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BY HASSAN HAJJAJ PHOTOGRAPHY, FASHION, FILM, DESIGN


CONTENTS “SUNNY SIDE UP” 5 by Katia Hadidian “HAJJAJ IN CLOSE-UP” 6 by Martin Barnes MY ROCK STARS 13 “A CASE OF LOVE AT FIRST SIGHT: 14 A CURATOR’S PERSPECTIVE” by Linda Komaroff ’ KESH ANGELS 46 DAKKA MARRAKESH 69 “STUDIO & STREET: 70 HASSAN HAJJAJ’S STYLE MASH-UP” by Jessie Wender & Mitra Abbaspour SALON HASSAN 95 BIOGRAPHY 110 TO MY MUM AND DAD This book represents a journey in which so many things happened, and I have to say a massive thank-you to all my family and friends for their support along the way. So, I would like to dedicate this book to everyone who believes in what I do and gives me their time.

BIBLIOGRAPHY 112 IMPRINT 120

Thank-you to my family for their love and care: “Yima”; Vanessa; Tariq; Zaynah; Anissa; Hayat; “Musty” (my brother and studio assistant); Rash; Paul Harris; Marcella; Nabila Hajjaj and her family; Yasmina; Farid; Latifa; Aliyyah; Zayd; Aishah; Jalila; Issah; and Othman. Many thanks to all my galleries and their teams, including Rose Issa Projects, The Third Line and Taymour Grahne Gallery, and to everyone on the art scene who has shared their vision and been so understanding. Thank-you to all who have helped and worked with me along the way: Abdelghafour; Badr; Bouchra Toumni; Chloe Ballu; Dennis Watson; Ekram; ET; JC; Jenny Fremont; Josh Dumond; Laura; Mandisa Dumezweni; Meriem Marmouche; Paul Bradshaw; Rkia; Siham Souiriji; Steve; and Swifty. Thank-you to Terence Tackie for, amongst other things, photographing a lot of the finished artworks in this book. Also a big thank-you to Rose Issa for starting my career in the art world and to Katia, Francesca and Amalia for their patient support. Finally, thank-you to my friends and to everyone who has taken the time to sit (or stand!) for these pictures: Alex Turnbull; Amina; Amine Bendriouich; André; Andrew Williams; Andy Blake; Blaize; Bouchra Ouizgen; Camilla TSS; Camillia; Carleen Anderson; Chantal and family; Des; Dillip; Donald; Donovan Harris; Duro Olowu; Ebon Heath; Errol; Femi; Gil; Giovanna; Hadeel Ibrahim; Hindi; Hue Harris; Jean; Jill; Joanna Brooks; Joanna and Petra Smith-Ryland; Joe Cang; José James; Joslyn Clark; Karima; Komi; Majda Elbour; Marisol; Meg Matthews; Meriem Talbi; Mike G; Momo; Mush; Obinna; the Ove family – especially Zak, Indra and Horace; Paul Amstrong; Paul Tully; Pete Stern; Richard Gordon; RJ; Rontom; Salwa and her family; Sam; Sandy; Scotty; Sharon Wray; Silvano; Simo; Simon at Momo’s; Suzy Gillet; Tai; Tish; Trampus; Ucef; Vicky D and her family; Walle; Yacine Aboufaras; and Zahed. Also a shout-out to my Capoeira and Gnawa family. If there are any names I have missed out, you know who you are, and that you are always in my heart if not always in my fizzing head... HASSAN HAJJAJ, LONDON 2013 Cover: Hindiii (detail), metallic Lambda print, 2011. This page: Hassan Hajjaj photographed in Brussels by Mustapha Hajjaj 2

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CONTENTS “SUNNY SIDE UP” 5 by Katia Hadidian “HAJJAJ IN CLOSE-UP” 6 by Martin Barnes MY ROCK STARS 13 “A CASE OF LOVE AT FIRST SIGHT: 14 A CURATOR’S PERSPECTIVE” by Linda Komaroff ’ KESH ANGELS 46 DAKKA MARRAKESH 69 “STUDIO & STREET: 70 HASSAN HAJJAJ’S STYLE MASH-UP” by Jessie Wender & Mitra Abbaspour SALON HASSAN 95 BIOGRAPHY 110 TO MY MUM AND DAD This book represents a journey in which so many things happened, and I have to say a massive thank-you to all my family and friends for their support along the way. So, I would like to dedicate this book to everyone who believes in what I do and gives me their time.

