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HOW WE GREW LONG AGO: LINDSAY’S WARTIME HOUSES | OUR SHARED DESTINY | NOBODY NEEDS MY OPINION

THE LINDSAY ADVOCATE WINNER - NEW BUSINESS OF THE YEAR

GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT IN KAWARTHA LAKES

GROWING TOO OLD, TOO FAST

MORE PEOPLE, MORE WEALTH WHAT OUR MP AND MPP THINK KAWARTHA LAKES PLACES THAT WILL GROW FASTEST

GROWING UP, OR OUT?

WE NEED MORE EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES


A POST OFFICE FOR EVERYONE DeliveringCommunityPower.ca

Join the call for Canada Post to Deliver Community Power. Canadian Union of Postal Workers


July 2019 • Vol 2 • Issue 16

PUBLISHED BY

Fireside Publishing House, a proudly Canadian company. The Lindsay Advocate is published monthly and distributed to a wide variety of businesses and locations within Kawartha Lakes, North Durham and Southern Haliburton County. We are a proud member of the Lindsay and District, Bobcaygeon, and Fenelon Falls Chambers of Commerce.

CONTENTS KAWARTHA LAKES’ FINEST MAGAZINE

TEAM ADVOCATE EDITORIAL

Publisher and Writer-at-Large: Roderick Benns Contributing Editor & Writer-at-Large: Trevor Hutchinson Research, Strategy & Development: Joli Scheidler-Benns Contributing Writers:

Trevor Hutchinson, Jamie Morris, Ian McKechnie LETTERS TO THE EDITOR SEND TO

kawarthalakespublisher@gmail.com or 151 King St, Suite One, Lindsay, ON, K9V 1E4 ADVERTISING & MARKETING

Advertising/Editorial inquiries: Roderick Benns

705-341-1496

CREATIVE

Graphic Design: Barton Creative Co. Photography: Sienna Frost

Visit www.lindsayadvocate.ca for many more stories

FOLLOW US ON

d The Lindsay Advocate @lindsayadvocate Roderick Benns @roderickbenns

c /The Lindsay Advocate PRINTING

Printed by Maracle Inc. OUR PRIVACY POLICY The Lindsay Advocate is independently owned and operated. The opinions expressed herein are the views of the contributors and do not necessarily reflect those of this magazine. Photos, text, and art work contained in The Lindsay Advocate are copyrighted and may not be published, broadcast, or rewritten without the express permission of the Publisher. Liability for incorrectly displayed advertising is limited to publishing corrections or advertising credit for subsequent issues. The Publisher reserves the right to reject, revise, cancel, omit, discontinue or even decline to print advertising without reason or liability, and without notice. The Publisher has made every effort to ensure information contained herein was accurate at press time. The Publisher does not assume and hereby disclaims any liability to any party for damage, loss, or disruption caused by errors or omissions.

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Letters to the Editor UpFront Benns’ Belief: Our Shared Path Ready, Set, Grow How do we Grow in Kawartha Lakes? Jamie Schmale How do we Grow in Kawartha Lakes? Laurie Scott City Notes Local Heirloom Recipes Dinner Program at Boys and Girls Club Friends & Neighbours with Jamie Morris Just in Time with Ian McKechnie Trevor’s Take: Nobody Needs my Opinion

OUR COMMON CAUSE It’s hard to believe that it’s just been one year since I moved back to this amazing community, along with my wife and daughter. Joli and I have been made to feel very welcome and all of us have tried to get involved as much as possible in the community, whether personally or professionally. We’ve shopped almost 100% locally and we love to connect with the small business owners, the linchpins of our local economy. We were also humbled to win the New Business of the Year award through the Lindsay + District Chamber of Commerce. In short, we’ve been made to feel like we belong. That’s what the Advocate was always meant to be about – to help create a more cohesive community where we work together in common cause for our mutual betterment. Thank you, readers, and thank you, advertisers, for supporting such a vision for Kawartha Lakes. ~ Roderick and Joli

Advertising Sales: Contact us at 705-341-1496 • kawarthalakespublisher@gmail.com


DSAY A TE

LIN

The Meaning of Community

AD O C V

For the Love of Canada, Vote Responsibly It has become clear to me that today’s Progressive Conservative government is an oxymoron. You cannot be progressive and be conservative. Under the leadership of Ontario’s Premier Doug Ford and the federal Conservative’s Andrew Scheer, the only thing progressive about the PC government is that it has become more and more progressively conservative: Rolled back sex education in schools to the 1990s; is against women’s reproductive rights; against the right to assisted dying: against protections from climate change: against diversity and inclusivity; against same sex marriage; against protections for children and the elderly; against the sustainability of our cultural institutions – schools, libraries, music, TV Ontario, CBC radio and the arts. Not only is today’s PC government not progressive – it’s not nice. The barrage of anti-Trudeau memes flooding social media is out of control. Created by a conservative group called Ontario Proud, they produce shareable memes and videos for Facebook, Instagram and Twitter that drive their conservative agenda with misleading information. This is not the same conservative party you may have voted for in the past, or your parents and their parents before them. No, today’s Progressive Conservative party is fueled by the extreme right whose mission is to turn back the clock 30 years. Times have changed. Rather than try to force our country back into a shape which no longer exists, doesn’t it make more sense to embrace change rather than fight it? To work with science rather than deny it? To create jobs that will meet the challenges of climate change and a more diverse demographic? And, this October, doesn’t it make sense to vote for a party that values people over corporations? That has zero tolerance for those who fuel hatred and fear? That respects and protects religious and gender-based differences, the rights of women, and the well-being of children and the vulnerable? For the love of Canada, this October, we need to vote responsibly. - Jerelyn Craden, Haliburton

My wife and I are relative newcomers to Kawartha Lakes and Pleasant Point in particular. We had no intention of purchasing a cottage when we decided to relocate for the summer back to Canada. It was our relatives who suggested we should consider looking at a cottage next to them.We were in fact looking at moving back to southern Ontario in the Burlington area. We fondly remember our visits to our relative’s cottage on Sturgeon Lake and the many people we met through them on the Point. I also experienced renting house boats from Three Boys and Elgin Marina and travelling the lakes and towns in the area. These visits were vacations but there was always this feeling of contentment remembering those times. So when we did agree to look at the cottage which we (eventually) purchased I asked my wife one question -- could she live here? The answer was a resounding yes. We had moved many times in the past and to purchase the cottage on the spur of the moment was a surprise to us and our families. What we didn’t realize was we were not buying a cottage but rather being adopted by a wonderful caring community known as Pleasant Point. As many people move from the city to get away from the stress of modern living they realize buying a cottage is really buying a community with people who care about each other. It reminds us of our youth and simpler times, or of putting on an old pair of slippers. - George Baillie, Pleasant Point

An unhealthy future? In 1902, James Ross establish the hospital on condition that it be maintained by the County, as a gift to the community. Its future was entrusted to the people who, at that time, could be board members. All that is about to change. The various acts of incorporation, that protected the original intent, purpose, and governance of the hospital, are about to go through the bureaucratic shredder. History, kindness, and forethought, are to be expunged. The new direction will be set by an unelected board of governors. The governors will be selected from a list created by a nomination committee. How the nomination committee is created, is a dark mystery. From what deity do they get the power to create the new demigods? Cronyism will see that the ‘right’ people are put in power.

