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TABLE OF CONTENTS DENVER DESIGN DISTRICT.............................................. 01 ECOLOGICAL FRAMEWORK PLAN................................... 02 MORGAN LIBRARY COURTYARD..................................... 03 ARCHERY RANGE...............................................................04 BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES GREEN ROOF.......................... 05 PONDEROSA CANYON COMMUNITY...............................06 WRITTEN WORKS...............................................................07 QUEST LIVING WALL......................................................... 08 PARK(ING) DAY................................................................. 09 Katy Miller Bachelor of Science Landscape Architecture ‘14 Colorado State University


DENVER DESIGN DISTRICT

01


“There is no logic that can be superimposed on the city; people make it, and it is to them, not buildings, that we must fit our plans.� -Jane Jacobs For this project, my team and I had the opportunity to create a plan for Denver’s upscale urban design district. The site is located within the city proper on the intersection of Alameda and Broadway and is home to many fine jewelry, art, and decor storefronts. With an area of roughly one square mile, our charge was to research the theories and components of what make a city successful and implement them into an ideal urban plan for the site.


ANALYSIS A thorough site analysis was the first step in the design process. Visiting the site allowed for an understanding of the site’s character through talking to locals, photo documentation, sketches, and site inventory.

Legend INDUSTRIAL RESIDENTIAL PARKS/OPEN SPACE GOVERNMENT FACILITIES RETAIL RESTAURANTS SCHOOLS RELIGIOUS CENTERS

Housing

Retail

Education

Parks

Restaurants

Industrial

Government

Religion

Site Parameters


The design process began by borrowing elements of other successful cities around the world and scaling them in accordance with the site.

PROCESS

The next step began to refine these rudimentary elements into a formal layout, informed through external site conditions and needs.

The balance between soft and hardscapes is explored in the next phase as well as location of elements as determined by walking radii.


Furthering the elements into zones allowed for a sense of organization within the site and helped break it up into manageable design problems.

The main artery of the district was implemented as a greenway to connect external ecological corridors and provide a recreational reprieve in the city.

The last step began to look at the site in more detail and furthered the development of circulation patterns, planting plans, and building size.


HOUSING DEVELOPMENT

A mixed-use housing development has been placed within the site to accommodate a variety of demographics. Strategically placed near the entrance of the transit station, the location allows for easy access to public transportation, thus minimizing reliance on the automobile. Also included within the housing development are private pools, areas to congregate, and community gardens.


NORTH TRANSIT PLAZA Light Rail Service Area

2,340

square miles

Light Rail Service Area

40 6 2 municipalities

counties

cities

48

miles of track

exist along the length of the light rail

Annual Ridership from this Station 2.86 million people

(2013)


ECOLOGICAL FRAMEWORK PLAN

02


“The first law of ecology is that everything is related to everything else.” -Barry Commoner For the Fort Collins’ city framework plan, various scales were analyzed in order to produce a cohesive strategy which maximizes the city’s ecological well-being. This project began as a study in analyzing patterns within the natural systems of Fort Collins and recognizing where these patterns could be strengthened. The following pages display how gaps in wildlife corridors can be mitigated through revitalizing neglected lots in Fort Collins as well as making better use of median parking.


SITE 1

Project Description Neglected lots can be found scattered throughout Fort Collins. These spaces have no real identity and are an eye sore to the community. Due to many of these lots’ central location, they have the potential to provide a valuable resource to the city. This particular site, located near Prospect and Meridian Avenue, is near the entrance of Colorado State University and could potentially serve as a gateway to the university while patching gaps that exist in the overall ecological web.

