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FORGOTTEN CEMETERIES | NEW GARDENING COLUMN | TAKING A GANDER AT GRASS HILL

THE LINDSAY ADVOCATE WINNER – MEDIA EXCELLENCE

Are we becoming Muskokaized? Hidden trails to discover

JULY 2021


Personal care. A personal touch. Our front-line people make all the difference.

Meet Dianne Smith Each day I leave my own small family to come to Caressant Care to care for my much larger family, to make them smile, comfort them, and provide healthy, nourishing meals. I'm proud of the work I do and hope that someday a young person will don a white apron and hairnet and experience the rewards, as I have.

Dianne Smith Dietary Aide Learn more on our website www.caressantcare.com

240 Mary St W, Lindsay | 114 McLaughlin Rd, Lindsay


July 2021 • Vol 4 • Issue 39

PUBLISHED BY

Fireside Publishing House, a proudly Canadian company. The Lindsay Advocate is published monthly and distributed to a wide variety of businesses and locations within Kawartha Lakes, North Durham and southern Haliburton County. We are a proud member of the Lindsay and District, Fenelon Falls and Bobcaygeon Chamber of Commerce. TEAM ADVOCATE

CONTENTS KAWARTHA LAKES’ FINEST MAGAZINE

FEATURES

EDITORIAL

Publisher: Roderick Benns Associate Editor: Nancy Payne Contributing Editor: Trevor Hutchinson Research, Strategy & Development: Joli Scheidler-Benns Contributing Writers: Geoff Coleman, Leah Barrett Werner,

Nancy Payne, Kirk Winter, Jamie Morris, Ian McKechnie, Trevor Hutchinson Web Developer: Kimberley Durrant LETTERS TO THE EDITOR SEND TO

kawarthalakespublisher@gmail.com ADVERTISING & MARKETING

Advertising/Editorial inquiries: Roderick Benns

705-341-1496

CREATIVE

Graphic Design: Barton Creative Co. Photography: Sienna Frost, Nancy Payne, Geoff Coleman,

Yannick Grignon, Ian McKechnie

On the Cover: Anchor at sunset, Garnet Graham Beach,

Fenelon Falls. Photo: Keith Morgan

Visit www.lindsayadvocate.ca for many more stories FOLLOW US ON

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The Lindsay Advocate @lindsayadvoc

15 12 Editorial: Won’t you be my neighbour? 13 Opinion: The stigma of being “unproductive” 15 Cover Story: Is Kawartha Lakes becoming Muskokaized? Preserving the spirit of the traditional family cottage in the drive to bigger and flashier.

24 Hidden trails to explore this summer Discover cool new spots to stretch your legs

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28 28 Exploring forgotten cemeteries Inactive graveyards give us great insights into local history.

IN EVERY ISSUE

4 Letters to the Editor 8 UpFront 11 Benns’ Belief 40 The Local Kitchen 41 The Local Gardener 39 Crossword 43 Friends & Neighbours 44 Just in Time 46 Trevor’s Take

/The Lindsay Advocate PRINTING

Printed by Maracle Inc. OUR PRIVACY POLICY The Lindsay Advocate is independently owned and operated. The opinions expressed herein are the views of the contributors and do not necessarily reflect those of this magazine. Photos, text, and art work contained in The Lindsay Advocate are copyrighted and may not be published, broadcast, or rewritten without the express permission of the Publisher. Liability for incorrectly displayed advertising is limited to publishing corrections or advertising credit for subsequent issues. The Publisher reserves the right to reject, revise, cancel, omit, discontinue or even decline to print advertising without reason or liability, and without notice. The Publisher has made every effort to ensure information contained herein was accurate at press time. The Publisher does not assume and hereby disclaims any liability to any party for damage, loss, or disruption caused by errors or omissions.

Our Vision

We care about the social wellness of our community and our country. Our vision includes strong public enterprises mixed with healthy small businesses to serve our communities’ needs. We put human values ahead of economic values and many of our stories reflect the society we work to build each day. ~ Roderick and Joli

Advertising Sales: Contact us at 705-341-1496 • kawarthalakespublisher@gmail.com


A TE

LIN

DSAY

AD O C V

Frank Smith gets it right

A non-politicized, wonderful, real magazine article. I’m referring to Frank Smith’s opinion piece, a teaching article. (“The Big Lie says ‘progress’ is good” June edition of the Advocate.) Hear it loud and clear folks, there are “only four things that we really need... Everything else is superfluous.” Joe Berta, Bobcaygeon

Indigenous wisdom would be a welcome addition

We should want nothing less than to investigate the lands and documents of every residential school in Canada. Since 1954, we successfully branded ourselves around the world as peacekeepers in the spread of Western philosophy. The proof of our true commitment to “Westernization” of the world and the lie of Canada in the role of “chief peacekeeper” can be found within our own borders. This falsehood continues to this day. It must stop with us. We say it with our admired immigration policies but perpetuate the opposite with our schooling and collective conventional wisdom about the Indigenous and other cultures. If we adopted a fraction of Indigenous and other cultures’ wisdom, Canadians would be infinitely better off. Wesley Found, Lindsay

Federal and provincial support needed in the cultural sector

My sincere appreciation to publisher Roderick Benns and associate editor Nancy Payne of The Lindsay Advocate for the opportunity to contribute to the recent article, “State of the Arts: Do we support Arts & Culture strongly enough?” The article was a thorough and fair representation of the accomplishments and challenges within the sector, providing an accurate overview of the past and present status of the sector. However, for myself, the question regarding our municipality and its support of the cultural sector goes far beyond the borders of our community. Our municipal government has done an excellent job of working to increase support for the cultural sector, even throughout the economic crisis created by the COVID-19 pandemic; however there is a much larger, critical issue of a lack of support for many

rural organizations within the levels of federal and provincial support for rural municipalities.While the levels of funding within the various funding opportunities are healthy, the flow of monies into rural communities is restricted due to being overlooked by disconnected levels of decision-making within our federal and provincial levels of government. With limited insight into the challenges of being an organization in a rural municipality, geographical parameters are set for the various federal and provincial funding bodies that have smaller rural organizations competing with large urban organizations, with the rural organizations only being successful at being consistently denied. How can we continue to ask more of our municipality when our federal and provincial governments do not support our rural communities strongly enough? Susan Taylor, Lindsay Executive Director, Kawartha Art Gallery

Fund physiotherapy for stroke survivors

As we approach Ontario’s election day of June 2, 2022, a campaign question should be, “Which political party will finally provide OHIP funding for physiotherapy for stroke survivors between ages 20 and 64 and eliminate age discrimination in Ontario stroke treatment?” Jim McEwen, Bowmanville

Councillor’s ‘defensive manner’ questioned by reader

I have been following the off-road vehicle task force and the recommendations it has made to the city and to city council and the submissions to the Advocate from various sources identified in your magazine. It would be reasonable to believe that the members of the task force were likely selected for their interest in the subject matter, or their expertise or familiarity with the activity and the related impact the activity would have on the participants and the affected community. I am therefore quite surprised at the comments Councillor Pat Dunn made in response to Dr. Natalie Bocking’s recommendations.  Dr. Bocking was quite clear that her recommendations were health and safety oriented with the only mention of legal consequences being made in her reference to “enforcement of the rules must be stringent.” It is unclear why Mr. Dunn would immediately respond in a defensive manner asking Dr. Bocking “Is it appropriate to punish those who hadn’t committed a crime?”

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As the person leading this task force, it is surprising that Mr. Dunn would confuse a preventive measure as a punishment. Mr. Dunn’s background as a former police officer with the OPP would surely make him recognize the difference between a preventative measure and a punishment. Mr. Dunn should also be familiar with the importance of placing public safety first and foremost above recreational activities. Our community playgrounds are just one example of a preventative measure designed to help ensure public safety.  Apparatuses that were deemed a safety risk to all children were removed from community playgrounds with the intent that it would help ensure the safety of our children. This was not a punishment to those children who had done something wrong, it was simply a preventative measure to protect our children. It is unfortunate when an individual’s objectivity is tainted in such a manner that it would place the safety of our community and the participants of this recreational activity in danger. M.D. Bruyns, Cameron

Quantify Numbers that matter

Kawartha Lakes has plenty of size going for it in many different ways

250 2

The number of lakes in our far-flung city

Our rank in Ontario for the physical size of our municipality, second only to Greater Sudbury

Source: City of Kawartha Lakes

Climate change criticism

I wish to examine some of the claims made by Bill Steffler in his letter, “ORV use contributes to climate change-related deaths” (June Advocate). He writes that of the CO2 emissions over the last 300 years, half have occurred since 1980. Well, that could be true only if you ignore the fact that presently, 96 per cent of all CO2 emissions are from natural sources — oceans, volcanoes, etc. We must assume then, that the writer is referring only to CO2 emissions from human sources, in which case it seems quite curious that he has to go back 300 years to come up with that statistic, since we weren’t burning fossil fuels 300 years ago. Most of us have lived through the 1980s to the present and have witnessed the miraculous advances that have been achieved in technology and wise use of our natural resources to dramatically improve our quality of life. He also writes that transportation is a major source of greenhouse gas emissions. It’s actually 15 per cent. The letter writer also states that encouraging more ORV use makes us complicit in thousands of deaths per year. From fatal accidents, perhaps, but from climate change? By that reasoning, cutting down a tree in our backyard makes us complicit in the wholesale clearing of millions of acres of forest for agricultural purposes. Carl Sweetman, Lindsay CONT’D ON PAGE 6

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Italy

Life in Italy is more balanced in favour of workers compared to Canada. For instance, Italian workers have about 30 to 35 paid holidays each year. According to the International Labour Organization, in addition to the European Union-mandated four weeks of vacation, Italy has 12 national paid holidays. And in December, employees are paid a Christmas bonus roughly equal to a month’s salary. In Italy, if you don’t use all your vacation days in a given year, they carry over to the next year. Getting married in Italy also has its rewards — such as 15 days of paid holidays.