BIBLIOGRAPHY 112 IMPRINT 120

Thank-you to my family for their love and care: “Yima”; Vanessa; Tariq; Zaynah; Anissa; Hayat; “Musty” (my brother and studio assistant); Rash; Paul Harris; Marcella; Nabila Hajjaj and her family; Yasmina; Farid; Latifa; Aliyyah; Zayd; Aishah; Jalila; Issah; and Othman. Many thanks to all my galleries and their teams, including Rose Issa Projects, The Third Line and Taymour Grahne Gallery, and to everyone on the art scene who has shared their vision and been so understanding. Thank-you to all who have helped and worked with me along the way: Abdelghafour; Badr; Bouchra Toumni; Chloe Ballu; Dennis Watson; Ekram; ET; JC; Jenny Fremont; Josh Dumond; Laura; Mandisa Dumezweni; Meriem Marmouche; Paul Bradshaw; Rkia; Siham Souiriji; Steve; and Swifty. Thank-you to Terence Tackie for, amongst other things, photographing a lot of the finished artworks in this book. Also a big thank-you to Rose Issa for starting my career in the art world and to Katia, Francesca and Amalia for their patient support. Finally, thank-you to my friends and to everyone who has taken the time to sit (or stand!) for these pictures: Alex Turnbull; Amina; Amine Bendriouich; André; Andrew Williams; Andy Blake; Blaize; Bouchra Ouizgen; Camilla TSS; Camillia; Carleen Anderson; Chantal and family; Des; Dillip; Donald; Donovan Harris; Duro Olowu; Ebon Heath; Errol; Femi; Gil; Giovanna; Hadeel Ibrahim; Hindi; Hue Harris; Jean; Jill; Joanna Brooks; Joanna and Petra Smith-Ryland; Joe Cang; José James; Joslyn Clark; Karima; Komi; Majda Elbour; Marisol; Meg Matthews; Meriem Talbi; Mike G; Momo; Mush; Obinna; the Ove family – especially Zak, Indra and Horace; Paul Amstrong; Paul Tully; Pete Stern; Richard Gordon; RJ; Rontom; Salwa and her family; Sam; Sandy; Scotty; Sharon Wray; Silvano; Simo; Simon at Momo’s; Suzy Gillet; Tai; Tish; Trampus; Ucef; Vicky D and her family; Walle; Yacine Aboufaras; and Zahed. Also a shout-out to my Capoeira and Gnawa family. If there are any names I have missed out, you know who you are, and that you are always in my heart if not always in my fizzing head... HASSAN HAJJAJ, LONDON 2013 Cover: Hindiii (detail), metallic Lambda print, 2011. This page: Hassan Hajjaj photographed in Brussels by Mustapha Hajjaj 2

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SUNNY SIDE UP by Katia Hadidian

Lab inctempore, voluptatia conempera diciet fugitiorum ressit rent, optat pore nonsequ ibusdae paribus maximincius reius et pro est latusan debitiis eariam hil eius re, in cum res eture volor alit qui nonsequo il molupidel is et volorum qui coritem ant volecea re, tem is et pelicatiost, quostotatem intis reperna tibusap erspero iliquas. Maybe quote?

When the new Marrakesh Museum of Photography and the Visual

exhibiting in Morocco itself (“I want to see the readings and

Arts (MMPVA) opened to international acclaim in September 2013,

reactions that it receives there”, see above); moving into film,

Hassan Hajjaj was interviewed on national television as one of

including a project on Capoiera (tick, tick!); and working in

the stars of the inaugural exhibition, Ten Contemporary Moroccan

America (tick, tick, tick!). At the time we were delighted at

Photographers. By his own admission, such a moment would

how, 18 years after his first meeting with Rose Issa, he had

have been unimaginable at the start of his career, when he felt

metamorphosed from a fashion, furniture and interior designer;

that, “Morocco was a very lonely place, and people didn’t

DJ, club and band promoter; retailer and restaurateur into a

understand my work.”

highly sought-after artist-photographer. The memory of his arrival at Issa’s office with a battered suitcase held together with elastic

His growing popularity in the West helped turn attention on

luggage straps and bursting with hundreds of contact sheets

Morocco as a font of innovative artistic talent, while the Bamako

(these were his pre-digital days), still makes them laugh.

