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MIAMI AD SCHOOL | SAN FRANCISCO 2009

Katiy Heath


I’M KATIY

HELLO

Heath

I’m a self starter. A Chuck Palahniuk enthusiast. A dog lover. A proud Space Camp graduate. A member of the no-cavities club. A writer. A cyclist. Someone who has an affinity for pockets, pushing conspiracy theories, convincing the unconvinced, and asking too many questions. Imaginative and authentic. I have high self awareness and a need to be different. But not too different. Subtly unique. When I was 13 I changed the spelling of my name to end in “I-Y” because there were too many “K-A-T-I-E’s” in my class. One little letter, and one rather large statement. And that marked the beginning of my self-branding. My decision was based on too many K-A-T-I-E’s, and as many agencies can relate, differentiation is vital for survival. Understanding this is essential not just across the industry landscape but within a classroom of planners as well. Differentiation. From yearbook signings to insights, to breakthrough ideas.


& THIS IS MY BOOK

BOOK

Case Studies

Heath


CODA

OVERVIEW

Heath

The car industry is rapidly changing and automakers now need to redesign products according to new political and social standards. This new era of environmentally-friendly cars, from the hybrid Mercury to the all-electric Pod, must not only comply with industry standards, but consumer expectations of cost, convenience and performance. Big brands, both in and outside the automotive industry, are anticipating 2010 to be the resurrection of the electric car. Various car companies like Nissan are pushing to get e-car models to market, while other American corporations are gearing up for a world in which people need to fill up with a plug and not a pump. Electricity has gradually become accepted as the new fuel, and the e-car is on its way to becoming the new format for driving. How does Coda enter this new era of driving and pioneer this revolution?


Heath

Objective Peak interest in a new era of transportation, while creating demand for and supporting the launch of Coda, a new e-car.

BRIEF

Societal and Category Insight A new era of driving is ahead of us. It’s not a pod. It’s not a charge for which you put your life on hold. It’s where we’re going and how we’re going to get there. The current line of eco-automobiles can be a barrier to this movement. Small, unpractical vehicles. Long charges that threaten spontaneity. And in a country that loves its cars and combustible engines, but also loves recycling, reusable bags, lowering its carbon footprint and energy dependence — this is the norm. Expectations of keeping up with the Joneses blend with prudence and practicality. Americans have been forced into a hybrid life. Where the best of both worlds actually prevents us from moving into the new world. Americans love cars. And beer runs. And late-night pile-ins for ice cream. Picking up the neighbors’ kids from school. Washing bugs off the grille. The opportunity is not in hybridizing two ideals, but creating the next stepping stone that drives us toward the future. Consumer Insight Even within the environmentally-aware target, the Coda is not a practical car. Drivers don’t want to clock their charges. They don’t want to limit their road trips. Remember the people who waited in line for a Prius? They weren’t trading patience for performance. They wanted a drivable, moving, four-door manifestation of their ideal, but on their terms. Transportation technology is changing. What was once the ‘norm’ has evolved. It’s time to put two feet on one side of the fence, firmly within this new normal.

Coda is the new normal .


There are more than 6,000 homeless in San Francisco — one third of them living on the street — and every day, they’re victims of the worst form of discrimination: ignorance. We’re all guilty of not looking at them, not saluting them, not smiling at them—attitudes that further remove the homeless from the human condition, turning homeless people into faceless beings.

Heath

Across the globe - and especially in San Francisco — awareness campaigns have not broken through attitudes to change behavior. While attitudinal changes may be positive changes, it will take a change of behavior to truly make a difference in the fight against homelessness. Challenged by two Goodby Directors, this project was to create a campaign and generate ideas on behalf of a local charity, ‘Homeless Connect.’

CONNECT

OVERVIEW


BRIEF

Heath Objective Change San Francisco residents’ perceptions of the homeless, and make them understand that each homeless person has a face and is just as human as anyone else.

T S LO

Societal Insight The San Francisco homeless population is invisible. Government programs have made living on the streets a more sustainable lifestyle, attracting more and more people to San Francisco. With this influx of the homeless on the rise, they’ve fallen back into the woodwork of the urban landscape. And in turn, also become part of the SF experience. The “Bushman” at Fisherman’s Wharf has become a tourist institution, where people come from all over just to point and gawk. We have no empathy toward these people, in fact we don’t treat them like people at all. We point, we laugh, we ignore. We view these people as beneath us, sub-human. Consumer Insight While people may view the homeless as less than human, in contrast, we treat our pets as if they were one of us. From designer collars, to gourmet organic dog food, to the millions of dollars we invest in animal rescue shelters, animals live like humans. They sleep in beds, they have a place at the table and all while actual human beings are living like animals on the streets.

