__MAIN_TEXT__
feature-image

Page 1

TREVOR’S TAKE: THE POWER OF MAGICAL THINKING | BENNS’ BELIEF: A POVERTY OF TIME | VICTORIA MANOR’S FUTURE

THE LINDSAY ADVOCATE WINNER – MEDIA EXCELLENCE

MARCH 2021

Caring hearts, overworked hands DO WE RELY TOO HEAVILY ON WOMEN’S UNPAID WORK?

COVID-19 ISN’T A PANDEMIC; IT’S A SYNDEMIC

WOMEN IN LEADERSHIP: COMMUNITY PROFILES


Do you often ask others to repeat themselves? Have people ever told you that you listen to the TV or radio too loud? Do you have trouble hearing in noisy situations? Do you find it difficult communicating using a telephone?

If you answered ‘yes’ to any of these questions for yourself or a loved one, it may be time for a hearing evaluation.

AT HELIX HEARING CARE, WE ARE COMMITTED TO HELPING YOU HEAR THE BEST YOU CAN! Our experienced hearing care professionals in Lindsay offer a variety of services, including: Telehearing care Full hearing assessments

Colleen Reid

Hearing aids and fittings

Hearing Instrument Specialist

Batteries and accessories

CALL OUR OFFICE TODAY TO BOOK AN APPOINTMENT WITH ONE OF OUR HEARING CARE PROVIDERS.

Alisa Rorabeck

Communicative Disorders Assistant

Linda Skipworth Senior Client Care Coordinator

We’re your local hearing health care providers. We will develop a hearing care plan that suits your lifestyle and support you every step of the way. Helix Hearing Care has been providing quality hearing care in the community for over 40 years.

WE ARE OPEN FOR ALL YOUR HEARING CARE NEEDS BY APPOINTMENT ONLY WE ALSO PROVIDE: Telehearing Care Services and Curbside Pickup / Mail Services

705-702-2720

Kent Place Mall 189 Kent Street West, Suite 107 Lindsay, ON K9V 5G6

helixhearingcare.ca


March 2021 • Vol 4 • Issue 35

PUBLISHED BY

Fireside Publishing House, a proudly Canadian company. The Lindsay Advocate is published monthly and distributed to a wide variety of businesses and locations within Kawartha Lakes, North Durham and southern Haliburton County. We are a proud member of the Lindsay and District, Fenelon Falls and Bobcaygeon Chamber of Commerce. TEAM ADVOCATE

CONTENTS KAWARTHA LAKES’ FINEST MAGAZINE

FEATURES

EDITORIAL

Publisher: Roderick Benns Associate Editor: Nancy Payne Contributing Editor: Trevor Hutchinson Research, Strategy & Development: Joli Scheidler-Benns Contributing Writers: Nancy Payne, Dr. Helen Scott,

Roderick Benns, Kirk Winter, Jamie Morris, Ian McKechnie, Trevor Hutchinson Web Developer: Kimberley Durrant LETTERS TO THE EDITOR SEND TO

kawarthalakespublisher@gmail.com ADVERTISING & MARKETING

Advertising/Editorial inquiries: Roderick Benns

705-341-1496

CREATIVE

Graphic Design: Barton Creative Co. Photography: Sienna Frost, Erin Burrell On the Cover: Valmay Barkey in Lindsay. Photo: Sienna Frost

Visit www.lindsayadvocate.ca for many more stories FOLLOW US ON

d

The Lindsay Advocate @lindsayadvocate Roderick Benns @roderickbenns

cf

13 10 Editorial: We need more

doctors; let’s consider new scholarships.

11 Opinion: Dr. Helen Scott

explains the social origins of the COVID-19 pandemic.

13 Cover Story:

Women have been the backbone of the caring industry, formally and informally, for decades.

20 Victoria Manor — ­

should it be retrofitted and expanded or torn down for a new facility?

/The Lindsay Advocate PRINTING

Printed by Maracle Inc. OUR PRIVACY POLICY The Lindsay Advocate is independently owned and operated. The opinions expressed herein are the views of the contributors and do not necessarily reflect those of this magazine. Photos, text, and art work contained in The Lindsay Advocate are copyrighted and may not be published, broadcast, or rewritten without the express permission of the Publisher. Liability for incorrectly displayed advertising is limited to publishing corrections or advertising credit for subsequent issues. The Publisher reserves the right to reject, revise, cancel, omit, discontinue or even decline to print advertising without reason or liability, and without notice. The Publisher has made every effort to ensure information contained herein was accurate at press time. The Publisher does not assume and hereby disclaims any liability to any party for damage, loss, or disruption caused by errors or omissions.

24 24 WOMEN IN LEADERSHIP

Check out our profiles section of our amazing women entrepreneurs, and our non-profit and business leaders.

IN EVERY ISSUE

4 Letters to the Editor 6 UpFront 9 Benns’ Belief 40 The Local Kitchen 41 Crossword 43 Friends & Neighbours 44 Just in Time 46 Trevor’s Take

Our Vision

We care about the social wellness of our community and our country. Our vision includes strong public enterprises mixed with healthy small businesses to serve our communities’ needs. We put human values ahead of economic values and many of our stories reflect the society we work to build each day. ~ Roderick and Joli

Advertising Sales: Contact us at 705-341-1496 • kawarthalakespublisher@gmail.com


A TE

LIN

DSAY

AD O C V

Lock your cars, says reader

Just a warning… At 2 a.m. on Jan. 22 I awoke and grabbed a biscuit snack. It was snowing heavily. I could see headlights way up Bond Street, from my home on Adelaide Street. They would creep closer and stop, over and over. So I watched. Then I could see a guy dressed all in black walk down Bond Street while his buddy stayed in their small, noisy car. They looked like they were checking for vehicles left unlocked. As the guy got to Adelaide, I was ready to call police. He must have seen me standing in the window because he turned and walked back to the car on Bond and they drove south on Adelaide. By then it was too late to bother the police but I will know the vehicle if I see or hear it again. Be sure all your windows are closed up tight. Be sure your vehicle is locked. Do not leave money or valuables in your vehicle. The creeps are out there! Mary Wootton, Lindsay

Where is the GO bus?

Thank you Kirk Winter (Advocate writer) for your article on amalgamation and Lawrence Barker (letter, Jan. Advocate) for “Why city and not municipality?” About 20 years ago we travelled between Barrie and our cottage in Bancroft. One Monday we discovered a sign in Kinmount: City of Kawartha Lakes. It took us some time before we discovered this city; not even the CAA road map could show us this magic city. Now I have lived in Lindsay — I will not use “city” — for more than 10 years. I love living here! One thing I found out very fast: If you are a senior citizen without a car, you are stuck. No GO bus to Peterborough! I cannot understand. Beaverton, Cannington, Sunderland, Port Perry, all have GO bus connections. Why not Lindsay? A few years ago, I attended two meetings with people from city hall to discuss the GO bus situation. We signed petitions. Nothing positive developed. Two to three years ago I attended a meeting at the Lindsay rec centre which Mayor Andy Letham attended. I asked about the GO bus situation. I had the feeling I touched a sore spot. He told me, “We have plans for the future.”

Are they working on those plans? Could we interest our local MPP and Minister of Infrastructure Laurie Scott in our GO bus connection? Gunter Schubert, Lindsay

Time to move past climate change denials

It has been so satisfying to see the action that the new Biden presidency is bringing to climate change in the U.S. It is a sea change and one can only hope that it will push our federal, provincial and municipal governments to step up. There is so much to be done. But to then open The Lindsay Advocate and see a letter to the editor rolling out the same out climate denial arguments makes one realize that there is still pushback from a certain portion of our population. In this case the letter said that science was ignoring slight changes in the tilt of the earth on its axis or changes in its orbit or changes in volcanic activity etc. and that these natural processes and not man-made greenhouse gases, have been altering earth’s climate for billions of. Yes, these things and many others do affect our climate, but the truth is that all these factors are very closely followed by our climate scientists. Scientists refer to these factors as “climate forcings.” A forcing can be positive or negative; that is, it can tend to warm or cool our climate and can change from year to year. The point is all these things are considered and their amplitudes closely measured. But the forcing that far outweighs all the others and that is now driving climate change is our carbon emissions. Carbon dioxide in our atmosphere is now higher than it has been at any time in the last three million years. It is time to move past this silly argument. Barry Snider, Lindsay

Former reeve saw amalgamation coming

In the early 1990s I sat on county council as the reeve of the United Townships of Laxton, Digby and Longford. Foreseeing amalgamation, I did a rough draft of a proposal and brought it up at council and suggested that a committee be formed to come up with a proposal. I said if we didn’t do something it would be done for us. Some of the other members were adamant that it wouldn’t happen and we would be wasting our time. The end of the decade saw it imposed on us. Doug Horton, Kawartha Lakes

4

www.lindsayadvocate.ca


Amalgamation created bureaucracy, tax increases

After reading the article about amalgamation (Jan. cover story, Advocate), there were comments, from some, suggesting that many services were now better. I wondered if other taxpayers would agree. We were told that amalgamation would be more efficient and save money. But most taxpayers have seen increases, some as much as 40 per cent.  In Victoria County, the total cost of the county council, including warden and 22 councillors, was less than one senior administrator today. Victoria County plus all the municipalities had about 400 employees.  Today we have at least four times that number, and yet the overall area is still the same. Amalgamation created a bureaucracy that controls everything. At one time you could go to your local council meeting and speak directly to your council. They listened, and collectively made decisions. Now it is very difficult to speak to the council as a whole. If you do, the council will refer the issue to staff for a report. Previous municipalities had a surplus for “rainy days.” Now we have no idea what our debt is. It is not reported in the budget; it is chopped into pieces, then shuffled around until everything is hidden in a fiscal smokescreen. The true debt, as understood by most people, must be $100 million. Some will say that we need to move on and that may be true. My question is are we moving in the right direction? Faye McGee, Fenelon Township

Living in Toronto makes opinion valid, says reader

In a letter to the editor, Biz Agnew says of me, “I hope he is better at doling out advice to flailing investment bankers than he is in describing the city of Toronto.” This message suggests that I have worked with and possess financial expertise suitable to advise investment bankers. Biz does not know me, and has never met me and I am concerned that your readers will be left with the impression that I am someone with finance expertise and work experience as a financial adviser that I do not possess.

For the record, I worked in the information technology sector from 1977 to 2018 with 35 of those years as a professional IT recruiter in the Greater Toronto Area initially and then in the U.S., Mexico, Brazil, U.K. and EU countries in the final eight years. I possess zero experience in investment finance. Regarding my opinion of Toronto, I lived and worked in Toronto from age 16 to 66 and feel that this qualifies me to have an opinion. Obviously, Biz did not have the same experience as me, as I have been much happier as a full-time resident of Fenelon Falls than I was in my final years in Toronto. Gene Balfour, Fenelon Falls

Doherty’s a special place, says reader

I so much enjoyed your article in the Feb 2021 issue of the Advocate, The Corner Store. I well remember Dohertys store. It was a wonderful place that is totally unknown to most folks today. When I was at boarding school my friend, Georgina and I went every day after school to Doherty’s. Fresh, large, soft and delicious honey-dipped doughnuts were five cents each and seven cents for two. If I had the seven cents I would buy two for Georgina and me and if she had the seven cents she would treat us both. There were times when neither of us had seven cents so we would buy one doughnut for a nickel and split it between us. Another time the family had to be away for a day and Mrs. Doherty asked me if I would like to work in the store that day after school. I was thrilled to accept her offer. What I found amazing was no one paid for anything but asked to put it on their tab and the only ones who paid were kids who  brought in empty  pop bottles in exchange for penny candy. May Doherty was one of the most patient people I have ever had the pleasure of knowing. Sharron Noonan McGrath, Fenelon Falls

We want your letters! Send us your thoughts to be featured on this page.

The Lindsay Advocate welcomes your Letters to the Editor. We reserve the right to edit letters for clarity or length. Simply email kawarthalakespublisher@gmail.com. Please keep your letters to 200 words or less.

www.lindsayadvocate.ca

5


Quantify Numbers that matter

Women in Leadership

29% 18%

of MPs in Canada’s Parliament are women

UPFRONT

If This House Could Talk }} Dunsford woman’s book a humorous look at lockdowns and coping with change

of director seats on company boards in Canada are women

Source: StatsCan

Heather Dahmer with her new book. Photo: Dave Cook.

Iceland leads the world in gender equality

Iceland is the most gender-equal nation in the world. Its new session of Parliament has the highest share of women parliamentarians yet, at about 45 per cent, while

company boards must include at least 40 per cent women. It also has

the most generous parental leave policy in the world. However, gender equality does not happen naturally. Iceland’s success required collective action and solidarity, which included polit-

ical will, legislation and gender quotas.