Biennale (Rencontres de Bamako), founded in 1994 by Mali’s Ministry of Culture and the Institut Français, and the Marrakesh

Hajjaj agrees that he’s come a long way, reflecting on his family’s

Biennale, founded in 2004 by hotelier and art patron Vanessa

shock at arriving in 1970s England to join his father, who had

Branson and entrepreneur Abel Damoussi, launched the region’s

emigrated earlier in search of work. “I found London difficult,

art scene on to the international radar. To Hajjaj, Morocco’s

strange and sad,” he recalls. “It was a really tough time. I just

participation makes perfect sense: “We’re in touch with Africa

couldn’t understand it at all. My family came from a small fishing

and we’re in touch with Europe. We’re a bit of everything.”

town in Morocco called Larache and we couldn’t read, write or

The same could be said of Hajjaj himself, with his distinctive

speak English. We had such a sense of freedom growing up in

dreadlocks, Capoeira-trained bearing, Camden Town street smarts,

Morocco, on the beach, in a totally different culture.” His response

and warm, cheeky, cheerful and hospitable nature that comes

has been to celebrate being what he calls noss noss (half-half),

straight from the heart of his cultural heritage.

by creating a playful, technicoloured universe in which he masterminds every element, from what his subjects wear to how

Another admirable aspect of his career is that he has achieved

they pose and which props surround them, from their motorbikes

what he set out to do. In our first publication about him in 2008,

to their chairs, tables, and teapots.

Dakka Marrakesh, Juliet Cestar interviewed him about his hopes

4

and ambitions for the future. His list included photographing

At this juncture of his career, we thought it timely to explore the

traditional Moroccan musicians (“I want to document them to

many aspects of his work in the detail they deserve, and thank all

pass it along to the younger generation – to give something back

our contributors for taking part and expressing so knowledgeably

to my culture, not just take things away”, see pages 44-45);

and eloquently what first attracted them to Hassan’s world.

The artist’s Motobécane at the ’Kesh Angels show, Rose Issa Projects, London 2010

5


SUNNY SIDE UP by Katia Hadidian

Lab inctempore, voluptatia conempera diciet fugitiorum ressit rent, optat pore nonsequ ibusdae paribus maximincius reius et pro est latusan debitiis eariam hil eius re, in cum res eture volor alit qui nonsequo il molupidel is et volorum qui coritem ant volecea re, tem is et pelicatiost, quostotatem intis reperna tibusap erspero iliquas. Maybe quote?

When the new Marrakesh Museum of Photography and the Visual

exhibiting in Morocco itself (“I want to see the readings and

Arts (MMPVA) opened to international acclaim in September 2013,

reactions that it receives there”, see above); moving into film,

Hassan Hajjaj was interviewed on national television as one of

including a project on Capoiera (tick, tick!); and working in

the stars of the inaugural exhibition, Ten Contemporary Moroccan

America (tick, tick, tick!). At the time we were delighted at

Photographers. By his own admission, such a moment would

how, 18 years after his first meeting with Rose Issa, he had

have been unimaginable at the start of his career, when he felt

metamorphosed from a fashion, furniture and interior designer;

that, “Morocco was a very lonely place, and people didn’t

DJ, club and band promoter; retailer and restaurateur into a

understand my work.”

highly sought-after artist-photographer. The memory of his arrival at Issa’s office with a battered suitcase held together with elastic

His growing popularity in the West helped turn attention on

luggage straps and bursting with hundreds of contact sheets

Morocco as a font of innovative artistic talent, while the Bamako

(these were his pre-digital days), still makes them laugh.