Why are we treating the homeless like stray animals?

DOG


Heath PHASE 1:

After developing the strategy, we took an audit of existing communication surrounding the homeless issue to ensure our campaign would not only be relevant but also ‘break through the clutter.’ Past and current campaigns exploit homeless living conditions in ways that SF residents can’t relate, playing on the same emotions of sympathy and guilt, and while thought-provoking, are not compelling enough to elicit people to take a stance on the issue. Our creative approach isn’t meant to just change perceptions. It’s meant to cause a riot, stir up controversy, and grab attention. It’s meant to make people feel uncomfortable and tap into one of the most powerful human emotions that can elicit change­— anger. Pieces of inspiration for our satirical and extreme approach were George Orwell’s Animal Farm and 1984.

Our mission :

Eliminate Homelessness in SF. Our plan was two-fold: 1- Shock: Expose real issue 2- Unveil: Expose hoax and real solution

Posters

PHASE 1 = SHOCK


Heath

PHASE 1:

Street Fliers & Stunts

Fliers will be littered throughout areas of high foot traffic such as Union Square, the Financial District, Fisherman’s Wharf, Hayes Valley and The Mission. “Stunts” will take place in these same areas. Vans will simulate dog catchers, spontaneously picking up actors posing as innocent homeless people on the streets.

PHASE 1:

Spoof Website


Heath

PHASE 2:

Updated Posters and Fliers

PHASE 2 = UNVEIL

PHASE 2:

Replacement of Website

In the second phase, the “spoof” website will transform to a real website, featuring the above image, scrolling video as well as directions to a phone number and information on how they can “Eliminate SF Homeless.”


Heath

OVERVIEW Häagen-Dazs is the leading premium-quality ice cream brand in the US. Awareness and sales have been stable in 2008 and 2009. The brand reputation is positive, but a bit too “soft, nice and quiet.” The new Chief Marketing Officer wants to shake up the category, incite organic growth and surprise consumers with new flavors. Overall, there is ubiquity in the in-home ice cream category. Too many brands producing the expected scope of flavors and even risqué flavors are routine; from Vanilla to Birthday Cake Surprise—ingredients are standard, run of the mill, and innovation ceases to exist when it comes to flavor profiles. Brands aren’t listening to consumer taste expectations, leaving an opportunity for Häagen-Dazs to come in and shake things up.


Heath

Category and Societal Insight The in-home ice cream category is boring and has fallen behind larger food industry flavor profiles. America’s palette has progressed. People are more passionate about food than ever before. Cultural influences are integrating once exotic menu items into our daily culinary vernacular. Children are eating California rolls, and items like kale and foie gras are not so foreign anymore. As food trends evolve, a spectrum of palettes has emerged. While you have the foodie fanatics who will go to great lengths to try anything, you also have your meat and potato eaters who are set in their ways. But the general public falls somewhere in the middle. One can be both an aspiring foodie one day but also find comfort in a casserole another day. Consumer Insight As adventurous as some may be, even the most ardent “foodies” have limits or thresholds. But there’s an overall need to shake things up once in a while, whether that’s moving from chocolate to dolce de leche or from grilled salmon to tuna carpaccio. Their hesitation in the unfamiliar may hold them back, but their intrigue overrules and challenges those instincts. Sometimes they just need a little nudge.

lds o h s e r h T r u Challenge Yo

STRATEGY

RIEF

Objective Create a new line of ice cream to break Häagen-Dazs, the leading premium-quality ice cream brand in the U.S., out of its traditionally “soft, nice and quiet” mold.


Heath

Launch Event


Heath

Johnnie walker is a Scottish blended whisky, containing four labels within its brand portfolio — Red, Green, Black, and Blue — each signifying a different level of quality. Johnnie Walker’s sales, especially the Black Label, are losing momentum among core American whisky drinkers. Within the whisky category, there are as many types of drinkers as there are drinks. From mixing to sipping, savoring to shooting. Many other whisky brands have a narrow focus on ideas of success: masculinity, wealth, mature taste, etc. Johnnie Walker has built its iconic brand around the idea of progress, tying this mantra to the personal journey, and creating a world-renowned and award-winning campaign, “Keep Walking.”