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Arts support should be voluntary, says reader

When I read State of the Arts: Do we support Arts & Culture strongly enough?” in the June edition of the Advocate, I wondered to whom the “we” referred and what was meant by the word “support”? We are each an individual, and we encounter other people as individuals too. Each one of us possesses unique interests, circumstances and personal resources with which to make choices. My wife, for example, has more interest in arts and culture than I do, and she spends proportionately more of her time, attention and money on those interests. “We” is a collective term that applies to many individuals. In a collective sense, “we” have supported arts and culture through taxation for many years and could further increase those taxes. This would be unfair to many individuals who have other uses for their hardearned incomes. Instead, what if we could greatly reduce taxes to enable the possibility of greater voluntary support for arts and culture? Consider that the average Canadian family remits over 50 per cent of annual earnings to taxes imposed by all levels of government — it was only 38 per cent in 1961. The tax-financed public sector has grown massively since John Diefenbaker was prime minister. This relentless expansion has contributed to much of the subsequent rise in the cost of living. Should Canadians be expected to support the arts and culture sector through more involuntary tax remittances? Alternatively, we could roll back the tax burden to 38 per cent, thereby enabling Canadian families to voluntarily spend on their individual priorities — arts and culture included. Gene Balfour, Fenelon Falls

Lindsay’s welfare is determined by rural-leaning councillors

The recent Kawartha Lakes City Council approval for the operation of recreational off-road vehicles (ORVs) on Lindsay’s paved streets and trails has exposed a serious flaw in the administration of this municipality. The city of Kawartha Lakes was cobbled together by the provincial government in 2001 without the initiative or support of most of the population. A referendum held on the amalgamation in 2003 showed that the citizens of Lindsay remained in opposition. Since municipalities exist under the authority of the province, the referendum results were simply ignored. In approving ORV use in Lindsay, seven councillors voted to allow, while only one councillor and the mayor voted against. Six councillors, an overwhelming majority of those voting, do not represent the residents of Lindsay who will be the ones impacted by the ORV allowance. The one councillor who voted against the motion reportedly stated he had concluded that the vast majority of the citizens of Lindsay he represents were strongly opposed. Nevertheless, those councillors representing citizens living outside of Lindsay who will not be negatively impacted by the allowance easily carried the day. Forcing both rural and urban people to share in the decisions of a united municipality must inevitably lead to inequitable decisions as demonstrated by this matter. Under the current municipal construct the residents of Lindsay will continue to be governed by people who demonstrate little interest in the town’s welfare. Now along with poultry in our yards we will have ORVs on our streets. B. Morris, Lindsay

We want your letters! Send us your thoughts to be featured on this page.

The Lindsay Advocate welcomes your Letters to the Editor. We reserve the right to edit letters for clarity or length. We do not publish anonymous letters unless it’s a matter of public importance and/or someone risks harm by writing us. We would then publish under strict guidelines and only if we can verify the person’s identity. Simply email kawarthalakespublisher@gmail.com. Please keep your letters to 200 words or less.

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Jump In, Kawartha Lakes Dock Encroachment Policy online survey Kawartha Lakes is amending its Dock Encroachment policy, so staff can better address concerns of public safety regarding docks on municipal property. We want to hear from you! Have your say at kawarthalakes.ca/dockpolicy by July 30, 2021.

Backyard Chickens Pilot Project A two-year pilot project has been launched to allow those in residential areas to have chicken coops under certain conditions with a maximum of four chickens at any one time. Apply at kawarthalakes.ca/backyardchickens.

Learn more at kawarthalakes.ca/jumpin www.lindsayadvocate.ca

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UPFRONT

Fenelon’s outdoor amphitheatre gets set for August grand opening

Tim Wisener, co-founder of The Grove Theatre and Nicole Myers-Mitchell, general manager.

The Grove Theatre, Fenelon Falls’ new amphitheatre, is the first of its kind in Kawartha Lakes. It’s an outdoor theatre space where professional theatre, concerts, live music and other community events will animate the stage for locals and tourists alike. Nicole Myers-Mitchell, general manager of The Grove Theatre, says the project “arose from a shared vision in the community.” She sees it as a place where “all the fun, laughter and spontaneity that has been missing from our lives of late” can once again happen. Thanks to significant support from donors, sponsors, volunteers and patrons, Myers-Mitchell says they have accomplished a great deal so far. “We are well on our way to achieving our goal.” The Grove Theatre team is still looking for support to take the facility over the top before its grand opening in August. Book a tour at grovetheatre.ca or contact The Grove Theatre at info@grovetheatre.ca or call 705887-7937 to get involved.

A Place Called Home needs active support in community fundraiser

With COVID-19 restrictions still in effect, A Place Called Home is unable to hold its usual group cycling event to raise much-needed funds. However, the homeless shelter is drawing on its characteristic ingenuity and appealing to the community for help. For the past 17 years, the Kawartha Lakes Classic Cycling Tour has been one of the largest fundraisers for the agency. This year, though, the virtual event is not just for cyclists. Organizers are encouraging participants to safely walk, run, horseback ride, swim, kayak or cycle, following government-mandated rules, on or before Aug. 28. There is no registration fee, and donors will receive a charitable tax receipt. Deb Smith, a volunteer board member The shelter provides for A Place Called Home, is cycle-ready temporary housing for for the shelter’s big fundraiser. youth, adults, couples Photo: Sienna Frost. and families and is the only organization of its kind in Kawartha Lakes and Haliburton. The shelter has not been in use since pandemic restrictions were enacted in March of 2020, given that its shared bedrooms didn’t conform to physical distancing requirements. To rebuild the agency with physically separate bedrooms, as well as create an accessible shelter and five new affordable transitional/supportive rental units, A Place Called Home is redeveloping its site at 64 Lindsay St. S in Lindsay. It has already secured major capital funding from the provincial government and the City of Kawartha Lakes, but needs to raise a further $1.5 million from the community. For more information and to register visit www. kawarthaclassic.com

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Business UPFRONT

Award-winning facility drawing management company is located in Lindsay

Engineering drawings are the lifeblood of managing any facility. They guide the initial construction stage, instruct architects and provide important value for maintenance, planning and operations for the future. Managing and preserving these paper engineering drawings (blueprints) and/or digital drawings is a critical component of a facility’s health, productivity and safety. Tammy Mitchell, marketing specialist at DCM Inc. in Lindsay, says facility managers are those essential workers who maintain and preserve some of the world’s most valued assets — buildings. Facility managers are “constantly solving building problems we didn’t know we had, in a way we don’t often understand,” she tells the Advocate. Whether it’s the local recreational facility, hospital, school board, hotel, resort, apartment building, church, mall or community centre there is a facility manager working their magic. However, facility managers across

Facility managers are essential and help maintain and preserve buildings.

the globe struggle with keeping their engineering drawings organized, up-to-date and accessible for their teams, due to staff turnover, lack of long-term planning or inhouse facility management support. DCM is removing this burden from facility managers by implementing a way to manage these drawings for their unique situation. “Our vision is to simplify the complicated world of engineering drawing management for facilities managers across the globe,” says Mitchell. DCM is fresh off a win for the 2021 Canadian Business Awards in the category of Best Facility Management Document Conversion Management Company. To learn more, visit drawingspecialists.com

Hypnotherapist aims to help people discover more fulfilling lives

Hilary Leehane, hypnotherapist. Photo: Sienna Frost.

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Hilary Leehane, consulting hypnotherapist, originally trained as an industrial designer — someone who develops concepts for manufactured products. The job would have combined art, business and engineering. However, six months after graduating, she developed a severe sleeping disorder that threw her imagined life “off the tracks,” she says. “Among the doctors I saw and medications I took, the single most effective treatment I found was hypnosis.” The Little Britain resident, who recently opened State of Mind Hypnosis in Lindsay, has been qualified as a practicing hypnotherapist for the past two years. She says the most common reasons for visiting a hypnotherapist are anxiety and weight loss. “Luckily, it only takes a few sessions to release most anxieties and my weight loss program has been very successful,” she says. Many people also use hypnosis to explore their spirituality, another side of the work she enjoys. While many people think hypnotherapy is like what they see on stage or in movies, Leehane says that’s not it at all. “My clients would tell you that they go into a state where they are more relaxed than they have ever been. They are aware and awake the whole time. We have conversations back and forth and they release all their limiting beliefs about themselves.” State of Mind Hypnosis is located at 84 Russell St. W. Learn more at somhypnosis.com or call 705-313-9179

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Personal service, from the team you trust.