Heather Dahmer realized that writing a book would be a great way to deal with the ups and downs the past year has offered. She recently released a book called If This House Could Talk, which tells the story of a single woman, 60, who returns to her empty house in Dunsford at the start of the pandemic. (Spoiler alert: The woman in the book is Dahmer.) All of her things are in storage, and lockdowns mean there’s no way to get them out. Dahmer says it’s a humorous recounting of the dayto-day surprises she has faced and how she managed after coming back to an empty house last March as the lockdown began. She had left the home empty for about five months while in Florida. “I began chronicling my daily adventures on Facebook so folks could get a laugh at my expense,” she says. From finding critters in the walls, to sump pump failures and terrible cellphone reception, “I couldn’t believe all the things that were happening on a daily basis.” Neither could anyone else; her followers encouraged her to write a book. Dahmer self-published it with FriesenPress and it is now available at major online book retailers.  The adventures continue; she is working on a sequel.

6

www.lindsayadvocate.ca


Business UPFRONT

Local acupuncturist sets up new clinic one year after COVID closed her down Lori Mitchell’s acupuncture clinic in the Queen’s Square plaza on Russell Street West in Lindsay was one of the first local business casualties of the March 2020 lockdown. But one year later Mitchell is back in a new location as On The Go Acu. Since then, Mitchell has been offering mobile treatments to clients, but not everyone has been comfortable with someone coming to their home during this time. To help those people, she chose to open a small space that is more suitable for working with COVID restrictions, but she continues to offer mobile services. “I am looking forward to this new chapter and seeing faces I haven’t seen in a while.”

Since 2020, Mitchell has upgraded her skills in sports and neuroacupuncture and has also added Thai massage. She is also offering a non-invasive bioresonance full body scanner that will help to determine the root cause of clients’ symptoms by giving a detailed visual health status of the body’s organs, systems and tissues. On The Go Acu is located at 55 Mary St. W. For more information visit onthegoacu.com.

Local man launches affordable digital marketing business

Starting Point Digital Marketing owner Matt Geraghty. Photo: Sienna Frost.

www.lindsayadvocate.ca

Starting Point Digital Marketing has launched in Kawartha Lakes, gearing its offerings to small business owners looking for affordable, basic marketing services. Matt Geraghty, who also runs the more personalized, premium marketing service Matty G Digital, says the business was born out of a need to have services available for all budgets. “It’s for those who may not have the time to work on their own digital marketing, or the money to hire a typical marketing agency,” says Geraghty. “It gives people the starting point they need to take their business online effectively without breaking the bank.” The service allows small businesses to make an impression on social media, get found more easily on Google, build an email list, run ads and improve brand awareness. Visit startingpointdigitalmarketing.ca or call 705-230-0825.

On The Go Acu owner Lori Mitchell. Photo: Sienna Frost.

Dvine to hire 18 people by the fall Dvine Laboratories in Lindsay will be hiring about 18 people by September after striking a deal with SnowPlus, a vape company headquartered in Beijing, China. Dvine is Canada’s largest e-liquid contract packaging facility. Other product lines include food flavouring and sanitization/ cleaning products, such as the hand sanitizer it started producing after the pandemic began.

7


ONLINE SHOPPING

www.womensresources.ca/vickys-values-online-store

New items added regularly! Check often for the best selection. Contact us at 705.878.5938 • Mon-Fri 10am-2pm

or vickys@womensresources.ca

Enjoy winter at our house this year!

8

www.lindsayadvocate.ca


BENNS’ BELIEF

RODERICK BENNS, Publisher

A poverty of time

Last month I watched the fantastic BBC eight-part series of Les Misérables on CBC Gem. The miniseries is not based on the celebrated musical but rather the darker offering of Victor Hugo’s novel on 19th century urban France as it was on the cusp of revolution. Observing the working-class characters’ brutal lives got me thinking about “free time.” Ninety years ago, John Maynard Keynes figured we’d be working just 30 hours a week by 2030. Our problem, he surmised, would be a surplus of free time. We were on track to fulfilling Keynes’ speculation, steadily reducing our working hours right up until 1980. That’s when globalization started in earnest and working harder — and and more often — became desirable for the wealthy who wanted more wealth and undeniably urgent for the working class who now toiled harder just to get by. When people were making a better living from the 1950s through to the 1970s, people chose to use some of their free time to join service clubs, making weekly contributions of their time to the community. (Our feature story this month explores this theme and how volunteering has changed.) It’s worth pointing out that the ancient Greeks saw a difference between “play” and ”leisure.” Play, or recreation, was true downtime. Leisure, on the other hand, combined learning, discussing political ideas and connecting with the community. This is one of the reasons I support a basic income as a foundation of a just society. When we take the worry of poverty from people’s shoulders there will be time to contribute to one’s community, something that happens naturally when basic needs are met. Instead, we are united in the premise of maximizing people to produce labour, or jobs. We disparage idleness and reflection, even as mental health challenges soar, and we make our social benefits conditional on labour and its frantic pursuit. Professor Guy Standing from the U.K. notes that if a person “goes from looking after frail relatives to pouring tea for a boss, national income and employment go up; if the person goes in the other direction, a job is ‘lost.’ What counts as work depends not on what you do but whom you do it for.” The fact that so few of us mock this absurdity is perhaps the saddest aspect of all. Now, with the labour aspects of our lives so intense and all-consuming for many, we use our limited free time at play, not in leisure, because we need downtime to unwind and recover from our jobs. The consequence, as Standing writes, is that the squeeze on time means real leisure — community participation and civic connection — is lost for too many of us. Poverty, then, is not just a lack of money for individuals; it is a lack of participation in community life.

www.lindsayadvocate.ca

9


EDITORIAL

Doctoring our success The Kawartha Lakes Health Care Initiative told city council last month that Kawartha Lakes is short more than 14 doctors. Lisa Green, president of KLHCI, said there are 3,550 adults and 300 children in our municipality who have no access to a family doctor. This is a shocking number of people for a small city with an aging population. At the same council meeting, Brock Slabach, senior vice president of the National Rural Health Association, pointed out that offering incentive or reimbursement programs that would pay part or all of a physician’s student debt has been a great way to bring doctors to rural areas like ours. Signing bonuses is yet another way. The city’s website notes KLHCI offers a variety of incentives to practice family medicine here, including relocation costs, family practice office grants, family practice office rent grant, professional fees and continuing medical education grant. These are all elements of a commendable strategy. However, we believe it’s time to find candidates even earlier, and for the city to get behind this initiative. Let’s find local high school students who are considering a career in medicine and have the city give them a grant to attend university in the first place. We have so many bright young students in high school who are dreading the thought of oppressive school debt. A generous city bursary to help kick-start the career of say, up to three promising students per graduation year might help get the wheels turning. The city should also coordinate with the local school boards to ensure there is an annual guest speaker for senior grades who can describe the advantages and contribution to society they could make by choosing a career in medicine. The earlier we plant these seeds, the greater the yield when it comes to community health in the form of home-grown doctors. Coupled with doctors we can attract from elsewhere, we’ll be meeting our population’s needs for years to come.

LETTER SPOTLIGHT Retired truck driver says unions essential for a better world

I am a retired truck driver and long-time member and union steward of Teamsters Local Union 938, and I couldn’t agree more with the fact that unions are needed more than ever. (February Advocate cover story.) In these unpredictable times, we must keep our unions strong. The weaker that unions become, the less benefits will be paid by companies, and less-defined pension plans will occur in the future. If you refuse unsafe working conditions and don’t belong to a union, your job could be in jeopardy. Also, if a person wishes to proceed with a grievance independently, a person could not afford to continue to any form of arbitration; you need a union to represent you. Unions are essential to create a safe, positive and fair work environment. They provide guidance and support while protecting the workers’ rights and needs. Unions help make the world a better place, and that’s just what we need right now. Mike Lynch, Lindsay

10

www.lindsayadvocate.ca


OPINION

}} Rebuilding after the pandemic COVID-19 isn’t a pandemic — it’s a syndemic with social origins DR. HELEN SCOTT Dr. Helen Scott is an epidemiologist and assistant professor at the Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto. A resident of Lindsay, she works at the World Health Organization. Scott has worked on global health and public health programs in Canada and around the world for 20 years. She is tackling chronic diseases caused by the obesity epidemic through her newly launched program, www.WeightLossMasterclass.ca.

As we approach 2.5 million deaths globally from COVID-19, we must begin to address the reality that we are not taking a broad enough approach to managing the outbreak. Up until now, we have mostly viewed the cause of this global crisis as an infectious disease. Government interventions have focused on stopping viral transmission to control the spread of the virus. We are relying on measures like social distancing, hand-washing and lockdowns. Epidemiologists and infectious disease specialists are guiding governments by approaching COVID-19 in the same ways that we dealt with the pandemic more than 100 years ago. But what we have learned so far tells us that the story of COVID-19 is not so simple. It could be said that we are not facing a pandemic, but rather, a syndemic — a synergistic epidemic. Rather than solely facing an infectious disease outbreak, we are experiencing the intersection of two types of diseases: COVID-19 infection and chronic disease. Chronic diseases are those that go on for a long time and often do not completely go away. These include diabetes, obesity, heart disease and cancer. People who have “pre-existing conditions” or chronic diseases who become infected with COVID-19 are more likely to get sicker, to be hospitalized and to die.

www.lindsayadvocate.ca

Chronic diseases do not happen randomly in our communities. They are connected to deeply embedded patterns of inequality. When you overlay chronic diseases and COVID-19 on a background of social and economic disparity, the adverse effects of each are amplified. If COVID-19 is indeed a syndemic, the threats we face require a more nuanced approach to protecting health in our communities. The most important outcome of looking at COVID19 as a syndemic is to underline its social origins. The vulnerability of older citizens, persons of colour, minority ethnic communities and “essential workers” who are often poorly paid with fewer job protections, brings forth the stark reality that no matter how protective a vaccine, a purely biomedical solution to COVID-19 will not be successful. Unless we devise policies and programs to reverse profound disparities, our societies will never be truly protected from COVID-19. As Dr. Merrill Singer from the University of Connecticut describes, “A syndemic approach provides a very different orientation to clinical medicine and public health by showing how an integrated approach to understanding and treating diseases can be far more successful than simply controlling epidemic disease or treating individual patients.” I would add one further advantage to diagnosing COVID-19 as a syndemic. Our communities need hope. We are possibly advancing toward an economic crisis. This will not be solved by a drug or a vaccine. Addressing COVID-19 as a syndemic will invite us to cast a larger vision as we rebuild in its aftermath — encompassing education, employment, nutrition and food systems, tax structures, and housing. It will create an opportunity to not only build back better, but to build back fairer.

11


In 2020 alone, Edwin Binney's Community Garden... • Yielded 12,700 lbs of food • Reached 1,500 individuals

• Supported 21 organizations

• Led 3 community outreach projects

Support your neighbours today, visit ckl-unitedway.ca/donatenow


Caring hearts, overworked hands }} For decades, social agencies, charities, arts groups and churches have relied heavily on women’s unpaid work. Can those volunteers keep it up?

NANCY PAYNE Associate Editor

Mrs. Schmale and Mrs. Richardson as convenors of a Daffodil Tea held in aid of the local Cancer Society. Photo courtesy of Kawartha Lakes Public Library.

Picture a community-minded female volunteer from the past. Perhaps you think of a hatted and gloved lady pouring tea at a charity luncheon, or a farm woman teaching teenaged girls how to sew curtains. Maybe it’s an image of capable women from 70 years ago organizing a campaign for the Ross Memorial Hospital or Academy Theatre … and then handing over the proceeds to a largely male board of directors. Whether or not those pictures were ever true to life, it’s increasingly clear that they aren’t any

www.lindsayadvocate.ca

more. Women volunteers have long been the backbone of a wide range of community initiatives, but their involvement is changing. While of course men do an enormous amount of volunteering in areas that benefit people all over Kawartha Lakes, Statistics Canada figures — which include all types of volunteer work — show that about 40 per cent of men in Ontario volunteer compared to 43 per cent of women. CONT’D ON PAGE 14

13


Canadian women working outside the home in 1953:

24 per cent In 1990:

76 per cent In 2014:

82 per cent (Statistics Canada)

Millions of hours volunteered by women in Ontario:

364 By men:

243 (Statistics Canada, 2018)

Percentage of total volunteer hours given by Canadian women:

60 (Statistics Canada, 2018)

Women spend an average of 6.3 hours more than men per week on housework. (Statistics Canada, 2018)

Three times more

Canadian women than men spend time looking after an adult family member or friend.

(Statistics Canada, 2018)

Pat Clarke started volunteering when she was just 18. Photo: Sienna Frost.

