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K AT H E R I N E H A N N A H


Philosophy Designers are DREAMERS and PROBLEM SOLVERS... invisioning new aspiring ideas to the ever-evolving world. Design should be respectful at the same time it is CHALLENGING and INNOVATIVE... respectul towards the well-being of its’ users as well as the practice of sustainability. Functionality and beauty must coexist within society... Functionality is a necessity to install a NEED for design, beauty is a necessity to install ACCEPTANCE of design. Function gives purpose, and beauty invites.


TABLE O F CON T E N TS

The Anderson House

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A Residential Project

The Pollak Coffee & Tea Shop

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A Commercial Project

RBHA Healing Garden

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A local community project

Girls For A Change

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A Hospitality Project

Renderings + Skills

Mixed-media

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T H E ANDER S ON H OUS E


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T h e A nd e r so n Hous e The concept for the Anderson House can best be described by the Ripple Effect. When a pebble is thrown into water, the initial impact and splash is the most apparent in form and movement. The waves that resonate around the initial impact imitate it in lessoning degrees the further away they get from the source. The Anderson House demonstrates the Ripple Effect by creating a strong focal point that serves as a guiding force for the rest of the space. All other decisive factors are diluted echoes of this initial impact. This is apparent through the geometry of the rooms, materiality, and color palette.

Fan Row House

Jackson Ward House

Vernacular study 2/3’s ratio vs. 1/2 ratio

Applying the 1/3’s ratio derived from the Fan Row House to the Ripple Effect


Vicinity Map The Fan

Jackson Ward

The Anderson House Site

Application of Ripple Effect to footprint of Plan

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T h e A nd e r so n Hous e The Ripple Effect is shown in the geometry of the apartment by the influence of the pre-existing bay windows commonly found in the Fan Row Houses. By mimicking the bay window geometry through the parti diagram and applying it to each room in plan, the space begins to repeat and “ripple� in geometric measures. The play of warm and cool tones are used to either draw emphasis or mute the angles in each room. The kitchen is seen as the focal point, and therefore has the most warms tones and emphasis on the angled geometry of the space. The further away a room is from the focal point, the less warm tones are present and the less emphasis on the geometry.

Reclaimed Oak

MaharamTabby Check in Flame

Honey Walnut Wood

DesignTexUlster Upholstery in Sky

Architectural CeramicsChelsea Brick

Corian- Sea Foam

Section Through First Floor Not to Scale


Kitchen Perspective

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Master Bathroom & Walk-in Closet

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Parti diagram that mimics bay windows shape in plan

Custom-designed furniture was created to fit into the unique angles of the spaces


Refridgerator w/ warm wood facade

Bed built into wall w/ encompassing wood bed-side table

Master Bedroom

Staircase angled to preserve parti shape

Foyer

Lounge Area

Kitchen

N First Floor of the Anderson Apartment Not to Scale

Guest Room

Guest Walk-In Closet & Bathroom

Lounge Area

Second Floor of the Anderson Apartment Not to Scale

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T HE POLLA K COFFE E S HO P


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T h e Po l la k C of fe e S ho p The concept for this project is to create a meditative passage to encourage stressed, busy-paced students to be more present during their everyday schedule and route to campus. An axis is created with a wood joinery structure to encourage passage to the coffee shop. The form of the structure was inspired by the juxtaposing vertical trees within the couryard of the Pollak Building, a building otherwise characterized as a “concrete box on stilts”. Repetition and movement are used to influence a meditative mindset, as well as incorporating elements of Biophilic Design. The design of the counter provokes customers to walk around it as part of their passage, as well as enabling them to become part of the “ritual” of preparing coffee. The metal grate outside the shop was a pre-existing condition, and the counter was designed to allow air flow from the grate. This space is ADA accessible.

Concept model of wood structure reflecting the pre-existing Pollak Building column structure


VCU Campus

The Pollak Building

N Key: Existing Common Path of Travel Proposed Common Path of Travel Shop Location

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T h e Po l la k C of fe e S ho p

Satin Steel

Polycarbonate Sheet

Wood Structure The design aesthetics of the coffee shop was inspired by japanese wood joinery. The wood structure guiding students to the shop is designed so that it only uses wood joinery and no other binding substrate. It is composed of a series of fins that reflect a wave shape, influenced by elements of biophilic design and made so that it helps to induce a mediatative mindset when traveling under the structure. It is an alternative passage amidst the typical, busy city sidewalks.