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This new board may merge, disband, restrict, expand, or alter any, and all, hospital services with complete impunity. The public can do nothing. This is the textbook culmination of the growth in bureaucratic imperialism. We are ruled by plutocrats, and managed by bureaucrats. It will create a system that is much larger, more costly, less efficient, and more autocratic than anything we have seen before in public health. This is a permanent change in structure. Any future change would require the board to dissolve itself! Does royalty take itself to the scaffold? At the meeting on May 22, I heard that a major issue was whether the correct name for the hospital was The Ross Memorial, or simply Ross Memorial. Apparently, our civil servants, and legal beagles, spent thousands of dollars, and many hours, discussing this issue.This is banal nonsense. It is well below the commonsense threshold of the average taxpayer. The people at the meeting were mainly seniors. In 20 years we will be compost. At that time there will be no communal memory of a time before Big Bureaucracy. The people will be swept up, like crumbs, by the brave new world, into a state of submission, and servitude. The curtain is coming down on democracy, genuine empathy, and common sense. The local health coalition is fighting hard against a social evil that is funded by our taxes! The health coalition needs your help. - Peter Weygang, Bobcaygeon

The Elephant in the System Your water issue was most excellent. For years I have been dismayed, watching the amount of salt (some marble sized) spread on our roads and sidewalks, sometimes when the temperature was rising and there was no forecast of colder, inclement weather. By now, we are all aware of the ‘nuisance’ lawsuits that have imprisoned society. According to the City Works Department it is a fear of these that so much prophylactic salt is spread. Third party liability is the elephant that is trampling us and our water systems provincially and possibly country wide. It makes sense to use salt in the winter but overkill for the ‘just in case’ scenario must be stopped. This will have to be a system-down change but the desire will have to

come from the will of the people somehow. An election issue perhaps, if a political party would go up against the insurance/legal system. Precedent-setting cases have already created a pattern of ‘misuse’ of laws and the removal of the individual’s right to be responsible for themselves. Why should the majority of responsible people be held captive and our waterways deluged by the amount of salt going into them, changing the health of our ecosystem and affecting aquatic life? - Anonymous (by request), Lindsay Any ideas out there?, Any politicians who will take this on?

A Fan from the Beginning Wow this magazine just keeps getting better and better. I have been a fan from the beginning and read it from cover to cover. Thanks for the best colourful informative magazine this town has ever had. - Judy Robinson, Lindsay

Dry stone wall in Norland Interesting story of stone walls (‘The Dry Stone Wall Experience in Kawartha Lakes’ by Margaret Cunningham, June edition). There is another great example of a dry stone wall at Moncks Landing Golf Club at 155 Hiltons Point Rd, Norland, that (people) may want to check out. They also have a magnificent 100 year old stone barn made all of local stone. - Ross Fogwell, Norland

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HOME IS NOT A PLACE...IT’S A FEELING. LET ME HELP WITH YOURS.

We want your letters! Send us your thoughts to be featured on this page. The Lindsay Advocate welcomes your Letters to the Editor. We reserve the right to edit letters for clarity or length. Simply email thelindsayadvocate@gmail.com or mail to 151 King St., Suite 1, Lindsay, ON, K9V 1E4. Please keep your letters to 200 words or less.

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UPFRONT

}} Lindsay Advocate wins New Business of the Year award

Chris Wizowski, left, (Kawartha Lakes This Week) presents New Business of the Year Award to Roderick and Joli Benns of The Lindsay Advocate

PHOTO: SIENNA FROST

Liz Parker, Rob Macklem, Citizen of the Year: Claus Reuter, Kelly Parker

David Feeley, Brad Bird, Business Leader: Don Brown, Candace Buckley

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The Lindsay Advocate has been named New Business of the Year by the Lindsay + District Chamber of Commerce at the 2019 Evening of Excellence event. The Advocate was presented with the honour (which was sponsored by Kawartha Lakes This Week) at the Lakeview Arts Barn. It’s the second award for the Advocate in the past year, after winning an Innovation Award through the Kawartha Lakes Community Futures Development Corporation earlier. The Chamber, partnering with Cogeco, recognized local individuals, groups and businesses. The other winners awarded Excellence Awards were: Marketing Excellence Award: Kawartha Care Wellness Centre, Health & Wellness Excellence Award: Integrated Care Pharmacy, Youth Excellence Award: BTW Electronic Parts, Innovation Excellence Award: PKA SoftTouch Inc., Customer Service Excellence Award: Fresh FueLL, Design Excellence Award: Horizons Family Dentistry, Employer of the Year Award: Wards Lawyers, Notfor-profit Excellence Award: Soroptimist International of Kawartha Lakes.  The highest honours went to Don Brown, and Claus Reuter, who were named Business Leader of the Year and Citizen of the Year, respectively. Comedian Denis Grignon acted as master of ceremonies for the night. For the 2020 Evening of Excellence the Chamber will open nominations immediately and accept them until February 28, 2020.

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BENNS’ BELIEF

RODERICK BENNS, PUBLISHER

Our shared path

People who reside in small towns, much more than in large cities, have a shared destiny. We are not lost in the shuffle of faceless people and endless possibilities. We are each others’ possibilities; we are each other’s best chance. The ache of a factory or business closing is felt not only by the people who work there, their lives scarred by uncertain days ahead, but by everyone in the town.That includes our small businesses who may then not see as much support. It could include your neighbour or a family member whose life has irrevocably changed. Similarly, we can celebrate together when there’s a new employer or a business expansion. Or we can enjoy the quiet happiness of a new or refurbished park or the growth of a community garden. Public institutions are magnified in importance in small towns. Luckily, our excellent system of public education in Ontario means great things for smaller centres like ours. For no matter where we live here we can be assured of good schools. The OECD – which has measured our education system in Canada and found it to be in the world’s top 10 – would say our dominant theme is equity, with very little variation between schools. Our libraries are integral civic spaces that connect us, offering not only books but access to the internet, programs for families, and a chance for levelling life’s playing field. In a small town, especially, they are lifelines to the broader world. Part of our shared path is to inevitably grow together. As Contributing Editor Trevor Hutchinson writes in our in-depth feature story we are projected to grow quite a bit larger in Kawartha Lakes within the next 20 years. Our small community of communities -- to borrow former Prime Minister Joe Clark’s phrase -- will find itself with a larger tax base and the means to do more. We will need more employers as well as great public institutions as we grow. Seniors add much to our communities but even they will tell you we need younger, working age families, too. Attracting entrepreneurs looking for the kind of balanced lifestyle we can offer here is part of that equation. As we grow and become something shaped by both new and old, what will we want our shared destiny to be? Will we be happy to become Toronto’s playground or will we find a way to protect our core elements – our town’s soul – that makes us what we are? Protecting who we are cannot mean the status quo, though. Towns (or businesses, or people) that resist all kinds of change are destined to fail. So we must let change in and manage it wisely. With a nod to Mahatma Gandhi, we must all speak up – and be a part of – the change we wish to see.

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Dr. Jacquelyn Nicholls invites you to a new experience in healing.