Precedents

before


after


SITE 2 before Project Description The Old Town portion of College Avenue contains an abundance of median parking that causes congestion, is not aesthetically appealing, and does not promote ecological sensitivity. This area could be greatly improved by implementing a green corridor through the median. The proposed pedestrian greenway would open up College Avenue to cyclists and various animal species while diverting parking to surrounding parking garages. Precedents


after


MORGAN LIBRARY COURTYARD

03


“Simple can be harder than complex: You have to work hard to get your thinking clean to make it simple. But it’s worth it in the end because once you get there, you can move mountains.” -Steve Jobs The Morgan Library is centrally located within Colorado State University’s campus. The courtyard is currently an unwelcoming, underutilized space that takes up two floors within the library. My design proposal begins to display the courtyard’s full potential by incorporating pyramidal study cubicles and a diverse palette of vegetation into the space. Each cubicle is custom designed with a different texture so as to easily identify when meeting fellow classmates for study sessions.


FCAA ARCHERY RANGE

04


“The shot will only go smoothly when it takes the archer himself by surprise.� -Eugen Harrigel The Fort Collins Archery Association range is located east of Fort Collins on Mulberry and I-25. This project required research about the technical aspects of what is needed in an archery range including regulation length target courses, obstacles for field archery, training areas, and implementation of safety requirements. The following pages show the progression of my design to incorporate these elements as well as including space for additional recreational activities.


BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES GREEN ROOF

05


“For in the true nature of things, if we rightly consider, every green tree is far more glorious than if it were made of gold and silver.� -Martin Luther On the fourth floor of the Behavioral Sciences building at Colorado State University lies a vacant balcony overlooking the entire campus. This building was constructed two years ago yet no action has been taken to implement a design that would allow the space to be enjoyed. Considering harsh conditions that green roofs must endure, the low available square footage, and the views of the campus, a design and technical drawings have been produced to maximize each square foot to its full potential.


PLAN & SYSTEMS 4

2

3

1

6

5

Bar Seating

4

Intensive Planting

2

Extensive Planting

5

Lookout Area

3

Wood Decking

6

Redosier dogwood Planters

Plant List

Redosier dogwood

Creeping thyme

Great plains yucca

Prairie Sage

Extensive Green Roof Section

1

Intensive Green Roof Section

Key


PERSPECTIVE


PONDEROSA CANYON COMMUNITY

06


“Thousands of tired, nerve-shaken, over-civilized people are beginning to find out that going to the mountains is going home; that wildness is a necessity; and that mountain parks and reservations are useful not only as fountains of timber and irrigating rivers, but as fountains of life.� -John Muir Ponderosa Canyon Mixed-Use Community is a redevelopment of a suburban golf course community in Flagstaff, AZ. The goal for this project was to create a welcoming home for residents which promotes a denser way of living without compromising the high quality of life to which they are accustomed to. Emphasis is placed on increasing the opportunity for friendly neighborhood interaction, while still maintaining a desirable balance between public and private domain. The community design also incorporates an ecological restoration plan including roadside rain gardens, which treat stormwater runoff, and protected wildlife corridors, which maintain the existing functions of migratory patterns.


PROBLEM STATEMENT

Growth Trends Current

Future

1962 1983 2012

Travel Times Walking

2032 2062

Biking 4 4

8

5 8

6

1

6

2

8

1 2 3 4 1

10 20

30

40

50

60

5 6 7

K-12 School University Grocery Shopping Downtown theatre library park

3 4

4 3

2

2

1

7

4 3

5

1

7

2

5

8

6 7 2

1

10

20

30

K-12 School University Grocery Shopping Downtown theatre library park

40

The city of Flagstaff, Arizona is a rare gem located two hours north of Phoenix on the southern edge of the Colorado plateau. Situated at an elevation of over 7,000 feet, the city is surrounded by the largest contiguous growth of Ponderosa trees in the United States. With a plethora of outdoor recreational opportunities and a lively downtown culture, Flagstaff is quickly becoming a sought after place to live. With this increased desirability has come an increase of population. Over the last decade, Flagstaff has seen a population growth of 24.5%, in comparison to only 9.7% of the total U.S. population. This, combined with Flagstaff’s low precipitation and high elevation, equals a very sensitive environment for future development.


