  that  600  workers  were  selected  for  returning to work with continual on the job training. The often found problem is that  many  skilled  workers  lack  knowledge  transfer  and  training  skills.  The  trade  union  center  therefore  requested  supports  from  their  local  partners  to  jointly  provide  trainings  to  solve  this  problem.  This  attested  how  partnership  among  small  local  organizations plays significant role in labour skills trainings.  In certain locality mobile units have proven  to be of high capacity to provide  basic  skills  trainings,  i.e.  social  skills  which  are  very  useful,  jointly  with  local  organizations. The trade union is committed to acquire employment for workers.  Workplace  learning  is  the  starting  point  to  create  social  relations  among  various  sectors  leading  to  improvement  for  employability  and  job  opportunity,  especially  amidst  globalization  for  which  cost  reduction  is  a  mean  to  enhance  competitiveness. Therefore competency to increase productivity is of course the route  to  create  mutual  benefits  to  all  parties.  Moreover  workplace  learning  must  be  in  harmony  with  industrial  relations  based  upon  the  positive  tripartite  system.  Investment  for  labour  skills  development  is  inevitably  required  as  a  long  term  contribution to promote national economic development.  Social dialogue and partnership to support workplace learning  (Mr. Panus Thai­luan, President, National Congress of Thai Labour (NCTL))  Different concepts from that of ILO were discussed as follows:  ­  Different industrial structure  Thailand  is  of  a  different  industrial  structure  due  to  concentration  of  approximately  60%  of  the  workforce  in  the  agricultural  and  20%  in  the  industrial  sectors respectively. But those workers in the industrial sector also aim to go back to  farming  after  retirement.  Therefore  they  only  work  for  a  short  term  in  industrial

27 


without much needs for skills development. Moreover the industrial structure is ever  changing. The 2 obvious issues now are:  1. The retirement age which reduces from 60 to 55 years of age; a reduction of  5 years.  2.  The  payment  system  is  based  on  a  very  low  wage  standard,  especially  by  FDI (Foreign Direct Investment), of 6,000 bahts monthly plus other welfare benefits  i.e. cost of living allowance, transportation, accommodation and meals which add up  to 10,000 bahts per month. At a glance it seems like employees are paid highly, but a  bonus  is  based  upon  the  basic  salary  of  6,000  bahts.  More  importantly  there  is  no  budget allocation for skills development adhering to this salary base.  ­  Obstacles for workplace skills development  1.  The  Thai  industrial  structure  is  not  in  line  with  investment  advancement  which requires adaptation of certain concepts and approaches. It is rather difficult to  follow the ILO direction.  2. Industrial investment in Thailand is of 2 models; 1) local investment, and 2)  FDI.  Problems  are  found  in  relocation  of  FDI  whenever  the  investors  face  certain  required conditions set up by Thailand as the host country. So far as the government  cannot  enforce  rules  and  regulations  on  skills  development  trainings  there  is  still  limitation to request compliance by the businesses, except for large companies such as  Toyota  and  Honda  where  good  workplace  skills  development  systems  have  been  established.  3.  Technology  which  controls  investment  is  changing  so  fast  to  ensure  competitive advantages. This of course  discourages skills development which can  be  proven useless.  4.  Structural  improvement  is  required  to  ensure  that  10%  of  investment  is  allocated  for  skills  development  since  the  labour  cost  accounts  for  1.5%  of  investment.  The  remaining  portion  is  for  covering  logistics,  raw  materials  and  taxation.  Some  large  companies  set  up  0.1%  of  the  budget  for  specific  skills  development required by certain technology, for instance, new models automobile for  which such skills are not applicable where else.  5. Among all FDI companies those from Taiwan, China and South Korea are  difficult  to  negotiate  with  even  for one  baht  of  wage  increase.  But they  would right  away make a 3 baht adjustment as it is required by the law. Therefore it is difficult to  have them allocate budget for skills development. Only the Japanese companies will  agree to do so.  6.  The  most  important  matter  is  to  have  reliable  data  bases  of  various  industrial sectors. It is a real question whether the government can classify more than  400,000 enterprises of the large and SME sizes into the specific sectors of electronic,  automobile,  steel  and  others  etc.  with  exact  numbers  of  them  all.  Without  such  industrial data bases skills development plans become vague without directions. This  also affects education of youth who find no works after schooling.  ­ Suggestions for skills development at the workplace  1.  The  government  should  establish  the  industrial  data  base  center  for  HRD  and  vocational  standards  planning  to  provide  guidelines  on  occupation  and  employability to the public at large so that people can make decision on learning and  training.

28 


2.  The  public  sector  (ministry  of  labour)  must  have  information  on  various  industrial sectors, i.e. numbers of steel and iron factories, requirement for workforce  and specific technology etc.  3.  Strengthening  public  mechanism  to  ensure  effective  negotiation  with  the  investment  sector  on  certain  conditions,  i.e.  technology  transfer  after  a  period  of  5  year operation so that technology will be as well acquired by workers, not just skills.  Skills development should be a chapter under the investment agreement.  Social dialogue and partnership to support workplace learning  (Ms. Siriwan Romchattong, Employers’ Confederation of Thailand (ECOT) )  The  above  presentation  gives  us  some  facts  in  certain  conditions  and  enterprises. But to facilitate skills development at workplace level the employer must  firstly recognize profits of so doing. In Thailand all things are fine in the case of those  large companies like Toyota, Honda and SCG. But among the SMEs which are not of  a  strong  structure  and  facing  changes  more  often  whether  by  reduction  of  the  workforce, sizes of operation and others it does need positive attitude in HRD. That is  a  small  number  of  excellent  employees  can  drive  for  real  advancement  of  the  company.  Resource  management  must  also  cover  allocation  of  funding  for  skills  development among  the  middle  and  low  level  employees,  not  just  only  for  the  high  level. Job rotation must be planned under the  HRD annual planning. Employees  are  also excepted to practice self development with provided incentives by the employer,  i.e. rewards and scholarship etc.  Facing problems  Mainly problems are found in small workplaces of less than 20 employees or,  in certain cases, even less than 10 workers. These workplaces cannot afford time off  for  worker  trainings  due  to  order  deadlines  and  needed  cash  flows.  There  is  no  supporting  budget  allocated  for  them  since  the  Skills  Development  Act,  B.E.  2545  only prescribes funding for enterprises of 100 employees and over. Therefore in such  a  small  workplace  trainings  are  voluntarily  provided  by  the  employer  with  positive  attitude.  However  those  traditional  attitudes,  i.e.  it  is  more  difficult  to  supervise  skilled  workers,  trained  workers  are  often  bought  by  other  employers  etc.,  are  still  somewhat  influential  for  many  employers.  Therefore  it  is  better  for  them  to  hire  competent workers with trained skills.  Skills  development  for  workers  is  the  win­win  way.  It  is  important  to  encourage  the  employer  for  recognition  of  workplace  learning  which  increases  productivity, better performance and higher profits etc. Incentives should be provided  to  employees  with  enhancing  values  of  learning  for  their  own  job  security  and  advancement.  The  government  must  be  convinced  that  HRD  with  “new”  skills  trainings are highly required to meet the need of global markets.  Cooperation  for  skills  development  between  employer  and  local  organizations  can  be  obtained  by  entering  the  Memorandum  Of  Understanding  (MOU) with the Development of Skills Development for attending the HR 108 course  (a  personnel  management  course  covering  108  problems  for  108  hours  of  training)  and other logistic courses.

29 


Cooperation  for  skills  development  between  employer  and  international  organizations through IT and HR management training courses of APEC­IT.  ECOT roles to promote workplace learning  Our  commitment  is  to  ensure  togetherness  advancement  with  HRD  research  projects and partnership among our members and awareness of the needs and benefits  of skills development. 

Group discussion: How can workplace learning are supported by  government, workers organizations and employers’ organizations.  (Ms. Siriwan Romchattong: employers’ representative)  Referring to observation made by Mr.Dragon Radic on “free rider”, meaning  those who exploit the others, Khun Siriwan commented that businesses have achieved  successful  outcomes  but  contributors  can  not  be  identified.  As  a  whole  those  who  work for the least would gain as much as the others. Actually it should be evaluated if  each employee performs with his/her fullest capacity. If not because of unwillingness  or inability, who should be then responsible to improve such a situation and enhance  profit gaining by the business.  The  reason  why  the  private  sector  has  to  concentrate  on  workplace  skills  development  is  because  mainly  enterprises  in  Thailand  are  SMEs.  Certain  medium  and  large  companies  have  established  good  workplace  learning  systems  while  all  small  and  some  medium  businesses  are  found  without  any  facility.  They  therefore  need  to  plan  the  annual  development  road  map  with  assessment  systems.  Some  employers have provided incentives for self­development i.e. training expenditure or  the  best  learner  award.  In  the  case  of  the  Panda  Jewelry  Co.  Ltd.  trainers  from  the  Royal Goldsmith  Collage  have been invited to organize craftsmanship workshop for  employee  trainings.  The  company  believes  that  learning  creates  wise  workers.  External education courses are also provided to upgrade schooling certification.  Factors  leading  to  successes  of  the  workplace  learning  are  attitudes  hold  by  both  the  employer  and  employee  which  need  proper  tuning  and  visions  for  advancement. This also requires supporting culture of the organization. With all these  facilities  the  employer  must  acquire  cooperation  from  the  employee  and  the  government for needed supports.  Group presentation: Group1.  The  tripartite  approach  to  promote  workplace  learning  firstly  comprises  of  policy making by the  government for which the  Skills Development Promotion Act,  B.E.  2545  has  been  adopted  to  ensure  trainings  for  workers.  Required  trainings  are  provided by employers if they are affordable otherwise the government shall provide  training venues, courses and trainers as needed. The employer is also allowed to make  contribution to the skills development fund instead of organizing workshop trainings.  Trainings should be planned to enhance working skills, competency and effectiveness.  Since  the  announcement  of  the  Act  the  Siam  Continental  Hotel  has  requested  the  budget  to  support  English  courses  for  the  employees.  However  the  main  purpose  of this Act is to enhance working skills without aiming for fund accumulation. During 30 