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READY, SET

GROW Speak to any four people in the City of Kawartha Lakes about the prospect of growth and development and you are likely to get at least as many opinions. Some will no doubt abhor the idea of more people, more traffic and less of the tranquility that they either grew up with or came here to enjoy. A business owner might say we need to grow and we need to grow fast to increase economic opportunity and wonder how we can increase employment. A parent with young children might suggest that we are growing too old as a community and ask about much-needed community amenities. Still others might simply ask, ‘‘When is the Walmart coming?” It’s the question Mayor Andy Letham gets the most and one that he hears in every area of our vast city. “I’ve been asked that question in seniors homes and while visiting public schools,” jokes the mayor. For a lot of us, the Walmart saga has been a touchstone -- a filter through which we judge both the pace and possibility of growth and development ever since an optimistic developer erected a ‘coming soon’ sign 13 years ago in a field that still looks more like a nature preserve than anything else. For some the Walmart saga is the gateway drug to complaining that our City can’t get anything done. But the facts -- always more nuanced than emotion -- tell a different story. The site required an extensive investment in infrastructure (the northwest sewer trunk). All the planning and zoning work required for that development has long been completed by the City. The development is out of the City’s hands -- it’s now a matter between a private developer and their negotiations with other private companies. If anything, the Walmart saga has given us a slow motion look at the complexity of growth and develop-

TREVOR HUTCHINSON

ment. Growth requires public infrastructure and private capital. It requires coordination of a bunch or interconnected issues. There’s one thing we can be sure of though. We are going to grow, and that change will happen a lot faster than a certain big box development. And while we might not self-define this way, we are considered by the Province to be in the Greater Golden Horseshoe, and we have been tapped for growth. A lot of growth. So whether we like the idea or not, it’s something that we all have to think about. To help wade through this, The Lindsay Advocate interviewed city officials, the Mayor, our MP and MPP, and consulted other experts to look into the growth that is coming to our communities.

WHY DO WE HAVE TO GROW?

01

Even if we decided, for some reason, that we didn’t want to grow, it wouldn’t stop growth and development 01 02 WHERE WHERE ARE ARE WE WE GOING TO TO GROW? GROW? from happening. AndGOING that’s because of our geographic location. As Richard Holy, Manager of Planning for the City of Kawartha Lakes, explains, “[The] KL offers an affordable opportunity for residents to experience 03will HOW WILL WE homeownership andGROW? recreational opportunities. We continue to grow based on our proximity to Durham Region and the GTA in general as people choose KL either as ARE a placeWE to raise a family or as a place to retire.” GROWING And withTOO Highway 407 getting closer, we04 will be even OLD? more accessible. “Future highway improvements by the Province for Highways 35 and 7 will benefit Lindsay as well as the City as a whole through improved connection to the Highway 407,” adds Holy.

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CONT’D ON PAGE 10

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READY, SET, GROW CONT’D FROM PAGE 9

But it’s more than an issue of economic migration based on land prices. Our city has been identified as an area for future provincial growth in the provincial master growth plan. A Place to Grow: Growth Plan for the Greater Golden Horseshoe -- the province’s “strategic, long-range, comprehensive and integrated approach to build thriving and affordable communities across Ontario” -- identifies growth targets for our city. It envisions a population of 100,000 people by 2031 and 107,000 by 2041. Think about that for a second: Based on the 2016 census, we had 75,431 residents. This planning document (which compels the City to make official plans and bylaws around those targets) calls for a 32 per cent increase in our population in just 22 years, with more growth predicted after that. Most people contacted for this story don’t think we will actually hit those provincially set targets, but clearly growth is in our future.

” This planning document (which

compels the City to make official plans and bylaws around those targets) calls for a 32 per cent increase in our population in just 22 years, with more growth predicted after that.

And when you do the math that might not be such a bad thing. The CKL covers a massive geographical area with 5,400 ‘lane kilometres’ of road to maintain, not to mention all the infrastructure in our settlement areas and all the amenities that make this a pretty cool place to live. But the only way to have municipal taxes stabilize, or even increase less is to expand the tax base. As Mayor Letham explains, “when we grow, it helps spread the cost over a larger tax base. With growth, there’s extra costs, so we need to keep those costs under control, and offset the costs for the overall benefit of taxpayers. Businesses benefit with growth. Those who want to raise a family also want to see growth and new amenities.” CONT’D ON PAGE 11

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City of Kawartha Lakes projections for the Urban Settlement Areas in 2031 are as follows:

SETTLEMENT AREA

POPULATION BASE (2006)

POPULATION BASE (2031)

SEASONAL POPULATION (2031)

Lindsay

19,361

31,002

11,471

Bobcaygeon

3,313

4,625

1,711

Fenelon Falls

2,164

3,640

1,347

Omemee

1,323

2,143

793

Woodville

875*

1,217

n/a

* Base year for Woodville is 2011 and data is sourced from the Census Assumes a person per unit ratio of 2.48 in 2011 and data is sourced from the Census

City of Kawartha Lakes projections for future housing growth in Settlement Areas at 2031 are as follows:

SETTLEMENT AREA

TOTAL UNITS (2006)

TOTAL UNITS (2031)

UNIT DEMAND 2006 TO 2031

Lindsay

7,744

13,657

5,913

Bobcaygeon

1,325

2,037

712

Fenelon Falls

866

1,604

738

Omemee

529

944

415

Woodville

345*

490**

145

Source: Adapted from the City of Kawartha Lakes Growth Management Strategy (May 2011) * Base year for Woodville is 2011 and data is sourced from the Census ** Assumes that all draft approved and potential residential units totalling 145 can be developed by 2031

It might not be quiteTO as dramatic WHY DO WE HAVE GROW?as a “grow or01die”

scenario or maybe it is. Simply put: we are not only scheduled to grow, we have to grow.

WHERE WHERE ARE ARE WE WE GOING GOING TO TO GROW? GROW?

01 02

Most areas of our very diverse city are planned for massive growth. As the mayor explains, “It’s not just Lind03are HOW WEforGROW? say that WILL is targeted growth.The rural communities also targeted for growth through our secondary plans. The new growth plan is allowing KL to grow in a healthy way for aARE community our size. We will eventually get to WE GROWING the growth plan numbers, just not at the04 timeline the OLD? province TOO has set. We need to deliver controlled, reasonable, responsible growth.”

Those CAN provincial WE targets GROW(again, JOBS?which05all of our planning must be based around) are quite something though: over 11,000 new residents in Lindsay by 2031; over 1,700 new residents for Bobcaygeon; over 1,300 for Fenelon, almost 800 for Omemee; and 360 for Woodville. 06 WHAT DO WE NEED TO GROW? That’s over 5,900 new homes in Lindsay alone. For any of this growth to happen, we have to finish our planning processes which involves the rather confusing state TO of DECIDE our Secondary WHO GETS WHEREPlans. As Holy 07 describes, that work nearly done. AND HOW WE isGROW? “We have an approved Official Plan for the City of Kawartha Lakes that has been in effect since June 8, 2012; however, it remains the subject of various 08 HOWtoWILL WE FIGURE THIS OUT? appeals the Local Planning Appeal Tribunal (LPAT)

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CONT’D ON PAGE 12

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READY, SET, GROW

Barbara Doyle HaliburtonKawartha Lakes-Brock

Climate. Jobs. Justice.

On your side for the issues important to all Canadians. Contact me to find out more or to volunteer today!

BARBARA DOYLE CAMPAIGN info@barbaradoyle.ca www.barbaradoyle.ca

CONT’D FROM PAGE 11

that are being resolved. While the Secondary Plans for Lindsay, Bobcaygeon, Fenelon Falls, Omemee, and Woodville similarly remain at the Tribunal, City Staff are working to resolve issues with all appellants. This should result in the approval of a new planning framework within the next 1-2 years.” Then of course there will be growth coming from seasonal residents in almost every area of the city who decide to transition to fulltime residents. This might involve the City ‘assuming’ roads and will definitely require working out winter maintenance and garbage pick-up in areas that were previously only seasonal. Letham thinks that given the amount of property tax that these people pay, such things aren’t a really big ask, noting that, “we would benefit from this.” “We need toTO change to accommodate01their needs as much CANasWE GR WHY DOwould WE HAVE GROW? possible. Many people have bought here and are transitioning to retirement.” However more permanent residents along our lakes and rivers has to be thought out. As Holy notes, “While we encourage new development throughout the City, we need to be mindful that new development is contemplated 01 02 WHERE WHERE ARE ARE WE WE GOING GOING TO TO GROW? GROW? WHAT DO WE NEE with environmental protection in mind to ensure that our lakes are protected for the long-term.”

