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DO DIE OR

‘Do or Die’ is a business that aims to tackle the social issue of homelessness, whilst challenging and changing the perceptions of those sleeping rough. It will do this by sharing the shocking, real life stories of how individuals became homeless, as well as revolutionising the way donations are obtained. Through life size donation pillars offering contactless payment, and using this funding to provide self-esteem care boxes to the homeless. Being a versatile business that acts as an enhancement add-on, Do or Die is able to work alongside any homeless shelter or charity, and can be specifically adapted to address their needs and values directly, raising money exclusively for their visitors and supplying them with made to order care packages. First launching with Crisis, alongside their Crisis at Christmas from October to December 2018. The campaign will roll out on Instagram on October 10th - World Homeless day, and take to the streets via slap up stickers, and posters on bus shelters around key London areas; Kings Cross, Victoria, Paddington and Euston.

On November 1st life size donation pillars with take their place within the train stations in these four areas, next to the self-service ticket machines, offering an innovative and accessible way to make donations via contactless payment. Making 50 donation days up until December 20th to fund 5000 care boxes, chosen by the visitors via a menu, where they are able to make their own selection, and choose which core product pack and three additional extras they wish to make up their care box. All ready to be packed and delivered in time for pick up during Christmas at the Crisis day, and rough sleeping centres. To ‘Do or Die’ is to carry on no matter what, to face a battle with sheer determination, and the only option being to succeed. This is exactly what homeless individuals do every single day, they fight a battle in order to stay alive. And this is exactly what Do or Die will do for them. By finding a creative solution to a social issue, creating innovative ways to help the homeless and ultimately making the ignored, un-ignorable.


MORE THAN

300,000


PEOPLE IN BRITAIN ARE

HOMELESS


134

1

IN

59

IN

2 0 0

134 307,000

78,000 3

4 5 0 0

3 1140

216,000

34 307,000 1 in 200 1 in 59 4500 73 % 1140 34% 216,000 78,000 134% 73 %

people in the UK homeless in the UK homeless in London homeless people sleeping rough in England increase in sleeping rough in 3 years rough sleepers a night in London increase in homelessness since 2010 empty houses accross the country families living in temporary accomodation increase of people sleeping on the streets since 2010 more children children homeless than in 2010

73


WHY DO OR DIE?

34 5 0 0

1

IN

The issue of homelessness and sleeping rough is becoming more severe every year, with statistics spiraling out of control. According to Shelter, more than 300,000 people in the UK are homeless, equating to 1 in every 200, as well as rough sleeper numbers in England rising for the seventh year running. It is painstakingly evident already that improvements need to happen. Something clearly isn’t working and needs to change. London is the hardest hit area with this issue in the UK. With figures three times as much than any other area, and 1 in 59 people homeless, it remains Britain’s homelessness center. These harsh facts illustrate the need for Do or Die to focus its attention on this specific area, targeting London in a bid to improve its escalating statistics. Because these are not just statistics on a screen or a piece of paper, these are human being’s lives.

200

7 8 0 0 1 IN 2 0 0

HOMELESSNESS IN THE UK 50k LONDON SCOTLAND & WALES SOUTH - EAST WEST MIDLANDS EAST OF ENGLAND SOUTH - WEST NORTH - WEST EAST MIDLANDS YORKS & HUMBER NORTH - EAST

100k

150k


What prevents people from helping or donating money? People hold back on donations because of two key factors, how donations are taken, and their negative perceptions of homeless people. The sad fact is, is that people would like to help but they don’t know how, or what’s best - with even the most compassionate of people feeling like it is easier just to walk by. There is also a distrust to where their money is going, how much of it is used and what for. Through interviews it has become apparent many people hold back from making donations down to their false perceptions and stereotypes of the homeless; putting all of them into the category of addicts who will spend their money on substances.