the  first  year  the  Skills  Development  Institute  Region  8,  Nakornsawan  received  a  large  amount of  contribution.  But later  on  in  the  second and  third  years  when more  enterprises had clearer views of the training objectives contribution become zero. The  government  should  be  sincerely  supporting  this  project  as  earlier  mentioned  by  the  employee representative.  Employees,  on  the  other  hand,  if  the  employer  arranges  for  training  choices  with  various courses, will be able to attend the most suitable one for them. Anyway  full  time training  is  not  possible  while working.  Therefore  classroom training  is  not  really  necessary  since  working  skills  can  be  learned  from  observing  the  more  experienced  peers.  The  employees  must  participate  in  planning  for  training.  If  the  employees  want  to  be  paid  higher  they  must  be  able  to  prove  for  a  worthwhile  productivity. They should be as well enthusiastic for self development.  Group presentation: Group 2  Observation  on  state  supports  is  similar  to  that  of  Group  1.  However  the  representative  from  Samutprakarn  added  that;  1)  priority  should  be  firstly  given  to  SMEs without ignoring the need of larger enterprises, 2) there are 1,475 enterprises in  Samutprakarn  hiring  more  than  100  employees  whereas  122  of  them  have  not  sent  workers  for  training.  The  concerned  authority  is  trying  to  create  awareness  on  required  trainings  among  those  employers  in  compliance  with  the  aforementioned  Act. At least 2 trainings should be organized by the enterprise yearly.  The  employee  representative  pointed  out  that  the  employer  aimed  to  reduce  costs  in  terms  of  money  and  time.  Trainings  for  workers  have  been  viewed  as  wasteful  by  the  employer  as  it  is  not  really  productive.  The  employer  should,  therefore  consider  employees  as working partners  who  should  share  profit  earnings;  not  only  be  paid  for  wages  and  welfare  benefits.  The  employer  should  bear  a  new  attitude that worker trainings are investment for higher productivity and organization  development.  Workers  should  participate  in  courses  planning  which  should  clearly  specify  activities  for  a  one  year  time  frame.  Many  companies  only  comply  to  the  compulsory trainings such as the occupational health and safety.  Certain  enterprises  mainly  use  outsourcing  labour  based  upon  piece  work  payment  of  500  units,  without  overtime.  Working  culture  plays  a  vital  role  in  the  payment  system.  India  and  other  South  Asia  countries  are  least  willing  to  pay  for  training,  next  to  them  are  China,  Taiwan,  Thailand  and  European  countries.  Japan  favours  training  the  most.  The  employer  should  provide  incentives  for  training  in  terms of career advancement.  Group presentation: Group 3  Conclusions are similar to those of Group 2 and 3. The additional observation  is that learning  is more than trainings. Bipartite  means walking together with 3 legs  since  a pair  of  them  has  been  tightly  coupled. The  overall  picture  is  that  the  public  sector must play the leading role to promote compliance with the Skills Development  Promotion  Act,  B.E.  2545  as  well  as  to  introduce  certain  innovation  to  drive  workplace  training.  It  should  also  serve  as  the  information  center  for  workplace  training.  There  should  be  regional  facility  for  skills  training  through  the  industrial  council and chamber of commerce channels.

31 


Designing teaching, Learning and Assessment Resources to Support  Workplace Learning.  Ms. Carmela I. Torres: We should promote learning culture for all to enable  participation  by  anyone  who  can  make  it  with  safe  and  healthy  environment  to  enhance  new  ideas  for  working  development.  There  must  be  learning  designs  equipped with training manuals to serve needs of trainees, trainers and the employer.  Training  equipments  include  E­learning  system  as  required  by  the  competency  standard. Assessment shall be required at the end of the training.  Manuals  for  trainees  will  cover  various  activities  to  serve  training  needs.  Trainees will be informed of the training procedure, ending with assessment. Sources  of  information  and  knowledge  should  be  listed  in  the  manual  which  as  well  covers  training objectives and details of all activities.  The  trainings  should  allow  for  appropriate  flexibility  which  responds  to  the  national  accreditation  system  and  enhance  both  personnel  and  organization  development. The outcomes must be concrete. The assessment system should specify  needed skills and who the assessors are. It must be continually updated. Assessment  requires bench marks of the national standards (if existing). Thailand has established  the national standards for certain vocational skills. The assessor must be a specialist or  expert in certain skills and able to give suggestion for assessment as well as designs of  training courses.  Mr.  Matsubara:  The  Thai  government  deserves  sympathy  for  such  loaded  burdens  including  a  request  from  an  ILO  expert  that  the  Skills  Development  Promotion Act, B.E. 2545 should be properly enforced. In Japan the trend is to create  working  dynamics  without  commands  by  the  supervisor  to  encourage  learning  together  and  sharing  of  experiences  among  all  peers.  Therefore  trainers  shall  be  named or appointed at the workplace. Japanese enterprises believe that it is the best to  learn at the workplace by on the job training approach.  If  trainings  are  needed  the  Japanese  enterprise  will  ask  for  the  government  support through social partnership. The government has no power to demand trainings  either  by  the  employer  or  employees;  but  to  support  and  facilitate  them  in  certain  cases.  For example, one of the gigantic automobile companies utilizes the workplace  for training  facility  since it can  identify skills and levels of required trainings. Some  supervisors  are  responsible  to  serve  as  assessors.  However  such  a  training  is  not  sufficient to activate real changes.  The  fast  changing  technology  becomes  a  determining  factor  for  on  the  job  training at the workplace where competency indicators are required. It is very difficult  to develop  the  appropriate  set  of  indicators. Many  large  companies  are  tackling  this  matter.  The SMEs have to request some supports from the government to handle this  matter, i.e. training funds. But the fact  is that 70% of the employees are responsible 32 


for  their  own  training  costs  whereas  only  30%  of  them  depend  on  the  company’s  support.  In Japan there is a system called “satisfying customers” who are employees in  various training courses. Those trainees will firstly enter training agreement with the  trainers of what competency or skills they want to acquire. The company learns from  such  agreement  of  what  their  employees  need  from  trainings  and  what  should  be  added to the existing courses or models. This should be an agreement made between  the company and the training organization. The company can as well design its own  courses. Sometimes a person to person training might be required for a very specific  job and skill development. At the regional level there are training councils which are  partners  of  the  government  authority.  Partnership  between  the  public  and  private  sectors is quite common. Japan has also established HRD lifelong training systems.  Ms.  Patcha Wattanaluckkee:  The  workplace  must  know  what trainings  are  needed  for  its  employees.  It  is  the  international  practice  on  investment  for  training  based upon salary, sales and profit measures. Investment for training is considered as  a part of operational costs. For the Mall Group employees are valuable resources who  need  continual  development.  The  company  observes  the  following  international  principles for HR trainings, namely:  1. The 360 °  training principle based on information gathered from employees,  supervisors and most importantly from customers. The Mall Group has established the  Service Management System and is now planning for a world class model.  2.  The  clear  competency  base  for  each  job  level,  not  only  for  professional  practices but also for technical skills i.e. mechanic and electrical technicians. Training  roadmap has been developed to enhance higher competency for employees i.e. after a  tree year working period.  3.  The  talent  pool  has  been  developed  for maintaining  capable employees  in  various areas for whom needed skills trainings must be provided.  4. The effective communication system has been established to avoid any gray  area  and  conflicts,  for  instance,  foreigners  do  not  like  to  see  their  children  being  touched by our employees. That should be added in a cultural course training.  5.  The  Work  Life  Balance  culture  for  all  to  ensure  a  happy  working  life  for  both the employer and employee.  The  Mall  Group  has  developed  a  large  number  of  training  courses  with  60  internal  trainers.  Salary  is  not  the  only  incentive  for  training  but  also  additional  experiences and various new skills. However social factors are keenly considered for  course  designs  and  planning  i.e.  gender  issues  qualification  and  social  norms  of  various eras which bearing  influence on people mindset. Learning are  not  necessary  taking place in the classroom environment, but by other media such as websites and  magazines. Examination is provided as a mean to assess required competency which  serves as the salary and bonus bases. The Mall takes these approaches as the baseline  of the learning organization, especially for lifelong learning.  Finally it is for the 360° assessment system with clear and specific procedure.  Both  the trainers  and  trainees  need  performance  assessment  to  identify  achievement  according  to  expected  outcomes.  After  trainings  each  shop  needs  to  assess  gaining  productivity  and  wasteful  investment.  Evaluation  forms  are the  tool  for  assessment. 33 


The Mall Group is not quite successful regarding cultural training because clients still  put  in  their  remarks  that  they  have  been  looked  down  by  stern  attitude  of  the  employees.  So  these  problems  still  need  solutions as  well  as  “no  time  for  training”.  However where there is a will, there is always a way. 

Trainings of trainers and assessors – International experiences.  (Mr. Ray Grannall)  Many  people  lack  good  attitude  toward  workplace  learning  with  less  seriousness  and  enthusiastic  response.  In  Australia  a  teacher  does  not  need  to  hold  several  degrees.  Instead  trainers  must  possess  certain  working  skills,  for  instance,  trainings for cooking must be given by the experienced chef and not by a graduate in  home economics. More information can be obtained from www.never.edu.au.  In  the  United  Kingdom  the  ENTO  will  serve  as  the  information  center  on  trainings  to  provide  required  information,  suggestion  and  supports  for  vocational  trainings. There is also the on­line system for chatting and acquiring information from  www.ento.co.uk.  In  Philippines  assessors  and  the  assessment  center  must  be  certified  by  TESDA  (Technical  Education  and  Skills  Development  Authority)  for  required  competency in certain technology and training methodology.  In  Singapore  both  trainers  and  assessors  must  be  registered  with  required  certification  or  verification  to  ensure  that  they  possess  specific  skills  or  other  competency  In  Sri  Lanka  the  National  Vocational  Committee  is  responsible  to  maintain  and  promote  standards  of  skills  trainings  as  well  as  to  monitor  performing  skills  to  enhance the required competency. Trainers are regularly reviewed to ensure that they  are  of  certain  required  skills.  Certification  will  be  revoked  if  the  trainer  fails  to  maintain skills of the required standard so the person can no longer serve as a trainer.  The next topic is how to keep the trainer updated. It is very important that the  trainer and assessor are able to catch up with technology advancement. In some cases  trainers  and  assessors  are  provided  by  the  professional  associations.  Some  organizations  do  not  want  to keep  the  trained  employees  in  the  same  old  jobs  since  they  become  more  competent  and  should  be  assigned  for  a  position  with  higher  remuneration.  In  Australia  and  New  Zealand  the  national  committees  oversee  activities  carried  out  by  industrial  councils.  There  are  10  industrial  councils  which  jointly set up standards for skills trainings through consultation with workers to serve  the real needs. Working with the more experienced persons are proven to be of better  outcomes. The large organizations such as Siam Paragon or Emporium may have no  training problems while many small enterprises still need training adjustment.  Many Asian countries continue to assign full time teachers for skills trainings  which is not really requiring. Actually experienced workers in each field also serve as  trainers. In Australia trainers are working on a part­time basis, for instance, 2­3 days  weekly. It is not necessary to hire a full­time trainer. The manager and supervisors can  participate in trainings or be assigned to work as trainers. 34 


