Page 1

Kaylyn Crane’s Digital Process Book


Contents Project Section 3

Mini Project Section 56

Project 1 - Inside Columbia

Mini Project 1 - Love Letter

a. b. c. d. e.

Intake 4 Creative Development Worksheet 5 Research 7 Computer Play/Ideas 9 Final Execution 12

Project 2 - Stephens Life a. b. c. d. e.

Intake 14 Creative Development Worksheet 15 Research 19 Computer Play/Ideas 22 Final Execution 28

Project 3 - Design Your Own Magazine a. b. c. d. e. f.

2

Intake 33 Creative Development Worksheet 34 Research 40 Enlarged Ideas 48 Computer Play/Ideas 49 Final Execution 52

Single Letter & Infographic 57 Mini Project 2 - Business Card

Read, Reflect and Report Section 66 Ch 6 67 Ch 10 68

Intake 52 Final Business Card & Letterhead 62 Printing Spec Sheets 63 Mini Project 3 - Olive Oil Sketches to Final Design 64

Publication Design Taking large amounts of information & designing it in a way that makes it quick & easy for the viewer to read.


Project Section

3

3


Intake

4

4


5 5

Project 1 - Inside Columbia: Creative Dev. Worksheet Brainstorming


Project 1 - Inside Columbia: Creative Dev. Worksheet

6 6

Brainstorming


7 7

Project 1 - Inside Columbia: Research Inside Columbia Magazine


Project 1 - Inside Columbia: Research

Possible Color Choices

Kaylyn Crane

8

8

8


Nelson plummeted under water once Nelson plummeted under water once more and realized his No. 2 rule was now broken: Never get separated from your boat. more and realized his No. 2 rule was now broken: Never get separated from your boat.

Nelson plummeted under water once more and realized his No. 2 rule was now broken: Never get separated from your boat.

Nelson plummeted under water once more and realized his No. 2 rule was now broken: Never get separated from your boat. Nelson plummeted under water once more and realized his No. 2 rule was now broken: Never get separated from your boat.

Project 1 - Inside Columbia: Computer Play

Possible Font Choices (Pull Quote)

Nelson plummeted under water once more and realized his No. 2 rule was now broken: Never get separated from your boat.

9

9


Possible Font Choices (Header)

Lost Wild Lost d l i Wild A Story of SurvivalW in the Last Frontier

Lost Wild Lost Wild

in the

A Story of Survival in the Last Frontier

A Story of Survival in the Last Frontier

in the

A Story of Survival in the Last Frontier

in the

Lost Wild Lost Wild d l i W Lost WILD

By Whitney Dreier Phtotos By L.G. Patterson

Lost in the Wild A Story of Survival in the Last Frontier

By Whitney Dreier Phtotos By L.G. Patterson

in the

Kaylyn Crane

10

in the

10

Lost in the A Story of Survival in the Last Frontier By Whitney Dreier Phtotos By L.G. Patterson

Wild

10


Nelson plummeted under water once more and realized his No. 2 rule was now broken: Never get separated from your boat.

S

tuart Nelson Jr. paddled his kayak expertly down the Little Wind River. The late August weather was warm and sunny, despite Nelson’s proximity to the Arctic Circle. Eroding spruce trees dangled from steep riverbanks into the water, their limbs dancing with the current in a deep, fast rhythm. “The thought went through my mind to be really careful here,” 58-year-old Nelson says. “These were not simple annoyances; they were serious obstacles.” No sooner had Nelson reminded himself of the dangerous situation than he rounded a bend and plowed straight into a fortress of heaving branches. “I knew I was going to hit it,” he recalls. “There was no way I could miss it.” The boat hit the sweeper, flipped over and became tangled in spruce boughs. “Well, this could be it,” thought Nelson, who, even with his life jacket on, couldn’t tell up from down as he descended below the water’s surface. ***