HOW WILL WE GROW?

03

WHO GETS TO DEC AND HOW WE GRO

You don’t have to drive too far from the CKL to find cities that did AREgrowth WE GROWING not manage very well. Many people and experts, perhaps unfairly, 04 suburban growth HOWended WILLupWE cite Barrie as an example where unrestrained TOO OLD? creating complex ‘livability’ issues. So the question we must ask ourselves is how do we grow, smartly? The accepted wisdom in urban design says that intensification and increasing density is the smartest, least expensive and environmentally friendly way to grow. In other words, growing up before growing out. That approach -- while it will no doubt create disagreements -- has a lot to recommend it. The city has a 20 year supply of land within the urban settlement borders. And as discussed in a recent story in The Lindsay Advocate, the development of brownfields is another opportunity where density can be increased to the overall benefit all of our citizens. Growing with a subdivision model requires more infrastructure and has other long-range costs, like busing costs. “Lower density forms of development do require more infrastructure that will ultimately be maintained by the City. We are [aware] of these long-term costs and therefore strive to increase densities where possible to more effectively utilize our infrastructure,” notes Holy. CONT’D ON PAGE 14

Authorized by Financial Agent Barbara Doyle Campaign

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FIG


There are 30 kids across Kawartha Lakes who need the life-changing experience of having a big brother or big sister. Could you be that life change to just one of them?

It’s proven that kids who who have just a few hours of mentoring a week make better life decisions. That’s better for our whole community. Imagine who they can become! 705-324-6800 klh@bigbrothersbigsisters.info

www.bigbrothersbigsisters.info

Come and Join the Fun! Nexicom will be hosting a Free Community BBQ at La Mantia’s Country Market 50 William St. South. Cheese burgers, hot dogs, sausages, and cold refreshments available. 100% of all donations goes to support the Kawartha Lakes Food Source. Also accepting non-perishable food donations. All are welcome.

See you there!

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WHERE WHERE ARE ARE WE WE GOING GOING TO TO GROW? GROW?

READY, SET, GROW CONT’D FROM PAGE 12

Will we be ready for increased density? Taller buildings and other changes to some of our settlement areas -- that haven’t really changed dramatically in decades, if ever -- will come as a shock to some of us. We will no doubt disagree from time to time. But this is exactly where good planning comes into play: It’s about getting the mix right, in the right areas.

Will we be ready for increased density? Taller buildings and other changes to some of our settlement areas -- that haven’t really changed dramatically in decades, if ever -- will come as a shock to some of us. “The key to integrating new growth in our community will be to intensify in appropriate areas. Intensification is context-based: in some cases, this means smaller lot singles or townhomes whereas in other cases it could result in apartment buildings of various heights,” explains Holy. And it’s the small details, combined with an overall vision, that will make the difference and result in good urban design. We will want to ensure that building location and placement, landscaping, lighting, accessibility, and exterior design are all considered. “This will be important in managing intensification and ensuring that higher densities are compatible with their surroundings,” adds Holy. But our growth won’t just be through intensification alone. There will be new developments on ‘green-

HOW FACTOID The health care realities of our older population– example: the local Sub-Region (Kawartha Lakes-Haliburton) of the Central East LHIN has the highest proportionate population with complex needs (with 8.2 per cent of patients having 4+ conditions – compared to 6.1 per cent in the Central East LHIN and 5.8 per cent provincially (2015/16 data).

spaces’. According to Holy, we have between 600-700 hectares of greenfield area available for future residenWILL WE GROW? tial development in our five settlement areas.

ARE WE GROWING TOO OLD?

04

Rebecca Mustard, manager of economic development for the city notes that Ontario is growing old and “Kawartha Lakes is not only following that trend, we have higher than average statistics.” Adds Rod Sutherland, director of corporate services, “we have the second highest proportionate population aged 65+” in the entire province. To be clear, this is not to suggest that having a high proportion of seniors is a bad thing. Seniors offer a lot to our community, as Letham sums up nicely. “There are many benefits to having older people here. They are contributing to our community in volunteerism, giving hours and wisdom…we can’t look at that as a negative. The senior care industries (also) have economic value.” Having an older population does have policy and planning implications though. The City incorporates population trends and all its related costs and programs. Sutherland adds that all planning “should encompass consideration of an aging population considering such issues as affordable housing; supportive housing; employment (supporting service industries); development services (active transportation, accessibility requirements); health care (supportive housing, home services, long term care); and transit.” But if we are to have a vibrant community that will continue to prosper, we will need to ensure that we attract and retain younger people and young

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CONT’D ON PAGE 18

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impact maracleinc.com

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WE ASKED LOCAL MP JAMIE SCHMALE

How do we grow (and grow smartly) in Kawartha Lakes? The vast majority of infrastructure priorities are determined at the local level. For example, during the stimulus funding allocated by the former federal government during the great recession (2008-2015), our riding received over $200 million for local infrastructure. Those dollars saw a major addition for the Lindsay Recreation Centre, a new arena built in Fenelon Falls, the construction of the northwest trunk sewer to facilitate growth in Lindsay’s north ward, a new dam built in Bolsover, and the refurbishment of Kawartha Lakes Road 45 (Monck Road) just to name a few. Today, money continues to flow into the riding through various federal programs such as the New Horizons for Seniors Program, Canada Summer Jobs, Enabling Accessibility, numerous arts and culture funding envelopes, flood mitigation work and the gas tax rebate given directly to municipalities for local roads and bridge repairs. My priorities build on the great work being done in our communities. Since being elected in 2015, I have fought tirelessly to see a VIA Rail Quebec City-OttawaPeterborough-Toronto relief line become a reality. Despite the current government’s continued delay, this will remain a top focus going forward. Another important project that I am wholly focussed on, is rural internet and cellular coverage. During the last Parliament, the former federal government partnered with the former provincial government and member municipalities in Eastern Ontario to start the process to expand connectivity to our region. Since that time, local Mayors and Wardens have completed the first phase and are now ready for the next stage which will close the remaining gaps.

In terms of public transportation, I think we need to constantly work to improve existing services while at the same time, think outside the box for innovative solutions. Four years ago, the Town of Innisfil commissioned a consulting firm to produce a report on transit options. After considering options for fixedroute bus services, Council determined it would be too costly and service would be limited to a small area of the town. Residents were looking for a transit system that was on-demand and affordable, and could service the needs of all members of the community. From there, Uber and the Town of Innisfil worked together to develop Innisfil Transit; an on-demand, shared transportation option powered by Uber and subsidized by the town. In Kawartha Lakes, groups like Community Care offer affordable transit solutions for area seniors. White Lightning Bus Services provides a free weekly option for people to move across the municipality. Allowing people the ability to make choices with a variety of options, including a personal vehicle where applicable, will result in more freedom for the individual and a better quality of life. After high speed internet and cellular service, housing is one of the biggest issues I hear about around the riding. Never-ending government policies and neverending taxation have pushed home ownership further away by making it harder to qualify for mortgages. The second part of the housing equation, is supply. That means, we need to make it easier for people to buy or rent homes. To that end, the federal government needs to work with provinces and municipalities to explore ways to facilitate bringing new housing to the market. Everyone benefits when communities experience a positive investment climate that creates business and job opportunities. Lowering taxes and allowing people to keep more of the money they earn, will help to facilitate growth and wealth in our area.