Pharmacists Clare Millington, Cathy Puffer and Ellen Patterson welcome you to CKL’s only compounding pharmacy specializing in medications to fit your personal needs 108 Kent St W, Lindsay • 705-324-0500

KLPS wishes everyone a safe and happy Pride Week!

Have your say on the proposed ATV connection route in Lindsay A suggested route has been brought forward to Council proposing a connecting link between the Logie Street and Thunder Bridge Road Trail Heads for ATV riders. Before making a decision, Council is asking residents for their feedback on the proposed route. A short online survey has been created on Jump In and will be available until July 30. Hard copies of the survey are also available at the Lindsay Service Centre located at 180 Kent Street. Input, especially from residents who live within the impacted areas of the proposed route, is encouraged and will help Council determine the best course of action. Visit www.kawarthalakes.ca/orv to take the survey or learn mo more about the Lindsay ATV route.

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BENNS’ BELIEF RODERICK BENNS Publisher

What is the value, not the price?

Why do we buy water? Quite simply, big business has told us we should. It’s healthier, say Nestlé Pure Life and Aquafina (the latter owned by Pepsi). Why put your faith in stringent municipal testing in towns or cities when you can put your faith in the Corporation? Why risk the possibility of contaminated well water if you live in a rural area? The Corporation has your back. (Take a trip to any grocer in Lindsay and watch this in action, as people push carts full of cases of personal-sized plastic bottles.) Why do we buy air? The corner gas station where we once filled our gas tanks could also be counted on to provide air for our tires as needed. Now, only your loonie or toonie unlocks that privilege. Air, you see, is just a commodity for sale. This steady commodification of assets and activities — literally putting everything up for sale, including our free time — is eroding our social fabric. As Mark Carney writes in his recent book Value(s), activities as diverse as cooking, essay-writing, gardening and child-rearing are now for hire in the gig economy. This is the latest phase in the historical progression of commodification; first agriculture through the sales of surplus production, then manufacturing, then industry and now services, with many people encouraged to do jobs “flexibly” (no matter the personal toll on the labourer). This is when the reach of the market has extended so deeply into civic and family life that “the whole of society is becoming the factory,” as Paul Mason points out in Postcapitalism: A Guide to our Future. Sure, life might be better in some ways. But the gig economy has also undermined personal ties and social and civic values. As our connection to church life and our sense of a social contract with one another — businesses and citizens alike — frays, we are now more vulnerable to mental health crises, stress and diminishing happiness. When we allow shareholders to take, by far, the largest slice of society’s pie, we underinvest in the very things that contribute to our well-being: frontline health care workers, our environment or guaranteed income security for all. The spread of the market literally weakens community life. British Rabbi Jonathan Sacks once said, “The big question is, how do we learn to be moral again? Markets were made to serve us; we were not made to serve markets. Economics need ethics. Markets do not survive by market forces alone. They depend on respect for the people affected by our decisions. Lose that and we lose not just money and jobs but something more significant still: freedom, trust and decency, the things that have a value not a price.” What we can do about this will be explored in a future column.

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EDITORIAL

Kawartha Lakes life for all We often see the world in stereotypes. For instance, some people who live here speak of the “cidiots” from Toronto who arrive during the summer to wreak havoc on our small communities and pristine lakes. All it takes is one Mercedes with a lead-footed driver to cement this image in a few people’s minds. The truth, however, is that this situation is not the norm, but the actions of a few who colour our perceptions. (The same goes for the plain-old, home-grown Kawartha Lakes idiots who tear up and down Durham Street in Lindsay every Friday and Saturday night.) Then there’s the rich property owners who build massive “cottages” on one of our 250 lakes, as this month’s feature story examines. Sometimes these structures dwarf the small family cottages around them, oblivious to the ostentation and the unbridled excess they represent. There is certainly some truth that Kawartha Lakes is facing more “Muskokaization” and gentrification. People are looking for more creature comforts with each passing year. Is that an attitude really confined to city dwellers, though? It’s just that their dollars happen to go further, given the higher paying jobs in Toronto and higher real estate cash-ins for those who sell and move northward. Sneering at others won’t change them, and that negative energy sure doesn’t make anything better. Maybe the first step is to stop dismissing people as undifferentiated “cottagers” or “Torontonians” or, yes, “cidiots” and start seeing them as…neighbours. You know — people. Or, if it helps, fellow citizens of Kawartha Lakes. Heck, maybe they’ll even start seeing us as something more than “locals.” Our towns and villages are evolving. We have high-quality businesses, services and restaurants we’d never have imagined we’d see outside the city. People are moving here because they know what a great thing we have, and they’re prepared to commit to our community. Growth is inevitable. Change is inescapable. Let’s get to know each other.

LETTER SPOTLIGHT Advocate appreciated for tackling all manner of issues Thank you so much for the great work The Lindsay Advocate has been doing. It may be the issue of caregivers. It may be the issue of recognition of Indigenous people. It may be the issue of support for arts and culture. It may be the issue of a guaranteed living income. It may be an issue that we know and care about, or an issue we know little about. It may be an issue that we are a little uncomfortable with. You are dealing with them all — educating us, supporting us, heightening our consciousness, creating our awareness. Keep up the good work. The Lindsay Advocate is a unique magazine, exactly as its name describes ... “an advocate.” Dana Bachman, Fenelon Falls

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OPINION

The value of being productive and the stigma of not LEAH BARRETT WERNER Leah Barrett Werner is fulfilling requirements toward her master’s in the department of sociology and anthropology at Concordia University in Montreal. As part of her fieldwork, she spent months in Kawartha Lakes writing her thesis, When stories change our worlds: An ethnography of basic income in Lindsay, Ontario. We are often told that it is important to contribute to society. Yet we do not always get to define what constitutes a meaningful contribution. To a large extent, that has been shaped by a system that values constant economic growth above all else. How we are valued is too often based upon our ability to be productive and to work. Being able to work or not work, to be productive or idle, affects the way we feel about ourselves and our sense of value in the world. It also affects the possibilities we have in life because these values are reflected and reproduced in our economic structures and our social policies. As a part of my research on basic income, I met a woman in Lindsay who had been receiving money under the Ontario Disability Support Program (ODSP) for many years. She had suffered from a chronic illness for most of her life. Although she wanted to work but physically couldn’t, she felt that people looked down on her for not working. That meant that she had to cope not only with chronic illness and with living on an insufficient income — which would be hard enough for most — but she also had to cope with feeling stigmatized and rejected from the category of those who are considered valuable members of society. What is more, being “unproductive” is systemically penalized. On ODSP for instance, the amount people are expected to live on is barely enough to survive. But, we can ask, why does a policy that acknowledges that some people cannot work still punish people and push work as the end goal?

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It is in part because our social and economic policies reflect these kinds of societal values; they also play a role in producing them. As long as productivity and working is valued above all else, there will be an expectation placed on us that we should strive to be productive even when we cannot, and social assistance policies will continue to trap people in poverty. To move toward a more inclusive and sustainable society — one where we are valued simply for being a person in the world — we must begin questioning the disproportionate value placed on work.

Being able to work or not work, to be productive or idle, affects the way we feel about ourselves and our sense of value in the world. It also affects the possibilities we have in life because these values are reflected and reproduced in our economic structures and our social policies. During my research, there was another story from Lindsay that stuck with me. It was told to me by a neighbour of an elderly man. This man had lived with back pain his whole life and had always walked hunched over. The way he would often walk around, his neighbour told me, made it seem like he was carrying the weight of the world on his shoulders. When he went on basic income he bought a new back brace, and suddenly, she told me, he was walking upright. The burden of a system that is oppressive to so many — that leaves people with so little — had temporarily lifted. Indeed, one way to move toward a more equitable and inclusive society can be to create new social policies such as basic income that reflect a broader set of values. Let’s stop punishing people for not working, and instead start rethinking what really matters, what constitutes a meaningful contribution to society, and what else we can value in our shared future.

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Is Kawartha Lakes becoming Muskokaized? }} While large cottages and homes are

now being built on our lakes, the spirit of the family cottage is alive and well

“Cottages” like these massive homes on Sturgeon Lake are far larger than most people’s perceptions of what a family getaway might typically look like. Photos: Geoff Coleman.

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GEOFF COLEMAN Writer-at-large

When Bob and Ann-Marie Carruth bought their Sturgeon Lake building lot in 1997, some friends thought they were insane. Now they see it as the smartest investment move ever. Carruth felt that the Kawartha region was poised to become the next Muskoka, pointing out that while not as scenic to some eyes, “This region was still affordable, there was vacant land available, and it was a lot closer to the Greater Toronto Area,” said Bob. Not to mention that an aging population was soon going to leave a lot of money to middle-aged children who might enjoy retiring on the lake. In the ensuing 20 years, his predictions have been borne out, with demand for local cottages steadily increasing — even before the pandemic — and prices rising in lockstep. CONT’D ON PAGE 16

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The Prit cha rd cot tag e goi ng up in in the 195 0s.