Lost in the Wild A Story of Survival in the Last Frontier

By Whitney Dreier Phtotos By L.G. Patterson

The Nelson family moved to Columbia from Kissimmee, Fla., when Nelson’s father accepted a position with the University of Missouri College of Veterinary Medicine. “Being a kid in Missouri, I loved the outdoors,” says Nelson, who spent much of his free time canoeing and camping around the state. The family traveled to Alaska in 1967, and it was there that Nelson had his first taste of the Last Frontier. “I went up to that big country, saw the land, the beautiful rivers, the mountains,” Nelson remembers. “It captured my imagination.” Nelson, a Hickman High School alumnus, later attended veterinary school at MU. In 1995, he became the chief veterinarian for the Iditarod Dog Sled Race — although because the 1,161-mile race across Alaska is a once-a-year event (beginning the first Saturday in March), Nelson also practices in Sandpoint, Idaho. “The Iditarod is my full-time part-time job,” he jokes.

Every August, Nelson takes a “river month” in the Cana-

dian wilderness. He’s completed 18 solo kayak trips, which adds up to about 6,000 miles of paddling in the Yukon. All of those trips have ended successfully — except his 2010 expedition. “This year was the first time I didn’t come out on my own,” he says. “I had to be rescued.” *** When Nelson crawled out of the river on the afternoon of Aug. 23, his boat was pinned under the branches of the dying spruce. He felt stunned, shocked from the collision and the icy water. His No. 1 rule, “make no mistakes,” had been shattered. He climbed onto the tree and tried to free his boat. He pushed and pulled without success. He held onto the on sweeper and jumped on the kayak, which caused the current to spit the craft into the raging current. Nelson plummeted under water once more and realized his No. 2 rule was now broken: Never get separated from your boat. He tried to swim after his kayak — and the items stowed inside, which included his passport, cash, credit cards, driver’s license and satellite phone — but more sweepers intervened. He felt himself growing heavier in the water and crawled to the shore. He walked along Little Wind for seven hours with no sign of the boat. Around 11 p.m., he lay down to rest. Nelson awoke at dawn and continued his search, eating wild currents and blueberries as he walked. By the time he reached the larger Wind River, he’d accepted that his boat was gone. Suddenly, he heard an airplane flying down the Little Wind. Clad in neutral colors, he jumped wildly and ran sideways, hoping to move into the pilot’s line of sight. “My natural instinct was to yell,” he says, “which was totally stupid because he couldn’t hear me.” The plane passed, and Nelson began to assess his situation. A large gravel bar sprawled along the confluence of the Little Wind

Nelson plummeted under water once more and realized his No. 2 rule was now broken: Never get separated from your boat.

S

tuart Nelson Jr. paddled his kayak expertly down the Little Wind River. The late August weather was warm and sunny, despite Nelson’s proximity to the Arctic Circle. Eroding spruce trees dangled from steep riverbanks into the water, their limbs dancing with the current in a deep, fast rhythm. “The thought went through my mind to be really careful here,” 58-year-old Nelson says. “These were not simple annoyances; they were serious obstacles.” No sooner had Nelson reminded himself of the dangerous situation than he rounded a bend and plowed straight into a fortress of heaving branches. “I knew I was going to hit it,” he recalls. “There was no way I could miss it.” The boat hit the sweeper, flipped over and became tangled in spruce boughs. “Well, this could be it,” thought Nelson, who, even with his life jacket on, couldn’t tell up from down as he descended below the water’s surface. ***

Lost in the A Story of Survival in the Last Frontier By Whitney Dreier Phtotos By L.G. Patterson

11

Wild

The Nelson family moved to Columbia from Kissimmee, Fla., when Nelson’s father accepted a position with the University of Missouri College of Veterinary Medicine. “Being a kid in Missouri, I loved the outdoors,” says Nelson, who spent much of his free time canoeing and camping around the state. The family traveled to Alaska in 1967, and it was there that Nelson had his first taste of the Last Frontier. “I went up to that big country, saw the land, the beautiful rivers, the mountains,” Nelson remembers. “It captured my imagination.” Nelson, a Hickman High School alumnus, later attended veterinary school at MU. In 1995, he became the chief veterinarian for the Iditarod Dog Sled Race — although because the 1,161-mile race across Alaska is a once-a-year event (beginning the first Saturday in March), Nelson also practices in Sandpoint, Idaho. “The Iditarod is my full-time part-time job,” he jokes.