Group discussion: Training the trainers  Followings are guidelines to develop the action plans:  1. Training needs are identified by various approaches as follows:  1.1. Job description of each position.  1.2. Performing outcomes comparing to the required standards.  1.3.  Interviewing  various  groups  of  operators  and  supervisors  to  find  out  causes of failure.  1.4.  Training  designs  based  on  collected  information  to  serve  skills  development  needs.  2. International cooperation:  2.1.  Sending  trainees  to  the  courses  organized  by  the  head  office  in  the  original country.  2.2.  Jointly  organized  trainings  on  tools  and  technology  management  for  trainers by the head office and local companies, including courses development.  2.3.  Learning  from  international  seminars  for  required  adaptation  on  skills  development.  2.4. International  visits to gain direct experiences in skills training from both  developed and developing countries.  3. Cooperation on information exchanges and experiences sharing for skills training.  Technicians  need  to  read  the  specific  legal  regulations  pertaining  their  jobs.  They  also  require  technical  trainings,  skills  competition,  IT  learning  and  self  study  from  various sources i.e. periodical publication on new skills and electronic media.  4. Revision of rules and regulations.  4.1.  The  B.E.  2545  Act  should  prescribe  for  trainings  organized  by  the  enterprise of 50 employees and over.  4.2.  There  should  be  the  website  serving  as  the  IT  center  of  listed  trainers  available for needed skills development.

35 


APPENDIX

36 


APPENDIX: I  Programme  ILO/SKILLS­AP/Japan/DSD National technical workshop and study programme on  skills training in the workplace  Department of Skills Development  23 – 24 March  2010 

TUESDAY, 23 MARCH 2010 

0830 – 0900 

Registration 

0900 – 0930 

Opening addresses  ­ Mr. Nakorn Silpa­archa, Director­General, Department of Skills 

Development  ­ Mr. Bill Salter, Director, ILO SRO­Bangkok  0930 – 1000 

Introduction of participants  Programme and arrangements for the meeting  Group photograph  Selection of workshop session chairs and panel members (  plenary)  Coordinated by: DSD Representative 

1000 – 1030 

Tea/coffee break 

1030 – 1100 

Technical  session  1a:  Introduction  to  Skills  Development  and  Competency Based Training  Ray  Grannall,  Regional  Senior  Adviser  on  Skills  Development,  ILO  Asia Pacific Regional Office (ROAP)  Chairperson: Mr. Sandod Temsawaenglert, Director 

1100 – 1130 

Technical session 1b: Workplace Learning – ILO perspective and  international trends  Carmela I. Torres, Senior Skills & Employability Specialist, ILO SRO­  Bangkok  Chairperson: Worker participant 

1130 – 1200 

Technical session 2a: Workplace Learning: Japan case  Mr Nobuo MATSUBARA  Deputy­Director, Overseas Cooperation Division, Human Resources  Development Bureau, Ministry of Health Labour and Welfare of Japan  Chairperson: Government participant 

1200 – 1300 

Lunch

37 


1300 – 1400 

Technical Session 2b : Skills development in the Workplace: How  it is operated in Thailand  M.L.. Puntrik Smiti, Deputy Director General, Department of Skills  Development, Thailand ·  ways that skills development in the workplace operates in your  country ·  the extent to which workplace learning is supported by government  and the various employer and worker organizations ·  labour market structure and labour market information; ·  skills training and job assessment system  Questions and Open Discussion  Chairperson: Employer participant 

1400­1500 

Technical session 3: Training and skills assessment in the workplace  Ray Grannall, Regional Senior Adviser on Skills Development, ILO 

ROAP  Chairperson: Employer participant  1500­1530 

Tea/Coffee break 

1530­1630 

Technical session 4: Core skills/Key skills in the workplace  Carmela I. Torres, Senior Skills and Employability Specialist, ILO  SRO­Bangkok  Chairperson: Employer participant 

WEDNESDAY 24 MARCH 2010  0900 – 1000 

1000­1030 

Technical session 5:  Social dialogue and Partnerships to support  workplace learning  Introduction of topic by ILO Ray Grannall, Regional Senior Adviser  on Skills Development, ILO ROAP  Ms. Siriwan Romchattong, Employers’ Confederation of Thailand  (ECOT)  Mr. Panus Thai­luan, President, National Congress of Thai Labour  (NCTL)  Mr. Pong­Sul Ahn, Senior Specialist on Workers’ Activities, ILO  SRO­Bangkok  Mr. Dragan Radic, Senior Specialist on Employers’ Activities, ILO  SRO­Bangkok 

Tea/Coffee break

38 


1030­1200 

Group Discussion – How can Workplace Learning be supported by  Government,  workers organisations and employers organisations  Three Groups  Group presentations  Chairperson: Government 

1200­1300               Lunch  1300­1330 

Technical session 6: Designing teaching, Learning and Assessment  Resources to Support Workplace Learning  Carmela Torres, Senior Skills and Employability Specialist, ILO SRO­  Bangkok  Mr Nobuo MATSUBARA  Deputy­Director, Overseas Cooperation Division, Human Resources  Development Bureau, Ministry of Health Labour and Welfare of Japan  Ms. Pitcha Wattanaluckkee, Representative, The Mall Group Co. Ltd  presentation of locally produced materials including logbooks  Panel chairperson: Worker participant 

1330­1400             Technical session 7: Training of Trainers and Assessors –  International  experiences  Ray Grannall, Regional Senior Adviser on Skills Development,  ILO­ ROAP  1400 – 1500 

Group discussion: Development of action plans ) ·  Using various methods to identify workplace training needs; ·  Strategies to identify demand for training. ·  International cooperation: ·  Cooperation in sharing information and experiences on skill ·  Changes to Government regulation required ·  Government support required  Introduced by: 

1500­1530 

DSD 

Tea/Coffee break 

1530­1600 

Presentations from the Group discussions  Panel chairperson: from previous session (Government)  Presentations from:  Chairs of the working groups (10 minutes each) 

1600 – 1630 

Closing session  Statements by: Representatives of Governments, Employers’ and  Workers’ organizations

39 


APPENDIX: II Background paper  ILO/SKILLS­AP/Thailand Technical Workshop on  Skills Training in the Workplace  23­24 March 2010  The  International  Labour  Organization  (ILO)  clearly  recognizes  that  governments  cannot  provide  all  the  technical  training  needed  for  a  nation’s  workforce  and  that  most  learning  will  take  place  in  the  workplace.  Workplace  learning is  of increasing  interest and  increasing importance  in the  Asia  Pacific  region.  ILO  Recommendation  on  Human  resources  development:  Education,  training  and  lifelong  learning  (No.  195)  2004  recognizes  that  enterprises  play  an  increasingly  central  role  in  enhancing  investment  in  training  and  in  providing  workplace­based  learning  and  training  programmes,  The  Recommendation  also  stresses  the  importance  of  individuals  making  use  of  the  education,  training  and  lifelong  learning  opportunities  offered  and  urges  member  states  to  formally  recognize  such  learning,  TABLE OF CONTENTS 

What is Workplace Learning? ...................................................................................... 41  Structured Workplace Learning .........................................................................................  41  Competency Standards ............................................................................................... 42  Competencies Needed by Managers and Supervisors ................................................................42  Competencies Needed by Trainers .......................................................................................42  Assessment of Workplace Learning .............................................................................. 43  Recognition of Prior Learning (RPL) ....................................................................................43  Social Dialogue and Collective Bargaining ..................................................................... 44  Partnerships to Support Workplace Learning................................................................... 44  An “Ideal” model of workplace learning ........................................................................ 45  Including People with a Disability........................................................................................46  What Governments Can Do to Support Workplace Learning .............................................. 47  What Employers Can Do to Support Workplace Learning .................................................. 49  What Workers’ Organizations Can Do to Support Workplace Learning ................................ 50  References and technical resource materials .................................................................... 51

40 


What is Workplace Learning?  For the purposes of this background paper, Workplace Learning means  “The  acquisition  of  knowledge  or  skills  by  formal  or  informal  means  to  match workplace needs. It includes both formal on­the­job (OJT) training and  informal  workplace  learning.”    It  does  not  include  pre­employment  training  or formal courses at an educational institution.  Workplace learning can be organized in many ways.  Examples include: ·  A skilled worker guides the learner in carrying out particular activities; ·  A worker is given a relatively simple task, then progressively moves to more complex  tasks (with a progressive transfer of responsibility to the worker/learner); ·  A trainee works alongside an experienced worker to watch and learn; ·  One or more workers are identified as people who trainees and other workers can go  to for advice; ·  The  organization provides  short  training  courses  at the  work premises  (trainers  may  be either from the organization or an external partner); ·  The  organization  provides  information  and  communication  events  which  have  a  learning component; ·  Employees  are  encouraged  (and,  hopefully,  provided  with  resources)  to  learn  for  themselves – e.g. from books, manuals, videos, computer­based learning.  e­learning,  etc; ·  Suppliers of equipment provide training in how to use a new machine; ·  Employees learn informally through discussions  with customers, suppliers and other  external parties; ·  A  group  of  workers  work  together  to  identify  how  to  improve  manufacturing  processes (either formally as part of a quality circle, or informally). 