WOMEN AS VOLUNTEERS CONT’D FROM PAGE 13

Remove coaching, where men are overrepresented, from the equation, however, and the gap widens when it comes to volunteering for efforts that provide care for those in need and strengthen the community. And even if the proportion of each gender involved in volunteering looks similar, the average female volunteer gave 137 hours per year compared to the average male’s 104 hours. (Statistics Canada did not have information on volunteering among gender non-conforming individuals.) Many local agencies that keep track of volunteers’ gender note a strong prevalence of women. Kawartha Lakes Food Source reports that 68 per cent of its volunteers are female. Women also form the majority of volunteers in Ross Memorial Hospital’s auxiliary and at the Humane Society of Kawartha Lakes. At Hospice Kawartha Lakes, about 80 per cent of trained volunteers are female, the same proportion as at the Academy Theatre. You probably know a woman — or, more likely, several women — who for decades have devoted much of their free time to helping ensure people have food, shelter, safety from an abuser, places to experience theatre, art and music, and that faith communities stay strong. In more restrictive times, volunteering offered women a chance to get out of the house, socialize and do satisfying work, even if they weren’t paid for it. Long-time volunteer Kathy Anderson cites the example of her own mother. “I had such a role model in her. She was a teacher, but when she got married, she was fired from the school board because

14

www.lindsayadvocate.ca


married women weren’t allowed to teach in Oshawa then. She became a really wonderful volunteer in the community right until she died at 90.” The number of Canadian women doing paid work outside the home rose sharply from the 1950s until 1990, but much more slowly after that. Many of the non-profit groups that benefit our community were in fact started and sustained by women who were also raising families and working outside the home. Pat Clarke started volunteering when she was about 18 and has been a driving force in all kinds of community-oriented ventures around Lindsay, from the hospital’s auxiliary, board of governors and capital campaigns, to St. Mary’s church, Rotary, the curling club, the art gallery and more. She was named Citizen of the Year and has been inducted into the local sports hall of fame. Why bother? “Because there’s always a need,” she says. “I know what it’s like to come from a large family and have nothing.” Throughout it all, she taught school — even earning a prestigious Teacher of the Year designation for Ontario — and was involved with her own family’s activities. She rejects the idea that women had fewer demands on their time in the past. “Anybody who gets involved with volunteering with me knows that you don’t ever say ‘I can’t help with that because I’m too busy.’” That said, several groups she used to be involved with have folded, as have others that were once community Barb Traux. mainstays: all but two Women’s Institute groups, the local IODE, 4H sewing and cooking groups, for instance, and the women’s counterpart to Kinsmen, the Kinettes. Barb Truax, another long-time volunteer for myriad causes, remembers Kinettes cleaning and repainting dolls and other toys for the annual toy drive. It was a social gathering as well as a way to help brighten Christmas for others. “But now everything has to be bought new, and it’s all plastic,” she adds with a laugh.

Business and Residential Tech Support

New and Used Walk-Up Service, Laptop & No Appointment Desktop PC’s Necessary

CALL 705-328-9918

VISIT 1 William St. S., Lindsay BROWSE www.kcchelps.com

We see what others don’t. Lightning-fast, custom-made WordPress websites.

cmswebsolutions.com (705) 212-0012 Intentionally simple marketing for your small business in Kawartha Lakes

intentionallysimplemarketing.ca

CONT’D ON PAGE 16

www.lindsayadvocate.ca

Matty G Ad.indd 1

2020-12-08 11:57 AM

15


WOMEN AS VOLUNTEERS CONT’D FROM PAGE 15

Chantel M. Lawton barrister, solicitor and notary public

“Guiding Families Forward”

Accredited Family Mediation Services & Collaborative Law 189 Kent St. W., Suite 220 Lindsay, Ontario

705-878-9949 www.chantellawton.com

New Year, New Menu! All Your Favourites All Day Long.

Make this the year that you Pay it Forward and make someone’s day with a small gesture of kindness.

Yours in Good Health, - The Smitty’s Gang

Faith communities have also typically benefited from the hard work of volunteer groups such as the Anglican Church Women, United Church Women and the Catholic Women’s League. Membership in many of these groups has declined sharply, and although the remaining members are active and dedicated, their average age is steadily increasing. “It seems more difficult now for a lot of people to volunteer,” says Truax, who also worked outside the home for much of her volunteering career. She says it’s harder now to find younger people to step into organizing roles or to serve as committee chairs. Rather than asking them to take on open-ended or longer-term commitment to a board of directors or committee, many organizations are finding better success recruiting women to organize a specific event or volunteer their professional skills in a defined role. “You have to uncomplicated things,” says Clarke. “Everybody’s time is so very precious.” “It’s really important to have a good work-life-volunteer balance,” says Penny Barton Dyke, executive director of the local United Way. Government studies consistently show that in addition to working more hours outside the home, women still do much more of the unpaid work of child care, housework, cooking, grocery shopping and elder care than men do — an average of 2.5 hours more per day, according to Statistics Canada. There have also been huge changes in how we perceive family life and kids’ activities over the past few decades. Where parents once sent their children to walk to practices and music lessons and didn’t necessarily attend every one of their kids’ events, the norm now is a much higher level of parental involvement in their kids’ more heavily scheduled lives. “They’re expected to have a huge social life and do all these other things. And because they’re involved, you are, too,” says Tarina Koty. The mother of five spent decades as a Girl Guide leader and is deeply involved in Lindsay Little Theatre as well as her children’s activities. She says the expecSharon Robbins (far left), Bella Alderton (left) and Sharon Smith-Carter (far right), founders of 100 Women tations of parents have Who Care, present a donation from the group. changed over the years. “A lot of it is mandatory now.” For instance, parents are told when their child enrolls in some activities that they must put in a certain number of volunteer hours or pay additional fees. Koty enjoys much of her volunteer work, but says those mandatory hours are less satisfying. “I don’t necessarily even know the people I volunteer with.”

16

www.lindsayadvocate.ca


Women who want to address needs in the community are also finding new ways to contribute. “You want to make a difference but your time is limited,” says Sharon Robbins, one of the founders of 100 Women Who Care Kawartha Lakes. The group asks members to come to just three one-hour meetings a year, and donate $100 per individual or team of two to a charity selected by a vote after five-minute presentations. Its first meeting attracted 130 people; membership now stands at more than 240 and the group has donated more than $160,000 to local causes since its inception in 2016. “It’s allowed women to come together and to have some control over how their money would be used. It reflects a much more active role that women are playing in society as a whole,” says Robbins. The selected charity reports back to members on how their donation has been spent. “They like being able to say ‘I helped build a new laundry facility at A Place Called Home,’” Robbins says. She and the other two founders, Bella Alderton and Sharon Smith-Carter, have handed over organizing duties to a new team. A similar group, United Women Helping Others, takes on small, focused projects such as purchasing a greenhouse for Community Living and a printer for the John Howard Society’s educational program. Charities and non-profit organizations have also become more professional over the years, attracting funding that allows them to hire paid staff. Take Meals on Wheels, for instance. It started in the kitchen of Cambridge Street United Church when a group of women decided they wanted to help seniors who were unable to do much cooking or shopping for themselves. The women cooked as their kids played around their ankles, with their husbands often doing the deliveries. Now operated by Community Care, Meals on Wheels delivered 28,000 meals to 400 people in Kawartha Lakes in 2020. The little initiative begun to help neighbours in need now involves dozens of volunteers and staff. Likewise, women have taken their place in paid positions at charities where they may once have only been welcomed as volunteers, giving them the satisfaction of meaningful work as well as the reward of a paycheque. A quick glance at the leadership of local charities and social agencies shows women at the top of many organizational charts.

Meals on Wheels’ Brenda Rhodes, Food Services Coordinator Jen Sowden and co-op student Mya Burns.

Women and entrepreneurship According to the 2016 census, 1,880 women in Kawartha Lakes identified as self-employed, which accounts for 11 per cent of all women in the workforce. There is not a distinction of whether this constitutes full-time or part-time employment, only that it is their primary means of earning an income.

Volunteering gives Valmay Barkey profound satisfaction. Photo: Sienna Frost.

CONT’D ON PAGE 19

www.lindsayadvocate.ca

17


Want a clean house? It's cheaper than you think!

Personal service, from the team you trust.

CITY OF KAWARTHA LAKES’ ONLY COMPOUNDING PHARMACY - SPECIALIZING IN MEDICATIONS TO FIT YOUR PERSONAL NEEDS.

CATHY PUFFER, BScPhm RPh owner - operator 108 Kent St W, Lindsay Ph: 705-324-0500

Monday - Friday 9am to 5:30pm Saturday 9am to 1pm

Serving:

Weekly, bi-weekly, or monthly service 7 days a week at reasonable rates!

Norland Fenelon Falls Balsam Lake Bobcaygeon Kirkfield Lindsay + Surrounding Cottage Country

(705) 344-3288 | pennyclean1@gmail.com Pennywise 1/4 Ad.indd 1

ADULT LIFESTYLE CONDOMINIUMS

2021-01-11 10:17 AM

www.railwaylandslindsay.com

705-328-9055

NEW RELEASE - NOW REGISTERING One & two bedroom suites available. Located in downtown Lindsay within walking distance to shopping, restaurants, theatre and more.

18

www.lindsayadvocate.ca


Women’s Institutes dotted the former Victoria County. The active North Emily W.I.is one of the last still running. Here members assemble in their hall near Dunsford for a paint night in 2017. Photo: Carolle Boyce.

WOMEN AS VOLUNTEERS CONT’D FROM PAGE 17

For women working long hours at a job on top of the unpaid workload at home, precious spare minutes are preserved for family time or familyfocused volunteering. Once the kids grow up, though, they find new roles to step into. “Those women are bringing their skills from the workplace into their volunteer work and many are offering a high level of expertise,” says Barkey. “I was brought up with the belief that you always volunteer,” says Wanda Percival, a former high school principal. “I couldn’t do that when I was teaching, but I always said I would volunteer when I retired.” True to her word, she chairs the hospital board, sits on the police services board, is involved with the women’s Probus club and church work, and spent many years volunteering with the Ontario College of Teachers. When kids’ activities demand less of their volunteer time, many women turn their energy to causes that benefit the wider community. “I can see myself doing that,” says Koty. “There’s so much that you can help out with.” Barton Dyke says she’s optimistic about the future. “We get calls from both men and women

www.lindsayadvocate.ca

saying ‘I’ve gotten to this point in life and now I want to volunteer and give back.’” Even more encouraging, though, are the young people she sees who do their college placements or required high school stints at local non-profits. “Many of them come back and volunteer after they’ve done their mandatory hours. They give me a lot of hope.” From the Academy Theatre to the Kawartha Art Gallery, from Community Care to Community Living, from 100 Women Who Care to Women’s Resources, Girl Guides, school councils, churches, food banks, the hospital auxiliary and so many more worthy organizations, women’s volunteer work is indispensable. And no matter how busy those women are, for many, the idea of not volunteering is unthinkable. “Every single person should volunteer. You can’t live in a community and not give back,” says Clarke. “The rewards are just so great.” Not only do you meet some wonderful people, says Barkey, you experience profound satisfaction. “Volunteering gives that deep, sustained joy when you know you’ve made a difference in someone’s life.” Ultimately, she says, it’s all about community. “I just think that word is so powerful. No matter how we do it, we still need to make community.”

19


Victoria Manor }} Retrofit or rebuild it? ‘We also have to keep in mind that 45 years old is the accepted lifespan of a long-term care home.’

KIRK WINTER Municipal Affairs

The province says city council has to improve its 30-year old long-term care facility Victoria Manor by 2025.

Victoria Manor, the only publicly-owned long-term care home in Kawartha Lakes (managed by Sienna Senior Living), has a long history of caring for seniors and others with complex medical needs. By 2025 the Manor must be redeveloped to meet new provincial standards for accessibility and care, but council must decide what form that will take. Options include building a whole new facility or a retrofit of the building on Angeline Street North in Lindsay to meet provincial requirements. Chief Administrative Officer Ron Taylor and Director of Human Services Rod Sutherland provided an update to council in February which sparked considerable debate on the options, and who should pay for the changes needed. “The ‘new’ Victoria Manor was opened in 1990 and

currently has 166 beds. Kawartha Lakes is part of the Central East LHIN where the need for new beds is very high. In the central east catchment area alone 10,710 individuals are over the age of 75, close to 7 per cent of the population,” Taylor told council. He said the Eastern Ontario Wardens’ Caucus was looking at long-term care homes before the COVID pandemic began. EOWC was trying to come up with the best possible way for member municipalities to operate their 15 long-term care facilities. “EOWC is committed to the four hours a day of individual care endorsed by the province,” Taylor said, “but the question is how this will be funded. We also need to discover how we can recruit staff because in rural Ontario that is a real problem.”