Project 1 - Inside Columbia: Computer Play

Lost in the Wild (Drafts)

Every August, Nelson takes a “river month” in the Canadian wilderness. He’s completed 18 solo kayak trips, which adds up to about 6,000 miles of paddling in the Yukon. All of those trips have ended successfully — except his 2010 expedition. “This year was the first time I didn’t come out on my own,” he says. “I had to be rescued.” *** When Nelson crawled out of the river on the afternoon of Aug. 23, his boat was pinned under the branches of the dying spruce. He felt stunned, shocked from the collision and the icy water. His No. 1 rule, “make no mistakes,” had been shattered. He climbed onto the tree and tried to free his boat. He pushed and pulled without success. He held onto the on sweeper and jumped on the kayak, which caused the current to spit the craft into the raging current. Nelson plummeted under water once more and realized his No. 2 rule was now broken: Never get separated from your boat. He tried to swim after his kayak — and the items stowed inside, which included his passport, cash, credit cards, driver’s license and satellite phone — but more sweepers intervened. He felt himself growing heavier in the water and crawled to the shore. He walked along Little Wind for seven hours with no sign of the boat. Around 11 p.m., he lay down to rest. Nelson awoke at dawn and continued his search, eating wild currents and blueberries as he walked. By the time he reached the larger Wind River, he’d accepted that his boat was gone. Suddenly, he heard an airplane flying down the Little Wind. Clad in neutral colors, he jumped wildly and ran sideways, hoping to move into the pilot’s line of sight. “My natural instinct was to yell,” he says, “which was totally stupid because he couldn’t hear me.” The plane passed, and Nelson began to assess his situation. A large gravel bar sprawled along the confluence of the Little Wind

11


Project 1 - Inside Columbia: Final Execution

12 12

Lost in the Wild (First Page)


13 13

Project 1 - Inside Columbia: Final Execution Lost in the Wild (Second Page)


Project 2 - Stephens Life: Intqake

14 Kaylyn Crane

14 14

Intake


15 15

Project 2 - Stephens Life: Creative Dev. Worksheet Brainstorming


Project 2 - Stephens Life: Creative Dev. Worksheet

16 16

Contents & Visual Layouts


Project 2 - Stephens Life: Creative Dev. Worksheet 17 17

Identity Possible Layouts


Project 2 - Stephens Life: Creative Dev. Worksheet

18 18

Brainstorming


19

Possible Color Choices

Project 2 - Stephens Life: Research

Stephens Life Research

19


Project 2 - Stephens Life: Research

20 20

Layout Research


21 21

Project 2 - Stephens Life: Research Layout Research


Project 2 - Stephens Life: Computer Play

22 Kaylyn Crane

22 22

Possible Flags


23 23

Project 2 - Stephens Life: Computer Play Department Page


Project 2 - Stephens Life: Computer Play

24 24

Editorial Page Drafts


25 25

Project 2 - Stephens Life: Computer Play Editorial Page Drafts


Project 2 - Stephens Life: Computer Play

26 26

Visual Spread Drafts


Possible Font Choices

Morocco Morocco

Morocco

The Wanderlust Senior Collection 2012 The Wanderlust Senior Collection 2012

The Wanderlust Senior Collection 2012

27

Project 2 - Stephens Life: Computer Play

Departing Drafts

27


Project 2 - Stephens Life: Final Execution

28 28

Finished Cover & Department


29 29

Project 2 - Stephens Life: Final Execution Finsihed Editorial


Project 2 - Stephens Life: Final Execution

30 30

Finished Visual Spread (Page 1)


31 31

Project 2 - Stephens Life: Final Execution Finished Visual Spread (Page 2)