HOW DONATIONS ARE COLLECTED In addition, the key downfall of charities is how they collect donations. Straight forward cash through a charity worker or pot just isn't effective enough, and people are hesitant to do so or avoid it all together; held back by the uncertainty of where their money is going, and the mundane collection processes. It is evident there is a strong need and gap in the market of charities to be directly specific on donations and what they are paying for, that is why on the Donation Pillars the donator is aware £5 funds a care box, and all of the general public’s donations will be funding this, not advertising. It is a pleasant experience to be able to donate X amount of money with the affirmation


NEGATIVE PERCEPTIONS OF THE HOMELESS this is directly funding a specific item. Coming away from charities and donations, and to the actual people concerned; what do they need? Pride and self-esteem is an essential, and one of the biggest needs of any individual who finds themselves homeless. And is often where charities fall short, not going beyond the typical food and shelter. Which could be a potential factor to the increase in the levels of homelessness, I have witnessed first-hand (through TIH, a niche modelling agency exclusively featuring those currently or transitioning out of homelessness) the effects a confidence boost can do for a person and their situation. Psychologically, it takes them out of the realm of hopelessness, and gives them some tenacity to make changes and improvement, more than what a hot meal could do. Do or Die addresses the weaknesses of existing charitable elements, responding to their down falls and creating an innovative solution that is not only accessible for anyone, but revolutionises how donations are collected as well as addressing the needs of the homeless population as well. By challenging the often-false misconceptions of them, and addressing their need for self-esteem. It is a concept that is so socially engaged with an issue that is very current and present within the media, made advantageous by the current political interest and activism of present generations. Charities need a push, and Do or Die can do that.

DONT KNOW HOW TO HELP


ADAPTABILITY

DIGNITY

INSPIRATION


CRISIS One of Crisis’s core values is adaptability, and the willingness to change what they do, when they know what works. Making them a charity open to change and new ideas. Further core values include the pioneering research they undertake, into the causes and consequences of homelessness, inspiring others to help end the issue and upholding the homeless individual’s dignity by giving them the tools to help themselves out of the situation. They align perfectly with the ethos of Do or Die, and are an established charity to launch with, creating an ideal fusion of charitable platforms that can enhance each other. Crisis are based in London, my key target area (as well as 10 other locations across the UK - future potential) and run ‘Crisis at Christmas’ every year; bringing temporary day centers, and rough sleepers centers, to life at Christmas with a dedicated team of volunteers. This allows the alignment of care box providing with Christmas, opening up a successful charitable Christmas focus to the initial launch where people have higher giving generosity, and those in need feel the most unloved. Paired with Crisis, Do or Die can successfully demonstrate its charity enhancement potential. By aligning with their ‘Crisis at Christmas’ it has the ability to address the needs and opportunities of this existing element. For example,

Crisis do not provide any form of care box at their centers to the Christmas visitors. Here is huge opportunity to enhance Crisis at Christmas to its full potential; by tapping into one of their values of upholding the dignity of those sleeping rough - through a care box packed with tools to aid in self-esteem improvement. As well as this, Crisis’s donation methods are limited to primarily online, charity shops and charity workers; they are yet to branch into contactless developments. Here, the donation pillars can completely revolutionise their existing means of collecting money, and overall making them, as a charity, much more creative, innovative and appealing to the current trend of tech-savvy consumer, who are full of political power and activism. In particular, Gen-Z are more politically aware than they ever have been, demanding change and committing to social issues. Now is the perfect time for innovation within charity, exactly what Do or Die responds to.


DO YOU CAR DO YOU CA DO YOU C THE CAMPAIGN Before the donation pillar and care box elements, part 1 of Do or Die, the campaign; aiming to challenge and change the perceptions of those sleeping rough, will commence on the 10th of October, which is World Homeless Day. Allowing three weeks to advertise and build up anticipation before November 1st when the Donation Pillars take their place. During these three weeks, the campaign will be taking to the streets via bus shelter and underground station posters, as well as the strap line stickers slapped onto lamp posts in the surrounding areas. People are interested by people, and most of all their stories, which is why the campaign composes of a collection of perceptions the general public hold of those sleeping rough, faced with the harsh reality to how the homeless individuals found themselves on the streets, providing narrative and stark contrast between just two opposing images. This opens up a window of reflection onto the viewer, making them question their own perceptions once faced with the truth.