Biennale (Rencontres de Bamako), founded in 1994 by Mali’s Ministry of Culture and the Institut Français, and the Marrakesh

Hajjaj agrees that he’s come a long way, reflecting on his family’s

Biennale, founded in 2004 by hotelier and art patron Vanessa

shock at arriving in 1970s England to join his father, who had

Branson and entrepreneur Abel Damoussi, launched the region’s

emigrated earlier in search of work. “I found London difficult,

art scene on to the international radar. To Hajjaj, Morocco’s

strange and sad,” he recalls. “It was a really tough time. I just

participation makes perfect sense: “We’re in touch with Africa

couldn’t understand it at all. My family came from a small fishing

and we’re in touch with Europe. We’re a bit of everything.”

town in Morocco called Larache and we couldn’t read, write or

The same could be said of Hajjaj himself, with his distinctive

speak English. We had such a sense of freedom growing up in

dreadlocks, Capoeira-trained bearing, Camden Town street smarts,

Morocco, on the beach, in a totally different culture.” His response

and warm, cheeky, cheerful and hospitable nature that comes

has been to celebrate being what he calls noss noss (half-half),

straight from the heart of his cultural heritage.

by creating a playful, technicoloured universe in which he masterminds every element, from what his subjects wear to how

Another admirable aspect of his career is that he has achieved

they pose and which props surround them, from their motorbikes

what he set out to do. In our first publication about him in 2008,

to their chairs, tables, and teapots.

Dakka Marrakesh, Juliet Cestar interviewed him about his hopes

4

and ambitions for the future. His list included photographing

At this juncture of his career, we thought it timely to explore the

traditional Moroccan musicians (“I want to document them to

many aspects of his work in the detail they deserve, and thank all

pass it along to the younger generation – to give something back

our contributors for taking part and expressing so knowledgeably

to my culture, not just take things away”, see pages 44-45);

and eloquently what first attracted them to Hassan’s world.

The artist’s Motobécane at the ’Kesh Angels show, Rose Issa Projects, London 2010

5


MY ROCKSTARS 12

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MY ROCKSTARS 12

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Hindi Odalisque (detail), metallic Lambda print, 90 x 175 cm, 2013

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Hindi Odalisque (detail), metallic Lambda print, 90 x 175 cm, 2013

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“In a way, Hassan’s photography is a visual equivalent to my music. The common thread is the mix of the unconventional with the traditional. We both manage to bridge a gap between cultures. His photography is similar to what I am trying to create: work that is undefinable” Marques Toliver

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Marques Toliver (detail), metallic Lambda print, 2010-2014

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“In a way, Hassan’s photography is a visual equivalent to my music. The common thread is the mix of the unconventional with the traditional. We both manage to bridge a gap between cultures. His photography is similar to what I am trying to create: work that is undefinable” Marques Toliver

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Marques Toliver (detail), metallic Lambda print, 2010-2014

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My Rock Stars Experimental, Volume 1, video work (29 mins 51 sec), 2012. Collection of LACMA, California. Musicians (from left to right): Mandisa Dumezweni, South Africa and London; Boubacar Kafando, Burkina Faso and London; Simo Lagnawi, Morocco and London; Poetic Pilgrimage, Jamaica and London; Luzmira Zerpa, Venezuela and London; JosĂŠ James, USA; Toca Feliciano, Brazil; 41 The Venus Bushfires (Helen Parker-Jayne Isibor), Nigeria and London; Marques Toliver, USA


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My Rock Stars Experimental, Volume 1, video work (29 mins 51 sec), 2012. Collection of LACMA, California. Musicians (from left to right): Mandisa Dumezweni, South Africa and London; Boubacar Kafando, Burkina Faso and London; Simo Lagnawi, Morocco and London; Poetic Pilgrimage, Jamaica and London; Luzmira Zerpa, Venezuela and London; JosĂŠ James, USA; Toca Feliciano, Brazil; 41 The Venus Bushfires (Helen Parker-Jayne Isibor), Nigeria and London; Marques Toliver, USA


’KESH ANGELS 46

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’KESH ANGELS 46

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“I really admire artists who express themselves in an academic way and make references to the past and to other subjects. My work is more of an expression of what I feel – I don’t know how to be academic. So, I hope my work talks for me – and I want it to appeal to everyone, whether they’re a cleaner or an art critic” Hassan Hajjaj

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Wink, metallic Lambda print in wood frame with kohl eyeliner packets, 91 x 63 cm, 2007