Ecological Functions

Site

Flood Plane

Watershed

Wildlife Corridor Bow & Arrow

Sinclair Wash

Pine Canyon Golf Course gaillardia pinnatifida

oryzopsis hymenoides

bouteloua gracilis

agropyron cristatum

vitis arizonica

lonicera arizona

rhermopsis pinetorum

solidago sparsiflora

ratibida columnaris

penstemon clutei

penstemon barbatus

oxytropis lambertii

mirabilis multiflora

mahonia repens

lupinus argenteus

linum leisii

juniperus horizontalis

ipomopsis aggregata

geum triflorum

geranium richardsonii

gaillardia pulchella

fragaria ovalis

erigeron divergens

castilleja integra

anthemis nobilis

aquilegia chrysantha

antennaria rosea

agastache cana

achillea lanulosa

yucca baccata

fallugia paradox

cowania mexicana

berberis fremontii

shepherdia argentia

sambucus caerulea

salix exigua

rosa woodsii

rhus ovata

cowania mexicana

cerocoparpus species

caragana species

caragana arborescens

pinus nigra

holodiscus dumosus

pseudotsuga menziesii

ppicea pungens

pinus aristata

juniperus scopulorum

amelanchier alnifolia

agave parryi

pinus ponderosa

pinus edulis

juniperus osteosperma

juniperus monosperma

juniperus depperana

ables concolor

robinia neomexicana

quercus gabelii

prunus virginiana

populus tremuloides

plantanus wightii

juglans major

fraximnus velutina

celtis reticulata

acer grandidentatum

acer glabrum

spring

summer

fall

winter

SITE ANALYSIS Seasonal Vegetation Color Palette

Lower Rio de Flag Watershed

For this project, site analysis was done remotely through the use of digital topography models, GIS, Google Earth, previous projects, and other documentation. This research allowed me to make informed design decisions based on the location of ecologically sensitive areas, gaps in wildlife corridors, character images of the site, current plant palettes, walking and biking distances from the site, and growth trends.


INSPIRATION & STATISTICS Before

Native Vegetation

Housing Density

Walking Distance After

(600 Housing Units/Sq. Mile)

(Calculation from nearest grocery store)

Golf Greens

(50% Increase)

Wildlife Corridor

(30% Increase)

(1100 Housing Units/Sq. Mile)

Housing Plots

(25% Decrease after Increased Housing)

Project Inspiration & Influence Dark Sky Initiative Petroglyphs Native Vegetation Santa Fe Railway Craft Beer Logging Local Arts Mountain Biking Rock Climbing Hiking Community Gathering Education


PLAN Main Access Road Clubhouse Civic School Retail Star Park Duplex Rowhome Single Family Rain Garden

Pedestrian Lane

Golf Greens


TECHNICAL FEATURES

Rain Garden Section Stone Slab to Channel Runoff Planting Soil Porous Paving Units

Street with Porous Paving Vegetation

Street Curb & Gutter

Water Detention Line Gravel Drain

Aggregate

Aggregate

Star Park Section

Pedestrian Trail

Constellation Walls

Star-Gazing/Event Space


RETAIL & COMMUNITY SPACE

Description This perspective gives a peak into what life would be like for the citizens of Ponderosa Canyon Community in the retail and community portion of the site. Salons, coffee shops, and restaurants can all be found here within a 10 minute walk from any house located within the community. An expansive sidewalk and several outdoor patios create a welcoming experience for friends and families, while off-street parking allows for convenience and serves as a safety buffer between traffic and pedestrians.