Structured Workplace Learning  Workplace  learning  will  occur  naturally  in  all  work  situations  but  it  is  in  the  best  interest  of  both  employers  and  workers  that  learning  is  systematic  and  relevant.  Structured  workplace  learning  can  directly  focus  on  the  specific  skills  needed  within  an  organization.    If  the  organization  has  control  of  the  learning  process,  there  is  no  need  simply  to  hope  that  a  local  training  organization  will  provide  the  necessary  skills.  Workplace  learning  can  be  organized  so  that  it  does  not  interrupt  the  normal  production  processes;  indeed,  it  can  be  made  a  part  of  the  normal  production  processes.  Workers  can  train  on the actual  equipment that they  will  use.    (They  do  not  work  with perhaps  different  brands or models of equipment that might be available in a training institution.)  Other benefits are that: ·  It  can  help  in  attracting  new  employees  –  if  the  organization  is  known  in  the  local  community as being one which provides high quality skills development for staff ·  It  can  help  in  retaining  (high  quality)  employees,  if  they  feel  their  skills  are  being  developed ·  It can help in transmitting and underlining the organization’s culture and values ·  Workers  will gain improved job satisfaction,  as  a  result  of skills development and  a  feeling of self­worth and an improved self­image ·  The  development  of  workers’  skills  will  be  helpful  in  negotiations  and  collective  bargaining in relation to current employment ·  Workers will gain skills which will help their continued employability.

41 


Competency Standards  There  is  a need  for  some  way  clearly  to  describe  workplace  learning  needs  so  that  plans  can  be  made  and  meaningful  discussions  held  between  governments,  workers  and  employers.  Since  about  1980  there  has  been  an  international  trend  to  use  ‘Competencies’,  ‘competences’, ‘competency standards’ or ‘skills standards to describe the job components or  the  knowledge,  skills  and  attitudes  that  a  person  needs  to  carry  out  a  particular  job  or  occupation and the level of performance required.  Whatever term is  used,  the  key  feature is that it describes  “What  people are able to  do”,  not  simply  what  training  they  have  had.    It  is  recognized  that  people  can  become  competent in many ways  – for example, by learning on the job, reading a book, attending a  training programme, doing self­paced learning or through normal life experience.Competency  assessment  focuses  on  whether someone is  ‘competent’ or ‘not  yet  competent’. There is  no  such thing as a 50% (or whatever) pass mark.  Many large companies have defined their own  sets of competencies to describe the skills needed in the workplace.  Also, many countries in  the  Asia  Pacific  region  have  developed  national  sets  of  ‘competency  standards’  or  ‘skill  standards’.    These  are  grouped  in  different  ways,  such  by  occupation,  or  industry  or  some  other grouping. The ILO’s SKILLS­AP has also developed a number of simplified standards  in its Regional Model Competency Standards (RMCS) series.Many different formats are used  for  the  competency  standards  and  they  also  vary  in  the  amount  of  detail  that  is  included.  Some include things such as ·  ·  ·  ·  ·  · 

Evidence requirements (how to prove competency) Specific equipment to be used ‘Essential’ elements – usually related to occupational health and safety Suggested methods of assessment Requirements for trainers and assessors etc. 

Competencies Needed by Managers and Supervisors  Training, by itself will not provide maximum benefits to a company unless managers  have the capacity to utilise skills effectively.  Because of this, many countries have developed  supervisor or ‘front­line manager’ competencies which include: ·  Developing the skills of people in their team ·  Organizing and managing the learning of people in their team ·  Supporting people in their team in managing their own learning ·  Mentoring  Such items  should be part of job specification  of  managers  and supervisors  (whether  or  not  those job specifications use competency­based approaches) 

Competencies Needed by Trainers  Large  or  medium  size  enterprises  often  have  staff  specifically  responsible  for  organizing  workplace  learning  or  workplace  training.  For  such  staff,  the  following  competencies,  which  are  included  in  the  Australian  Training  Package  on  Training  and  Assessment, are relevant: ·  Foster and promote an inclusive learning culture ·  Ensure a healthy and safe learning environment ·  Design and develop learning programmes ·  Plan and organize group­based delivery ·  Facilitate work­based learning ·  Facilitate individual learning ·  Plan and organize assessment activities 42 


·  Assess competency ·  Participate in assessment validation 

Assessment of Workplace Learning  It  is  important  to  assess  the  effectiveness  of  the  workplace  learning –  whether  the  intended  skills  development  actually  took  place,  and  whether  the  individuals  have  indeed  developed  their  skills. As  mentioned  earlier,  competency  based  assessment  decides  whether  someone is ‘competent’ or ‘not yet competent’. The “not yet competent” concept, in contrast  to an examination failure, is helpful in many countries where there is a cultural reluctance to  “fail”  people.  In  the  workplace  the  person  can  continue  to  work  and  the  assessment  can  be  done  again  at  a  later  time  after  more  experience  has  been  gained.    The  learning  support  programme may be modified to provide assistance in particular areas. Workplace assessment  is the process of gathering evidence and then judging that evidence to come to a conclusion  about whether the required standard has been achieved.  The assessment method and outcome  should  be  documented,  especially  if  a  formal  qualification  or  part  qualification  will  be  awarded.  Assessment  methods  should  be  objective,  transparent  and  non­discriminatory  (including  being  not  gender­biased).    Where  national  competency­based  frameworks  exist,  the  assessment  should  relate  to  the  competencies  specified  in  those  frameworks.  When  learning  takes  place  at  the  workplace,  it  is  logical  that  assessment  should  also  be  at  the  workplace.  In  fact  it  is  often  difficult  to  do  otherwise,  that  is  to  create  the  appropriate  environment conditions for testing in a classroom.  A range of means of assessment can be used. These include: ·  Observation; ·  Simulation; ·  Questioning (“why did you do it that way?”; “what would you do if…?”); ·  Judging the quality of the products produced; ·  Fault  finding (a fault can be introduced and the worker must be able to identify and  correct it); ·  Role play (in some customer service occupations the assessor might for example play  the role of an angry customer to see how the worker responds).  Assessors  are  usually  from  the  same  workplace  but  they  might  also  be  from  the  partner training organization if formal qualifications are involved. They may be line managers  (either the line manager of the person being assessed, or a manager from another part of the  organization).    Or  they  may  be  others  who  have  been  trained  as  assessors  (in  many  organizations  which  have  trainers,  those  trainers  are  often  also  assessors).    There  are  many  publications  available  about  the  training  of  workplace  assessors;  see  the  “References  and  Technical  Resource  Materials”  section.  To  monitor  and  ensure  quality,  and  to  ensure  the  validity  and  reliability  of  assessment,  workplace  assessment  processes  usually  also  use  verifiers from outside the workplace – external verifiers. 

Recognition of Prior Learning (RPL)  Recognition of Prior Learning (RPL) is the recognition and accreditation of learning  which  has  taken  place  already.    In  some  countries,  the  term  ‘Recognition  of  Current  Competencies’  (RCC)  is  used  to  more  accurately  reflect  that  you  are  measuring  the  competencies  instead  of  the  learning.  The  emphasis  here  is  not  on  ‘how’  a  person  gained  a  skill,  but  on  the  fact  that  they  actually  already possess  the  skill.  In  the  workplace,  an  RPL  assessment is used to identify skills in which the employee is already competent so that they  can confidently be placed in specific jobs and particular elements of training do not need to be  provided.  It  eliminates  the  cost  of  specific  training  and  other  areas  of  skills  development  instead be included in the workplace learning strategy for the employee.

43


If the competencies involved are nationally accredited as a part of a qualification, or a  system of qualifications, the worker might find that they already have a large part of a formal  qualification,  which  often  makes  the  worker  more  motivated  to  gain  assessment  in  other  competencies to gain the full qualification. ·  If  more  people  have  their  existing  skills  recognized,  governments  can  promote  the existence of a skilled workforce to encourage more foreign investment. ·  Employers can benefit from RPL because they can place the right people in the  right  jobs  and  can  invest  in  training  more  efficiently.    Many  workers  will  also  want to stay within the organization if they can see that their skills are recognised  and they can gain certification of their competencies. This may help in recruiting  and  retaining  good  staff  and  the  organization  may  gain  a  reputation  as  a  good  employer. ·  Workers will have their skills recognized  and this will assist in gaining a better  job in the same or a different organizations. 

Social Dialogue and Collective Bargaining  The need for effective social dialogue and collective bargaining should be taken into  account  in  designing  and  implementing  workplace  learning.  There  should  be  effective  dialogue  between  governments,  employers’  and  workers’  organizations  at  national  regional  and local levels about the way that each can promote and expand workplace learning. Social  dialogue  is  defined  by  the  ILO  to  include  all  types  of  negotiation,  consultation  or  simply  exchange of information between, or among, representatives of governments, employers' and  workers, on issues of common interest relating to economic and social policy.  It can exist as  a tripartite process, with the government as an official party to the dialogue or it may consist  of bipartite relations  only  between labour and  management  (or trade unions  and  employers'  organizations),  with  or  without  indirect  government  involvement.    The  main  goal  of  social  dialogue  is  to  promote  consensus  building  and  democratic  involvement  among  the  main  stakeholders  in  the  world  of  work.  This  consensus  building  is  important  in  many  areas  of  work, including training and development, and therefore including workplace learning. 

Partnerships to Support Workplace Learning  Workplace  learning  can  be  organized  and  provided  by  the  organization  itself.  Alternatively, or additionally, some or all of it can be provided through partnering with one or  more  training  organizations  (including  both  government  and  private  sector  training  organizations or skills development centres). If the partnerships are established and managed  effectively, they can offer a number of benefits to organizations.  These include: ·  The organization’s management can focus on its core activities without becoming  too involved in the details of organizing training; ·  Specialists from the training organization can work with the enterprise to develop  a customised training plan for employees; ·  A  training  institution’s  existing  courses  can  be  customized  or  new  training  programmes  Staff  from  the  training  institution  can  carry  out  assessments  of  employee competencies (both before and after any training).  The institution may  also  be  able  to  provide  formal  accreditation  and  certification  of  skills.  In  some  cases employees will be able to gain nationally recognized qualifications through  workplace learning; ·  can be developed to exactly meet the needs of the organization ·  Special  support  programmes  can  be  organized  for  small  numbers  of  employees  with  specific  learning  needs.  It  is  likely  that  the  training  organization  will  have

44 


staff  with  expertise  in  literacy,  numeracy  and  in  addressing  specific  learning  needs; ·  Training providers  might  have access  to a wide range of learning resources  that  the company will not needed to spend time in developing. Training providers in  the  partnership  can  also  benefit  because  their  trainers  gain  current  information  about training needs of industry and current industry practice; ·  Expensive equipment need not be purchased purely for training purposes.  It is important to make sure that the partnerships are organized effectively and that both  partners are clear about the roles and responsibilities.  Issues to address include: ·  The level of customisation required to an institution’s existing courses; ·  The amount and type of learning resources to be provided; ·  The  availability  of  instructors  and  support  staff  –  fixed  times  each  week  or  flexible times to match the needs of the organization. Will training be available during the  training organization’s vacation period?; ·  Access to company premises including training rooms for training and  assessment purposes; ·  Whether formal certificates will be provided to employees; ·  Whether assessments in accordance with nation competency standards will be  nationally accredited; ·  Whether training will be provided for managers; ·  Whether an organizational training plan and also learning programmes for each  employee will be developed; ·  The extent of record keeping required; ·  The methods to be used record the time spent in providing training, assessing or  designing learning programs; ·  etc.  Formal partnerships work most effectively with large and medium size organizations; the cost  of customising courses or developing individual training plans may be too expensive for small  enterprises.  Small enterprises face particular difficulties in training (relevant approaches are  addressed  in  some  detail  in  the  ILO  2008  publication  included  in  the  References  section).  One  solution,  if  a  large  number  of  small  enterprises  are  located  together,  it  may  also  be  possible to organize partnerships between the group and one or more training organizations. 