Beech Wood


Pre-existing Metal Vent

Custom-built Coffee Counter

Steelcase Coalesse Shell Chair

11' - 5 1/2"

16' - 7 1/2"

Steelcase Turnstone Alight Coffee Table

Steelcase Coalesse Enea Cafe Stool

Traffic Flow

10' - 3 11/32"

Furniture Plan

Section of Wood Structure

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T H E RB HA HE AL I N G GARD EN


Watercolor of designed “labyrinth� and rain garden

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T h e R BHA He a l i ng G a rd en By Katherine Hannah, Christie Haskin, Kim Peters, Theresa Rozier

What is M.O.B.? MoB is a partnership of three design departments of VCUarts, which includes Graphic Design, Fashion Design, and Interior Design. These departments work with Storefront for Community Design, a non-profit design assistance center located within Richmond, VA. Storefront improves the quality of design within the city by facilitating access to design and planning resources. Interdiciplinary small groups work collaboratively on projects presented by clients in the city. Several community projects are completed each semester to fulfill the needs of local bsinesses and citizens. MoB and Storefront believes that:

design makes a healthier city where citizens participate more fully in their environment, their government and their culture�.

“Good

Our Project Brief: Richmond Behavioral Health Authorities is creating a healing garden and kitchen garden for their North Campus at 1700 Front Street. The campus provides residential substance abuse services for men, women, and families. There is a budget of $2500 to get the gardens started by the Fall of 2018 as a Phase 1 project. However there is a 1 acre green space that will need a speculative master plan for a community and learning space which will serve as Phase 2 of the project. This project team will assist with the two phases of the project.


Topographic Revit model by Katherine Hannah

Campus Facilities Drainage Issues Existing Gardens

Built Picnic Tables

Built Healing Garden Beds

Planted Trees in Orchard

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T h e R BHA He a l i ng G a rd en

Diagram of existing land conditions by Katherine Hannah

Concept:

Labyrinth and Rain Garden:

The approach to the RBHA Healing Garden is to unify the different components of healing through a series of paths, or “necklaces”. The conceptual approach of creating a necklace with varying beads and pendants is applicable to how the different types of gardens are held together by a unifying path. Every garden and component of the 1 acre plot of land exists as its own unique bead, each a small part of a whole picture. The larger path contains areas such as the kitchen garden, greenhouse, orchard, labyrinth, and firepit, with each element lying further or closer to the path depending on the privacy each element demands. The smaller, centralized path encompasses the amphitheater, healing garden, open field area, and children’s play area, putting emphasis on these areas as well as providing easy accessibility to these designated “pendants” on the necklace.

The Labyrinth was specifically asked for by the client, in order to provide an opportunity for meditation. The one-acre plot of land had a pre-existing path that circled the perimeter, and was very commonly traveled by patients. The Labyrinth was incorporated to be a part of this pre-existing path. The site also appeared to have some drainage issues, since the plot is entirely on a subtle but consistent slope. Water runoff destroyed paths and pooled at the far edge of the land. The Labyrinth was placed where the water pooled up and a rain garden was incorporated to address the drainage. The rain garden is filled with plants that can sustain with a lot of water pooling, and a series of bridges over the rain garden ensures that the path is not disrupted. The aesthetic is inspired by Japanese Gardens. Labyrinth and rain garden designed and illustrated by Katherine Hannah.


Designed by Katherine Hannah, Chrisitie Haskin, Theresa Rozier, Kim Peter Outline by Katherine Hannah, Illustration by Kim Peter

The Amphitheatre

The Labyrinth and Rain Garden

The Kitchen Garden

Open Community Field

The Orchard and Garden Shed

Children’s Daycare Play Center

Great Blue Lobelia

Elymus Hystrix

Marsh Marigold

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Re nderin g s + S k i lls


Marker Rendering Practice

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Fin is h B o a rd s - S heltering A rm s The following are materials and finish boards completed for the Sheltering Arms Institute in Goochland County, VA. The materials are divided up into the different types of spaces the new Institute will have. Completed renderings are incorporated to show each space. These boards were done through an internship at HDR. Branding Colors:

Supporting Colors:

Patient Room

Clinical Corridors

Multi-purpose + Team Area

Waiting

Clinical Spaces


Therapy Gym

Lobby

Dining

Public Spaces Public Toilet

Administrative Office + Conference

Chapel

Kitchen

Shower

Corridor

Administratiion Space + Support Space

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Pa intin g s

Top and bottom: Oil Paint on Canvas


Oil Paint on Canvas, 2’ x 4’

Oil Paint on Wood Panel

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Thank you! Contact: Katherine Hannah katherinehannahdesign@gmail.com 703.944.4507

Profile for Katie Hannah

Interior Design Portfolio  

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