RE ? ARE ? CARE ?


SOCIAL MEDIA As well as this, the campaign will hit social media platform Instagram, where it will be officially promoted by Do or Die ambassador Anthony Joshua, who is one of Crisis’s existing celebrity supporters, boasting a 6.3 million following on his own Instagram channel. His presence on board the campaign will offer promotion to a phenomenal number of people, and alone will generate so much awareness and potential visitors to the donation pillars. As well as being present at the grand opening of the flagship pillar at Waterloo when they launch. Coming from London himself, and being a “strong believer in giving back to the community� as quoted from his own website, he offers a celebrity presence whose heart is in the cause as well.


DONATION PILLARS In terms of collecting donations, the advancements of this practice have been extremely limited. With typical ways of doing so being donation pots at till points, people in the street with clipboards, and online. Through research it has become extremely apparent how the general public feel, in particular; about charity workers approaching them in the street and how they feel ‘hassled’ and ‘pressured’ which is often the reason they decide not to donate at all. Clip boards and shaking a collection pot has become over-saturated, and an innovative solution is desperately needed. In an ever-growing technological world, people of all ages, and especially the younger generation, are more adapted to contactless options, and technological ways of doing things as a whole. Especially terms of payment, with people rarely carrying cash. To add to this, as humans we are becoming more inclined to avoid

interaction with other people, naturally opting for the self-service options whether that be checkouts at supermarkets, ticket machines at train stations, or even ordering at McDonald’s. The demand for self-service is apparent, and strong. In general, when participating in a service, the consumer likes it to be quick with minimal hassle - especially from staff. In direct response to this, the Donation Pillar will provide an innovative solution, in the form of a modernised version of the classic change collection box. But with contactless payment ability through bank cards and apple pay on mobile devices (as well as chip and pin); revolutionising donations, and keeping up to date with the modern world by accommodating payment preferences and tackling the issue of people carrying less cash. Overall, this offers the donator a quick and private service by allowing them to make a donation independently and eliminating the potential pressure they may feel from a charity worker.

DO YOU


“I WANT TO GIVE TO CHARITY BECAUSE I WANT TO DO IT, NOT BECAUSE SOMEBODY IS HASSLING ME ON THE STREET. I HATE SOMEONE APPROACHING YOU, I HATE ALL THE QUESTIONS AND I HATE THE PRESSURE. SO I JUST AVOID IT ENTIRELY!”

CARE ?


NO SIGN UPS. NO LONG CONVERSATIONS. NO FUSS DESIGN The pillars design takes the very thing being challenged, the typical donation pot, making this 6ft, bright orange and in the middle of bustling London train stations. Completely revolutionising the boxes that usually gather dust at till point. This alone will generate vast attention and interest down to the pure novelty of the pillar; people are attracted to novelty, and would even potentially use it purely because it is interesting, or to take a picture of it. Entirely branded, this life size orange donation pot will definitely stand out within a busy station. Directly questioning the viewer ‘Do you care? Do you give? Do something!’ this automatically takes away the generally passive, and easy to ignore, current means of collecting donations. It makes it harder to ignore if the reader is directly spoken to in being asked a question, and naturally makes them reflect on themselves and their own actions. This is accompanied by the hashtag #doordie.give, where the individual can take to Instagram to find out more.

DO YOU


BREAKDOWN • Life size 6ft pillars in the shape of classic donation pots • Donations fund the self-esteem care boxes • Pillars stationed alongside self-service ticket machines at four central London train stations; Kings Cross, Victoria, Waterloo and Euston. • Offer contactless payment ability, apple pay and chip & pin • Options to donate £2.50, £5, £10 or another amount ‘£__’ • When donating £5 (1 x Care box) option to select an encouraging message from the drop-down list which will be printed and put into the care box you funded.