Project 2 - Stephens Life: Final Execution

32 32

Finished Departing & Visual Identity


33 33

Project 3 - Design Your Own Mag.: Intake Intake


Project 3 - Design Your Own Mag.: Creative Dev. Worksheet

34 34

Brainstorming


35 35

Project 3 - Design Your Own Mag.: Creative Dev. Worksheet Brainstorming


Project 3 - Design Your Own Mag.: Creative Dev. Worksheet

36 36

Brainstorming


37 37

Project 3 - Design Your Own Mag.: Creative Dev. Worksheet Brainstorming


Project 3 - Design Your Own Mag.: Creative Dev. Worksheet

38 38

Brainstorming


39 39

Project 3 - Design Your Own Mag.: Creative Dev. Worksheet Brainstorming


Project 3 - Design Your Own Mag.: Research 40

Competition: Travel Magazines

Running Destinations in Use

40


41 41

Project 3 - Design Your Own Mag.: Research Running Destinations in Use


Project 3 - Design Your Own Mag.: Research 42

Competition: Running Magazines

Possible Color Choices

42


43 43

Project 3 - Design Your Own Mag.: Research Magazine Research


Project 3 - Design Your Own Mag.: Research

44 44

Magazine Research


45 45

Project 3 - Design Your Own Mag.: Research Magazine Research


Project 3 - Design Your Own Mag.: Research

46 46

Magazine Research


47 47

Project 3 - Design Your Own Mag.: Research Magazine Research


Project 3 - Design Your Own Mag.: Enlarged Ideas

48 48

Cover Layout Ideas


Project 3 - Design Your Own Mag.: Computer Play

Charm Charm Charm Charm

49 49

Header Fonts Flag Ideas


Project 3 - Design Your Own Mag.: Computer Play

50 50

Feature Spread Drafts


51

Table of Contents Draft

Project 3 - Design Your Own Mag.: Computer Play

Feature Spread Draft

51


Project 3 - Design Your Own Mag.: Final Execution

52 52

Final Table of Contents Final Cover


53 53

Project 3 - Design Your Own Mag.: Final Execution Final Feature (Page 1)


Project 3 - Design Your Own Mag.: Final Execution

54 54

Final Feature (Page 2)


55 55

Project 3 - Design Your Own Mag.: Final Execution Visual Identity


Mini Project Section

56


Mini Project 1 - Love Letter: Ideas Brainstorming

57


Mini Project 1 - Love Letter

Love Letter

If a group of women are standing together but their eyes are wandering, they are likely to be looking for guys. If they each take a turn to break away from the group tot head to the bathroom alone, they are on the prowl. If they are huddled together giggling, they are usually not interested in finding men.

I have chosen “Kingthings Willowless” in the letter “o” because it has a specific, decorative quality that would work well in certain cases, such as being used as a header to grab the attention of the viewer. I also like the fact that it isn’t overly decorative and the semi circle cut outs along both sides add another dimension of detail without being gaudy. I also like the organic feel of the swirls because it gives it just enough oomph to make it fun, especially in the use of a children’s book or for holiday uses like Halloween.

58

Infographic


59 59

Mini Project 2 - Create Your Own Bus.: Intake Intake: Emily Park


Mini Project 2 - Create Your Own Bus.: Creative Dev.

60 60

Brainstorming


61 61

Mini Project 2 - Create Your Own Bus.: Drafts Bus. Card & Letterhead Drafts


Mini Project 2 - Create Your Own Bus.: Final Design

62 62

Final Bus. Card & Letterhead


Mini Project 2 - Create Your Own Bus.: Printing Spec. Sheets 63 63

Letterhead Spec Sheet Bus. Card Spec Sheet


Mini Project 3 - Olive Oil: Research

64 64

Research


65 65

Mini Project 3 - Olive Oil: Final Finished Spread


Read, Reflect & Report Section

66


67 67

Read, Reflect, & Report Ch. 6


Read, Reflect, & Report

68 68

Ch. 10


69

69

Digital Process Book  

Digital Process Book for GDE310A (Editorial Design).

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