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PRIDE WEEK EVENTS from July 8-14

Search ‘Kawartha Lakes Pride’ at lindsayadvocate.ca for full list of events.

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READY, SET, GROW CONT’D FROM PAGE 14

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families. And the amenities wanted and needed by younger people can be different than those of our older residents. Of course one of the biggest things we need to do if we are to lower our median age (or at least stabilize our age demographics) is we will need to grow employment.

CAN WE GROW JOBS?

01

05

In the view of the Mayor, we are starting to see healthy residential growth. What is required is more industrial and commercial growth. It is for this reason 01 02 OING OING TO TO GROW? GROW? 06 charges (DC) Task Force, which WHAT that DO WE NEED GROW?a development Council has TO established is currently examining reducing development charges to spur more economic growth. That task force is still seeking input from the public. $5.99 Breakfast Special 2 eggs, bacon/ham or sausage. Toast and hashbrowns or pancakes The City, through its Economic Development Strategy identifies five key GETS TO DECIDE WHERE & bottomless gourmet coffee. Week Days 7-11am, Week Ends WHO 7-10am OW? clusters (agriculture and food, culture, 07 tourism, specialized manufacturing, HOME OF THE ALL03 DAY BREAKFAST AND HOW WE GROW? and engineered products) as targeted growth opportunities to increase jobs Kids Eat Fish and businesses. Mustard notes that these sectors “have a strong and growing Fridays PurchaseFree! amount of $13.99 existing business base and they bring wealth from other areas into our OWING All you can eat 04 One meal from our Fish & Chips “under 10” menuHOW per economy.” 08 WILL WE FIGURE THIS OUT? each adult entree. The conversion of cottage properties to year-round residences will also Every day after4pm $11.99 Ask server for details improve our economy notes Mustard. “Currently many of our businesses rely on revenues made in the summer months, so more permanent residents will balance out revenues throughout the year,” she adds. Of course, increasing employment won’t necessarily mean Lindsay re-emerging as a factory town. The nature of the worldwide economy, and in fact, of work itself, has changed. Mustard notes that 20 per cent of all freeTravel Trends lancers in the country live in rural communities, adding that, “more people are CAN WE GROW JOBS? 05 01 E HAVE TO GROW? able to work remotely and the number of solo-preneurs (people who work for themselves) is also growing.”

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If we are to capitalize on the employment trends that Mustard notes, and if we are to benefit from the knowledge/culture economy, we will need better WHO GETS TO DECIDE WHERE 07 The mayor (who has and faster internet. But this too will take public money. AND HOW WE GROW? been doing a lot of work on this file as chair of the Eastern Ontario Wardens’ Caucus) explains: “Unless governments get involved, the private companies won’t invest. 08 the demand for access. HOW WILLsoWE THIStoOUT? It’s growing fast,FIGURE it’s impossible keep up with KL has committed to almost $1 million for the project in Eastern Ontario over a few years.” More people will mean the need for more of all the services the City provides. Holy says that this will require expansion of our emergency and government services to accommodate service demands. CONT’D ON PAGE 23

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WE ASKED LOCAL MPP AND MINISTER OF LABOUR, LAURIE SCOTT

How do we grow (and grow smartly) in Kawartha Lakes? WHAT INFRASTRUCTURE DO WE NEED IN PLACE? In recent years, we’ve seen more growth around Lindsay than we have seen in decades. This is very encouraging, and it’s important that our infrastructure keeps pace as much as possible with our population. The extension of Highway 407 to Highway 115 will shorten travel times to Toronto and the GTA, and help make the Kawartha Lakes a more attractive destination for commuters, tourists, cottagers, and new residents. WHAT PUBLIC SERVICES/AMENITIES DO WE NEED TO GROW? We need to make sure that our health care and education systems are modern and sustainable. In particular, as our population ages we need to make key investments to increase our health care capacity, shorten wait times, recruit more doctors, and address health care gaps. CAN WE GROW WITHOUT PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION? As our population grows, public transit will become increasingly important. Our government is looking for solutions that will improve transportation in many rural communities across Ontario, like Lindsay. As the local MPP, I am researching different options to address the public transit needs in our region.

HOW DO WE GROW EMPLOYMENT? From our perspective, the most effective way to grow employment is by creating an economic and regulatory environment that is open for job creation and safe workplaces. By giving small businesses and other job creators the confidence that our Government is working to reduce red tape and unnecessary regulations, we can empower them to create more opportunities for local workers. We have introduced a number of pro-growth labour reforms that are working – the numbers speak for themselves: employment is up by over 188,000 new jobs since last August. Additionally, local small businesses and job boards across the riding have told me they currently have many job vacancies available. HOW IMPORTANT IS (FAST) INTERNET TO FUTURE GROWTH? High speed internet is absolutely critical to our economic growth in rural areas, like ours. Expanding high-speed internet in rural areas is a top priority for me, and our Government. That is why we announced a $71 million investment into the EORN project that will close mobile data gaps across Eastern Ontario.

High speed internet is absolutely critical to our economic growth in rural areas, like ours. Expanding high-speed internet in rural areas is a top priority for me, and our Government. IS INCREASING THE QUALITY OF LIFE FOR ALL RESIDENTS POSSIBLE IN A GROWTH PLAN? We want our growth to be inclusive, and to improve the quality of life for local residents. One area of focus for us is making life more affordable for families and seniors. Three major local issues are housing affordability, affordable child care, and home heating/transportation costs. We recently announced our Housing Supply Action Plan to get more affordable housing built across the province, including locally. Our CARE tax credit will provide up to $6,000 per child in tax relief for child care expenses for families. The benefits of this tax credit is directed at those who need it most: low-and-middle income families. We also eliminated the cap-and-trade carbon tax to reduce gasoline prices, and home heating costs.

20

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READY, SET, GROW

sponsored content

CONT’D FROM PAGE 18

STEWART MORRISON INSURANCE

(Which certainly seems to underscore the need for a fully equipped hospital like Ross Memorial – not a watered-down, merged version with Peterborough Regional Health Centre.) 05 families, we will need to GROWandJOBS? If weCAN are WE to attract retain young continue to build our recreational and cultural capacity, including parks. We used to do this by having a five per cent levy on residential development and two per cent on commercial/industrial development, but not only DO has WE the City been to change that, 06the provincial laws WHAT NEED TOlooking GROW? that govern this have recently changed.

CANNABIS AND YOUR HOME INSURANCE - 4 COMMON MISCONCEPTIONS

WHO GETS TO DECIDE WHERE AND HOW WE GROW?