An “Ideal” model of workplace learning  An ideal or “gold star” model company in relation to workplace learning is likely to  have a  number of the following features:­  Company Policy and Philosophy ·  The organization is committed to training and workplace learning and it operates on  the basis that its success depends on the skills of its people ·  Training is part of the company’s strategy and business plan ·  Learning  opportunities  are  consciously  constructed,  rather  than  unplanned,  random and “accidental” ·  Learning is valued and there is a focus not just on learning particular skills but also  on “Learning to learn”. ·  Coaching,  mentoring  and  staff  development  are  recognised  as  a  normal  part  of  peoples’ job roles ·  There  is  recognition  that  some  workers  may  have  had  unsuccessful  learning  experiences in the past and that workers may need literacy, numeracy and learning  support

45 


·  Partnerships  are  in  place  with  high  quality  external  training  providers  to  provide  assistance in assessments, the development of learning plans and learning resources ·  Learning  activities  throughout the  organization are linked and integrated; they  are  not just a set of isolated, free­standing activities  Planning Workplace Learning ·  Workers  or  learners  and  their  line  mangers/supervisors  are  actively  involved  in  planning individual learning programmes ·  There  are  systems  to  identify  and  provide  formal  recognition  of  the  worker’s/learner’s current skills or prior learning. Most of this RPL assessment of skills  would be carried out in the workplace ·  Individual development plans, agreed  with the  workers/learners, set  out  ways  that  short­term  and  longer­term  learning  needs  will  be  met.    This  should  not  only  meet  the  organization’s goals and strategies but also the worker’s career development goals ·  The involvement of learning/training professionals (perhaps trainers from a training  department, if  the  organization  has  a  training  department,  or  perhaps  a  partner  training  organization) in identifying options for the person’s further development ·  There is a good system of record keeping – both of skills needs and also of skills  developed  Implementation of Workplace Learning ·  There  is  a  mix  of  both  formal  off­the­job  training  and  on­the­job  training,  and  a  wide  range  of  learning  opportunities,  activities  and  technical  resources  are  available  (including e­learning resources) ·  Experienced  workers  are  identified  as  mentors  or  coaches  and  they  are  given  special  recognition  for  this  role  in  the  company.    Training  should  be  provided  to  these  mentors  to  ensure  that  they  can  assist  and  guide  the  learner  in  developing  solutions  to  problems  and  complex  situations,  not  just  simply  provide  the  solution.    In  many  companies mentors are identified by badges or special clothing ·  Workplace learning is related to specific  work­related activities, such  as  a quality  improvement process, the introduction of new technology, etc, so that workplace learning  is relevant and “authentic” ·  Some  of  the  principles  of  work  design  are  implemented  to  enable  learning  and  development through processes additional to traditional training methods ·  Workplace learning is linked into the formal vocational qualifications framework of  the  country,  so that people  who are  assessed as  competent in the  workplace  can receive  certification, a qualification, or part qualification that is recognized outside the company  Many  organizations  implement  workplace  learning  with  some  but  not  all  the  ideal  features  above,  but  still  generate  benefits  for  the  organization  and  for  workers  individually  and collectively. 

Including People with a Disability  Approximately 10% of the potential workforce has some form of disability but many  people  do  not  receive  training  and  miss  out  employment  opportunities  as  a  consequence.  People  with  disability  include  those  who  have  long­term  physical,  mental,  intellectual  or  sensory  impairments  which  in  interaction  with  various  barriers  may  hinder  their  full  and  effective participation in society on an equal basis with others. The extent of disability varies  and in many cases people have multiple disabilities.  However, it also clear that many people  do not get an opportunity to work productively.

46


There is enormous potential for governments, workers and employers to resolve this  situation by supporting various measures and by providing workplace training for PWDs.  In  some  cases,  some  adjustment  to  the  workplace  may  be  necessary  for  training,  access  or  accommodating  the  worker.  However,  there  is  substantial  research  that  demonstrates  that  investment  in  training  people  with  a  disability  has  significant  long  term  benefits  for  employers and workers.  The  ILO  has  many  publications  and  technical  resources  to  assist  employers  in  making  the  necessary  adjustments  for  training in  the  workplace  and  to  implant  the  2008  United  Nation  Convention  on  the  Rights  of  People  with  Disabilities,  which  was  developed  “to  promote,  protect  and  ensure  the  full  and  equal  enjoyment  of  all  human  rights  and  fundamental  freedoms  by all persons  with  disabilities, and to promote respect  for their inherent dignity”. 

What Governments Can Do to Support Workplace Learning  Governments  have  a  major  role,  both  by  investing  directly  in  learning  and  also  in  creating  the  conditions  for  others  (particularly  employers)  to  enhance  skills  development.  There  are  a  number  of  issues  to  be  addressed  by  governments,  and  a  number  of  things  which governments can do to support workplace learning.  These include: ·  Clearly identify workplace learning as an essential and recognized element of the  TVET training system ·  Providing  funding  to  organizations  that  provide  training  in  accordance  with  national competency standards and national qualifications; ·  Supporting professional networks to enhance the expertise of providers; ·  Using financial and taxation mechanisms to encourage employers to develop the  skills  of  their  workforce  –  for  example,  through  making  training  costs  tax­  deductible.  In several countries this is formalised though a levy­grant scheme ·  Assist local organizations (for example Chambers of Commerce) to develop local  programmes supporting workplace learning. ·  Assist  trade  sector  organizations  in  developing  local  programmes  supporting  workplace learning. ·  Ensure  that  employment­relevant  learning  opportunities  are  available  widely,  including for disadvantaged groups. ·  Introduce legislation or encouragement for the inclusion into workplace learning  programmes of means of addressing basic adult education in relation, particularly  to literacy, numeracy and other core skills. ·  Develop through government, or encourage the development through employers,  of a structured vocational qualifications framework (whether using a competency­  based framework or not). ·  Ensure  that  the  national  framework  of  vocational  qualifications  includes  the  recognition of prior learning / recognition of current competencies ·  Ensure  that  the  national  framework  of  vocational  qualifications  includes  workplace learning, not only formal off­the­job training. ·  Ensure that national frameworks  for workplace learning benefit  from taking into  account  the  principles  promoted  by  ILO  of  “Decent  Work”  in  conditions  of  freedom and human dignity; and of social inclusion. ·  Sponsor pilot projects on workplace learning in priority sectors of the economy or  with key companies. ·  Encourage  the  formation  of  networks  of  organizations  to  share  examples  of  successful workplace learning. ·  Ensure  that  policy,  legislation  and  financial  support  relates  to  all  workers  and  potential workers, including disadvantaged groups. 47 


·  Ensure that whatever financial incentives governments make available to support  skills development are applicable to  workplace learning,  not  only to  formal  off­  the­job training. ·  Review the current quality framework for training and consider whether it needs  to be developed further. ·  Ensure  that  success  stories  and  case  studies  of  workplace  learning  are  made  known and publicised in the media. ·  Consider establishing apprenticeships (if they don’t already exist) or review them  (if  they  do  already  exist),  including  the  proportion  of  the  programme  which  is  workplace­based. ·  Support  the  development  of  learning  materials  which  are  relevant  to  skills  development for employability.  Some examples of Government Initiatives include: ·  The  Singapore  Skills  Development  Fund  manages  a  1%  levy  on  payroll  and  grants  which  cover  30%­70%  of  training  costs.  Training  for  certifiable  skills  is  the priority  with the current emphasis being on SME’s, service sector,  less­skilled workers, older workers.  The SDF has contributed to large expansion  of  company training. ·  The  Training  and  Productivity  Authority  of  Fiji  (TPAF)  operates  a  levy/grant  programme with a 1% levy on employers, through which employers can re­claim  up to 90% of their levy.  An issue is that large employers tend to re­claim; SME’s  do so to a smaller extent. ·  In  Indonesia,  the  banking  sector  has  a  2.5%  levy  of  labour  costs  for  learning,  including for workplace learning. ·  In  Korea,  the  Ministry  of  Labour  supports  vocational  training  within  small  to  medium  size  enterprises  (SME’s).  When  an  SME  establishes  a  training  partnership with a training provider, they  receive a subsidy to  cover the  cost  of  training  facilities,  materials  and  personnel.  Subsidies  can  be  used  for  organized  study  within  the  SME  workplace  or  as  a  contribution  from  the  government  to  support the expense of organizing a partnership with a training organizations ·  In  the  1970s,  the  US  State  of  Virginia  provided  direct  grants  to  employers  for  workplace­based services. However, services were often not sustained beyond the  funding  period.  To  increase  sustainability,  grants  were  made  to  adult  education  providers  working  with  employers  in  their  area.  This  approach,  however,  revealed that local programmes lacked both the necessary skill and motivation to  respond  to  employers'  needs.  As  a  result,  in  1990  funding  was  redeployed  to  create  the  position  of  employee  development  directors  in  selected  community  colleges  with  the  responsibility  for  brokering  workplace  education  programmes  by  explaining their benefits  to employers  and preparing local adult  educators  to  offer them. ·  Service  Skills  Australia  (www.serviceskills.com.au)  was  set  up  to  support  workforce  development  by  facilitating  partnerships  between  employers,  employees, unions  and training  organizations  to  ensure the vocational education  and training system supports and meets the needs of our industries – for industry  to have access to the right people, with the right skills at the right time. ·  The  New  Zealand  government  provided  funding  for  more  than  40  Industry  Training Industry Training Organisations (ITOs) covering for all major sectors of  the  economy.    The  ITOs  work  with  individual  companies  to  help  them  assess  training needs, and ITOs can contract with training partners to provide workplace  learning  (or  external  training).    The  training  relates  the  Industry  Training  Programme of New Zealand has established 40+ Industry Training Organisations  (ITOs) covering for all major sectors of the National Qualifications Framework.

