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OI T C Artists and designers have an enormous range of techniques and media at their disposal to communicate ideas, and it is probably true to say that COLOUR forms a common feature that is always present.

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Although successful design work and great works of art can be produced in Black and White, the addition of colour to a design or art form can often enhance and add visual impact that cannot be achieved in other ways. It is difficult to imagine our world without any trace of colour, whether it is the natural panorama of the changing seasons, or the functional colour coding on the mass of wires and transistors in most electronic equipment. Colour is both an art and a science, and a good understanding of its use is not only an asset to the designer, but can be an essential source of inspiration and a starting point for the teacher from which ideas may develop.The textile designer may use a range of fabrics, with embroidery or weaving techniques and screen-printing dyes, while the potter uses subtle ceramic glazes and a variety of natural clays. An interior designer produces a composite arrangement of furniture, carpeting, wall coverings, and curtains, while the architect uses brick, stone, and a vast array of man made materials for decorative or structural purposes. Whether there is an affinity towards painting or printmaking, textiles or fashion, furniture or ceramics, the work continually involves the use of colour and the theoretical terms associated with it. The pigment or media may vary, but the actual understanding of colour mixing and its application in design situations is similar. Before proceeding further, it would help to briefly describe the scientific approach. The physicist, basing his theories on the discoveries of Sir Isaac Newton (circa 1666) will describe how the colours we see are actually sunlight broken down into electro-magnetic waves. These waves can be seen more clearly by passing a beam of light through a prism, breaking the light into the colours of a rainbow. The pigment or media may vary, but the actual understanding of colour mixing and its application in design situations is similar. The pigment or media may vary, but the actual understanding of colour mixing and its application in design situations is similar. The pigment or media may vary, but the actual understanding of colour mixing and its application in design situations is similar. The pigment or media may vary, but the actual understanding of colour mixing and its application in design situations is similar.


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han Artists and designers have an enormous range of techniques and media at their disposal to communicate ideas, and it is probably true to say that COLOUR forms a common feature that is always present.

Although successful design work and great works of art can be produced in Black and White, the addition of colour to a design or art form can often enhance and add visual impact that cannot be achieved in other ways. It is difficult to imagine our world without any trace of colour, whether it is the natural panorama of the changing seasons, or the functional colour coding on the mass of wires and transistors in most electronic equipment. Colour is both an art and a science, and a good understanding of its use is not only an asset to the designer, but can be an essential source of inspiration and a starting point for the teacher from which ideas may develop.The textile designer may use a range of fabrics, with embroidery or weaving techniques and screen-printing dyes, while the potter uses subtle ceramic glazes and a variety of natural clays. An interior designer produces a composite arrangement of furniture, carpeting, wall coverings, and curtains, while the architect uses brick, stone, and a vast array of man made materials for decorative or structural purposes. Whether there is an affinity towards painting or printmaking, textiles or fashion, furniture or ceramics, the work continually involves the use of colour and the theoretical terms associated with it. The pigment or media may vary, but the actual understanding of colour mixing and its application in design situations is similar. Before proceeding further, it would help to briefly describe the scientific approach. The physicist, basing his theories on the discoveries of Sir Isaac Newton (circa 1666) will describe how the colours we see are

Artists and designers have an enormous range of techniques and media at their disposal to communicate ideas, and it is probably true to say that COLOUR forms a common feature that is always present.

Although successful design work and great works of art can be produced in Black and White, the addition of colour to a design or art form can often enhance and add visual impact that cannot be achieved in other ways. It is difficult to imagine our world without any trace of colour, whether it is the natural panorama of the changing seasons, or the functional colour coding on the mass of wires and transistors in most electronic equipment. Colour is both an art and a science, and a good understanding of its use is not only an asset to the designer, but can be an essential source of inspiration and a starting point for the teacher from which ideas may develop.The textile designer may use a range of fabrics, with embroidery or weaving techniques and screen-printing dyes, while the potter uses subtle ceramic glazes and a variety of natural clays. An interior designer produces a composite arrangement of furniture, carpeting, wall coverings, and curtains, while the architect uses brick, stone, and a vast array of man made materials for decorative or structural purposes. Whether there is an affinity towards painting or printmaking, textiles or fashion, furniture or ceramics, the work continually involves the use of colour and the theoretical terms associated with it. The pigment or media may vary, but the actual understanding of colour mixing and its application in design situations is similar. Before proceeding further, it would help to briefly describe the scientific approach. The physicist, basing his theories on the discoveries of Sir Isaac Newton (circa 1666) will describe how the colours we see are


Typographic Experiments  

Typographic experiements with different words.

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