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“I really admire artists who express themselves in an academic way and make references to the past and to other subjects. My work is more of an expression of what I feel – I don’t know how to be academic. So, I hope my work talks for me – and I want it to appeal to everyone, whether they’re a cleaner or an art critic” Hassan Hajjaj

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Wink, metallic Lambda print in wood frame with kohl eyeliner packets, 91 x 63 cm, 2007

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Hassan’s Angel – Miriam, metallic Lambda print in wood frame with Mountain Dew cans, 135 x 93 cm, 2010

Hassan’s Angel – Nisrin, metallic Lambda print in wood frame with Pepsi cans, 135 x 93 cm, 2010

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Hassan’s Angel – Miriam, metallic Lambda print in wood frame with Mountain Dew cans, 135 x 93 cm, 2010

Hassan’s Angel – Nisrin, metallic Lambda print in wood frame with Pepsi cans, 135 x 93 cm, 2010

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’Kesh Angels, metallic Lambda print in wood frame with tins of Roberts corned beef and Target corned chicken, 105 x 136 cm, 2010

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’Kesh Angels, metallic Lambda print in wood frame with tins of Roberts corned beef and Target corned chicken, 105 x 136 cm, 2010

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From left: Tagia Boy in Blue; Hayat in Veil in Pink; Y Bandana Veil; and Just Do It in Blue, all digital C-Type prints with hand-painted backgrounds in wood and tyre frames, 50 x 40 cm, 2000

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From left: Tagia Boy in Blue; Hayat in Veil in Pink; Y Bandana Veil; and Just Do It in Blue, all digital C-Type prints with hand-painted backgrounds in wood and tyre frames, 50 x 40 cm, 2000

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“People do comment about how some of the women in my photographs are veiled, but look at how modern and defiant they are! They’re blending tradition with pop fashion and I find them really strong and completely beautiful” Hassan Hajjaj

76

Saida in Green, digital C-Type print with hand-painted background in wood and tyre frame, 50 x 40 cm, 2000. Collection of the Victoria and Albert Museum, London

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“People do comment about how some of the women in my photographs are veiled, but look at how modern and defiant they are! They’re blending tradition with pop fashion and I find them really strong and completely beautiful” Hassan Hajjaj

76

Saida in Green, digital C-Type print with hand-painted background in wood and tyre frame, 50 x 40 cm, 2000. Collection of the Victoria and Albert Museum, London

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Ilham, digital C-Type print in walnut frame with kohl bottles and tins of Roberts corned beef and Rani juice, 94 x 129 cm, 2000. Collection of the Kamel Lazaar Foundation, Tunis

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Ilham, digital C-Type print in walnut frame with kohl bottles and tins of Roberts corned beef and Rani juice, 94 x 129 cm, 2000. Collection of the Kamel Lazaar Foundation, Tunis

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Karima On Da Phone, digital C-Type print in walnut frame with plastic alphabet blocks, 89 x 69 cm, 2000

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Malicious Look, digital C-Type print in walnut frame with plastic alphabet blocks, 89 x 69 cm, 2000

Ahmed Lighting Up, metallic Lambda print in walnut frame with Lion matchboxes, Casbah cigarette packs and alphabet blocks, 93 x 63 cm, 2000

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Karima On Da Phone, digital C-Type print in walnut frame with plastic alphabet blocks, 89 x 69 cm, 2000

82

Malicious Look, digital C-Type print in walnut frame with plastic alphabet blocks, 89 x 69 cm, 2000

Ahmed Lighting Up, metallic Lambda print in walnut frame with Lion matchboxes, Casbah cigarette packs and alphabet blocks, 93 x 63 cm, 2000

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SALON HASSAN 94

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SALON HASSAN 94

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Le Salon for the Jameel Prize, Victoria and Albert Museum, London 2009


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Le Salon for the Jameel Prize, Victoria and Albert Museum, London 2009


Above: Nyke in Red, digital C-Type print in a tyre and wood frame with woven plastic matting, 48 x 73 cm, 2010 Top right: Zezo the Boxer, digital C-Type print in a wood frame with Coca-Cola cans, 48 x 73 cm, 2010 Below right: Nabila, digital C-Type print in a tyre and wood frame with woven plastic matting, 48 x 73 cm, 2010