20

www.lindsayadvocate.ca


I CHOOSE HERE

Taylor said the province’s funding formula is too complex. “We are looking for funding on a per-bed basis. The province has committed to 30,000 new beds over the next 10 years but no one knows where the money is coming from. Each new long-term care home costs between $50-$80 million and that is simply too expensive for municipalities to carry that kind of debt alone.” Councillor Pat Dunn said when he first joined council “Homes for the aged were an albatross around municipalities’ necks. Municipalities couldn’t compete with private firms. Are we anticipating going down a different road with everything that has recently happened?” Sutherland said the pandemic “will be a key part of a provincial review of long-term care homes.” “There needs to be a continual assessment of sector safety. From the municipal standpoint, the pandemic has created more acceptance of municipal ownership. I see no movement of municipalities either to get out of the business or expand our roles with more long-term care homes. We need local facilities in rural Ontario so people can age in their community of choice.” Dunn said municipalities were “forced by the province to get involved.” While he said they may be necessary in rural Ontario, they are “underfunded by the province.” Councillor Kathleen Seymour-Fagan sits on the management board for Victoria Manor and reminded council that “It was not our decision to redevelop. The province has demanded these upgrades (at Victoria Manor).” Sutherland said the municipality has been told that by 2025 Victoria Manor needs to shift to having 100 per cent single or double rooms. Because of COVID there will also be a change in standards and minimum room sizes. “Our fire suppression system is already compliant,” Sutherland said, “but room sizes will need to grow and every door will need to be widened two inches.” Seymour-Fagan added the city has applied for the money from the province for these upgrades but so far it has not been forthcoming. When Sutherland was asked about the cost of a new build he said, “It would cost the city $15-30 million dollars just in carrying costs over 25 years if we built new.” (Carrying costs represent the recurring expenses paid on the old property even while a new facility is being built.) “We can redevelop the old building,” Sutherland said, “but it may not be feasible making rooms larger. We have looked at a new wing or a third floor. We have discovered that retrofitting is more expensive than a new building. We also have to keep in mind that 45 years old is the accepted lifespan of a long-term care home.”

www.lindsayadvocate.ca

KL

WHY I CAME BACK TO CALL KAWARTHA LAKES HOME

RYAN OLIVER I returned to the Lindsay area a little over five years ago. I grew up here and the combination of proximity to family, cost of living and opportunity to expand a business made the area ideal. It is surreal sending my children to the same school I went to, and to support the building of a community, a business idea and a way of living with the people I’ve known all my life. Pinnguaq builds its tech programming on the needs of rural communities and as we’ve expanded from Nunavut to the rest of Canada, Kawartha Lakes offers a friendly environment for us to continue our expansion across rural communities around Canada. But really, my mom and dad are here! I can get regular hugs whenever I want. Can’t beat that.

More news and stories available at lindsayadvocate.ca 21


Millions of Opportunities. One Exceptional Library.

KLPL

KAWARTHA LAKES PUBLIC LIBRARY

W

R VE EW CO ’S N IS T D HA

KIRK WINTER Municipal Affairs

KLPL

NOTES FROM CITY HALL Proposed Kawartha Lakes municipal budget - $275.6 million Operating budget - $210.7 million Capital budget - $30.6 million Special projects budget - $2.5 million Expected tax rate increase - Between 3-3.84 per cent The capital budget, which details new city projects for 2021, was approved late in 2020. Typically it contains $45$50 million, but for 2021 has been slashed by 40 per cent because of the pandemic’s impact.

KAWARTHA LAKES PUBLIC LIBRARY

YOUR GUIDE TO THE

Exceptional

Your fines are forgiven! Come visit us today!

Discovery Exploration Entertainment KawarthaLakesLibrary.ca Millions of Opportunities. One Exceptional Library.

The $30.6 million will be spent as follows: • $21.4 million for roads, bridges, sidewalks and street lights • $3.6 million for vehicle purchases • $2 million for landfill upgrades • $1.8 million for emergency services • $600,000 for cemeteries • $300,000 for building upgrades • $200,000 for libraries and recreation • $100,000 for the Kawartha Lakes Municipal Airport Key items in the $210.7 million operating budget, which covers costs of the day-to-day running of the city and has yet to be approved: • $71.2 million in salaries and benefits • $40.7 million in contracted services like Victoria Manor, waste pickup and winter control • $45.5 million in transfers to external clients like conservation authorities, the OPP and the health unit • $17.7 million to reserves • $16.1 million for items such as sand, salt, fuel and utilities • $10 million to cover the principal and interest on the city debt • $9.5 million in other costs; single biggest expenditure is $2.6 million for insurance

22

www.lindsayadvocate.ca


International Plowing Match and Rural Expo will go ahead

344 Logie St., Lindsay, ON | (705) 878-3530 | mabeeandassociatespwm.com

Call us and discover the Mabee & Associates difference!

Over 20 years’experience building and preserving wealth.

Directors and staff of the Ontario Plowmen’s Association (OPA) say they will be moving forward with plans for the 2020-21 International Plowing Match (IPM) and Rural Expo. OPA will welcome visitors to Kawartha Lakes Oct. 13-16, according to a media release. The IPM will be take place at the Lindsay Exhibition and neighbouring farms. With COVID-19 restrictions in mind, the organizers will be simultaneously planning both a traditional IPM and a re-envisioned IPM. Alternate designs with additional health protocols for both the “tented city” and the RV park are being developed. Traditional IPM features such as the Bank of Montreal Plowing Competition and Queen of the Furrow Competition may look different this year but the OPA assures the events will be just as exciting as in the past. “Our provincial and local volunteers will be ramping up their committee planning with conference calls and video calls,” says Don Priest, vice-president of the OPA. “We really look forward to the in-person committee and community meetings that we will be held just as soon as the provincial health situation allows.”

Investors Group Financial Services Inc. Trademarks, including IG Private Wealth Management are owned by IGM Financial and licensed to its subsidiary corporations.

Stock up on all your quilting supplies at Appleseed Quiltworks! 100 Kent St W, Lindsay, ON www.appleseedquilt.ca 705-324-0385

Tracy Hennekam Broker of Record / Owner

705-320-9119

705-320-9119 getsoldwithtracy@gmail.com getsoldwithtracy@gmail.com 46 Kent St. W., Lindsay, ON K9V 2Y2 www.sellwithtracy.com

051916 Tracy Hennekam BC proof.indd 1

www.lindsayadvocate.ca

2018-09-17 10:11 AM

23


SPONSORED CONTENT PAGE

SPECIAL EDITION

b\ Welcome to the three-year anniversary edition of the Advocate! Our annual women’s edition in March has become a fond tradition. Once a year we take a dedicated look at issues that particularly affect women, but also the whole community. We do this in honour of International Women’s Day this month and consequently to honour the women of Kawartha Lakes. If you read this magazine in order, you will have already read associate editor Nancy Payne’s feature story on how for decades we’ve relied heavily on all the unpaid work that women do in the service of their communities. But is the future going to be more of a challenge in an era when everyone seems more pressed for time than ever? The following pages are profiles of just some of the great women who work in Kawartha Lakes. From retail to food services, law, non-profits health care and so much more, these professionals are part of the fabric of our city through the businesses we frequent and the organizations we rely on. We hope you’re enjoying this special edition. Thank you for your continued support. Team Advocate

24

www.lindsayadvocate.ca


SPONSORED CONTENT PAGE

WOMEN IN BUSINESS

SPECIAL EDITION

JULIA TAYLOR OWNER

Country Cupboard

photo: geoff coleman

Julia Taylor is the owner and operator of the popular health food store, Country Cupboard, in downtown Fenelon Falls. She’s also a woman on a mission when it comes to our environment — and few can match her passion for green living and green initiatives. A member of the Fenlon Falls Landfill Public Review Committee, Julia has worked with Kawartha Lakes’ Waste Management Department for almost 10 years, first through the Environmental Advisory Committee, and for the last five years through the Fenelon Landfill PRC. “I really like being in direct contact with the city’s waste management department. It has allowed me to have a real say in decisions that affect waste in our city, as well as a broader understanding of issues that are not always black and white.” As a successful businesswoman, Julia felt it was also important to serve on the Fenelon Falls Chamber of Commerce board of directors. “I feel it is a duty as a business owner to improve our community so that

www.lindsayadvocate.ca

it thrives – and it’s also a way for me to sneak in my environmental stamp onto events and other projects that happen in Fenelon Falls.” When she thinks about this past year, she reflects on how intense it was. “It made me stronger as a business owner because I know that I can take whatever is thrown,” whether it’s changing rules and regulations or even figuring out what new demands might arise from customers’ needs. This year — 2021 — is Country Cupboard’s 40th year in business. They will be celebrating this milestone throughout the year, so “watch for surprises!” A major improvement to the façade of the building is in the works, including finishing off its accessible entrance. “We are always trying to meet the unique needs of the community by staying up to date on food, health, and environmental trends.” Visit them at countrycupboardhealthfood.com or call (705) 887-6644.

b\25


SPONSORED CONTENT PAGE

WOMEN IN BUSINESS

WOMEN IN BUSINESS

SPECIAL EDITION

SPECIAL EDITION

MICHELE SAUVÉ

MELISSA McFARLAND

OWNER

Gridley’s Bath Body and Home

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

Lindsay Downtown Business Improvement Association

photo: sienna frost

Gridley’s was founded by Michele Sauvé in 2011 with the vision of making the self-care experience more luxurious. Gridley’s bath products use potent aromas perfect for beautifying and mood-boosting properties. All products are vegan and sustainably sourced and are daily essentials for inner and outer radiance because balance and beauty start from within. To celebrate 10 years in business, Michele is adding new offerings including home cleaning products, DIY kits, and plans for classes and experiential-based tourism events. Gridley’s continues to please countless repeat customers helping them discover moments of bliss. Visit Gridley’s new website at gridleys.ca.

In her role as Executive Director of the Lindsay Downtown Business Improvement Association, Melissa oversees and executes all activities on behalf of its Board of Directors. The LDBIA is an association of businesses in downtown Lindsay dedicated to the prosperity of the downtown. Needs are met by advocating for businesses, beautification of the area, marketing and coordinating special events, and developing partnerships. While 2020 was a challenging year, McFarland says there is “light at the end of the tunnel” with a beautiful and revitalized downtown. Visit lindsaydowntown.ca

WOMEN IN BUSINESS

WOMEN IN BUSINESS

SPECIAL EDITION

SPECIAL EDITION

CHRISTY YAEL

MEGAN & ROBYN BARTON OWNERS

Barton Creative Co.

ARTISTIC DIRECTOR & CO-FOUNDER

NICOLE MYERS-MITCHELL GENERAL MANAGER

The Grove Theatre

Barton Creative Co. is an award-winning creative agency based in Bobcaygeon and Thunder Bay, Ontario. We work with clients from our own communities, across Canada, and internationally. We love building lasting relationships with the people we work with — becoming valued members of their teams, supporting their brands’ growth, and celebrating every win along the way. We also love supporting and working with female entrepreneurs and community leaders of all ages and are so proud to have been recognized in 2020 as the winners of the LDCC Marketing Excellence Award and 3 KLTW Readers’ Choice Awards.

Fenelon Falls would like to introduce Nicole Mitchell and Christy Yael, the creative and administrative minds growing The Grove Theatre. As a youth, Christy spent her summers in Fenelon. Now she has more than 20 years of theatre experience. She is The Grove’s Artistic Director and is looking forward to sharing her love of the arts with the community. Nicole is the General Manager of The Grove and brings with her a vast theatre background, along with administrative skills with equity in mind. Nicole and Christy look forward to welcoming you to The Grove’s outdoor amphitheatre for years to come.


JENNY CONNELL & JESSICA MOYNES OWNERS

SPECIAL EDITION

Unwrapped photo: sienna frost

WOMEN IN REALTY

SPECIAL EDITION

TRACY HENNEKAM BROKER OF RECORD/OWNER

Royale Town and Country Realty

Tracy is a 22-year veteran realtor who co-owns Royale Town and Country Realty, in downtown Lindsay. Her Brokerage allows other realtors the space to grow financially without huge fees, unlimited creative and to grow intellectually with other like-minded realtors. In 2020 Tracy embraced technology to help sell real estate in our new virtual world. In 2020 Tracy was in the Top 3% in sales in our marketplace. She says the market has shifted in 2021 to a Seller’s market so her focus is getting top dollar for her Clients while using technology as much as possible to keep everyone safe. Visit: sellwithtracy.com or call: (705) 320-9119

At its core, Unwrapped is about building and supporting a community dedicated to living more sustainably. By providing product options that are environmentally friendly, refillable, as well as health conscious, Jenny and Jess strive to ensure their store is a hub for those already on their sustainable living journey. But they’re also there to help educate those just starting out, as it can be overwhelming to figure out where to start in making more eco-friendly lifestyle choices. “We encourage everyone to take a few small steps at a time that are maintainable for you and your family and just keep building from there.” The pandemic lockdown forced them to quickly get an e-commerce site up and running and they’ve worked hard to keep active on social media to keep customers informed. “Although this has been going well, we can’t wait to interact in person again with all our fantastic customers!” In the coming year when this becomes possible once again, Jenny and Jess hope to be able to be more active in the community and maybe even launch some environmental initiatives they’ve been dreaming about. Visit unwrappedkawartha.com or call 705-701-8703.