POCKET NEIGHBORHOODS

Description Above: This perspective depicts the typical pocket neighborhood found within Ponderosa Canyon community. Each neighborhood is comprised of 4-6 single family homes, 8-12 duplexes, or 10-20 rowhomes. This concept eliminates streets running in front of the house and replaces them with plots of receational land which can be customized by individual neighborhoods to be used as a community garden, event space, or for passive and/or active recreation. Each individual plot is then connected along a curvilinear axis in order to create a longer system of pedestrian trails within the community. Right: This rendering depicts the star-gazing park to be located near the center of the community. This space will attract people within the community and surrounding areas during the day for jogging, dog walking, picnicking, and holding outdoor events. At night, the wall which lines the spiral path will light up as people walk by to reveal various constellations. As they make their way to the top of the elevated park, they will be greeted by a large open space to set up chairs and telescopes and gaze at the night sky.


Night

Day

STAR-GAZING PARK


WRITTEN WORKS

07


“It is better to travel well than to arrive.” -Buddha Land.Mark Magazine is Colorado State University’s Landscape Architecture newsletter which is released annually to local professionals, alumni, and community members. This year, I took a large role in the production of the magazine which allowed me to enhance my communication skills while contributing to CSU’s landscape architecture program.


FEATURE ARTICLE After studying abroad in Europe for the Summer

2013 semester, I had the opportunity to write about my experiences in the student landscape architecture magazine. This article allowed me to tell my story to the CSU community, and in particular, future Landscape Architecture students who were deciding whether a study abroad trip was right for them. The article is mainly focused on my time in Venice, Italy and balances between a personal narrative and an informative piece on the area. Patched in between personal trip experiences (such as meeting interesting people from around the world and walking through Italian fish markets), I briefly explain the history and culture of the area while describing pressing concerns related to Venice’s rising tides.


QUEST LIVING WALL

08


“What day is it?” It’s today,” squeaked Piglet. My favorite day,” said Pooh.” -A.A. Milne The Living Wall Competition was a design competition among undergraduate and graduate landscape architecture students at Colorado State University. The winning design is planned for construction in the Summer of 2014 as part of Fort Collins’ “Nature in the City” project to promote the utilization of green space within the city proper. My design was conceptualized through the desire to educate the public about living walls, create a safer sidewalk during the evenings, and to provide a beautiful icon in a otherwise neglected part of the city.


PERSPECTIVES Day

Night

Plant Legend Hardy Ice Plant Delosperma cooperi

Caucasion Stonecrop Sedum spurium ‘Red Carpet’

Boxleaf Euonymous Euonymus japonicus ‘Microphyllus’

Hancock Coralberry Symphoricarpos × chenaultii ‘Hancock’

Coralbells Heuchera ‘Palace Purple’

Crimson Pygmy Barberry Berberis thunbergii ‘Atropurpurea Nana’

English Ivy Hedera helix

Angelina Stonecrop Sedum rupestre ‘Angelina’

Lights Legend Twinkling LED Lights

Scale: 1”=6’-0”

1.5’

3’

6’

12’


DETAILS

Irrigation System Detail

Attachment & Irrigation Detail

Frame Attachment Detail


PARK(ING) DAY

09


“Everyone must make time to sit and watch the leaves turn.� -Elizabeth Lawrence Park(ing) Day is a worldwide event where artists and citizens around the world are allowed the opportunity to transform an urban parking spot for a day. This spot might be turned into anything from a contemporary exhibit to an interactive adventure. The goal is to challenge the conventional ways in which people view and allocate urban space and to develop concepts that identify with local community needs. These spaces have proven to be effective at enriching the quality of life by promoting green space and community interaction.


OLD TOWN OASIS Design Concept For my design, I chose to convert a parking space in central downtown Fort Collins into a temporary Utopian-style park. Complete with a manicured lawn, potted trees, and an assortment of different shrubs and perennials, it served as a temporary oasis within the hustle and bustle of the city. Throughout the day, visitors could sit and chat with friends, help put together the puzzle pieces of a mural which formed the backdrop to the park, and learn more about how urban space can be transformed in unconventional ways. Plan View Vehicular Road Mural Callery Pear Tree Topiary Tree Potted Shrub Chairs Wood Bench Potted Perennial Signage Sidewalk



A Portfolio of Landscape Architecture & Other Creative Works : Katy Miller