LOCATION

HOW THEY WORK

Train stations are one of the highest traffic generating areas within London, with just last year Waterloo having nearly ninety-nine and a half million people go through its doors, that’s an average of a quarter of a million-people passing through the station every day.

Above the payment screen there is an ‘About’ section; giving details of Do or Die, what they do, and how donations made provide self-esteem care boxes for the homeless.

The exact location of the pillars will be next to self-service ticket machines, so when these people are buying their tickets they will inevitably come in to contact with the donation pillar. Allowing them ease to collect their ticket and make a donation, with their card already out and donation pillar right in their pathway.

Then ‘Step 1’ offers instructions to choose your donation amount, and ‘Step 2’ to select an optional message form our drop-down menu, then use the contactless or chip and pin option for payment. This is so simple and easy to use, offering an almost ‘fast food’ option for donations. With a donation being able to be made in just three clicks and in under a minute!.

U GIVE ?


DO DO DO DO DO DO

SOM SOM SOM SOM SOM SOM


METHING METHING METHING METHING METHING METHING


CARE BOXES The common attitude of they’ll ‘get what they’re given’, and that homeless people only deserve the bare basics is unappealing and tiring. Why shouldn’t those that are homeless have luxuries? Why shouldn’t they have something packaged nicely? Imagine the benefits mentally and emotionally this would have on an individual to receive something so deeply thought about and personal. Especially considering the positive emotional impact, it has to any individual, let alone some body on the streets, is reason enough. The care boxes take the shape of a small package with an accessible handle, as well as in keeping with the branding of bright orange; signifying determination, encouragement and change. The contents are a box of feel good items, ranging from those that can improve personal hygiene, to feeding a pet companion. Addressing the specific seasonal and gender needs; through the acknowledgment of females need for sanitary

products, a male’s high bacterial risk in terms of a beard, and keeping cool/ warm with the changing seasons. There are countless variations of the care package, and they are not just restricted to only one. The visitor will receive a menu, where he or she can select specifically a core pack of hygiene items, and then add three special extras of their choice. This is to be able to address the issue of receiving items they already have, and also whether they require gender specific items, especially for women (in terms of sanitary products) as services are often male focused. “Expecting women to simply fit into homelessness services which have been designed for homeless men is not good enough. Service providers must understand the particular needs of homeless women” -St Mungo’s Report


A BOX OF ALL YOU NEED


A BOX OF AL A BOX OF AL A BOX OF AL A BOX OF AL A BOX OF AL A BOX OF AL A BOX OF AL A BOX OF AL A BOX OF AL A BOX OF AL Included in both core packages is a haircut voucher, brought to Crisis by a team of volunteers from Haircuts4Homeless, an organisation offering hair cut services to those in need around the UK; inspired by making individuals feel good about themselves

“Homeless people have many challenges to face, one of them often being low self-esteem. A haircut can have a great effect on someone, giving them a real boost.” -Haircuts4Homeless

Being able to actively make decisions and select what care package items they want would help boost an individual’s self-esteem alone, allowing them to have a choice and control over something in their life, with their opinion and wants directly addressed through the options and selection process of the menu.


LL YOU NEED LL YOU NEED LL YOU NEED LL YOU NEED LL YOU NEED LL YOU NEED LL YOU NEED LL YOU NEED LL YOU NEED LL YOU NEED Please fill out your name and date of birth above, select your box of all you need and hand this back to one of our volunteers.

1 - Toothbrush and toothpaste, hand sanitiser, lip balm, hair cut voucher

2- Wet wipes, comb, nail clippers, hair bands, hair cut voucher

Select three

Hat/Gloves

Playing cards

Beard Oil

Suncream

Underwear (M/F)