WOMEN IN REALTY

SPECIAL EDITION

CINDY RAY REALTOR

Affinity Group

Cindy Ray has been a realtor for 15 years — but she’s never been through a year like this. The most interesting part of 2020 and early 2021 was how strong the real estate market remained in our area, in the midst of a pandemic. From video showings to hands-free viewings, and constant screening of clients’ health it was a year to adapt. Ray feels good about the future of real estate in the region and believes there will be a high demand for homes as more people discover all that Kawartha Lakes has to offer. Visit cindyray.ca or call 705-340-1188.

SPONSORED CONTENT PAGE

WOMEN IN BUSINESS


SPONSORED CONTENT PAGE

WOMEN IN FOOD SERVICES

SHELLY HARDAKER OWNER

SPECIAL EDITION

Smitty’s photo: erin burrell

WOMEN IN FOOD SERVICES

Over the course of 2020 and into the new year, Shelly has witnessed many amazing women in Kawartha Lakes who persevered in trying circumstances. “I was so humbled by the women in our community, given all they overcame. Although it’s been a tough year for the restaurant industry, she says she thinks more about the women who had just embarked on starting a new business. “Some even had to tend to family members’ serious health needs” at the same time. She thinks of the moms who became teachers overnight while still working and trying to keep life as normal as possible. “We all reached out to each other to lend a supportive hand, a shoulder to cry on (virtually) or someone to listen. My heart goes out to all the women, and men, who have withstood the pressures of this past year.” Shelly says the support she has received from family, friends, co-workers and her incredible customers has kept her going, even though 2021 started the same way last year ended — her business shuttered except for takeout. She is keeping a positive attitude and says it has “given me hope that 2021 will be a good year.” Visit smittys.ca or call 705-878-3604.

WOMEN IN FOOD SERVICES

SPECIAL EDITION

SPECIAL EDITION

LEANNA SEGURA

LAURA LEMIERE & TARYN BERGIN

CO-OWNER

Fresh FueLL / North Ward Coffee Co.

OWNERS

Boiling Over’s Coffee Vault

photo: sienna frost

Leanna has co-owned Fresh FueLL with her husband, Luis, for five years. The couple hit their five-year anniversary recently and moved from downtown to the north ward – and that’s how North Ward Coffee Co. was born, an expansion of Fresh FueLL’s signature wraps, salads, and smoothies. North Ward Coffee offers Salvadoran coffee (where Luis is from), specialty coffees, teas, and hot drinks, along with pastries. Leanna says she hopes 2021 “brings us all more growth, more community, and more opportunities to discover everything our little town has to offer.” Visit freshfuell.com or call 705-878-FUEL (3835)

After almost six years of business, what Laura and Taryn love about Boiling Over’s Coffee Vault and Downtown Lindsay hasn’t changed. “We love our team; many have been with us since the beginning. Our Baristas are creative, committed, and make Boiling Over better.” The part owners say they also love their customers who have given amazing support, especially this past year. “We can’t wait for the revitalization of downtown to be complete to welcome everyone again. We have big plans to make Boiling Over an even better place to meet!” Visit boilingovers-coffeevault.com or call 705-878-8884.


SPONSORED CONTENT PAGE

WOMEN IN LAW

SPECIAL EDITION

MONIQUE MELOCHE, BROGHAN DEAN, KARISSA WARD, MELISSA WEMYSS Wards Lawyers We are privileged to work with a talented team of women lawyers, clerks, and administrative staff. Each of them brings to the table a unique combination of perspective, skills and drive that allows us to deliver, alongside the male lawyers and staff in our office, the excellence in legal leadership we strive for every day. We are grateful and want to thank each of our team members for their dedication and hard work. The past year has presented challenges for all businesses, but particularly for the hospitability and retail sector. It was incredible to witness the resilience of many of the business owners in our community. Lindsay’s downtown is notable for a strong presence of small businesses led by women in our community. These businesses have grappled this past year with not only the impact of the pandemic restrictions but the rebuilding of Kent St. We want to give a shout-out to some of the retail/ hospitality and personal service women business owners on Kent who have demonstrated extraordinary resilience and leadership in the face of these hardships.

The Yoga Loft – Joey Henderson, Charmin’s Wholesome Foods Catering & Meals – Charmin Trudelle, Sweet Annie’s – Louise Scully, Olympia Restaurant – Nicki Dedes, Jolie Hair Studio – Lieschann Fanning and Johanne Williams, Fresh Fuell – Leanna Segura (recently relocated to Angeline St.), Kent St. Tattoo – Corrie Worden, New Nails – Cha Cha, Brock Built-in Specialists – Cathy Dobson, Thairapy Beauty Bar – Monica and Rachel Kerschl, Unwrapped – Jenny Connell & Jessica Moynes, Down to Earth – Sandra Patrick, Appleseed Quiltworks – Sandra Falconer, Brittany N Bros – Tammy Thompson, Cathy Allan’s Ladieswear – Liz Grimes, Hamilton Creek – Rebekah Hamilton, Kent Florist – Ann Scarlett, Houghton Creek – Darlene Algiers, Kate & Co Home Accents – Kate Westcott, Kawartha Lakes Classic Flowers – Kathleen Horne, Olde Mill Candle Co. – Lacey Ball, The Lingerie Loft – Karen Ferguson, Tradewind Toys & Gifts – Angela Field, Johnson’s Jewellers – Janet Gennaro, Jane’s Kountry Kitchen – Michelle Houldsworth


SPONSORED CONTENT PAGE

WOMEN IN LAW

CHANTEL LAWTON BARRISTER, SOLICITOR & NOTARY PUBLIC

SPECIAL EDITION

Chantel M. Lawton

WOMEN IN WEALTH MANAGEMENT

SPECIAL EDITION

JENNIFER MABEE EXECUTIVE FINANCIAL CONSULTANT

Mabee & Associates Private Wealth Management Investors Group Financial Services Inc.

Several years ago, Chantel altered her practice from one which involved primarily litigating family disputes towards one with a primary focus on supporting her clients in resolving their disputes. The family portion of her practice is now focused on providing services as an accredited Family Mediator and in the Collaborative Process as a specially trained Collaborative lawyer. “I also use my resolution training, education and skills in my work as a child’s lawyer through the Office of the Children’s Lawyer and to assist my clients in preparing for their estate planning needs and with the administration of estates.” Chantel says her focus now is on confirming what is important to each of her clients and working to achieve their goals where possible. More and more families are choosing to resolve their disputes without the use of the court process, a trend that increased in 2020 when the court system was reduced to serving urgent matters only for a significant period. “I believe this trend will continue. I also see more separating families relying upon other professionals to assist them in resolving their disputes in creative ways that work for their family,” such as parenting mediators, financial professionals, and others. Visit chantellawton.com or call 705-878-9949.

WOMEN IN HEALTH CARE

SPECIAL EDITION

LORI MITCHELL REGISTERED ACUPUNCTURIST

On The Go Acu

photo: sienna frost

Lori Mitchell is a registered acupuncturist with a focus Jennifer has been in business for 24 years as an Executive Financial Consultant and a Certified Financial on pain relief and functional movement, while also helpPlanner Professional. She works with clients at every stage ing with digestion, anxiety, and other issues. Lori says she of life. From investment, insurance, education, tax, retire- has been in health and fitness for a long time but changed ment and estate planning, her team has worked with fam- directions when she had fertility issues with her last child. ilies of multiple generations and business owners. Jennifer “Unfortunately, western medicine didn’t offer much help, is hopeful to be able to meet with clients in person once but acupuncture and herbs helped me have a successful again this year.Even though there isn’t anything they can’t pregnancy.” She fell in love with eastern medicine and do for clients in the current environment, she misses the wanted to help others with their health issues, too. Lori is in-person touch. “Making a difference in our client’s lives is looking forward to meeting new clients and seeing famso meaningful for us.” Visit mabeeandassociatespwm.com iliar faces. 30 call www.lindsayadvocate.ca Visit onthegoacu.com or call 705-341-8830. or 705-878-3530.


CLARE MILLINGTON, CATHY PUFFER, ELLEN PATTERSON PHARMACISTS

SPECIAL EDITION

Remedy’s RX on Kent photo: erin burrell

WOMEN IN HEALTH CARE

DR. MANJU ASDHIR

CHIROPRACTOR & MEDICAL ACUPUNCTURE PROVIDER

SPECIAL EDITION

www.lindsayadvocate.ca

Kawartha Care photo: sienna frost

Collectively, these three women have 70 years of experience as pharmacists in Lindsay and area. As well, they are lifelong residents of Kawartha Lakes, other than when they studied pharmacy at university (Ellen – U of Alberta; Cathy – U of Toronto; Clare – U of Waterloo). Owner Cathy Puffer opened Remedy’s in 2009, the only compounding pharmacy in Kawartha Lakes, specializing in producing medications customized according to individual patient needs. The three agree that taking time to get to know their patients and those individual needs makes all the difference in providing important personal health care. “It offers an opportunity to provide truly personalized care,” says Clare who knew pharmacy was the career for her after a Grade 12 placement. As a high school student at Sylvestre Pharmacy, Lindsay, Cathy says she was fascinated with pharmacist Cecil Horton’s patient care. “Pharmacists are the most accessible healthcare provider. We are often the first line for issues that need to be referred to hospitals or family doctors,” Cathy says. Ellen agrees. “In a small town setting where many people do not have a full-time caregiver, we fill the need for advice. Customers rely on us.” Visit the store at 108 Kent St. W., Lindsay or call 705-324-0500 for more information. Over the past seven years, Kawartha Care grew from a one-woman clinic to a 16-person multidisciplinary team. “I have always prioritized making the lives of my team better through creating a culture of kindness, innovation, learning, and open communication. Workplace culture is everything,” says Dr. Asdhir. In creating such a positive environment, she says the team was able to come out even stronger during a challenging year. Kawartha Care has extended its hours, opened Saturdays, and has a virtual platform that offers health-care services like no other clinic in Kawartha Lakes. “We have changed the way we deliver health-care, in a new, safer, and limitless way -- Telehealth. We now are able to bring many of our services through a virtual platform, and reach patients we could not reach before,” says Dr. Asdhir. Services via Telehealth include: Physiotherapy, Chiropractic, Naturopathy, Counselling, and even Acupuncture. “As we expand to new heights, we are excited to be the first to deliver this type of care as a team in Kawartha Lakes!” The clinic owner says COVID really grounded her team and “brought us back to why each of us entered our professions.” Visit kawarthacare.com or call 705-878-8558. 31

SPONSORED CONTENT PAGE

WOMEN IN HEALTH CARE


SPONSORED CONTENT PAGE

WOMEN IN HEALTH CARE

VIKKI SMYRNIOTIS DENTURIST

SPECIAL EDITION

Kawartha Denture Clinic

WOMEN IN RETIREMENT CARE

ADRIENNE WEST EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

SPECIAL EDITION

Adelaide Place

Kawartha Denture Clinic provides custom-designed quality dentures, both full and partials and does tooth additions, relines and repairs. Vikki Smyrniotis, co-owner with her husband John, says it’s been a difficult year for small business owners but she thinks they’ve come out stronger as a result. “We are still the same family-run business that has been taking care of your denture needs for the last 22 years with over 40 years of combined experience.” Vikki says it’s important to never put off the care and maintenance of your mouth and teeth which can affect your overall health. “We take all the necessary precautions to keep you safe at our clinic. Our dental chair is covered with disposable plastic which is changed after each and every patient as well as surfaces are constantly cleaned and disinfected. We’ve installed a medical grade air purification system as well as plexiglass at our reception desk. Every patient is screened with a temperature check and asked a series of questions at the door. We are committed to taking care of all your denture needs and want to make sure you feel safe and well taken care of in our clinic.” Visit kawarthadenture.com or call 705-324-0767. When you first see Adelaide Place, the building gets your attention. Its stylish design aside, Executive Director Adrienne West says it’s not the bricks and mortar that makes us unique. “Our true ‘wow’ factor is our people. That includes our wonderful residents, amazing team, and our incredible friends and families that surround us with love and support. That’s what sets us apart.” This year pushed Adrienne to dig deep and find resilience she didn’t think she had, she says, and taught her that “embracing change is not enough, that I must expect it and be ready for it.” Most of all, this year demonstrated to her that “when you have a group of dedicated, wonderful people united in a goal, there is infinite strength in that.” This year will be focused on continuing to work diligently to keep residents safe and healthy. As well, this is an exciting year for the Adelaide family as they celebrate their tenth year by welcoming a new addition. “Our Senior Living Community opens this spring, and we are very excited to offer a unique independent retirement lifestyle to Lindsay.” Visit adelaideplace.com or call 705-340-4000.