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One would like to think that our community itself will decide how and where it will We have mechanisms 08that seek commuHOW WILL WEgrow. FIGURE THIS OUT? in place nity input at every level of the planning process. However, the passage of Bill 108, the More Homes, More Choices Act in June of this year has shifted the planning landscape, and many people are questioning what the law sets out to do. Critics, including the mayors of several large cities, decry the changes to the Local Planning Advisory Tribunal (LPAT, the body formally known as the Ontario Municipal Board or OMB) which is the ultimate arbiter of contested planning decisions. According to Tim Gray, executive director of Environmental Defence, says that the most recent version of the LPAT was the result of reforms to the old OMB which “had a long history of ruling in favour of developers who could afford to outspend municipalities.” The Association of Municipalities Ontario (AMO) shares some of this concern stating, “this move will take authority away from local councils and reverts…to an appeals process known to have a legacy of delays.” The AMO also disapproves of the capping of development fees. Municipalities used to get the development charges in advance of an approved development. Under the new legislation, a municipality will receive that money over six years, and over 20 years if the development is for affordable housing. As the AMO states, “this change will reduce the amount of revenue municipalities receive from development charges. It will also increase administrative burden for municipal governments.” This all might seem like bureaucratic detail, but the effects on our city could be real. Let’s imagine that, as Letham states, we don’t want to expand and grow at the expense of our agricultural land as agriculture and food is still our biggest local industry. We have codified that approach in our official plans. Previously, any appeal to the LPAT would CONT’D ON PAGE 25

1. GROWING CANNABIS AT HOME Bill C-45 states that it is only legal to grow up to four plants per household, not four plants per person. Additionally, both the law, and your insurance policy dictate that the seeds, clones or plants must be purchased from a legal source - which in the province of Ontario is still quite hard to find. 2. CULTIVATING CANNABIS AT HOME Along with growing cannabis, if you did not purchase marijuana for cultivation from a legal source, and can provide receipts, your home insurance policy will not respond in the event of a loss. 3. RENTALS PROPERTIES As the owner of a rental property, these laws of growing and cultivating illegal cannabis will still apply to you; even if it is your tenants who decided to grow, or cultivate, illegally sourced marijuana. 4. POSSESSION Canada now allows you to have 30 grams of legal cannabis at one time for personal use - likely not enough to warrant a call to your insurance broker. But should you decide to grow your own legal marijuana plants some insurers allow homeowners to list these under their contents insurance. In summary, your home insurance policy contains an exclusion clause for any good or item that is viewed as illegal. This is why, if you choose to grow or cultivate cannabis, or keep a certain quantity of it in your home, it is important to comply with the law. Doing otherwise might jeopardize your compensation in the event of a loss. MARLENE MORRISON NICHOLLS is the president of Stewart Morrison Insurance.

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READY, SET, GROW CONT’D FROM PAGE 23

be decided upon using what the local plan states. Now the LPAT has returned to de novo hearings -- or starting from the beginning; it can rule against a municipality, regardless of their plans. Critics like Gray are concerned asking, “What would the fantasy legislation for a developer look like?” It would look like Bill 108. “It is a complete erosion of planning procedure and everything we have learned about good planning. If a municipality wants to stop sprawl and the high service costs that go with it, they will have to lawyer up and take on a billion dollar developer.”

“What would the fantasy legislation for a developer look like?” It would look like Bill 108. The mayor seems less concerned, stating: “Each time a bill gets passed, some are in favour and some aren’t. Common sense usually prevails. I am not concerned about where we can grow and develop.We have many years supply of serviced land within our urban boundaries. Every city is different, so every mayor has their own concerns. ” Letham is in favour of the changes that cap development fees and allow flexibility in density, and says that lower density figures “are more realistic for our community and better reflect how we will grow over the next few years.” “I don’t believe the soft development charges should be part of growth development charges. That should focus more on infrastructure. I like the concept, but it is difficult to comment on until we know what the community fee charges will be. If we don’t collect enough, the shortfall passes to the tax base, which is already under extreme pressure.” Bill 108 not only limits the control we can ultimately exert over growth, it also guts our environmental protection. Gray considers it as “effectively a repeal of the endangered species act. Now, anything that gets in the way of developers will be overridden.” Leah Barrie, the City’s policy planning supervisor seems to share at least some of that concern. “Overall, the changes bring the potential for encroachment onto sensitive lands, where development would otherwise undergo a comprehensive regulatory review and be subject to restrictions or prohibitions. Development that is expedited into protected areas could benefit existing land owners, but may be at the expense of our wildlife, ecology, natural heritage systems and drinking watersheds. In addition, any potential on loosening development restrictions comes with the potential for sprawl. It will be important to balance competing interests.”

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Lisa Hart likes to make her grandmother’s Sauerkraut Chocolate Cake for family gatherings. Her Dad, Don Hart, enjoys a heavy cake like this one. When she told him she was submitting Margaret (MacRae) Hart’s recipe to the Local Heirloom Cookbook Project, he said, “She would be so proud to have someone still making her recipe.” Lisa is told she is a lot like her paternal grandmother and cherishes this recipe because it is one of the few things left that is a connection to her.

2 1/4 cups sifted all purpose flour 1/2 cup unsweetened cocoa 1 teaspoon baking powder 1 teaspoon baking soda 1/4 teaspoon salt 2/3 cup butter - room temperature 1 1/2 cup sugar 3 large eggs 1 teaspoon vanilla 1 cup water 2/3 cup rinsed, drained, and coarsely chopped sauerkraut

Mix as usual for ordinary cake, add sauerkraut. Bake in 350° oven. Sharon Walker is the creative director at Maryboro Lodge: The Fenelon Museum. She is documenting local, heirloom recipes for a cookbook. If you have a recipe that you would like to see featured, contact her at sharon@maryboro.ca.

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WHO GETS TO SET, DECIDE GROW WHERE READY, AND HOW WE GROW?

07

HOW WILL WE FIGURE THIS OUT?

08

CONT’D FROM PAGE 25

That could be the million dollar question. Certainly citizen involvement and community advocacy will have to play a part. An engaged citizenry that is involved in the planning process will be paramount, especially with the new provincial legislation. So, too, will the processes and indeed the manner in which we disagree with each other. Because change, by its very nature is disruptive. There will be winners and losers in this process and we are going to have to figure this out together. Letham remains positive, though.

We’re seeing developers come with applications (commercial, residential) almost every week. We never used to see this. We’re on the cusp of doing what naysayers think will never happen. “We have been working so hard over the last five years to put the base in place, to define our foundation of who we are, so that we can start marketing ourselves, because we can handle the growth. We are almost firing on all cylinders – we have the right people in place, capacity in place, now we open ourselves to the market and get to work. We’re seeing developers come with applications (commercial, residential) almost every week. We never used to see this.We’re on the cusp of doing what naysayers think will never happen. I’m very excited and optimistic.” Perhaps we can together achieve the optimism that Mustard, too, espouses, who says that communities and economies “are dynamic, constantly changing.” “Growing does not have to mean an increase in buildings, people, businesses or traffic. Growing can also mean adapting, improving, increasing resiliency. We are going to grow in population and jobs and this is healthy for Canadian communities, but equally important, we are also going to grow in our resiliency, ability to adapt and chart our own future.” Here’s hoping that through being informed and active, we get to chart our own future, a future that is probably going to look different -- and be a lot bigger.