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TOP: The Pritchard family. ABOVE: Carolyn Pritchard sitting on her dock. Photos: Geoff Coleman.

Lindsay real estate broker Tracy Hennekam says at that time, there was no interest in farms, and only a bit more in waterfront properties. The year 2010, however, saw an increase in activity, which then took a big jump in the last three to four years. Now? Real estate in Kawartha Lakes is enjoying a never-before-seen, pandemic-fuelled spike. “I have a client right now with a budget of $1.3 to $1.5 million and I can show him lots of places asking that, but they go for well over the asking price...$1.8, 1.9 (million dollars).” Hennekam is seeing some cottages go on the market right now strictly to make a good buck, but she has other clients looking to sell who gave rural life a try and just don’t care for it. Some others have younger children and want to give them access to the wider variety of activities urban areas offer. And still others have reached the point where they don’t want to deal with the maintenance of a second property and no one from the family is able to buy it. Brian Armstrong of Armstrong Construction in Fenelon Falls agrees that a shift occurred about 10 years ago. He says that previously it was rare that he would build a waterfront house. By 2010 he could count on one house per year.

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Carolyn Pritchard’s parents began coming to the Raby’s Shore area of Sturgeon Lake in the late 1930s, driving from Toronto to visit friends who had cottages there. When her father heard about a lot for sale, he pulled together the $500 asking price, and with the help of neighbours, put up their cottage. “Now it’s up to three,” he says. One trend he has noted is the conversion of three-season cottages for year-round use. He says people are paying so much for a recreational property, they want to get more than four months’ use out of it. Since many cottages were built in the 1940s and 1950s, they were due for significant upgrades, and current interest rates make it very inviting to do so. While it’s certainly the case that our lakes are seeing people from the GTA moving here and building big houses, it’s not always the case. The family cottage is alive and well; it just doesn’t always look like it once did. Sort of like your father’s Oldsmobile. Some families are still resisting selling or building big. Carolyn Pritchard’s parents began coming to the Raby’s Shore area of Sturgeon Lake in the late 1930s, driving from Toronto to visit friends who had cottages there. When her father heard about a lot for sale, he pulled together the $500 asking price, and with the help of neighbours, put up their cottage. At 480 square feet, it wasn’t the Taj Mahal, but it did have a new design feature called a picture window. Neighbours would actually come to visit, just so they could look through it, taking in the relatively big view of the lake. Pritchard and her husband Eugene James still live in Toronto, and she is happy to keep many features of the original cottage, although they have replaced windows, doors and furniture. The active retirees split their time between the Big Smoke and the campfire smoke at their Kawartha Lakes home-away-from-home. “We like what Toronto has to offer, and what the cottage has to offer. They are obviously very different,

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s. a b o ve th e fa ll Fe n el o n Fa ll s, lker, Fe n el o n M u se u m . es y G le n n Wa P h o to: C o u rt

azi ng fea ture on A The pic ture win dow was an am 0s. 195 the in e Stu rge on Lak

but each is great in its own way,” says Pritchard. While neighbours around her have raised cottages to create second floors, she and James continue to make do with a five-gallon hot water heater. Pritchard notes that many of the same families that cottaged there when she was a child are still around. The road is peppered with grown-up versions of the kids she used to hang out with at Johnny’s Hideaway, (cabin rentals and tuck shop), and of the girlfriends she would ferry up the lake to Wychwood Resort where they would play ping pong and flirt with the summer maintenance boys. Her own two children and their families use the cottage when time allows, and after 70 years, no one is in any hurry to change the way things are. CONT’D ON PAGE 18

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years ago when they passed it along to the oldest son. By then the younger brothers had both bought their own spots in proximity to each other. Interestingly, another family with three brothers own adjacent properties just down the shore. The Ric hel cot tag e Andy is recently retired, but his in the 195 0s. wife Tracy is still an executive at IBM. Several families around them have torn down or added on to existing structures to create year-round homes, and that may be in Bean’s future as well. Working from home, Tracy has not physically been in her Ottawa office since March 2020. “Most companies are going through this — finding new Diane and Jack Richel in front of the same cottage today, with only a few updates. Photos: Geoff Coleman. ways to work virtually. It took a pandemic to accelerate the model.” Her team members are in Montreal, Halifax and Ottawa, and since she can’t ever see returning to a regular office, she CONT’D FROM PAGE 17 has to decide where to create her home office. Similarly, Jack and Diane Richel have deep roots in That decision is not simple, as they debate options like their cottage area on Echo Bay Road on Sturgeon Lake. maintaining the status quo, spending part of the year on a The one they now live in belonged to Jack’s family, Caribbean island, and spending money on a cottage renowho bought it in 1954; Diane’s cottage was just two vation. As Andy puts it, “We bought long ago, so we don’t doors away. And, yes, they did meet by saying hello have a lot of money into it and are content to keep it a across the docks. simpler cottage, only used for three seasons. I don’t mind They made an effort to maintain the feel that their turning the key at Thanksgiving weekend.” cottages had when they were young, so when the deciWith the promise of better rural high-speed internet, sion was made to sell their home in Brampton and retire telecommuting is not going away, so more big home conhere, an addition was planned that preserved the rustic struction can be expected on these lakes. This is not necfeel of the place while still providing things considered essarily a bad thing. Some amenities we enjoy in cottage standard in a modern house. An extra 480 square feet country like nicely paved back roads, craft breweries and provided a bigger kitchen, laundry facilities, another an outstanding variety of restaurants exist in part thanks to bathroom, a third bedroom and a larger entryway the influx of cash and property taxes that comes with affluwithout tearing down any of the original cottage. ent home or cottage owners. Spinoff businesses in the area The Richels’ grandchildren visit regularly and take selling everything from furnaces to furniture benefit from part in the same things their parents did with Jack each renovation or new build. and Diane: trips to Kawartha Dairy (not the Tastee It’s easy to spot new, large, Muskoka-sized places as Freeze), learning to waterski, tobogganing in the winter. they go up around the lakes and perhaps get the impression They represent the fifth generation of Richels on the that the unique feeling of the small family getaway is disapproperty. pearing. But it doesn’t mean the spirit of the family cottage Not to be outdone, Cameron Lake has its share of has died. cottages that have been in the family for years. Andy Many simple cabins and elaborate homes around KawarBean and his two brothers all got places on the lake tha Lakes remain in the same family, creating memories as after spending their childhood summers at the family they have for 70 or 80 years. Meanwhile, new owners now getaway. His parents also started visiting the area in have the chance to start doing the same and to join the the 1930s, and they held onto their cabin until seven larger Kawartha Lakes family.

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BIA ADVERTORIAL

Downtown Vibes in Lindsay Melissa McFarland, Executive Director, Lindsay Downtown BIA

As summer kicks into full swing, it’s hard not to be reminded of summers past. A bustling Saturday Farmers’ Market that was just as much a social occasion as a shopping experience, a great place to take the family, and bump into old acquaintances.Thriving patios, which were an ideal place to watch the pedestrian traffic on a Friday afternoon. The annual Classics on Kent on a Sunday in July which would bring thousands to our main street. A myriad of community events, fundraisers and barbecues in Victoria Park, and sidewalk sales taking place along the retail shops of Kent Street. We’d see the boaters and cottagers arrive through the weekend and make a day trip of shopping and eating. The summer of 2020 seemed like one disappointment after another, as any event that might promote a gathering of people was no longer feasible. Community organizations scrambled to reimagine their annual events, and it many cases, just cancelled them altogether with promises to be “back in 2021.” Nobody pictured that summer of 2021 would roll around far more quickly than the end of the pandemic, and you can see the disbelief in people’s eyes that we’re facing another summer of restrictions, and a downtown that is still very much under construction.

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The one thing that 2021 has that 2020 did not, is a sense of hope. With vaccination rates climbing, and the spring lockdown at the beginning of the end, there is optimism that it will be the last of the lockdowns, and that every reopening milestone is a step towards the elusive “normal” that we’ve been seeking since March 2020.   Never before has there been such an emphasis on “shopping local.” We saw marketing campaigns, social media blitzes, magazine articles, and hashtags galore. As much as the financial impacts on small businesses were often substantial and long lasting, it seems the silver lining was that many of them were able to develop new ways of doing business, and – most importantly – finding new ways of connecting with their customers. Faced with supply shortages and often difficult-to-navigate corporate websites, so many people found that contacting a small local business got them access to a real live person who was able to help them find exactly what they were looking for. They realized that if you have a little patience, the payoff for supporting these businesses was immeasurable.