32

www.lindsayadvocate.ca


WOMEN IN FITNESS

SPECIAL EDITION

SPECIAL EDITION

TAMMY ADAMS

ROCHELLE PICKERING

OWNER

OWNER

Silver Lights Senior Services

Optimize Wellness Solutions

photo: sienna frost

Home is a powerful word and it’s integral to Tammy Adams’ business. Silver Lights ensures top quality care of your loved ones who want to stay in their own homes for as long as possible. This has given Tammy the opportunity to staff homes with 24-hour care or as much as needed. Known for her kind and patient approach, this year Tammy will be focused on even more training for clients experiencing dementia and Alzheimer’s given there is a high need for this type of care in Kawartha Lakes and surrounding areas. Visit silverlightsseniorservices.com or call 705-308-1940.

Rochelle consults with companies on establishing or improving their workplace wellness strategy. New health themes each month are offered with activities such as workshops, interactive presentations, newsletters, and personal health coaching. From there, a unique program is created to engage employees, improve worker satisfaction, and increase morale. ‘Lunch and Learns’ are available as live webinars on demand. The most popular topics are mental health and mindfulness, stress management, and how to get better sleep. Rochelle works virtually with HR teams, owners and CEOs of small to medium size businesses. Free initial consultation. Visit optimizewellnesssolutions.ca

WOMEN IN SPORT

Shana may be a Class A Professional with the PGA of Canada, but the game of golf never came easily to her. That’s why she likes to simplify what has traditionally been taught in a complicated way. Golf saw a boom last summer with people choosing a safe, fun, outdoor option to ride out the pandemic, with returning and new players getting involved in the game. In her thirst for knowledge, Shana recently completed certification for TPI Level 1, which focuses on the body-swing connection; your golf swing is based on how your body is able to move. She can screen your movements and help you build your swing with what you are able to do as well as marry that with the technology of her Foresight GC Quad launch monitor. This helps her to work with players of all ages and abilities. Shana has also been using the recent lockdown to assist in training new evaluators with the PGA of Canada. Glenn Cundari, Technical Director, said “As Canada’s Master Evaluator for golf, her role in supporting our national team of evaluators and young coaches is one few people can fill; Shana is leadership in action.” Visit kellysglen.com or call 705-731-7403. 33

SHANA KELLY GOLF PROFESSIONAL

SPECIAL EDITION

www.lindsayadvocate.ca

Kelly’s Glen photo: erin burrell

SPONSORED CONTENT PAGE

WOMEN IN HOME CARE


SPONSORED CONTENT PAGE

WOMEN IN NON-PROFITS

JANICE BALFOUR & VANESSA KOOT SPECIAL EDITION

Big Brothers Big Sisters of Kawartha Lakes Haliburton

Amelia Boyd, Kate Dorotheou & Emma Wood are leading the charge against food insecurity across Kawartha Lakes. Community Program Coordinator, Amelia Boyd, coordinates community gardens, a nontraditional food bank and a family cooking project. Having worked in food security in Toronto with student nutrition and community cooking programs, she feels fortunate to now be working in the community where she grew up and with an organization that aligns with her values. Community Engagement Coordinator, Kate Dorotheou, ensures meaningful volunteer and event engagement by creating a positive environment in which the community can give back, whether they are donating their time, funds, or food. With a background in community relations and a desire to connect with others, she enjoys working with residents of her hometown to support those in need throughout the Kawartha Lakes. Food Literacy Program Coordinator and Distribution Centre Assistant, Emma Wood, is AMELIA BOYD, well-rounded in all aspects of food systems. Currently KATE DOROTHEOU completing a postgraduate certificate in Food Security & EMMA WOOD Studies, her interest in food security stems from her love for cooking, nature and connecting over a meal. Kawartha Lakes SPECIAL EDITION Emma believes in the power of food to create and Food Source build relationships in our community. www.lindsayadvocate.ca

WOMEN IN NON-PROFITS

34

It’s been a challenging year for Big Brothers Big Sisters of Kawartha Lakes – Haliburton as we navigated and supported the change to virtual outings for matching young people with caring adults, but it has shown us how adaptable we can be while still providing services to youth in need. This past year has made us stronger by forcing us to reimagine our agency’s goals as we move forward. It has certainly encouraged us to be more creative in how we connect with youth and volunteers in our community. We needed to re-examine our fundraising tactics and move in a different direction. Despite adversity, we were able to work together to create a framework that would keep our doors open for the community. This year will allow us to offer more consistent group programming for youth who need those adult connections in their lives as we recognize the importance of those consistent relationships for youth while expanding our one-on-one programs with new community partnerships and ideas. Visit kawarthalakes.bigbrothersbigsisters.ca or call 705-324-6800.


SPONSORED CONTENT PAGE

WOMEN IN NON PROFITS

SPECIAL EDITION

CHRYSTAL SIMPSON, MARSHA WATTS, MICHAL WALLEN, MELINDA GILMOUR, KERRI DALEY & MICHELLE GRIEPSMA

Community Care City of Kawartha Lakes photo: graeme morrison

Touching thousands of lives each year, CCCKL’s services positively impact life and health. We are proud to highlight six of CCCKL’s women leaders who make a difference. Kerri Daley, Program Manager, Home Support Services, has brought her dedication, experience, and enthusiasm to CCCKL for over 25 years. She and her team are the heart of Meals on Wheels, Volunteer Transportation, and the annual Tax Clinics — programs that make a difference! Melinda Gilmour, RN, Coordinator for Primary Care, provides clinical leadership and community health expertise. With graciousness and a smile, throughout the pandemic she has ensured everyone has the knowledge and PPE they need to keep everyone safe and healthy. Michelle Griepsma, Manager of Hospice Services, brings her positive support to a suite of services that help people through serious illness, loss and grief. Her astute leadership has made her team a go-to resource in the community.

www.lindsayadvocate.ca

Chrystal Simpson, RPN, Program Manager of our Adult Day Program (ADP), channels her innovative spirit in transitioning ADP services from in-person delivery to at-home visits and virtual check-ins during the pandemic. Michal Wallen, Manager, Personal Support Services, supports a team of supervisors and 30+ PSWs who have never wavered in delivering expert in-home care throughout the pandemic. She also provides inspired leadership to our Client Advisory Council, giving clients a voice in care delivery. Marsha Watts, RN, Coordinator of the GAIN Team, has seen a surge in referrals to her program during the pandemic. She begins the day with a team huddle that connects and supports team members in providing specialized care to some of the most vulnerable. CCCKL thanks and salutes these six leaders and the leadership at all levels exhibited by the women at CCCKL and the Community Care Foundation. Without our women leaders, there would be no Community Care.

35


SPONSORED CONTENT PAGE

WOMEN IN NON-PROFITS

PENNY BARTON DYKE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

SPECIAL EDITION

United Way City of Kawartha Lakes

Community volunteers often find a career in the non-profit sector. Helping people in real time has been a driving force for the Executive Director for United Way City of Kawartha Lakes, Penny Barton Dyke, who began volunteering as a teen. Eventually she found her way to Breakfast for Learning as a Coordinator and champion for children before she joined the team for United Way. This sector employs 2.4 million people with a labour force base comprised of 70 per cent females and contributes 8.5 per cent to Canada’s GDP. United Way CKL has embraced a mix of innovative projects with traditional agency funding to create grassroots solutions to systemic issues. Through this work, Penny has recognized the critical role that local leaders in the non-profit and business sectors have played in creating successful programs. United Way’s COVID-19 response ensured fresh produce and funds went to both Haliburton County and The City of Kawartha Lakes through Edwin Binney’s Community Garden, a food security and education centre. Your United Way was able to filter $494,723 to our most vulnerable citizens since April 2020 and currently is working with donors to raise local funds for local critical programs.

Premier Homecare in Lindsay and surrounding area. Home is the safest place to be.

Exclusive caregivers available. Affordable / Client Caregiver Match guarantee with a consistent caregiver. Call 905-925-2273 Visit www.nursenextdoor.com 36

www.lindsayadvocate.ca


BOOKS

READER SPOTLIGHT Courtesy of Kawartha Lakes Public Library

JULIA TAYLOR owner of Country Cupboard

Offering office furniture + PPE solutions, and all your home office needs.

Chairs, Tables, Office Furniture, PPE + Sneeze Guards, Installation

We have all your office essentials.

Jeff Tompkins

jeff@rjts.ca | www.rjts.ca (705) 328-9329 CELL (705) 324-5209 OFFICE

The Buddha and the Bad Ass by Vishen Lakhiani This book teaches you how to marry the ideas of being as Zen and giving as a Buddha while being a badass in the working world. I recommend it if you want to raise your self awareness or are a social-preneur. Vishen does an excellent job of making us rethink outdated ideas and gives us tools and practices that can transform our lives. His first book Code of the Extraordinary Mind is another good mind-shifting read.

3 Years OF THE

LINDSAY ADVOCATE!

Thank you to our readers. Thank you to our small business owners who make the Advocate possible.

Let’s keep building community together!


HERE’S MY CARD FREE LOCAL DELIVERY

SHOP ONLINE ANYTIME!

EVERYWHERE LIFE TAKES ME

Environmentally, eco friendly products delivered safely to your door.

www.unwrappedkawartha.com Embrace low waste living with our selection of bulk refills and plastic free products for your home.

101 Kent Street West, Lindsay

c

109 Kent St. W. LINDSAY 52 King St. W. COBOURG 241 Queen St. PORT PERRY

We can make your ambitions reality.

Mario Mazziotti Community General Manager Tel: 705-324-2183 ext 222

Your trusted community partner. VISIT US IN KAWARTHA LAKES AT ANY OF OUR 4 LOCATIONS.

Neabor’s Family Restaurant Where friends and family meet! The Best Kept Secret in The City Of Kawartha Lakes!

705-324-1862 • 401 Kent St. Lindsay Square Mall, Rear Entrance

Our sincere thanks to our employees and to all who serve our community under these difficult circumstances. We appreciate your efforts, dedication and care!

LOOKING TO BUY

1958 to 1964 Chevrolet Impala, 1957 Belairs, Chevelle, Corvette, Deloreans, Porsche, Jaguar Any condition considered.

Call or text Roger at 647-298-6434 We pay you CA S H today! PROFESSIONAL • RESPECTFUL • CONFIDENTIAL Coins, Bars, Sterling Silverware, Gold Jewelry, Gold Watches, Old Paper Money, Military Medals, Estates Welcome We buy and sell Gold and Silver Bullion

705.874.3800 www.jamesgoldandsilverbuyers.ca rbuyers.ca WE ARE LOCAL & SUPPORT YOUR COMMUNITY


The local child care picture Licensed child care spaces in Kawartha Lakes: Infant: 39 Toddler: 120 Preschool: 313 Kindergarten: 423 School age: 495

Total: 1,390

Licensed child care centres (including after-school programs):

20

LOCAL BUSINESS FOR SALE Kawartha Lakes Classic Flowers Opportunity knocks. A lovely, well established downtown Lindsay flower and gift shop is waiting for you. $59,900 Call for details

Cindy Ray SALES REPRESENTATIVE

AFFINITY GROUP

P I N N A C L E R E A LT Y LT D . B R O K E R A G E

CINDY RAY, Salesperson CELL 705-340-1188

www.cindyray.ca

(Data courtesy of City of Kawartha Lakes)

COVID-19’s impact on the local workforce Using custom Labour Force Survey data for February to November 2020, the Workforce Development Board evaluated which demographics were most affected by COVID-19 by measuring the decreases in employment in the Muskoka-Kawarthas Economic Region, which includes Peterborough, Northumberland, Kawartha Lakes, Haliburton and Muskoka.