48


·  In Japan, there is a process through the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare  for accrediting in­company trade skill tests.  The national trade skills test system  covers 137 occupations, at four grades (superior, first, second and third grades).  A  total  of  about  4,000,000  people  have  become  “Certified  Skilled  Workers)  through this programme. ·  The  Philippines  Government,  through  the  Technical  Education  and  Skills  Development Authority (TESDA) accredits Industry Working Groups (IWGs) to  manage  the  assessment  programme  in  a  range  of  occupations.    The  process  started in a number of sectors of the economy, particularly heath, agriculture and  fisheries, tourism and ICT, and has been extended to other sectors. ·  In the UK, the “Train to Gain” programme provides low­skilled workers in small  organizations  with  training  which  leads  to  formal  vocational  qualifications,  and  provides  financial compensation to employers for the  time taken in the training.  The  UK  “Learn  Direct”  programme  provides  learning  materials,  particularly  computer­based  learning  materials,  which  are  employment­relevant  and  which  include,  for  example,  (i)  basic  literacy  and  numeracy  materials;  (ii)  team  working; (iii) sector­specific  materials, e.g.  manufacturing,  retailing, etc). These  materials can be used by employers as part of workplace learning, or by training  organizations  or by individuals.  The UK government also established a “Union  Learning  Fund”  with  the  aim  of  helping  unions  to  become  effective  learning  organizations,  ensure  the  provision  of  learning  opportunities  for  their  members  and have an increased impact on learning and skills policy.  Sectors of particular  emphasis  include  printing,  transport,  retail,  low­paid  workers  in  local  government, and hospitality/hotels. ·  The Finland apprenticeship programme is competency­based and only 20% of the  programme is classroom­based, with 80% being workplace­based. 

What Employers Can Do to Support Workplace Learning  There are a number of things which individual employer can do to support workplace  learning.  Additionally, there are a number of things which employers’ organizations  can do  so support workplace learning.  These include: ·  Participate  with  government  and  workers’  organizations  in  tripartite  bodies  to  identify skills needs and means of developing skills. ·  Establish  “sector  working  councils”  or  similar  bodies  to  determine  training  priorities for the sector, and ensure training (including workplace learning) is in place to meet  sector needs ·  Employers’  organizations  can  sponsor  national  or  local  workshops  for  their  member  companies,  to  address  issues  in  workplace  learning  and  how  best  to  implement  workplace learning successfully. ·  Employers’  organizations  can  encourage  their  member  organizations  to  change  their mindsets – from viewing workplace learning as a cost, to seeing it as an investment. ·  Individual  employers  can  establish  structured  processes  of  peer  learning,  recognizing that the best role model for a worker is another worker who is skilled at the job. ·  If  employers  are  fearful  that  workplace  learning  will  result  in  newly  up­skilled  workers  leaving  to  join  other  employers  they  can  emphasise  in  workplace  learning  the  context­specific elements of skills rather than generic skills. ·  Employers should consider extending their learning facilities and expertise beyond  the company, to the public. ·  Where companies are subsidiaries of international organizations or are affiliates of  international organizations, the local company is often able to benefit from the experience of  workplace learning of the international partner.  For example, In the hotel and catering sector  local  affiliates  or  franchises  are  able  to  draw  upon  the  experience  and  resources  of  the 49


overseas  organization  which  supports  workplace  learning  and  opportunities  for  staff  exchange. ·  Employers  can  encourage  self­learning  by  employees.  Some  organizations  provide  resources  such  as  books,  manuals,  videos,  computers  with  relevant  learning  programmes,  and  other  “open  learning”  or  “flexible  learning”  materials  –  to  encourage  employees to develop their knowledge and skills.  Sometimes, this is in a Learning Resource  Centre.  Some employers provide time for this; others provide only the resources and expect  employees to use the resources in their own time. ·  Groups  of  employers,  particularly  of  small  employers,  can  set  up  group  training  programmes, to ensure that skills development is available for their employees. ·  Employers can address the methods of work design outlined above, and introduce  appropriate  work  design  methods  with  the  twin  aim  of  improving  work  practices  and  developing workplace learning. ·  Employers’ organizations newsletters or magazines can include examples of good  practice  in  workplace  learning  and  case  studies  of  the  successful  implementation  of  workplace learning. ·  Praise and reward successful learning achievements of employees ·  Embrace the concept of being a Learning Organization ·  Individual  employers  should  carry  out  a  training  needs  analysis  –  both  of  the  organization as a whole and of individuals – as a basis for developing learning programmes,  including workplace learning. ·  Consider addressing learning opportunities for workers beyond specific workplace  skills.  Some examples of initiatives by employers include: ·  In the Philippines, the Gokongwei group of companies established the Gokongwei  Technical Training Institute as a state­of­the­art training centre for industry but it is also open  to the public.  Similarly, the Meralco Foundation Institute provides training to the public and  to corporations in a range of technical skills. ·  Vietnam  cigarette  companies  opened  their  training  programmes  for  farmers  on  “integrated  pest  management”  and  “farmer  field  schools”.    The  training  is  held  at  the  workplace – i.e. on the farms.  Assessment has shown that farmer workers participating in the  programme  have  better  harvest  than  other  farmers  in  the  same  geographical  area  who  have  not participated in the workplace training programme. ·  DuPont Performance Coatings (DPC) works with Toyota Motor Europe (TME) by  playing a leading role in the Body & Paint Skills Grand Prix competition, which is held every  three years in Brussels ·  Marriott Hotels  hire  many people  with  disabilities  and  match them to a range  of  jobs. The Hong Kong JW Marriott provides training for workers with intellectual disabilities  is so successful that other major Hong Kong hotels are hiring the trainees that Marriott cannot  absorb into its workforce.  Trainees are first trained at replica hotel rooms and then receive on  the job training 

What Workers’ Organizations Can Do to Support Workplace  Learning  Workers’ organizations have a twin role in relation to workplace learning in:  1.  encouraging  people  to  make  use  of  workplace  learning  and  lifelong  learning  opportunities; and  2.  within a collective bargaining framework, encouraging and negotiating for the expansion  of those opportunities, including for disadvantaged groups.

50 


Specifically, workers’ organizations can: ·  Encourage  and  negotiate  within  a  collective  bargaining  context  for  workplace  learning to be a part of the skills development which employers provide, not just off­  the­job formal training. ·  Encourage  and  negotiate  within  a  collective  bargaining  context  for  employers  to  include within a workplace learning programme a range of generic personal skills and  life­skills such as problem solving and decision making. ·  Within a collective bargaining framework, encourage multi­national organizations to  provide  in  the  host  country  learning  opportunities,  including  workplace  learning  opportunities, comparable to those which they provide in their home country. ·  Negotiate for workplace learning to be recognised and accredited as part of national  qualification frameworks. ·  Within  a  collective  bargaining  framework,  ensure  that  workplace  learning  at  organizations  takes  sufficient  account  of  differences  in  learning  styles  of  older  and  younger workers, male and female workers, etc. ·  Encourage  and  negotiate  within  a  collective  bargaining  context  for  employers  to  include within a workplace learning programme means of addressing, where relevant,  basic adult  education in relation to literacy  and  numeracy, and  means  of improving  the skills of disadvantaged groups, migrant workers, etc. ·  Emphasise and support the trend in recent years internationally for “learner­centred”  rather than “teacher­centred” methods of providing learning opportunities. ·  Publicly acknowledge and praise good examples of learning at the workplace ·  Review  their  policy  in  relation  to  breadth  of  work  activity.    Some  workers’  organizations which traditionally took the view that workers should do only a specific  job have moved to a view that expertise across a range of jobs is beneficial for their  members. ·  Review  how  their  involvement  in  national  skills  contests  may  best  promote  the  interests of their members. ·  Develop the skills of people who have roles in workers’ organizations (including both  full­time staff and also part­time workplace representatives), including in relation to  training and workplace learning ·  Support the concept of the “worker­learner”.  Some examples of initiatives from worker organizations include: ·  The  UK Trades  Union Congress  has  developed  UnionLearn,  an  organization  whose  mission is to “increase workers’ life chances and strengthen their voice at the workplace  through high quality union learning", and whose aims include “to help unions to become  learning  organisations”  and  “to  research  union  priorities  on  learning  and  skills, identify  and  share  good  practice,  promote  learning  agreements,  support  union  members  on  learning and skills bodies, and help shape sector skills agreements”.  Its targets for 2010  are  to  have  trained  and  accredited  22,000  union  learning  representatives  and  250,000  trade union learners. ·  In  2006,  the  All­China  Federation  of  Trade  Unions  organized  nationwide  skill  contests among the workers jointly with the state departments concerned.

51 


References and technical resource materials  Many General resources are available no the SKILLS­AP Community of Practice.  To join go to  http://skills­ap.ilobkk.or.th/join_form  Other resources include: ·  ·  ·  ·  ·  ·  ·  · 

· 

· 

Journal of Workplace Learning American Society for Training and Development www.astd.org European Training Village www.trainingvillage.gr/etv European Centre for the Development of Vocational Training (Cedefop)  www.cedefop.europa.eu ILO  http://www.ilo.org/public/english/dialogue/ National Centre for Vocational Education Research (Australia) www.ncver.edu.au Union Learning Fund (UK) www.unionlearningfund.org.uk Ashton, D., Sung, J., Raddon, A., and Riordan, T (2007)  “Challenging the Myths about  Learning and Training in Small Enterprises: Implications for Public Policy, International  Labour Office. Harris, H., (2000), “Defining the Future or Reliving the Past?: Unions, Employers and the  Challenge of Workplace Learning”  Office for Educational Research and Improvement  (USA), available from Education Resources Information Centre at  http://eric.ed.gov/ERICDocs/data/ericdocs2sql/content_storage_01/0000019b/80/16/2b/88.pdf UnionLearn (UK) “Negotiating Learning Agreements”, www.unionlearn.org.uk/agreements

52 


APPENDIX: III Pictures

53 


APPENDIX: IV List of participants  ILO/SKILLS­AP/ Japan/DSD National Technical Workshop and study programme on Skills Training in the Workplace  Department of Skill Development  23­24 March 2010  List of Participants  No. 