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by Sarah Quick

2300 Pigeon Lake Road

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www.lindsayadvocate.ca


Dinner program at Boys and Girls Club ensures healthy, affordable meals Thursday is a hectic day of the week for Candice Toms, a Lindsay mother of two. That’s why, like so many other parents, she relies on the Boys and Girls Clubs of Kawartha Lakes’ dinner program to give her a hand. For only $5 she knows that her daughter, Amelia, will get a fantastic, nutritious dinner that night. Toms works 9 am to 5 pm each day at her business, Everyday Specialties Inc., a promotional product manufacturer in Lindsay. But Amelia has swimming on Thursday nights, so there’s no time to be cooking dinner and then have time to make that swim practice. “They can’t eat at McDonald’s for that price,” she tells the Advocate. “And at the club it’s a healthy dinner – it’s just fantastic.” While Toms can make that payment for her daughter to eat well on Thursdays, still about half the others involved with the program can’t. But thanks to donors in the community and strategic partnerships the Boys and Girls Club has a full subsidy program in place so that no one is turned away. The dinner program is for ages 5-12. About 40 different children participate in the dinner program and the club averages around 15 kids each night. Amy Terrill is the new executive director of the Boys and Girls Club. She knows what parents are up against when it comes to the ticking clock. “As a parent of two girls, I remember those busy weeknights when there was barely enough time to get a healthy dinner on the table, help the kids with homework and get organized for the next day,” she says. “The fact that our Club is able to offer such affordable options for parents in such a flexible way is a wonderful service to the community.” Arielle Fegan also has two children who are familiar with the Boys and Girls club, with her six-year-old daughter Leigha and eight-year-old son, Edward, both making use of the dinner program. Leigha has been using the program since September, usually four days a week, according to Fegan. She also

RODERICK BENNS, PUBLISHER

PHOTO: RODERICK BENNS

pays the full amount for meals but considers it a bargain, given their busy lives. “The program works great for our schedule, as I work late and getting them home to finish homework and get ready for the next day is hectic enough,” she says. “It really helps relieve the stress from an already busy school night. I know what my children are being fed and for the most part they enjoy each meal,” Fegan says. Toms says it’s the Boys and Girls Club in general that has kept them going back month after month after all these years, including the whole spectrum of programs offered. “It’s fantastic place. It keeps kids out of trouble. They pick the kids right up from school and it gives them something fun to do.” Terrill says peace of mind is offered to families at the club, knowing their children are in good hands with caring adults. “Children are in safe hands in a place that was built and designed just for them. I think that is a true gift to families in our community.”

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29


FRIENDS & NEIGHBOURS

No matter where you are in Kawartha Lakes, there’s Dave Dave has been our neighbour for close to 20 years. Neither Dave nor his wife, Karina, have aged perceptibly. It’s when I see Luke or Spanky that the passage of time hits me. Luke, their son, was a toddler when they moved in. Now he’s promotions manager at Canadian Tire, and a few months ago found his own place.Their beagle, Spanky (named by Luke, a L’il Rascals fan as a kid) strained at the leash a dozen years ago. When Dave takes her out now, Spanky mopes along behind, trailing her master by the full length of the extensible leash. Dave’s what you’d want in a neighbour -- friendly, quiet, considerate. When I encounter him (usually with Spanky in tow) he’ll remove his earbuds and we’ll exchange a few words. Here’s what’s odd, though: It seems like everywhere I go -- the butcher’s, the bulk food store, the Rec Centre -- I hear Dave’s voice. It sounds like my neighbour, but a consistently upbeat, slightly caffeinated version. One time, having lunch at Ping’s, I had the odd experience of listening to Dave while seeing him through a window, a block away, walking home. Dave is, I should reveal, Dave Illman, program director and principal DJ for BOB-FM. He’s on the air weekdays from 5:30 am to Noon. It could be you feel you know Dave: he’s my neighbour, but part of the soundtrack for a whole community. There’s lots about Dave I didn’t know -even after 20 years. So, recently I waylaid him and invited him to cross the street and join me for a chat. My chance -- and yours -- to learn a little more about his background, his work-life and his off-work life. For me, a chance to answer a nagging question: Just what is he listening to on those walks?

JAMIE MORRIS

THE BACK STORY

Dave grew up in Fenelon Falls. He got an early start in radio in Lindsay, back when music was on vinyl and DJs messed about with turntables. It was the start of high school co-op programs, and Dave’s placement was at the locally-owned Lindsay radio station, CKLY. He was hired on part-time afterwards. He’d always loved music -- was a drummer in a high school rock band. “The band wasn’t going anywhere,” he tells me, but radio has kept him associated with the ‘80s, ‘90s and whatever’ music he’s always gravitated toward. He studied Radio, Television and Film at Niagara College, and it was during that period he met Karina (a Lindsay girl).

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Dave and Spanky

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Dave and Karina married in 1992. They moved to Lindsay, and he found full-time employment with CKLY.

WORK (DAVE’S ‘A’ SIDE)

Dave may not have changed a lot, but radio has. Vinyl gave way to CDs, which have been replaced by computer hard drives. Playlists are now scheduled a few days ahead with a program called MusicMaster. Instead of local ownership, there’s a corporate structure -- BOB-FM is part of the BellMedia empire (Country 105 in Peterborough is a sister station). It’s not as freewheeling as it was. Monday to Friday, for the past dozen years, Dave has followed the same routine. Get up at 4:15 am and at work by 5 am. A scramble for the first half hour: he goes online and checks news, sports for tidbits he’ll incorporate. At 5:30 he’s on-air with co-host Julie Corlett for Bob’s Breakfast with Dave and Julie. He cracks wise with her and they spin disks. There are guests and games. They’ve worked together for years, so their banter has an upbeat, relaxed, comfortable feel. Dave explains, “Sometimes it’s a bit of self-therapy. It may not be the best morning, but when you turn on the microphone…we’re lovin’ it.” The breakfast show over, he grabs a quick lunch, then continues with his own show until noon. After going off-air, as program director he has administrative responsibilities. He programs coming days, has meetings, voices local commercials. Outside regular hours he’s often called on to emcee community events including fundraisers for Women’s Resources, United Way and others. For Big Brothers/Big Sisters alone there can be four or five events annually. All of that -- and the guests he and Julie bring in -- have left him feeling very connected to his community, and with a deep appreciation of all the dedicated volunteers contributing to our collective wellbeing.

CANNABIS AND HOME INSURANCE

OFF-WORK (DAVE’S ‘B’ SIDE)

Off-work there’s more work. A few years ago Dave bought a business that provides show prep to radio stations. Roughly a hundred stations from as far away as Australia pay monthly fees for the subscription service. Karina helps with research. (She also operates “Karina’s Creations,” employing a sublimation printer to add custom designs to everything from mugs to rubber jar openers and tea towels). It’s not all work, though. Almost every winter since the ‘80s he’s played hockey in an Ops Saturday night league. (Players range in age from 14 to 60; at one point Luke was in the league, too). Then there are the hour-long dog-walks with Spanky. He picks up the pace by walking a dog for another neighbour, who has limited mobility after a fall. When he has a need for even more speed, he cycles local roads and trails. He’s registered for the August 24 Kawartha Cycling Classic’s 50 km route.

AND THE PLAY-LIST?

My final question: What’s coming through those earbuds? He’s a genuine fan of the BOB-FM music but goes deeper into the catalogue of favourite artists -- the complete Aerosmith, the complete Van Halen.