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Tracy Hennekam

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051916 Tracy Hennekam BC proof.indd 1 Mayor recommends additional members to balance ORV task force “This (off-road vehicle review) started last fall,” Mayor Andy Letham said at a recent committee of the whole meeting. “It made sense to have ATV riders with knowledge on the task force to discuss linkages for the trail. Now as we move forward to other issues it makes more sense to have other (two additional) community members added to the task force in the fall for a better balance.” Letham told council that it is important for the city to do We also do: the expansion of road access for ORVs properly “or the initiative will fail.” Repairs, Refittings, Tooth Additions City accepts petition on tiny homes A petition calling for the legalization of tiny homes in Kawartha Lakes, initiated by Peter Wallace of Lindsay and signed by 98 people, was accepted by the city for further consideration. The petition suggests that tiny homes — no more than about 500 square feet — could be one of the many answers to the lack of affordable housing in the city. Caregiving 24 Councillor Tracy Richardson said, “Tiny homes are an hours a day is eco-friendly model — smaller footprint with lower living hard work. You expenditures, which is a viable option regarding the current deserve a break. crisis with house affordability.”

Councillor wants food truck bylaw reviewed Councillor and entrepreneur Kathleen Seymour-Fagan, who owns Kawartha Coffee Company in Bobcaygeon, has asked that staff look at increasing the mandatory distance between mobile food vendors and brick-and-mortar restaurants. “2020 has created many new challenges for business owners,” she wrote in her request for a bylaw review. “We need to support our brick-and-mortar businesses as they pay tens of thousands of commercial taxes yearly.” The bylaw will be returned with recommendations to council in the fall.

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advertorial

Community builder, Flato Developments, looks to bring homes and new services to Lindsay, Cameron SHAKIR REHMATULLAH

PRESIDENT Flato Developments

Shakir Rehmatullah always does his homework. For about 10 years he has been driving frequently from his home in Markham to Kawartha Lakes, learning about our city and what its needs are. As the President of Flato Developments, Rehmatullah will be building a community on Lindsay’s east side, and another one in Cameron. Don’t ever call him a home-builder, though — he will quickly insist that he builds communities. “Community building takes time and patience,” he says. “And every town or area is unique. I want to know how the community wants to grow. I want to know what the people feel is missing. What are the amenities they need?” And since Rehmatullah always does his homework, he’s taken the time to gather advice from city councillors, the mayor, and other municipal officials and is now seeking advice from local community groups and residents. They have told him about the acute shortage of purposebuilt rental units; they have told him about the lack of a bus stop to connect to Peterborough and other cities; they have mentioned the need for housing for seniors; and they have told him about the need for affordable home-buying options. All of this, and more, Rehmatullah plans to tackle. In the case of the bus stop, he hopes to push the municipality and province hard, pointing out the wisdom of investing in transportation for a city that is only going to grow larger.

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Just where he is building is also important. Flato’s land is near I.E. Weldon Secondary School and Highway 36, on Lindsay’s east side. The east side has suffered from a lack of amenities for many years, based on early feedback, the developer has heard the east side has suffered from a lack of amenities for many years. This community builder wants to change all that, visualizing parks, perhaps another library location, a large grocery store, good commercial plaza, and maybe even a recreation centre. It would be a destination for people to live and work. “We’re going to make the east side beautiful,” he says. Building a community takes a lot of work — and a lot of workers. Rehmatullah plans on hiring as many local people as possible along the way, such as tradespeople, and to use as many local services as he can, whether local restaurants when food is needed to lumber and building supplies that are sourced from local stores. “We’re going to create lots of local jobs,” he says. In Cameron, the focus will be on larger estate homes on Sturgeon Lake in the Long Beach Road area, all of them on one-acre lots. There will also be smaller, all-season cottages with other amenities there, including perhaps a restaurant, golf, pool, and resort. Rehmatullah says he learned long ago there’s an important role for a developer to play in community building. “We’re so blessed to live in this country, surrounded by lakes and natural beauty. We’re looking forward to doing great things for the Kawartha Lakes community.”

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Walk it off

}} Discover new places to stretch your legs and your horizons in these lovely, less well-known spots around Kawartha Lakes

NANCY PAYNE Associate Editor

It’s been a year of walking — for health, for a change of scenery, for sanity. But eventually those walking routes may have come to feel, shall we say, overly familiar. Over the past 15 months, many of us have taken time to check out new corners of our Kawartha Lakes backyard — conservation areas, the Victoria County Rail Trail, the Ballyduff Trails and the Trans Canada Trail have all seen a huge increase in users. If you’ve exhausted that list, too, here are a few places to de-stress and discover nature that you may not be as familiar with. (And for those of you thinking “There’s nothing new about that spot,” keep in mind that your old news is someone else’s exciting discovery.) Please note that three of the areas we’ve highlighted are not public property; none have signs indicating that they are off limits and all three bear clear indications of being well-used, so we’ve included them here because they’re obviously popular with those in the know. No matter where you venture, please be respectful and leave nothing but footprints. Oh, and don’t forget the insect repellent. Photo: Sienna Frost

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2. Bobcaygeon

Photo: Yannick Grignon

Riverview Park near the end of River Park Road on the south end of town is a pretty spot for a picnic, but if you walk past the Forbert Pool and across the dam, a bit of wilderness awaits. Stretching from the water almost to Kawartha Lakes Road 36, it’s a pretty bit of peace and quiet that is not public land but is obviously well-loved judging by the beaten trails.

KEEPING TRACTS The Somerville Tract on the Monck Road west of Kinmount and the Emily Tract on Peace Road northeast of Omemee are city-owned forest lands with extensive trails. The city’s website also lists forest tracts in Manvers and Laxton but provides no other information; neither is listed on the Explore Kawartha Lakes tourism site.

3. Lindsay

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1. Altberg Wildlife Sanctuary

This is the biggest of the 26 reserves owned by Ontario Nature, a charity that protects and conserves wildlife and habitats. The trails, which wind through a northern portion of the 470-hectare property, are cared for by the Kawartha Field Naturalists; you can do one loop or combine several for a longer walk through peaceful forest. A spot where presumably there would normally be a map was empty when we visited but the trails were well indicated with triangular markings. The entrance is at 4164 Monck Road. If you’re in the mood for a takeout snack afterward, depending on which way you’re heading, try Kinmount Fish and Chips or the Queen of Fries in Norland.

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Beyond the south end of McLaughlin Road lies a huge expanse of land bordered by housing to the east, the Trans Canada Trail to the south and Hwy. 7 to the west. Judging by the footpaths and bike tracks, enough people know about this undeveloped area that it’s commonly used for non-invasive recreation. More open and full of large dirt piles at the north end, it offers meadows, trees, wildflowers and peaceful spaces as you meander south. This is not public property, so be responsible.

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WALK IT OFF

TRAILING AROUND LINDSAY

CONT’D FROM PAGE 25

4. Labyrinth Take a few minutes just for yourself in this oasis of calm. It was created through donations of time and materials by local companies and residents when the adjoining building housed the Hospice Services arm of Community Care. It’s still available to the community thanks to accounting firm Hutton Angelo, which now occupies the attractive brick office. The gravel path leads you on a contemplative, curving walk to a stone bench at the centre where you can sit in peace for as long as you wish. The labyrinth is open during daylight hours; please respect distancing and masking requirements and maintain quiet if others are nearby. 112 McLaughlin Road. 4

5. Fenelon Falls

Photo Credit: Courtesy of Community Care

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This huge expanse of land on the northern edge of Fenelon Falls feels like a hidden conservation area. (It is not public property although there are unopened road allowances running through it and it’s obviously popular with residents.) From the main street, turn northwest on Queen Street just past the downtown and park where the road runs out. The nearby gravelly mound offers one of the nicest views of Cameron Lake you’ll find anywhere. Trails winding through the property range from well-maintained mown paths through meadows to steepish tracks amid trees.

If you live outside our biggest town, you may not know about the walking areas residents love. Next time you’re in Lindsay foran appointment or some shopping, leave time to try the beautiful riverside Rotary Trail. It’s paved, making it ideal for strollers and wheelchairs and even easier for walkers and cyclists. Pick it up off King Street east of the locks, from Nayoro Park (another lovely spot worth exploring) or off Logie Street. Do a circuit across the bridges, walk up and back beside the peaceful Scugog or do a loop out to the spectacular new Logie Street Park. (Keep an eye out for the ever-lengthening rock snake at the west end of the trail near the Pyjama Factory Condos. If you’re hungry, just cross King Street to the Tastee Shack.) The Trans Canada Trail between Memorial Park on Lindsay Street and Fleming College makes you forget within moments that you’re in a busy town. If you want something shorter, park on Broad Street near Silverbrook Avenue and follow the dog-walkers on the path running southeast beside the houses; it will take you maybe 15 minutes to walk this pretty little trail to Angeline Street and back.You’ll find the best doughnuts in town just back to the north on Commerce Road at Kawartha Wholesale Bakery.