OVERVIEW

The assignment: write the next chapter of “Keep Walking” for the U.S. market via an inspiring campaign, still within the campaign framework.


STRATEGY

Objective Refresh the existing “Keep Walking” campaign for the U.S. market by aligning the brand with American whisky drinkers’ perceptions of progress. Who are we talking to? “Adopters”: Men who use and like the brand but Johnnie Walker may not be their go-to spirit, as they are still exploring. “Adorers”: Men who are completely enamored by the brand and Johnnie Walker is their whisky of choice. These two segments, though exclusive in usage, together represent the greatest opportunity to increase usage and loyalty. This also continues to evolve both groups within the customer lifespan of the brand as the Adopters will become the Adorers and the Adorers will soon become Enthusiasts.

Progress is moving forward on your own terms.

Consumer Insight Adopters/Adorers are wading through a transitional stage in life. Coming out of the carefree college years when Jack and Coke was their go-to, they’re now moving into sipping on Johnnie Walker. Now is the time in which their identity is becoming more of substance. Whether it’s taking on their first mortgage or making a career move, there is a constant influx of change. And with this change comes feelings of anxiety, impatience, and self-doubt. However, there also is a high level of confidence rooted in their core. While they may be unsure about tomorrow, they can make a clear distinction on how they feel about the important things in life today. They see hipsters sporting the pencil thin skinny jeans and smirk. Instead, they continue on in the same loose fitting Levi’s and flannel shirt because that’s what they like. For many men, their choice in drink is driven by image. Not for these adopters/adorers. Johnnie Walker is not so much of an anchor in who they are as an individual, but more of a timeless artifact they collect along their own journey in life.

BRIEF

Heath


Heath

BRAND MANIFESTO Walking isn’t about simply moving forward. It’s moving forward without compromising integrity. Walking past distractions. Maintaining conviction. Bypassing fads. You can’t truly progress as an individual if you don’t stay an individual. Johnnie Walker relates: His Black Label hasn’t changed its recipe since 1938. And his label and bottle have stayed the same since 1870. Unlike its competitors, Johnnie stays true to his ingredients and honors his own legacy. He doesn’t fit in a shot glass…he refuses to. And he encourages his drinkers to do the same. To keep I don’t sacrifice quality for quantity. I keep walking. your own ingredients, your own bottling. And by effect, I don’t settle just to have someone. I keep walking. honoring your own legacy. It’s no question Johnnie keeps I don’t accept the first job offer. I keep walking. walking. You just have to make sure you do the same. And I don’t settle on passable. so do I. I keep walking. I don’t look fads in the eye. I refuse to rely on my stock portfolio. I don’t settle for “everything will fall into place.” I keep walking. I don’t want a job that’s just a job. I refuse to suffocate my whiskey with a shot glass. I refuse to float on . I don’t sacrifice a co-worker’s friendship for a promotion . I keep walking. I refuse to follow paychecks. I keep walking. I won’t sacrifice my savings for everyone else’s lifestyle. And I don’t take a job just because the money is right. I don’t do mulligans. I keep walking. The size of my whiskey glass isn’t negotiable. I won’t stand for an unfair relationship. I don’t compromise my loyalty to a friend. I won’t take a job I’m overqualified for. I keep walking. I don’t settle on someone who’s just good enough. I keep walking. I don’t compromise I keep walking.


Heath

Ice cream . E-Cars. Homeless. Whisky. Katiy

There’s more to each, and I would love to fill you in.

Contact: katiyheath@gmail .com @katiyheathbar http://katiyheath.posterous.com/


Heath

EXPERIENCE Account Planner Miami Ad School San Francisco, CA Assistant Account Manager Barkley Kansas City, MO Student Account Executive MOJO AD: Student Staffed Ad Agency Columbia, MO Public Relations Intern Barkley Kansas City, MO Brand Management Intern Sullivan, Higdon & Sink Kansas City, MO

EDUCATION

• Miami Ad School, Account Planning Bootcamp • Missouri School of Journalism, Bachelor of Journalism, Strategic Communications • Universidad de Cuernavaca, Hispanic Cultural Studies • U.S. Space & Rocket Center, Space Camp Academy


Miami Ad School Planning Portfolio - 2010