Experienced Advice Experienced LegalLegal Advice for your for your Residential & your Recreational Experienced Advice for CALL US! Residential &Legal Recreational Transactions Transactions & Estate Planning Residential & Recreational Transactions & Estate Planning & Estate Planning

We also do:

Tooth Additions Experienced Advice Experienced LegalLegal Advice for your

Experienced Legal Advice your Residential for your Residential &for Recreational Experienced Advice for your Residential &Legal Recreational Transactions Transactions & Estate Planning Residential & Recreational Transactions & Recreational Transactions & Estate Planning & Estate Planning & Estate Planning

STAPLES & SWAIN

The most significant loss in jobs during the first eight months of the pandemic were in the following cohorts:

professional corporation

Barristers, Solicitors, Notaries

Full-Time Employment

• Male, 55-64 10,100 jobs • Male, 65+ 1,400 jobs • Female, 55-64 4,100 jobs Part-Time Employment • Male, 15-24 2,200 jobs • Female, 25-44 500 jobs • Female, 55-64 5,000 jobs • Female, 65+ 1,500 jobs (Workforce Development Board)

www.lindsayadvocate.ca

Residential Recreational Purchases, Residential&&Residential Recreational & Recreational Purchases, Sales & Refinancing Sales & Refinancing Purchases, Sales & Refinancing Heather Richardson

Contract Preparation &Preparation Review Contract &&Review ContractPreparation Review Angus McNeil

Residential &&Residential Recreational Purchases,ofPurchases, Wills & Powers of Attorney Residential Recreational Residential Recreational Wills &&& Recreational Powers Wills Powers ofAttorney Attorney Purchases, Sales & Refinancing Sales Purchases, Sales&& &Refinancing Refinancing Sales & Refinancing

Business Succession Planning Contract Preparation &Preparation Review Business Succession Contract Preparation &&Review Contract Preparation & Review Contract Review Planning

Business Succession Planning

Wills & Powers of Attorney Wills & Powers of Attorney Wills & Powers of Attorney

Wills & Powers of Attorney Estate Administration Estate Administration

Business Succession BusinessPlanning Succession Planning BusinessPlanning Succession

Estate Administration

Business Succession Planning

Incorporation Estate Administration EstateIncorporation Administration Estate Administration

Estate Administration Incorporation Incorporation IncorporationIncorporation Partnership &Shareholder Shareholder Partnership & Agreements Incorporation Partnership & Shareholder Agreements Partnership& &Shareholder Shareholder Agreements Partnership Agreements Partnership & Shareholder Agreements Partnership & Shareholder AgreementsAgreements 10 William St. St. S., 10 William S.,Lindsay Lindsay (705) 324-6222 www.staplesswain.com (705) 324-6222 www.staplesswain.com Dedicated to Excellence Since 1959 Dedicated to Excellence Since 1959

39


The Local with Kitchen

Diane Reesor

proudly

Order online for free delivery or pick up.

PRESENTED BY Boxty Instead of a silver spoon, Diane was born with a potato in her mouth! She loves potatoes and especially the potato skins. She never peels her potatoes. When she came across these potato-based griddle cakes, she was intrigued by the name. Diane now saves a cup every time she makes mashed potatoes just so she can make boxty the next day! 1 cup finely grated, raw russet potatoes 1 cup mashed potatoes 1 cup flour ¼ cup finely chopped scallions or caramelized onions 1 teaspoon salt ½ teaspoon coarsely ground pepper 2 teaspoons baking powder 2 lightly beaten eggs ¼ cup milk (approximate) Butter and/or oil, for frying

Optional: Add ½ teaspoon of seasonings to the batter (chives, oregano, rosemary, basil, grated onion or onion powder, garlic powder, etc.)

Grate raw potatoes onto a clean cloth and twist to remove excess moisture. Mix flour, baking powder and dry seasonings. Combine with raw potatoes, mashed potatoes, scallions and eggs. Add milk to make a thick batter, then allow it to sit while the griddle is heating to medium. Add butter/oil to form a thin film over the bottom of the pan. When the oil is hot, drop batter by the heaping tablespoon (the cake circle should be about 2 1/2 to 3 inches in diameter) into the pan, and slightly flatten each round by flipping it right away. Add oil as needed between batches. Brown both sides, cooking about four minutes per side. Drain on paper towel and keep warm. Butter each boxty and serve hot.

Tip: If you have leftovers, they can be split in half and toasted Story and photos by Sharon Walker

countrycupboardhealthfood.com

Bulk Foods Health Foods Alternative Foods 9 May Street, Fenelon Falls • 705-887-6644 Mon. to Wed. 9 am to 5 pm • Thurs. & Fri. 9 am to 8 pm Sat. 10 am to 5 pm • Sun. 11 am to 4 pm


It's It's aa Mystery Mystery It's a Mystery ACROSS Across Across 11 Entertain Entertainwith withtales tales Across

77 Entertain "Ay, (Bart Simpson "Ay,___!" ___!"with (Barttales Simpsoncry) cry) 1 14 "Rocky" opponent Creed 14 "Rocky" opponent Creed 7 "Ay, ___!" (Bart Simpson cry)

15 Île-du-Prince-___ 15 "Rocky" Île-du-Prince-___ 14 opponent Creed (Charlottetown's province: Fr.) (Charlottetown's 15 Île-du-Prince-___ province: Fr.) 16 "?" 16 (Charlottetown's "?" province: Fr.) 18 "___ 18 "?" "___anything anythingfor foryou" you" 16 19 Aboard 47-Across 19 "___ Aboard 47-Across 18 anything for you" 20 Ending with fib or 20 Ending with fib orform form 19 Aboard 47-Across

22 "?" 22 Ending "?" 20 with fib or form 25 Apple 25 "?" Applemessaging messagingprogram program 22 27 Fiction editor's pkgs. 27 Fiction editor's pkgs. 25 Apple messaging program

28 "___ three, four!" 28 Fiction "___two, two, three,pkgs. four!"(marching (marching 27 editor's shout) shout) 28 "___ two, three, four!" (marching 29 Fill 29 shout) Fillfully, fully,as asaabelly belly 31 Alastair Christmas 31 Fill Alastair of"A ChristmasCarol" Carol" 29 fully,of as a"Abelly 32 Dot follower, on the Web 32 Alastair Dot follower, on the Web 31 of "A Christmas Carol" 33 The other team 33 The other team 32 Dot follower, on the Web 34 "?" 34 The "?" other team 33 37 Jimi 37 JimiHendrix Hendrixhairdo hairdo 34 "?" 39 French connections? 39 Jimi French connections? 37 Hendrix hairdo

40 What Catholic 40 French Whataaconnections? CatholicFather Fatherisisnot, not, 39 ironically ironically 40 What a Catholic Father is not, 41 Cleaned 41 ironically Cleanedup upthe thedraft draft 43 Levy charged ininthe 43 Cleaned Levynot notup charged theNWT NWT 41 the draft 44 End of many religions 44 Levy End not of many religions 43 charged in the NWT 47 Nina and Santa Maria's 47 Nina and Santa Maria's 44 End of many religions companion companion 47 Nina and Santa Maria's 48 "?" 48 companion "?" 50 Some 50 "?" SomeT-shirt T-shirtsizes: sizes:Abbr. Abbr. 48 51 Maj.'s superior 51 Some Maj.'sT-shirt superior 50 sizes: Abbr. 54 Prefix meaning 54 Maj.'s Prefixsuperior meaning"wine" "wine" 51 55 "?" 55 "?" 54 Prefix meaning "wine"

59 Large 59 "?" Largesoup soupvessels vessels 55 60 It "was white as 60 It "was white assnow," snow,"ininaakid's kid's 59 Large soup vessels song 60 Itsong "was white as snow," in a kid's 61 Compound 61 song Compoundused usedto tomake makeplastic plastic 62 Homeland, 62 Compound Homeland,affectionately affectionately 61 used to make plastic

62 Homeland, affectionately DOWN Down Down 11 Ethnic-based Ethnic-basedbigotry bigotry Down 22 Ethnic-based Lyric Lyricpoems poems bigotry 1 3 Some Dutch 3 Some Dutchcheeses cheeses 2 Lyric poems 4 "It's ___ nothing" "It's ___ nothing" 34 Some Dutch cheeses 4 "It's ___ nothing"

www.lindsayadvocate.ca

by Olson byBarbara Barbara Olson CROSSWORD ©©ClassiCanadian Crosswords ClassiCanadian Crosswords by Barbara Olson © ClassiCanadian Crosswords

22 A 33 MYSTERY 44 55 66 IT’S

77

88

99

10 10

11 11

12 12

13 13

1 14 14

7 15 15

8

9

10

11

12

13

11

2

3

4

5

6

14 16 16

17 17

16 18 18

17 19 19

18 22 22

23 23

24 24

22 27 27

23 28 28

24

27

31 31 34 34

37 37

38 38

37 41 41

38

19

28

32 32

31

35 35

34

39 39 42 42

51 51

52 52

53 53

51

52

53

55 59 59

56

29

30

40 40

48 48

23 Pet require aalicense 23 "Lemme Petthat thatdoesn't doesn't require license 21 ___!" (fightin' words) 24 Military off-road vehicle 24 Military off-road vehicle 23 Pet that doesn't require a license 26 Referenced, as aafootnote 26 Military Referenced, asininvehicle footnote 24 off-road 29 The 29 Referenced, The___ ___(Sault (Sault Ste. Marie's 26 asSte. in aMarie's footnote nickname) nickname) 29 The ___ (Sault Ste. Marie's 30 InInthe 30 nickname) thethick thickofof 31 "Fire puck!" 31 In "Fire the puck!" 30 thethe thick of 32 Certain trains 32 Certain trains 31 "Fire the puck!" 34 Resolves, as 34 Certain Resolves, asdifficulties difficulties 32 trains

35 When off, 35 Resolves, Whento totake take off,approx. approx. 34 as difficulties 35 When to take off, approx.

20 20

21 21

20

21

33 33 33

36

48

44 44

45 45

46 46

44

45

46

49 54 54 57 57

58 58

57 60 60

58

62

13 Overdo 13 Hullabaloo Overdothe theadmiration admiration 12 17 Pack down, as 17 Overdo Pack down, aspipe pipetobacco tobacco 13 the admiration 21 "Lemme ___!" (fightin' words) 21 "Lemme ___!" (fightin' words) 17 Pack down, as pipe tobacco

26

49 49

61

10 Café (latte 10 Café___ ___ (lattecousin) cousin) 9 "Hair" part 11 Victoria Day month 11 Café Victoria Day month 10 ___ (latte cousin) 12 Hullabaloo 12 Hullabaloo 11 Victoria Day month

25

43

60 62 62

77 A This or to Thierry This orthat, that, toin Thierry 6 billion years, astronomy 8 Colourful quenchers 8 Colourful quenchers 7 This or that, to Thierry 99 Colourful "Hair" "Hair"part part 8 quenchers

26 26

40

59 61 61

55 Law Lawschool schooldeg. deg. 6 A billion years, A billion astronomy 56 Law schoolyears, deg.ininastronomy

25 25

36 36

43 43

47 50 50 56 56

30 30

32

39

42

55 55

29 29

35

41 47 47

50

15

54

36 36 What Whatcomputers computersare are"fed" "fed"and and "spit out" "spit out" 36 What computers are "fed" and 37 Fridge or 37 "spit Fridge orstove: stove:Abbr. Abbr. out"

38 They're given atatHalloween 38 Fridge They're often given Halloween 37 oroften stove: Abbr. 42 More contrived 42 More contrived 38 They're often given at Halloween 43 Angus Reid 43 More Angus Reidsurvey, survey,e.g. e.g. 42 contrived 44 Actresses Woods and 44 Angus Actresses Woods and Graff 43 Reid survey, e.g.Graff 45 Company that merged with 45 Actresses CompanyWoods that merged with 44 and Graff Petro-Canada Petro-Canada 45 Company that merged with 46 Made 46 Petro-Canada Madeaacatty cattyremark? remark?

48 "There's ___ about 48 Made "There's ___crying crying aboutit" it" 46 a catty remark? 49 High on nose candy, with "up" 49 "There's High on___ nose candy, withit""up" 48 crying about 52 The Lord's address? 52 High The Lord's address? 49 on nose candy, with "up" 53 Smythe for whom 53 The Smythe foraddress? whomaatrophy trophyisis 52 Lord's named named for whom a trophy is 53 Smythe 56 Ironic, 56 named Ironic,as ashumour humour

57 Min. with 57 Ironic, Min.concerned concerned withCanadian Canadian 56 as humour waters waters 57 Min. concerned with Canadian 58 Speak 58 waters Speak___ ___ofof(slander) (slander)

58 Speak ___ of (slander) You’ll find the solution on page 46

By Barbara Olson © ClassiCanadian Crosswords

41


HORTON KOHL LLP 705-999-4733 BARRISTERS & SOLICITORS

ALLAN HORTON B.A., M.A., LL.B.

• Real Estate • Wills & Estates • Criminal Defence • Civil Litigation • Family Law • Appeals • Mental Health Law * and more

MICHAEL KOHL B.MSC. J.D.