Photo: Yannick Grignon

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6. Indian Point Provincial Park

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You can’t help but feel for the disappointed Toronto resident who left a one-star online rating and this comment: “Drove over 2 hours from Toronto to explore this ‘park’ and was thoroughly disappointed!” In fact, the Ontario Parks website makes it clear this is what’s known as a non-operating park. There are no facilities, no maps, no parking area, no beaches and, on the day we visited, no other people … which, if you like solitude, makes it a great place to walk. From Coboconk, take Grandy Road southwest; just outside the village on your right is a pullout near some mailboxes. With no guidance to be found, we just headed down the track across the road and walked for about half an hour through alvar and woods before realizing there was no loop or offshoot to the nearby water (the park is on a peninsula). We then drove about 10 minutes down the point — here’s hoping Ontario Parks changes the name as part of its planning process — past the developed area on its west side. At the end of the road, another simple blue sign indicates another entrance to the park; we followed one trail a short distance to a small outlet by the water. For the moment, walks in this park are a chance to enjoy peace and accessible wilderness, but maybe don’t drive two hours out of your way. As always, don’t venture anywhere that you’re not sure is part of the park; there’s a lot of private land on the peninsula, too, although the province acquired the land nearly 50 years ago and it’s been a designated park for more than 30. Do take precautions against ticks. Before or after your walk, stop in at M’s Bake Shop in Coboconk for delicious homemade sausage rolls and other treats. Photos: Nancy Payne

onelo k

REAL ESTATE REIMAGINED.

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Through history’s eyes

}} Inactive cemeteries offer some of the

most peaceful and intriguing places to travel to on an afternoon outing

IAN McKECHNIE Writer-at-large

Blakely Farm Cemetery. Note that the Blakely sign was spelled with one e, the gravestone with two e’s in the surname. Photo: Ian McKechnie.

I got lost as I was looking for it — the Blakely Farm cemetery, that is. When I ought to have gone due south on Old Mill Road in the former Ops Township, I instead made a left turn and ended up cycling through some of the most spectacular scenery in this part of Kawartha Lakes. Much of the rural infrastructure I pass — barns, farmhouses, split-rail fences — has scarcely changed in the last century or so. Nor have the views across the countryside, which members of the Blakely family no doubt enjoyed as they toiled in their fields many years before Canadian Confederation. After finding my way back to Old Mill Road, I shift into low gear to climb the hills to reach my destination. I take a sip of water and make my way gingerly through the long grass in the ditch at the side of the road. Behind a page-wire fence is an assortment of marble headstones, all canted over at awkward angles and

glistening in the late afternoon sun. I trudge over to the metal gate and undo the chain that keeps it well secured. Once inside, I step respectfully over and around these ancient memorials, their inscriptions in many cases still amazingly readable: MARGARET Wife of John Blakeley Died April 15, 1858 Aged 73 Years Twisting, rusting pieces of metal stick out of the ground in various places, some barely supporting the half a dozen or so markers in this burying ground that dates to 1856.

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Roadside Burials

Ballyduff Presbyterian Church Cemetery. Photo: Ian McKechnie.

The Blakely Cemetery is one of just over 30 inactive cemeteries in this area. Defined by the city as one that no longer has any lots for sale and no longer sees any burials, many of these inactive burying grounds haven’t seen an interment in well over a century and a half. Inactive cemeteries — along with the still-active privately maintained cemeteries, municipally run rural graveyards, and those adjacent to many country churches — offer some of the most peaceful and intriguing places to travel to on an afternoon outing over the summer months. Unlike Lindsay’s Riverside Cemetery, which covers some 60 acres, the vast majority of these smaller cemeteries can be explored in an hour or less. They are also, for the most part, located adjacent to some of the municipality’s quieter roads; the chirping of birds, a light breeze, or the distant hum of farm equipment being the only sounds interrupting the peace and quiet. Of the inactive cemeteries, the vast majority are located on privately owned land, often farms, and are not readily visible from the roadside. Care should be taken to respect the privacy of these properties. In addition to the Blakely Cemetery at 912 Old Mill Road, publicly accessible inactive cemeteries include the old St. James Anglican Church Cemetery on Church Hill in Fenelon Falls; McLaren’s Cemetery at 1040 Monarch Road; and the Bethel Old Methodist burying ground at the northwest corner of Golf Course Road and Highway 35 South. Both active and inactive cemeteries are often well-signed and open for exploring from 8 a.m. until sundown. Quite apart from their being a source of information for genealogists, these rural cemeteries offers lessons in geography, theology and anthropology. A 161-year-old marble stone in Manvers Township’s Ballyduff Presbyterian Church Cemetery announces

Some of the more intriguing cemeteries in Kawartha Lakes have little more than a solitary marker and are found at the side of roads — a stark reminder that burials sometimes happened hastily when resources for a formal interment were lacking. Perhaps the most wellknown and accessible of these is that of James Williamson, a three year-old boy born in Scotland and killed by a falling tree at his new home in our area in 1831. Surrounded by lilac bushes, this burial site is located on the west side of County Road 46, a short drive north of Argyle. Jessie Williamson MacPherson, a distant relative of the little lad, had this concrete marker installed in the 1950s. 

Geocaching In Cemeteries Geocaching — a recreational activity in which participants use GPS and mobile devices to locate small containers called “caches” hidden around the world — has become very popular over the last two decades. For the avid geocacher, a rural cemetery offers many opportunities to not only place and find caches, but also to learn something about local history and geography. “We have noticed that so many of the little pioneer cemeteries are in beautiful sites, many of them on hills that have views in several directions,” observes Lindsay-based geocacher Denham Dingle. “Some of these little cemeteries would be passed by without one even realizing that they were there had one not been caching.”

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FORGOTTEN CEMETERIES CONT’D FROM PAGE 29

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the name of a settler from County Cavan, in Ireland; an obelisk (a tall pyramidal monument) in the municipally run Argyle Cemetery informs passersby that Neil McEachern (d. 1875) was a native of Argyleshire, Scotland. One could almost virtually tour the British Isles merely by studying the inscriptions in these stones. The symbols and words inscribed on headstones can often give us clues about the person they memorialize, their age at death and their worldview. A weeping willow is very common on stones marking the final resting places of adults; a lamb almost assuredly denotes the burial of a child. Other universally used symbols include doves, fingers pointing heavenward and urns draped in cloth. During the 19th century, many young people succumbed to disease, death in childbirth and farming accidents, and the inscriptions often tried to soften the blow through somewhat awkward verses that are heartbreaking to read,  as on the marker of a two-year-old in McLaren Cemetery: Sleep on sweet child And take thy rest God called thee home He thought it best

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McLaren Cemetery. Photos: Ian McKechnie.

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Door Dash now available!

All Your All Day Long.

Make this the year that you Pay it Forward and make someone’s day with a small gesture of kindness.

McIndoo’s Cemetery. Photos: Ian McKechnie.

Other stones in the municipality, while acknowledging that death is inevitable, insist that it is merely a temporary time of waiting before resurrection and re-creation — however one might define that: “I am not dead, but sleeping” reads a defiant inscription on an obelisk in the Argyle Cemetery. Although many of the inactive and rural cemeteries have signs erected by the city on their periphery that give a date of establishment, it is often possible to discern this merely by looking at the materials used for the monuments. McLaren Cemetery, dating all the way back to 1834, consists almost entirely of greying marble slabs stretching out to three, four, or even five feet in length. All but a few of these lie flat in the ground, many slowly disappearing beneath the sod or partially hidden by a layer of lichen. Marble markers are among the earliest in Ontario and were common through the 1870s. Thereafter, polished granite became the norm. As picturesque as these ancient stones are, the imperfections that make them so photogenic also betray fragility. Over the years, various techniques have been used to stabilize these artefacts of an earlier age. Dating to 1862, the Bethel Old Methodist Cemetery is one example of a restoration effort in which all of the headstones have been transplanted from their original plots and mounted together in one corner of the property. Though well-meaning, this method divorces the headstones from the burials they were intended to mark. Old cemeteries have become cliches in the genre of Gothic literature and are admittedly a little creepy: on entering McIndoo’s Cemetery, a private burial ground on Linden Valley Road near Woodville, the gate creaks loud enough to stir the dead. But enter the gate I do with thanksgiving in my heart — for these tranquil places which have been so beautifully preserved across Kawartha Lakes, and for those whose lives are memorialized therein.

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Yours in Good Health,

Chantel M. Lawton barrister, solicitor and notary public

“Guiding Families Forward”

Accredited Family Mediation Services & Collaborative Law 189 Kent St. W., Suite 220 Lindsay, Ontario

705-878-9949 www.chantellawton.com

31


I CHOOSE HERE

KL

WHY I CAME BACK TO CALL KAWARTHA LAKES HOME

CATHY PUFFER Born and raised in Lindsay, I returned home to Lindsay after graduating from university and getting married in 1987. My husband and I consider ourselves fortunate to have always been able to live and work locally. Lindsay has provided a positive atmosphere for raising our children, as well as opportunities to get involved in our community socially, and with different organizations on a volunteer basis. One of the biggest thrills I have had in my professional career has been establishing Remedy’s RX on Kent Street in downtown Lindsay, alongside so many other amazing women who also run their own local businesses. I think that’s just one thing that makes our community special and vibrant!