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Lindsay|Fenelon Falls|Bobcaygeon Port Perry|Peterborough

L i n d s a y 7 0 5 . 3 2 4 . 6 6 81 stewartmorrison.ca

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JUST IN TIME

Hidden gems:

}} Lindsay’s wartime houses In 2007, Mark Robinson, my Grade 11 American History teacher at LCVI, shared with our class the lyrics to John Mellencamp’s 1983 hit, “Pink Houses.” The song has sometimes been interpreted in the context of the so-called American Dream, with its refrain about “little pink houses for you and me,” representing the idealism typically associated with that country’s national ethos. Mellencamp himself has said that the song is in fact a thinly-veiled critique of American culture – in fact, the “little pink houses” in question, which on the surface sound idyllic, were inspired by the “shotgun houses” of the American south. That these simple structures were frequently associated with poverty and racial segregation seems to subtly contribute to the irony woven into Mellancamp’s lyrics. A different kind of little pink (or white, or blue, or buttercup yellow) house was coming to symbolize the [North] American Dream three quarters of a century ago. Peace had returned, and people on both sides of the border were flocking to the suburbs. There awaited a little house with a neatly-trimmed lawn and a white picket fence – complete with the latest portholed Buick or chrome-laden Cadillac occupying the freshly-paved driveway. Although the picture-perfect suburban house has come to be associated with postwar prosperity, the earliest of these postwar abodes in Lindsay were built to combat a severe housing shortage. These are the “wartime houses” one can still see today, with a high concentration of them located on Ardmore Avenue, Churchill Crescent, Melbourne Street East, and Princess Elizabeth Crescent. Urban development was not a new phenomenon in Lindsay, as it grew from a riverside mill village to a substantial town in the last quarter of the 19th Century. “Mr. W.A. Goodwin has his hands full of decorative

IAN McKECHNIE

work, principally at the residences of a number of opulent north ward magnates,” intoned one correspondent in 1884. On May 2, 1890, it was reported that “...a large number of new residences are being erected this spring. These for the most part are substantial in character and will add much to the appearance of the town.” A little over half a century later, housing was no longer being defined as “opulent” or “substantial.” Out were the faux mansions sporting Queen Anne-style porches and high Victorian gables; in were small and straightforward structures built from plans provided by the governmentrun Wartime Housing Ltd. for returning veterans. Known for their clapboard exteriors, steeply-pitched roofs, and unique chimney designs, nearly 50,000 of these “wartime houses” were built across Canada, with those in Lindsay being completed between 1946 and 1948. Dan McQuarrie, the town’s industrial commissioner at the time, expressed his frustration with the lack of housing for those returning to the area, starting families, and going to work in the various factories then setting up shop in Lindsay. “You cannot operate industries without homes,” he declared before civic authorities in 1946. “We welcomed the boys back last year – yes, back to what?” McQuarrie asked rhetorically, before going on to enumerate the inadequacies of the current housing situation. “If the town’s finances can stand it,” he pleaded, “we should have about 100 additional Wartime Houses.” (McQuarrie was apparently not one to rest on his laurels, for he also pushed for the building of a 50-unit apartment house on land opposite the East Ward School.) While the wartime housing scheme was welcomed by many, it was not without its detractors. Jill Wade, writing about the history of Wartime Housing Ltd. four decades after it led the country through a postwar building boom, notes that local property owners were concerned about the possibility that the “simplified Cape Cod” structures

32

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would devolve into slum housing as the years wore on. Ada Greaves told Lindsay councillors on June 3, 1947 that she had heard from several East Ward residents who opposed wartime housing; but as the Lindsay Post reported, Alderman J.C. Kingsborough declared at the same meeting that “...Council should strongly condemn the frequent use of the word ‘rabbit hut’ in referring to Wartime Houses. He asserted they were very comfortable and quite spacious.” Despite the derogatory descriptions and the opposition from East Ward residents, the Wartime Housing Ltd. projects went ahead as planned, with contracts being signed between the crown corporation and the town over the winter of 1946 and 1947. The Eastwood Construction Company of Peterborough and the Russell Construction Company of Toronto, respectively, handled construction for the first two batches of housing. They were practical and affordable for the average family, with rental figures ranging from $22 to $30 in 1948.

Summertime

Patio Life DELICIOUS FOOD. CHILLED DRINKS. GREAT SERVICE.

PHOTO: SIENNA FROST

For over 70 years, local families have been making their homes in the 100 or so dwellings first designed by Wartime Housing Ltd. for returning service personnel. “I lived on Churchill Crescent from 1958 to 1963,” recalls Ken Nicholls, now vice-president of Stewart Morrison Insurance Brokers Ltd. “Our house had a centre staircase, kitchen on the left, living room on the right. Two bedrooms upstairs, bathroom behind kitchen, no basement. Many of the other homes had a basement dug out with a bulldozer. It was fun to watch as a kid.” Today, the wartime houses are the unsung heroes of Lindsay’s architectural heritage, their steeply-pitched roofs proudly peeking out from behind the trees in some of our town’s prettiest neighbourhoods.

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106 Kent Street West Lindsay, ON

705.328.1444 olympiarestaurant.ca

cf

33


TREVOR’S TAKE

TREVOR HUTCHINSON, CONTRIBUTING EDITOR

Nobody Needs My Opinion on This

There has been a lot of handwringing in some quarters over the release of the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigeneous Women and Girls (MMIWG) report, specifically with the report’s use of the word genocide. Here’s my take on it: my opinion isn’t really needed right now. See, I’m a white dude. A white dude that’s lucky enough to get to share my opinion sometimes. But now is not the time for me to speak. It’s the time for me, and people like me, to listen. And hopefully learn. We are so set up to opine, though. In our super-charged partisan atmosphere -- with the help of the echo-chambers of social media -- we are almost egged on to weigh in on every issue, regardless if we have researched it, thought about it, let alone lived it. But on the issue of the MMIWG report, to use the poetic minimalism of the twitterverse, it’s time for people like me to STFU. No white mansplaining is really needed (imho). I attend a mainstream church and my bulletin begins with a land acknowledgment. I am reminded every week that all of the City Kawartha Lakes is situated on traditional Michi Saagiig Territory and lands included in the Williams Treaty and Treaty 20. While it uses slightly different wording, it is a way that my church, as a result of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, deals with its legacy of our historical involvement in the residential school system and other issues of systemic racism. For me, I use that weekly declaration to remind myself that seemingly well-intentioned people can be horribly wrong and on the wrong side of history.

The 200th anniversary of Treaty 20 was last year and no local media, including this publication, covered it. To be sure, such contemplation doesn’t make me a better person, but it does help me think through some rather complicated issues that aren’t just historical but current. These issues speak to the heart of what our country means and what it could be. The 200th anniversary of Treaty 20 was last year and no local media, including this publication, covered it. Clearly we have to do a better job of thinking about these issues locally, a better job of including other voices. We need to discuss, to include, to learn, to heal, to grow. But sometimes to do any of that we have to first listen. I know, I know: we all have a right to our opinion. But just maybe that right should come with a responsibility -- to first listen to the opinions and lived experience of others.

34

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Mickaël’s Café Librairie

Big news from your little bakery At last, Summer is here! For us at the bakery, it is a very exciting time. On top of baking for our daily customers in our Lindsay Bakery, we have also taken on the challenge to be present in 10 different Farmers Markets each week – Lindsay Thursday Market, Haliburton, Minden, Stanhope, Uxbridge, East Gwillimbury, Georgina, Peterborough Regional, Port Hope and Fenelon Falls.

I am happy to announce that we are now able to offer croissants every day of the week, all summer. New equipment and more staff made this

MONDAY 8:00-5:30 TUESDAY 8:00-5:30 WEDNESDAY 8:00-5:30 THURSDAY 8:00-5:30 FRIDAY 8:00-5:30 SATURDAY 8:00-5:30 SUNDAY 8:00-5:30

possible. We could not have done any of this without the support of our loyal customers. We continue to bake everything from scratch. Please do not hesitate to order at this number: 705 341 4143.

In other exciting news, we will be opening a new café in Omemee. It is situated at 26 King Street East, next to

the Public Library. We will offer seating, regular coffee and expresso, some lunch options and all of our selection of sweets and breads. Thank you for your loyal support as we continue to grow. - Mickaël Durand

230 Kent St. W., Lindsay 705.341.4143

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Lindsay Advocate - July 2019  

Lindsay Advocate - July 2019  

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