42

www.lindsayadvocate.ca


FRIENDS & NEIGHBOURS

Jane Junkin

}} Volunteer gets back

as much as she gives

JAMIE MORRIS Writer-at-large

more, though, it has been taking patients to Toronto “They are the heart and soul. Without their dedicahospitals. tion, we wouldn’t be able to offer our programs.” That’s Long trips with individuals anxious under stress. Graeme Morrison of Community Care; he’s talking about What’s needed are, she explains, “people skills: being volunteers. Ask at any social agency or charity and you’ll able to listen, a sense of humour, a tough skin.” The skills be told the same. that served her well as a vice-principal. At Community Care, volunteers do everything from Over the years she developed bonds with those she cooking and driving for Meals on Wheels to assisting clients with income tax preparation to hospice client care. helped. They range from a four-year old with leukemia In the year before the pandemic put (now 15, and doing very well) to a feisty some services on temporary hold, 434 92-year-old. Not all stories end happily. “The volunteers contributed about 70,000 toughest part is the ones you lose,” she hours (the equivalent of approximately says. “They have a special place in my 40 full-time jobs). heart.” Being able to compartmentalize Who are these good-hearted and big-souled volunteers? Overwhelmingly, becomes important. “I still have my own they are seniors (roughly 80 per cent life — grandkids, family, things I’m busy at Community Care) and women outwith and a home to keep up,” she says. number men. She also has three dogs and four My friend Jane Junkin ticks both cats — Jane’s always had a soft spot for those boxes and for the past decade has animals, particularly animals in need of given over three or four days a week a caring home. to Community Care and another to the Which brings us to her Humane Society volunteer work. Two of the dogs, Humane Society. I first knew Jane as the vice-principal a Shih Tzu and a miniature Schnauzer, at the elementary school where I taught. came from the shelter. “If you volunteer at the Humane Society, sometimes She was the perfect fit for the job: caring Jane Junkin, a former teacher who you bring your work home with you.” and empathetic, unflappable and toughnow volunteers. Photo: Jamie Morris There have been memorable and skinned, but with a highly-attuned b.s. satisfying experiences. She remembers, for example, the detector and a sense of humour. When she retired after 34 years in education Jane betime 27 animals (one pregnant) were rescued. All were gan driving for the Cancer Society. On trips to Toronto’s adopted out, given a second chance. Princess Margaret Hospital, she’d drop off clients then A final question for Jane: Why volunteer? “You don’t wait at the “Drivers’ Lodge.” That’s where she heard do it for yourself. It’s what it does for the clients, whether two-legged or four-legged.” But there are lots of ways Community Care offered the same service along with she and other volunteers benefit too, as she’s quick to many others and decided to volunteer as a driver there. point out: “Volunteers are really good people; friendSome of her Community Care driving has been local, transporting people to medical appointments, for shopships develop from volunteering and you share laughter ping, the hairdresser — whatever is needed. More and and tears. It makes you appreciate what you have.”

www.lindsayadvocate.ca

43


JUST IN TIME

Overcoming Hurdles

}} The Life of Eleanor McQuarrie, DVM Life had changed in untold ways for Lindsay residents by the mid-1940s, particularly in terms of how they got around. Save for the odd wagon belonging to a milkman, internal combustion vehicles had long since displaced the horse-drawn traffic of years gone by. Scarcer still was the sight of someone riding about town on the back of a horse. Yet, that was exactly what folks living across the way from 17 Adelaide St. saw when teenaged Eleanor McQuarrie emerged from that house and mounted her steed during that decade. Later, when the family moved to 251 Kent St. — home to today’s Kent Inn — Eleanor spent many pleasant hours with her horse adjacent to Lindsay’s increasingly busy main thoroughfare. The youngest of Dan and Ada McQuarrie’s five children, Eleanor was born north of Argyle in 1930, shortly before the family moved into Lindsay where her father had taken up a job as Victoria County’s Registrar of Deeds. Eleanor’s uncle, Duncan McQuarrie, who died when she was six, kept horses on the 400-acre family farm. Hardly a photo exists of young Eleanor where she isn’t cuddling or soothing an animal of some kind, whether it be dogs, kittens or horses. Although she taught school for a few years, it was clear where Eleanor’s interests lay. In 1956, she became just the 33rd Canadian woman to graduate as a doctor of veterinary medicine. Eleanor McQuarrie was among the cohort whom Weekend Magazine  reporter Jock Carroll called “a small, select group of pioneers.” After all, it wasn’t easy for women to get into vet school 70 years ago. As historians Kevin Woodger and Elizabeth Stone point out in their essay “‘One of the Boys’: Women at the Ontario Veterinary College in the Twentieth Century”, “Women — both those applying to and those who managed to gain entry into the veterinary program — were met with the masculine culture of veterinary medicine that viewed them as less than capable veterinary practitioners.” Sexism prevailed at the OVC during the 1950s and into the early 1960s, particularly among those who wished to specialize in the field of large animal medicine, which

IAN McKECHNIE Writer-at-large

was deemed to be a masculine profession. It was no wonder, then, that Eleanor and her peers described the five-year program through the alliterative “Five Ds:” disillusioned, disappointed, discouraged, disgusted ... and, ultimately, delighted, when they finally graduated. Asked by Weekend Magazine’s  Carroll if she would do it all over again, Eleanor replied “I’d have to think about that, knowing what I do now.”

44

Eleanor with horse.

www.lindsayadvocate.ca


Upon graduating, Eleanor married a fellow student, Dr. John Hare, and they soon set sail for Kenya. While there, they lived in Narok, where they tested cattle for brucellosis and looked after a variety of domestic animals. A diary Eleanor kept reveals the day-to-day life of a Canadian veterinarian working abroad. From nursing a neighbour’s sick chickens back to health and administering a vaccine to an ill dog, to checking in on local horses to keeping monkeys away from their front porch, Eleanor was one busy lady. (“Had 25 minutes to do shopping,” she wrote one day.) When Eleanor and John returned to Canada a few years later, they brought with them not only their eldest son, Clifford — who had been born about halfway through their African sojourn — but also a monkey named Gilbert and an African grey parrot named Sullivan. This bird became an entertaining fixture at the Hares’ new veterinary clinic in Simcoe, Ont., where Eleanor became known for never turning a sick animal away. Whether it was a piglet or puppy, Eleanor loved them all and occasionally invited her sons, nieces and nephews to join her around the operating table as she worked. Eleanor died suddenly when she was only 39 years old, leaving When Eleanor and John behind three young sons. Had any of returned to Canada a them decided to pursue careers in veterinary medicine, they may well few years later, they brought with them not have had an easier time in applying than their mother, as Woodger and only their eldest son, Stone report that discriminatory Clifford – who had been attitudes lingered among some at born about halfway the OVC into the 1970s and 1980s. through their African (Should Eleanor have a daughter, asked Jock Carroll, of  Weekend sojourn – but also a would she like her to monkey named Gilbert Magazine,  become a vet? Perhaps recalling the and an African grey hurdles her own contemporaries parrot named Sullivan. faced, Eleanor responded with “No, not my daughter.”) Of course, times have changed considerably in the last seven decades, and today Canada’s veterinary colleges count far more female graduates annually than they do male graduates. Among that number is Dr. Sarah Hannah, née Downing, who completed her Doctor of Veterinary Medicine degree at the OVC in 2017. An LCVI alumnus like Eleanor McQuarrie, Dr. Hannah grew up on a Little Britain area farm and was instilled with a strong love of animals from a young age. “Since graduation, I have had the pleasure of working alongside many strong, intelligent and compassionate women at the Fenelon Animal Clinic in Fenelon Falls,” Dr. Hannah says. “As a female veterinarian in a small town,” she reflects, “I believe I have an excellent opportunity to be a visible role model for the young women of our community, and I strive to encourage other women to achieve their dreams in the field of science.” ~Eleanor McQuarrie is the author’s great-aunt.

www.lindsayadvocate.ca

YOUR COMPLE TE LEG AL TE AM LITIGATION BUSINESS & CORPORATE FAMILY L AW PERSONAL INJURY COLL ABORATIVE REAL ESTATE ESTATE PL ANNING L ABOUR & EMPLOYMENT WARDLEG AL .C A | 705-324 -92 7 3

84 KENT STREE T WE ST LINDS AY, ON 45


TREVOR HUTCHINSON Contributing Editor

TREVOR’S TAKE The Danger of Magical Thinking

Whether it’s because of my procrastination or just plain laziness there are at least four rooms in my house that I haven’t got around to painting. It’s possible I have the start of a pre-plan but the paint hasn’t been purchased and the walls haven’t been prepped. “I am going to paint those walls” has become “I am painting those walls,” as if by just thinking about it I’m getting paint on walls. What I am really doing is using magical thinking, what the Cambridge online dictionary defines as “the belief that thinking about something or wanting it to happen can make it happen.”   All of us do this to some extent. At its most benign it can be a healthy way to deal with stress. At its extreme it can be a symptom of serious mental illness. But when politicians use magical thinking it can be downright lethal. Take long-term care homes. As early as late March of 2020, Premier Doug Ford was announcing an “iron ring” around our “seniors and other vulnerable people.” Iron ring is a great metaphor for a system meant to protect. I mean, that is some good PR. Ford has repeated the phrase several times. But saying isn’t doing: Nearly 2,000 people in long-term care needlessly died in the second wave alone as a result. And it turns out Minister of Education Stephen Lecce also has a gift for magical thinking. Aided by a seemingly weak chief medical officer of health, he has repeated ad nauseam that schools are safe zones. Somehow, in their minds, COVID magically stops at the door. But saying something is safe doesn’t make it safe, no matter how much union-bashing you wrap the statement in. Safe is actual lower class sizes (like a maximum of 15 students in a class), not skewed and meaningless averages. Safe is improved ventilation. Safe is recognizing aerosol transmission and looking at the new COVID variants of concern. Saying something repeatedly, even with Lecce’s private school charm, does not make it so. Politicians resort to magical thinking because it works. We want to hear that schools are safe. We want to hear that people who live in nursing homes are protected. We just want an end to this cluster cuss of a year. Preying on those needs, politicians can easily twist the truth. “We are only doing asymptomatic testing in 1.8 per cent of schools” can become, in the time it takes to eat a Timmie’s egg sandwich, “We have robust asymptomatic testing!” Lots of jurisdictions, including in Canada, are doing a better job at battling COVID than Ontario. As we take a breath before a third wave, we should learn from them. You don’t blame another level of government. You get on it with it and take concrete actions supported by facts. You leave magical thinking for magic shows.

46

Portrait & Fine Art Photography

Capturing Precious Moments www.allinimages.ca 519-940-1713

cf SOLUTION

to this month’s crossword, page 41 It's a Mystery 1

R

14

A

2

E P

3

G O

16

C O U

18

4

A L L

I

D

D O

S

E

A

22 27

M S

R

5

L L D

37

A

41

P

38

F

23

C

P L

N

S

I

M

H

A

V

G

S

55

T

F L

56

T

61

S

R L

L

Y

S

E

A 25

29

S

30

A

I

T

S

E

D

40 43

P

48

N O

53

C O

L

H O U

L

U

R

E

E

N

S

T

Y

R

E

N

E

I

36

D

D

A

S

T

T

A

D

60

F

62

O

58

A

D

O U 21

U

L

H

A

T

I

A

T

E

T

H

E M

E

A

A

D 44 49

C

I

45

46

S M

L

U

O

E

N O

54 57

13

C

26

33

C O M

R 20

T

32 35

12

E

E

T

11

A M B

T

N O

52

10

T

P

A 51

9

A

E

39 42

H O W S

59

T

A

D O U

H M E U

R O

I

17

8

E

24

H

R O O

47 50

I

N

C

15

A

31 34

7

E O 19

28

S

6

© Classi

E

I

K

N O W

L

E

E

C

L

D

S

O D

E

By Barbara Olson © ClassiCanadian Crosswords

www.lindsayadvocate.ca


WINNER

Media Excellence 2020 (LDCC)

WINNER

New Business of the Year 2019 (LDCC)

WINNER

Innovation Award 2018 (KLCFDC)

The Advocate Podcast Stories from Kawartha Lakes

Sponsored by

Presented by

WHERE?

WHEN?

lindsayadvocate.ca, iTunes, and Spotify

The 15th and 30th of every month.


KAWARTHA LAKES 20/21

ill be We w g all in follow otocols r p h lt nts hea ireme u q e r and

Wednesday, OCTOBER 13 to Saturday, OCTOBER 16, 2021 Kawartha Lakes, Lindsay, Ontario WE SALUTE AND THANK OUR PRESENTING PARTNERS:

Check our Website www.plowingmatch.org for the latest developments on our many 20/21 IPM features

For additional information, contact:

ONTARIO PLOWMEN’S ASSOCIATION

1-800-661-7569 Email: Guelph office: admin@plowingmatch.org Email: Lindsay office: ipm2021@plowingmatch.org

Profile for Lindsay Advocate

March 2021  

Advertisement
Advertisement