If you love podcasts... you’ll love

The Advocate Podcast:

Stories from Kawartha Lakes. Spotify • Apple Podcasts Podbean • lindsayadvocate.ca

Join the growing list of Advocate supporters! EILEEN MACDONALD CHRISTINE WILSON BOB ARMSTRONG • JANICE NEIL PETER & SANDRA MACARTHUR MIKE PERRY • LINDA FRIEND PETER & KATHY ANDERSON JOE & JOYCE MCGUIRE GLENDA MORRIS NORA STEFFLER ROSS & PAT SMYTH CORDULA WINKELAAR RICHARD & DONNA CLARKE ROSS & SUSAN BEATTIE DONNA CAMPBELL JO-ANNE STEPHENS JOANNA & DOUG FARR LORNA GREEN • DEBORAH SMITH SHIRLEY GLEESON • ALAN GREGORY JANET & RODGER SMITH ZITA DEVAN • MILTON BATTERSBY NORMAN & EVELYN REEDMAN BARBARA IRWIN • JAMIE SWIFT BRUCE & DEBBIE PECK JIM BUCHANAN & DONNA GUSHUE BRYAN & BARB TAYLOR M & M JACKSON ANNE PATTERSON BOB & CAROL BARKWELL LAURENE DECHERT • LAUREN DREW PETER PAYNE & DR. GAIL PAYNE MAURICE & MARIE JACKSON NEIL CAMPBELL, AND MORE!

LOVE YOUR ADVOCATE? Go online to lindsayadvocate.ca and choose Support Us in the top right corner. Or email kawarthalakespublisher@gmail.com or call 705-341-1496

32 Tell us about your...

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33


PHOTO CONTEST Our favourite five photos for July — including our cover image

Fa rm Fa m il ie s of Ka Ph ot o: Su sa n St w ar th a La ke s. ac ey, O ak w oo d.

Dra ma tic Tre e Swa llow. Pho to:

Mar y Hac ket t, Lin dsa y.

Reflectio ns on Cameron Lake. Photo: Jamie Milroy, Fenelon Falls. So me th in g’s Fis hy. Ad ria n Grac ie ho ld s a mu sk ie. Ph ot o: Ha ile y Ni co le Brow n, Re ab oro.


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BOOKS

READER SPOTLIGHT Courtesy of Kawartha Lakes Public Library

LOUISE PLANTE

Memories are windows to the past. Let’s celebrate them. Traditional or cremation services, ask us how we can help celebrate your memories.

Mackey Funeral Home Inc. 33 Peel St., Lindsay, ON www.mackeys.ca www.celebrationslindsay.ca

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Want a clean house?

Louise Plante is reading The Next Accident, by Lisa Gardner. This book is about a killer who has targeted the family of FBI special agent Pierce Quincy, who is a brilliant profiler. The police say that his daughter’s death was an accident but he sets out to prove the truth.  He gets help from his former girlfriend, Rainie Conner, an ex-policewoman. When the killer’s next victim is Quincy’s ex-wife, it is obvious that the killer is stalking his entire family. This suspense novel reveals an intense, chilling plan.

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36

2021-01-11 10:17 AM

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}} Nominate your business Chamber of Commerce Awards of Excellence nominations now open

Jason Ward, winner of the COVID-19 Hero award for LDCC’s 2020 Awards of Excellence.

Nominations for the Lindsay + District Chamber of Commerce Awards of Excellence are now open. The awards are presented annually by the LDCC, with support from multiple local sponsors. Celebrate our local business community and volunteers, rewarding them for their resilience over the past year. The LDCC recognizes local individuals, groups and businesses who go above and beyond to provide innovative products or services, develop exceptional new practices, and improve the community for all. Nominations are judged by a panel outside of our community, composed of chamber of commerce professionals across North America. All residents, businesses and organizations within Kawartha Lakes and any LDCC members are eligible for nomination. You do not have to be a Chamber member to be nominated. Self nominations are encouraged. Submission deadline is July 31. The LDCC is planning this event for the second week of November 2021, the exact date to be determined. Every nomination will be entered into a draw for a $100 gift card to an LDCC member business of your choice. Nominations forms are available for download here.

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37


HERE’S MY CARD

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Mario Mazziotti Community General Manager Tel: 705-324-2183 ext 222

Your trusted community partner. VISIT US IN KAWARTHA LAKES AT ANY OF OUR 4 LOCATIONS.

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Mortgage Agent (M20001946 ) 705-878-0398 Cell: 289-404-8444 stephaniewoods@dominionlending.ca www.stephaniewoods.ca

Office:

255 Kent St West, Lindsay, ON K9V 2Z3 Dominion Lending Centres Premier Financial Group Independently Owned and Operated FSRA#12511

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39


The Local with Kitchen

Diane Reesor

proudly

countrycupboardhealthfood.com

PRESENTED BY Mint is a dominant ingredient in many Vietnamese, Thai and Indian dishes. It can be compared to basil in the way that it is often used in cooking. Mint is a herb that makes food taste fresh. Add a touch of mint to salads for a remarkably fresh taste. Fresh mint can be purchased at the grocery store. Wild spearmint can be harvested locally near water that is moving. For this recipe, select any kind of mushroom that tickles your fancy. FYI: There are vendors at area farmers’ markets who grow oyster and shiitake mushrooms locally.

Mint, Garlic and Mushroom Pasta 10 minute prep time, 10 minute cooking time 8 oz long pasta pasta cooking water, reserved 2 tablespoons olive oil 4 cloves of garlic 3 cups sliced mushrooms

2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil Zest of one lemon 3 tablespoons chopped fresh mint Salt and pepper to taste Optional: dry cheese, grated

Hint: If you start boiling your long pasta as you start to fry the mushrooms, they should be ready at the same time.

Shred garlic through a grater. In a large skillet, add two tablespoons of olive oil over medium heat. Allow the oil to heat and then add the grated garlic. Cook until the garlic is lightly browned. Add mushrooms and cook until softened. Add salt.

In a large pot, boil water and cook your preferred long pasta to taste. Reserve a few tablespoons of pasta water. Drain the pasta and run it under cold water. Put the pasta into the frying pan with the mushroom mix. Add about a tablespoon of water to stop the pasta from sticking to the bottom of the pan. Toss the pasta and mushrooms together. Finish with a couple of tablespoons of extra virgin olive oil. Add lemon zest and chopped mint. Add salt and pepper to taste. Toss until the ingredients are well distributed. If you like, grate some dry cheese over the served pasta. Story and photos by Sharon Walker

Order online for free delivery or pick up.

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The Local with Gardener

Sylvia Keesmat

Water in the Garden As the hot days of summer settle around us, our thoughts turn increasingly to water. Swimming in it, drinking tall cold glasses of it and finding ways to ensure our gardens have enough of it. I like to take my cue from nature when contemplating water in the garden: • Mimic a moist forest floor covered with leaf litter by covering the ground around your plants with a mulch of straw, leaves, loose grass clippings or wood chips (avoid cedar since it inhibits growth). • A gentle steady rain that nourishes the ground happens under cloudy skies with no wind. A sprinkler does not mimic this well; instead it can lead to water evaporation. A watering can or drip line early in the morning works better. • Dips and hollows in forests hold water until it can be absorbed by the earth. If you did not create a bowl shape around your plants when planting, consider creating a small moat or hollow in the ground near the plant so that water can soak slowly into the ground. • Water the soil around your plant rather than the leaves, to avoid both evaporation and fungal issues. • Healthy plants have deep roots. Water deeply once or twice a week to encourage roots to reach for the deep, moist soil. • Rocks along shorelines and in streams provide places for insects and birds to perch as they drink water. A bowl or two filled with water and stones can fulfil the same function in your garden. Watering our gardens is like nurturing our relationships. It takes care, time and depth.

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Tips for taking Continuing Education courses WHAT DOES IT TAKE TO LEARN ONLINE?

In most of the courses you’re given the material and assignments one week at a time, and then you get to decide, how to fit that into your schedule. That requires a certain amount of self-discipline and self-motivation. I’d also recommend a good internet connection and basic computer skills.

HOW MANY COURSES SHOULD I TAKE AT A TIME?

One or two courses. More would be challenging. You need time to study and complete the assignments.

WHEN DO COURSES START?

Many start monthly and registration is now open for the upcoming academic year.