Name 

Position 

Organization 

Telephone 

Tele­fax 

DSD  1 

Mr.Tanut  Sritana 

Director 

RISD 1 Samut Prakan 

0 2315 3800 

0 2315 3800­8 

Mr.Veerasak Ladakom 

Director 

RISD  2 Suphan Buri 

0 3541 2394­6 

0 3541 2394­6 

Ms.Dongjun Wongsamut 

Skill Development  Technicial  Officer, Professional level 

RISD  2 Suphan Buri 

0 3541 2394­6 

0 3541 2400­1 

Ms.komkay  Taveelumlerdsup 

Skill Development  Technicial  RISD 3 Chon buri  Officer, Senior Professional level 

0 3827 6821­6 

0 3827 6827 

Ms.Kanokwan Pinyosiripan 

Skill Development  Technicial  Officer, Professional level 

RISD 3 Chon buri 

0 3827 6821­6 

0 3827 6827 

Ms.Tonglor Toypan 

Director 

RISD 4 Ratchaburi 

0 3233 7607­9 

0 3233 7612 

Ms.Wattana Supoakit 

Skill Development  Technicial  Officer, Professional level 

RISD 4 Ratchaburi 

0 3233 7607­9 

0 3233 7612 

Mr.Somboon Nadeerak 

Skill Development  Technicial  RISD 5 Nakornratchasrima  Officer, Senior Professional level 

0­4441­2646 

0­4441­2646 

Ms.Jutamat Boon­ard 

Director 

RISD 6 Khon Kaen 

0 4323 7960­1 

0 4323 7808 

10 

Ms.Kritsana  Kruerat 

Skill Development  Technicial  Officer, Professional level 

RISD 6 Khon Kaen 

0 4441 2646­ 7 

0 4323 7808 

11 

Mr.Sahar Wongsapan 

Skill Development  Technicial  RISD 7 Ubon Ratchatani  Officer, Senior Professional level 

0 4531 9556­9 

0 4531 1657 

12 

Ms.Kambong Yakthaisong 

Skill Development  Technicial  Officer, Professional level 

RISD 7 Ubon Ratchatani 

0 4531 9556­9 

0 4531 1657 

13 

Mr.Udom Ketnaratkul 

Director 

RISD 8 NaKorn Sawan 

0 5680­2701­11 

0 5625 5330 

14 

Mr.Chalermpong Bunrod 

Skill Development  Technicial  RISD 8 NaKorn Sawan  Officer, Senior Professional level 

0 5680­2701­11 

0 5625 5330

54 


No. 

Name 

Position 

Organization 

Telephone 

Tele­fax 

0 5680­2701­11 

0 5625 5330 

0­5529­9270­6 

0 552 99278 

0­5529­9270­6 

0 552 99278 

0­5529­9270­6 

0 552 99278 

15 

Ms.Srivilai Saunkul 

16 

Mr.Pawvanuch Phungladda 

Skill Development  Technicual  RISD 8 NaKorn Sawan  Officer, Senior Professional level  Director  RISD 9 Phisanulok 

17 

Dr.Searmsakul  Pojjanakarun 

Skill Development  Technicual  Officer, Senior Professional level  RISD 9 Phisanulok 

18 

Skill Development  Technicial  Mr.Teeradet Treetippayabut  Officer, Professional level 

19 

Ms.Usa Teramatee 

Director 

RISD 10 Lampang 

0 5435 6681­2 

0 5435­6680 

20 

Ms.Siriporn Jien­sanong 

Skill Development  Technicial  Officer, Senior Professional level  RISD 10 Lampang 

0 5435 6681­2 

0 5435 6681­2 

21 

Ms.Maliwan Wan­arpa 

Director 

RISD 11 Surathani 

0 7721 1503 

07721 1504 

22 

Mr.Chaowalit Sritong 

Skill Development  Technicial  Officer, Professional level 

RISD 11 Surathani 

0 7721 1503 

0 7721 1503 

23 

Mr.Nopadol Rodreungdet 

Director 

RISD 12 Songkhla 

0­7433­6050 

0­7433­6049 

24 

Mr.Auttapon  Suwatanadecha 

0­2643­4978 

0­2248­3671 

25 

Ms.Wandee Keawjumrat 

0­2643­4978 

0­2248­3671 

26 

Mr.Tavorn Moopuing 

0­2643­4978 

0­2248­3671 

27 

Ms.Lakkana Rungreung 

0­2643­4978 

0­2248­3671 

28 

Ms.Naovarat Kamda 

0­2643­4978 

0­2248­3671 

29 

Mr.Vichan Srilek 

Division of Skill Development  Director  Promotion  Skill Development  Technicial  Division of Skill Development  Officer, Senior Professional level  Promotion  Skill Development  Technicial  Division of Skill Development  Officer, Professional level  Promotion  Skill Development  Technicial  Division of Skill Development  Officer, Professional level  Promotion  Skill Development  Technicial  Division of Skill Development  Officer, Professional level  Promotion  Skill Development  Technicial  Division of Skill Development  Officer  Promotion 

0­2643­4978 

0­2248­3671 

RISD 9 Phisanulok 

employers  30 

Mr.Pradit  Pornsirichaiwattana 

Senior Advisor 

Employer’s Confederation of Consumption  and Service Supply Traders﴾ECOS﴿ 

0­2755­2165 

0­2756­5346 

31 

Mr.Opard Osapanon 

Senior Advisor 

Employer’s Confederation of Consumption  and Service Supply Traders﴾ECOS﴿ 

0­2690­3244 

0­2690­2238 

32 

Ms.Siriwan Romchattong 

Secretary 

Employers’s Confederation of Thailand  ﴾ECOT﴿ 

0­8184­5796 

0­2385­8577

55 


No. 

Name 

Position 

Organization 

Telephone 

Tele­fax 

33 

Ms.Jittra Posang 

Excucive Committee 

Employers’s Confederation of the Nation  ﴾ECN﴿ 

34 

Mr.Thaveekiat Rongsawadi 

President 

Employers’s Confederation of the Nation  ﴾ECN﴿ 

0­2446­0186 

0­2435­7638 

35 

Ms.Phaichit  Chraruwatcharawan 

Secretary of 

The Confederation of Thai­International  Employer ﴾CTIE﴿ 

0­2530­3481 

0­2933­0769 

36 

Mr.Suthep Sripiean 

Committee Treasurer 

The Employers’  Confederation of Thai  Agriculture and Business Industry ﴾EABT﴿ 

0­2285­3502 

0­2285­3502 

37 

Ms.Pitcha Wattanaluckkee 

HR Manager 

The Mall Group Co.Ltd 

8­1801­8690 

0­2318­2480 

Employees  38 

Mr.Panus Thailuan 

President 

National Congress of Thai Lavbour  ﴾NCTL﴿ 

0­2395­1387 

0­2389­5134 

39 

Mr.Voravut Oumsiri 

Vice President 

Thai Trade Union Congress﴾TTUC﴿ 

02 3840438 

0­2384­0438 

40 

Mr.Suradej Choomanee 

Asistant Organize 

Labour Congress of Thailand ﴾LCT﴿ 

0­2758­3330 

0­2758­3330 

41 

Mr.Bunn Ployrungroj 

President 

Labour Congress Center for Labour Union  of Thailand L ﴾CCLUT﴿ 

0­2932­9215 

0­2932­9215 

42 

Mr.Pirat Soiytong 

­ 

Labour Congress Center for Labour Union  of Thailand L ﴾CCLUT﴿ 

0­2932­9215 

0­2932­9215 

43 

Ms.Panida Hankitrung 

Vice President 

National Congress of Private Industrial of  Employee ﴾NCPE﴿ 

0­2311­4576 

0­2311­4576 

44 

Mr.Udomsak Buppanimitt 

President 

Labour Congress Thai Labour  Organization﴾ILTLO﴿ 

0­2741­2068 

0­2816­2325 

45 

Mr.Arwut Pinyoyong 

Excucive Committee 

The National Congress of Thai Labour  ﴾NCTL﴿ 

0­2395­1387 

0­2395­3187 

46 

Mr.Somsak Nakkoed 

Excucive Committee 

National Congress of employee ﴾NCE﴿ 

0­2334­1956 

0­2389­5134 

47 

Mr.Nikom Songkorn 

Secretary 

Confederation of Thai Labour ﴾CTL﴿ 

0­2755­2165 

0­2756­5346 

Director General  Deputy­Director General  Deputy­Director General  Deputy­Director General 

Department of  Skills Development  Department of  Skills Development  Department of  Skills Development  Department of  Skills Development 

0­2247­6600  0­2247­6602  0­2247­6601  0­2245­1820 

0­2247­0300  0­2245­1180  0­2245­7736  0­2245­3449

Observers  48  49  50  51 

Mr.Nakorn Silpa­archa  Mr.Prapun Montakantiwong  Mr.Pravit Keingpol  Ms.Puntrik Smiti 

56 


No. 