Umbrella

Sanitary Products

First Aid Kit

Dog food package

Handwarmers

THIS VOUCHER ENTITLES YOU TO 1 X HAIRCUT

BROUGHT TO YOU BY


DO OR DIE DO OR DIE SCHEDULE

Do or Die can align with and adapt to the existing Crisis at Christmas dates, with the day centers opening from 23rd-29th of December and the rough sleeper’s centers open from 22nd- 30th of December. With funding ranging right from November 1st - December 20th (50 days) to collect money via donation pillars and have the campaign advertised. Then on the Friday 21st & Saturday 22nd (the weekend before Christmas) take care box orders from visitors and have them ready to collect on Christmas day and Boxing day. These can be packed and sorted by the existing 11k volunteers already available for Crisis at Christmas. The day centers, where visitors have access to food and entertainment, cater to 250 guests and there are 4 centers. That is a maximum of 1000 visitors per day, with potentially 2000 spread over the 21st/22nd order days. When taking into consideration the five rough sleepers centers this holds the potential of a grand total of 5000 care boxes. Launched on November 1st this allows 50 days to acquire the target amount of ‘5000 care boxes in 50 days’ incentive. Each care box costs £5 to produce, that equates to a grand total of £25,000. Spread across the 50 days equals £500 a day needed to be raised, and £125 per pillar, per day. With all extra proceeds going to Crisis.


TARGET £25,000 ÷ 50 DAYS = £500 PER DAY £500 ÷ 4 (DONATION PILLARS) = £125 PER PILLAR, PER DAY

SCHEDULE 10TH OCTOBER - CAMPAIGN 1ST NOVEMBER - PILLARS LAUNCHED 20TH DECEMBER - PILLARS TAKEN AWAY 21ST-22ND DECEMBER - VISITOR BOX ORDERS 25TH-26TH DECEMBER - CARE BOX COLLECTION


FUTURE As a charity business enhancement, Do or Die has boundless potential to grow, as well as an extensive amount of charities to work with. It can be adapted and changed to suitably unify with various homeless charities across the UK, with the capability to be launched abroad. And has the power to become a more permanent fixture; and rolled out quarterly rather than a one-time occasion. When uniting with a charity, Do or Die can be adaptable to various campaigns, events, or specific values. The donation pillar and care box elements hold the versatility to be suited alongside any of these, and can be used as a general charity element, or as part of a specific event (e.g. Crisis at Christmas). In terms of element improvement, where the donation pillars are situated could be spread across a wider variety of areas and locations; rather than restricted to only 4, and just at train stations (but of course with varying charities this would be different). In addition, the boxes could become larger, offering entire packs of products rather than individual items, and have even more choices to select from.

S RA PRO Do or Die align so well with Crisis, that it could actually become a part of their charity completely. Whilst alongside this, potentially working with less established charities to aid them in terms of growth and donation acquirement. This could be done with a different smaller shelter bi-annually, to raise a % of their donations for them and provide care boxes for their visitors (50% going to them, and 50% going to Crisis). Although Do or Die is dedicated to those that are homeless and sleeping rough, in the future it could also be applied to those that experience poverty


SHOUT IT AISE IT OVIDE IT in general, in particular reaching out to the young and the old. And be used in schools, for young teenagers and children who receive free school meals and whose parents otherwise would not be able to fund a care box of treats and items considered luxury. And finally, grow to other charities concerned with other social issues, such as OAP’s who receive care visits; e.g. Age UK and The Salvation Army. We reveal the truth behind your social issue. We raise money through our innovative life size donation pillars. We provide self-esteem care boxes.


REFERENCES REFERENCES REFERENCES REFERENCES REFERENCES REFERENCES REFERENCES REFERENCES REFERENCES


S S S S S S S S S

CRISIS: https://www.crisis.org.uk/ ANTHONY JOSHUA ON CHARITY WORK: https://www.anthonyjoshua.com/giving-back/ HAIRCUTS4HOMELESS: https://www.haircuts4homeless.com/ LEE JEFFRIES - HOMELESS PHOTOGRAPHY (CRISIS PG.): https://500px.com/leejeffries TRAFFIC IN LONDON STATIONS: https://www.standard.co.uk/news/transport/revealed-uks-busiesttrain-stations-and-how-many-are-in-london-a3708276.html STATISTICS: https://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/home-news/homelessness-rough-sleepers-record-england-stats-homeless-people-2017-increase-a8177086.html http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-42536418


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