MARY

Customer Service Advisor for Fleming College Continuing Education

flemingcollege.ca

Have Somewhere to Be? Let Community Care Take You There Whether you're going to dialysis, cancer treatment, or just to get your hair cut, Community Care City of Kawartha Lakes' Transportation Services will take you there! Our wheelchair and stretcher accessible transportation program aims to help seniors maintain their independence by improving access to medical appointments, social activities, grocery shopping and more. For more info or to book a ride today: 705-324-7323 www.ccckl.ca

42

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FRIENDS & NEIGHBOURS

Lindsay woman with rare condition sees new possibilities open

WILLIAM McGINN Writer-at-large

Joye Daniels, Megan’s grandmother, recalled one Ever heard of porphyria (por-FEAR-e-uh)? Or maybe doctor telling Megan she needed psychiatric help. “It a specific kind of it, erythropoietic protoporphyria (EPP)? was devastating,” said Joye. Me neither. In fact, some doctors have not heard of it and Megan’s mother, Robyn Mathe, had to fight to ensure even disbelieved Lindsay resident Megan Nicholas when her daughter could stay in for recess when necessary, she told them she felt like she was burning up, despite no too. outward symptoms. “There have been times my mom and I have gone to Along with her family, Megan, who has lived with the the zoo,” said Megan, “and we’d have to go on the days condition her whole life, has had to endure accusations, it was cloudy. There has never been any planning on it. isolation and disadvantages that few do. But now the It’s more like, ‘Okay, it’s cloudy right now, let’s go right 19-year-old is part of a medical trial nearing completion now.’” that could offer a breakthrough for her and others facing About a year and a half ago they the same issue. noticed a social media post from the Porphyria is a rare group of disAmerican Porphyria Foundation, noting orders that disrupt the chemical steps a scientific trial was underway to deto the production of a substance called velop a new medicine. COVID delayed heme, which is vital for all the body’s things but two phases were completed organs. Only about one in 74,000 is in the U.S., with good results. Megan — diagnosed with the EPP disorder one of only 10 Canadians — has been Megan has; hers primarily affects the participating in the third and final trial skin. “When I go out in the sun,” before the new medicine is sent for Megan explained, “my skin will start approval. to feel like it’s burning, I’ll get itchy, Twice now Megan and her mother my skin gets red, and it gets hot to have visited the Kaye Edmonton Clinic the touch. I also get blood clusters, in Alberta’s capital as part of the trial. like little red blotches. Usually my When she returned home with the hands and feet are the first to feel the new pills, she learned to keep a log effect of the sun, and the effects can every time she went out into the sun. last for 12 hours to even a few days.” The family hopes to hear soon about EPP causes sensitivity to the the trial results. point where even sunlight that passThis fall, Megan is going to Fleming es through window glass or sunlight Megan Nicholas. College in Peterborough for a threeduring a cold winter can cause a reacyear program in child and youth care. As she nears this tion. Megan told the Advocate she at least has been lucky next chapter in her life, she may have not only helped to have friends who stick by her, including a best friend herself, but others like her who have endured a chalwho would stay in with her for recess at school and lenging disorder for so long. always understood when she would have to head inside, but the rest of the world has not been as kind.

www.lindsayadvocate.ca

43


JUST IN TIME

In search of

Grass Hill The evening of June 8, 1912, saw a typical scene play out in Grass Hill, some five kilometres east of Woodville. Train No. 31, bound for Orillia, was waiting at the Grand Trunk Railway’s diminutive station to take on commuters. John Staples, then the storekeeper at Grass Hill, had disembarked after spending the day in Lindsay. A few horsedrawn wagons might have been waiting nearby, loaded with bags of feed or wool ready for Mr. Staples to weigh in his warehouse. For the passengers aboard Train No. 31,

Grass Hill sign (looking east).

however, life would change forever within a matter of moments. At 7:37 p.m., a second train plowed into the train coaches waiting at Grass Hill — severely injuring three people and killing one. Lying dead amid the wreckage was Nellie Babcock, a 29-year-old mother of two from Lindsay. Today, the site of this tragic railway accident is visible only as a barely discernible grassy berm dotted with dandelions and demarcated by a line of hydro transmission towers. It’s among the first things I see to my left as I pedal up the Woodville Road into Grass Hill (sometimes spelled Grasshill) on an overcast Saturday morning, eager to learn

IAN McKECHNIE Writer-at-large more about this charming hamlet. At various points in its history, Grass Hill sported a blacksmith shop, a wagon maker and a grain elevator. These are long gone, and today “downtown” Grass Hill consists of a one-time general store, a few older houses and a couple of newer dwellings. Before exploring Grass Hill proper, however, I want to check out the schoolhouse that played such an important role in this largely agrarian community. I make a right

A farm on Grasshill Road. Photos: Ian McKechnie.

turn onto the Grasshill Road and head north, passing a few peaceful looking farmsteads laden with fragrant lilac bushes. About two kilometres in, I encounter United School Section No. 2, a red brick building that in 1911 replaced a school damaged in a tornado. This school played host to many a spelling bee, literary society meeting and Christmas concert over the years. “All of the neighbours would come to watch our recitations and skits,” recalls lifelong Grass Hill resident Don Myers, who attended U.S.S. No. 2 in the

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1950s. “It was the only thing going on in mid-December.” His first teacher, Alice MacDonald, boarded with his family down the road and presided over a class of no more than 12 students. Today, this house of learning is, like its contemporaries, a private home. I turn my bicycle around and head south, stopping to enjoy a picnic of barbecued chicken sandwiches, iced tea, shortbread and an apple at the side of the dirt road. As I sit atop a rock in the ditch, I think of students from long ago who walked along this route, perhaps planting saplings which might have grown into the very trees in whose shade I take shelter. What became of them? Did they stay in Grass Hill and work the land, or did they make their mark elsewhere? I think of Pearl Jordan, a Grass Hill native who went on to study at the Toronto College of Music, passing with first-class honours in 1909. She returned to the hamlet on several occasions to entertain her friends and neighbours — when they weren’t busy tobogganing down Jewell’s hill, playing baseball, or attending Maypole dances. (Grass Hill has long been home to musically talented residents; Myers reminisces about George Reed, a local farmer and plasterer who could sing in five octaves.) The sun peeks through the clouds as I bring my bike to a stop in front of the squarish building once home to Harold and Annie “Nan” Belfry’s general store. Starting in 1949 and continuing for at least a decade, the Belfrys pumped gas, graded eggs and supplied the community with groceries. They lived upstairs and raised two children in I bring my bike to a stop this store. Mrs. Belfry (1914-2012), a in front of the squarish member of the Grass Hill Women’s would eventually go on to building once home to Institute, serve as an administrative assistant Harold and Annie “Nan” to Thomas H.B. Symons, the foundBelfry’s general store. ing president of Trent University, and later worked as acting executive Starting in 1949 and continuing for at least director of the Anigawncigig Institute for Native Training, Research a decade, the Belfrys and Development, also at Trent. pumped gas, graded Today, the delightful cacophony of cattle, chickens and goats echoes eggs and supplied the from an ancient barn behind the old community with store. The current owner tells me groceries. that she and her family moved to Grass Hill to escape the hustle and bustle of Toronto. As we chat, she expresses a keen interest in learning more about the hamlet’s history and muses about opening a coffee shop in the erstwhile store one day, catering to the many hundreds of people who travel along the Woodville Road. When I set out in search of Grass Hill, I half-expected to find a partial ghost town. After all, it fell on hard times when the grain elevator burned in the 1960s, when the school closed in 1965, and when the railway took up its tracks a year later.  Yet as my conversation with one of Grass Hill’s newer residents suggests, a community cannot be measured merely by what it has lost over time, but by what it continues to offer — namely, the hospitality, peace and quiet of the country.

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TREVOR’S TAKE TREVOR HUTCHINSON Contributing Editor

Grateful to imagine postpandemic life

I was sitting on my favourite bar patio the other day doing my level best to support the local economy. (Rationalizing a few “pops,” as Doug would describe them, has never been so easy!) The temperature was as hot as a room full of locals discussing ATV routes but no one seemed to mind. As quartets of friends and acquaintances arrived, you could see the smiles under the facemasks. The servers looked so happy and relieved to be back at work. The kids were at home playing with visiting friends and just having fun, doing goofy kid stuff. Even the dog seemed in good spirits, with the return of doggie playdates. As a new pint of economic stimulus arrived, it hit me: For the first time in a long while, despite all the painful and disturbing stories of the last year and notwithstanding a provincial government that is trying to protect me by removing my constitutional rights, I was beginning to imagine a post-pandemic life for my family. As friends discussed second dose appointments, I felt a moment of privilege and gratefulness. With an unprecedented scientific effort and the sacrifices and support of most Canadians, Canada will soon be the most vaccinated country (by any metric) despite the white noise of anti-maskers and anti-vaxxers. I do hope that Ontario will follow provinces like New Brunswick in allowing businesses to restrict customers based on their vaccination status. I am more concerned with my right to stay alive than I am for some conspiracy theorist’s right to ”free-dumb.” While I can just laugh off certain opposition parties that did everything they could to negatively portray our vaccination program that will soon be the envy of the world (“We won’t get vaccines until 2030!”), it’s time to call out these anti-masker asshats. But despite those idiots, I am still hopeful. Of course, it’s too soon to claim victory and we all must be leery of optimism bias. The next two months will be crucial. We will need to be smart and fast to try to avoid the dangers of a surging Delta variant, to name just one risk. We will need to maintain public health measures as the finish line draws nearer. We will have to remain steadfast and patient a little while longer. Could there be another bump in the road? Of course. But we are so close. With the situation well addressed at home we can concentrate on helping the rest of the world. If the pandemic has taught us anything it’s that our health and well-being is connected to the health and well-being of the entire world. And to that, and to all the scientists, health-care workers, essential workers, civil-service workers and teachers who helped my family and country this last 16 months, I raise my glass. And to support the economy, I just might raise two glasses.

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Portrait & Fine Art Photography

Capturing SOLUTION Precious Moments to this month’s www.allinimages.ca crossword, 519-940-1713 page 39

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By Barbara Olson © ClassiCanadian Crosswords

www.lindsayadvocate.ca


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July 2021  

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