Name 

Position 

Organization  Department of  Skills Development  Department of  Skills Development  Office of Instructor and Training  Technology Development 

Telephone 

Tele­fax 

0­2245­2018  0­2247­6600 

0­2343­4979  0­2247­0300 

0­2245­6894 

0­2643­4986 

52  53 

Mr.Somjai Bunprasit  Mr.Kovit Burapatanin 

Inspector  Consultants 

54 

Mr.Sandot Temsawanglerd 

Director,Higher Level 

55 

Mr.Narong Chambonrot 

Director ,Primary Level 

Office of Instructor and Training  Technology Development 

0­2245­6568 

0­2245­7791 

56 

Mr.Chayada Skulwong 

Director ,Primary Level 

Office of Instructor and Training  Technology Development 

0­2643­4981 

0­2643­4981 

57 

Mr.Tawat Benjatikul 

Director ,Primary Level 

Office of Instructor and Training  Technology Development 

0­2247­6608 

0­2247­6608 

58 

Mr.Santipong Sonti 

Director ,Primary Level 

Office of Instructor and Training  Technology Development 

0­2245­6622 

0­2245­6622 

59 

Mr.Sirawut Noiprasert 

Director ,Primary Level 

Office of Instructor and Training  Technology Development 

0­2245­6563 

0­2643­4983 

60 

Ms.Ninrath Suwanpotipra 

0­2245­4630 

0­2245­7791 

61 

Mr.Vorawit Akanvanit 

0­2245­4630 

0­2245­7791 

62 

Ms.Jiraporn Punyarit 

0­2245­1825 

0­2643­4986 

63 

Ms.Chomporn Laovatcharin 

Skill Development  Technicial  Officer, Professional level 

Office of Instructor and Training  Technology Development 

0­2245­1825 

0­2643­4986 

64 

Mr.Sumpan Aonsard 

Skill Development  Technicial  Officer, Professional level 

Office of Instructor and Training  Technology Development 

0­2643­4986 

0­2643­4986 

65 

Mr.Matee Chuttong 

Skill Development  Technicial  Officer, Professional level 

Office of Instructor and Training  Technology Development 

0­2245­4360 

0­2245­7791 

66 

Ms.Panyamol Rittichot 

Skill Development  Technicial  Officer, Professional level 

Office of Instructor and Training  Technology Development 

0­2245­4360 

0­2245­7791 

67 

Ms.Vanlapa Naknarimit 

Skill Development  Technicial  Officer, Professional level 

Office of Instructor and Training  Technology Development 

0­2245­4360 

0­2245­7791 

68 

Ms.Umarat Intravet 

Skill Development  Technicial  Officer, Professional level 

Office of Instructor and Training  Technology Development 

0­2245­1825 

0­2643­4986 

69 

Ms.Det Pingkayai 

Skill Development  Technicial  Officer, Professional level 

Office of Instructor and Training  Technology Development 

0­2245­1825 

0­2643­4986

Skill Development  Technicial  Office of Instructor and Training  Officer, Senior Professional level  Technology Development  Skill Development  Technicial  Office of Instructor and Training  Officer, Senior Professional level  Technology Development  Skill Development  Technicial  Office of Instructor and Training  Officer, Senior Professional level  Technology Development 

57 


No. 

Name 

Position 

Organization 

Telephone 

Tele­fax 

70 

Mr.Tongchai Jitarn 

Skill Development  Technicial  Officer, Professional level 

Office of Instructor and Training  Technology Development 

0­2245­1825 

0­2643­4986 

71 

Ms.Areerat Champachur 

Skill Development  Technicial  Officer, Professional level 

Office of Instructor and Training  Technology Development 

0­2245­1825 

0­2643­4986 

72 

Mr.Patipan Lerdsuvanon 

Skill Development  Technicial  Officer, Practitioner level 

Office of Instructor and Training  Technology Development 

0­2245­1825 

0­2643­4986 

73 

Mr.Somcaiy Sudton 

Instructor 

Office of Instructor and Training  Technology Development 

0­2245­4360 

0­2245­7791 

74 

Mr.Sittisat Tungyu 

Instructor 

Office of Instructor and Training  Technology Development 

0­2245­4360 

0­2245­7791 

75 

Mr.Kritsana Punmaisri 

Skill Development  Technicial  Officer, Professional level 

Office of Instructor and Training  Technology Development 

0­2245­4360 

0­2245­7791 

76 

Mr.Santi Bamrungkunakorn 

Director,Higher Level 

Office of Skill Standard and Testing  Development 

0­2246­1931 

0­2246­1931 

77 

Ms.Chanit Vatchareeyotin 

Director ,Primary Level 

Office of Skill Standard and Testing  Development 

0­2246­1931 

0­2246­1931 

78 

Mr.Teerasak Yupet 

Skill Development  Technicial  Officer, Practitioner level 

Office of Skill Standard and Testing  Development 

0­2246­1931 

0­2246­1931 

79 

Mr.Somsak Phomdam 

Director ,Primary Level 

Office of Skill Standard and Testing  Development 

0­2246­1931 

0­2246­1931 

80 

Mr.Prasit Niyomkeaw 

Skill Development  Technicial  Officer, Professional level 

Devision of Planning and Information  Technology 

0­2247­6603 

0­2247­6603 

81 

Mr.Vinai Prasansaun 

Skill Development  Technicial  Officer, Professional level 

Devision of Planning and Information  Technology 

0­2247­6603 

0­2247­6603 

82 

Mr.Aunchana Ketkanda 

Director ,Primary Level 

Division of International Cooperation 

0­2245­1829 

0­2245­1829 

83 

Ms.Vijittra Buranavanit 

Skill Development  Technicial  Officer, Professional level 

Division of International Cooperation 

0­2245­1829 

0­2245­1829 

84 

Ms.Buppa Suwanvarankul 

Skill Development  Technicial  Officer, Professional level 

Division of International Cooperation 

0­2245­1829 

0­2245­1829 

85 

Mr.Kreingkrai Saovapak 

Foreign Relations Officer 

Division of International Cooperation 

0­2245­1829 

0­2245­1829 

86 

Ms.Panida Tanaporn 

Director ,Primary Level 

Division of Workforce and  Entrepreneur Development Section 

0­2643­4978 

0­2248­3671 

87 

Ms.Darunee Panpet 

Skill Development  Technicial  Division of Workforce and  Officer, Senior Professional level  Entrepreneur Development Section 

0­2643­4978 

0­2248­3671

58 


No. 

Name 

Position 

Organization 

Telephone 

Tele­fax 

88 

Ms.Jamrut Chotpradit 

Skill Development  Technicial  Officer, Professional level 

Division of Workforce and  Entrepreneur Development Section 

0­2643­4978 

0­2248­3671 

89 

Ms.Amonsiri Tipmalai 

Skill Development  Technicial  Officer, Professional level 

Division of Workforce and  Entrepreneur Development Section 

0­2643­4978 

0­2248­3671 

90 

Ms.Anong Sumkeaw 

Skill Development  Technicial  Officer, Professional level 

Division of Strategy and Affiliation  Labour Development 

0­2245­1707 

0­2245­1707 

91 

Ms.Vanida  Ngernrup­arm 

Skill Development  Technicial  Officer, Professional level 

secretariat to the Department 

0­2247­0302 

0­2247­3367 

92 

Mr.Katachutt Junsang 

secretariat to the Department 

0­2247­0302 

0­2247­3367 

93 

Mr.Arurak Uchodkid 

secretariat to the Department 

0­2643­4978 

0­2248­3671 

94 

Ms.Usa Kongpakdee 

secretariat to the Department 

0­2643­4978 

0­2248­3671 

95 

Ms.Sopa Jariengjit 

secretariat to the Department 

0­2643­4978 

0­2248­3671 

96 

Ms.Padsaworn Wichasamitt  Director 

Bangkok Institute for Skill  Development BISD﴾ Wat Thatthong﴿ 

0 2390 0261­3 

0 2390 2212 

97 

Ms.Teinrat  Navamavat 

Director 

PISD Nonthaburi 

0 2595 4046­8 

0­2595­4045 

98 

Mr.Satiean Pojposri 

Director 

PISD Pathum Thani 

0 2577 5867­9 

0 2577 5871 

99  Ms.Somcaiy Tiemsanid  100  Mr.Chosit Thavornra  Mr.Pisit  101  Pongpathanakitchot 

Director  Director 

PISD Sara Buri  PISD Rayong 

0 3623 6297­5  0 3868­3198 

0­3623­6294  0 3868­3198 

0 3420 4701 

0 3420 4699 

102  Ms.Auchara  Kaewkamchaicharoen  103  Ms.Saisunee Kunsuk  104  Mr.Illyutt Chochasawat  105  Ms.Phattraporn Samantaraj 

Director 

PISD Chiang Mai 

0 5312 1002­3 

0 5329 8236 

Director  Director  Director 

PISD Lamphun  PISD Phuket  PISD Satun 

0 5353­7697­8  0 7627 3470­4  0­7473­0717 

0­5353­7696  0 7625 5970  0­7473­0716 

Skill Development  Technicial  Officer, Professional level  Skill Development  Technicial  Officer, Professional level  Skill Development  Technicial  Officer, Professional level  Skill Development  Technicial  Officer, Professional level 

Director 

PISD Nakorn Pathom 

RISD : Regional Instututes for Skill Development  PISD : Provincial Institutes for Skill Development

59 


No. 

Name 

Position 

Organization 

Telephone 

Tele­fax 

66­2288­2219 

66­2288­3058 

66­2288­1855 

66­2288­1086 

0­2288­1739 

0­2288­3043 

0­2245­1820 

0­2248­3449 

0­2288­1739 

0­2288­3043 

0­2288­2478 

0­2288­3047 

0­2288­2478 

0­2288­1086 

0­2288­1739 

0­2288­3043

Resource Persons  106  Mr.Bill Salter 

Director 

ILO Sub regional Office for East Asia 

107  Mr.Raymond Grannall 

Regional Senior Advisor on  ILO Asia Pacific Regional Office  Skills Development and Manager  ﴾ROAP﴿ 

108  Ms.Carmella Torres 

Senior Skills and Employability  Specialist 

ILO SRO Bangkok 

109  Mr.Nobuo Matsubara 

Deputy ­Director 

Overseas Cooperation  Division,Human Resources  Development Bureau Ministry of  Health Labour and welfare of Japan 

110  M.L.Puntrik Smiti 

Deputy­Director General 

Department of Skills Development  Thailand 

111  Mr.Pong­sul Ahn 

Senior Specialist, on Workers’  Activities 

SRO Bangkok 

112  Mr.Dragan Radic 

Senior Specialist, on Employers’  Activities 

SRO Bangkok 

113  Ms.Wipusara Rugworakijkul  Programme Officer 

Regional Skills and Employability  Programme for Asia and the Pacific 

114  Ms.Jittima Srisuknam 

SRO Bangkok 

Programme Officer for Thailand 

60 


61


รายงานการจัดสัมมนาโดยความร่วมมือองค์การแรงงานระหว่างประเทศกับกรมพัฒนาฝีมือแรงงาน