108 Opposite: Installation shot of Les Salles d’Arabe Gym for the Marque Déposée show at the Matisse Gallery, Marrakesh 2011

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Above: Nyke in Red, digital C-Type print in a tyre and wood frame with woven plastic matting, 48 x 73 cm, 2010 Top right: Zezo the Boxer, digital C-Type print in a wood frame with Coca-Cola cans, 48 x 73 cm, 2010 Below right: Nabila, digital C-Type print in a tyre and wood frame with woven plastic matting, 48 x 73 cm, 2010

108 Opposite: Installation shot of Les Salles d’Arabe Gym for the Marque Déposée show at the Matisse Gallery, Marrakesh 2011

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BIOGRAPHY

Hassan Hajjaj was born in 1961 in Larache, Morocco and moved to London in 1973. He lives in London and works in between London and Marrakesh.

SOLO EXHIBITIONS (SELECTED) 2014 ’Kesh Angels, Taymour Grahne Gallery, New York My Rock Stars Experimental, Volume 1 (video work), Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA) My Rock Stars, Volume 2, Gusford Gallery, Los Angeles 2013 My Rock Stars, Volume 1, Virginia Commonwealth University in Qatar (VCUQatar), Doha Vogue – the Arab Issue, Aria Art Gallery, Florence 2012 My Rock Stars, Volume 1, The Third Line Gallery, Dubai Mi Casa Tu Casa, Matisse Gallery for the Marrakesh Biennale, Marrakesh 2011 2010

Marque Déposée, Matisse Gallery, Marrakesh ’Kesh Angels, Rose Issa Projects, London 1430 in Casa, Bab Hotel, Marrakesh My Beautiful Rubbish, Freies Museum, Berlin

2009 1430 in Casa, Matisse Gallery, Casablanca Dakka Marrakesh, Galerie de l’INA, 8th Bamako Encounters African Photography Biennial, Mali 2008 Reuse 2.0, El Boutique at Lothan Exhibition Space, Kuwait City Dakka Marrakesh, Rose Issa Projects at Leighton House Museum, London

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Hajjaj in his London studio, 2013. Photograph by Jenny Fremont

2007 2005

Noss Noss: Photographic Works and Other Moroccan Stories, The Third Line Gallery, Doha Arabic Film Posters, Dar Sharfia, Marrakesh Salon Enrique, Royal Festival Hall, London

2001- Graffix From The Souk, travelling exhibition: Apart Gallery, 2004 London; Taros, Essaouira, Morocco; Institut Français, London; and Dar Sharfia, Marakkesh 2000 Pop Art In The Kasbah, Ministero Del Gusto Gallery, Marrakesh GROUP EXHIBITIONS (SELECTED) 2014 Marrakesh Biennale, Guéliz, Marrakesh International Photo Festival, Knokke-Heist, Belgium Fotofest 2014 Biennial – Contemporary Arab Photographic Art, Houston, Texas 2013

10 photographes contemporains marocains, Marrakesh Museum for Photography and the Visual Arts (MMP+) at the El Badi Palace, Marrakesh My Rock Stars Experimental, Volume 1, Crawford Art Gallery, Cork In the Name of Honour, Christie’s, London Syri-Arts, Beirut Exhibition Center, Lebanon 1:54 Contemporary African Art Fair, 1:54 Forum, Somerset House, London Beyond the Cloth: The Kafiye Project, White Box Projects, New York

111


BIOGRAPHY

Hassan Hajjaj was born in 1961 in Larache, Morocco and moved to London in 1973. He lives in London and works in between London and Marrakesh.

SOLO EXHIBITIONS (SELECTED) 2014 ’Kesh Angels, Taymour Grahne Gallery, New York My Rock Stars Experimental, Volume 1 (video work), Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA) My Rock Stars, Volume 2, Gusford Gallery, Los Angeles 2013 My Rock Stars, Volume 1, Virginia Commonwealth University in Qatar (VCUQatar), Doha Vogue – the Arab Issue, Aria Art Gallery, Florence 2012 My Rock Stars, Volume 1, The Third Line Gallery, Dubai Mi Casa Tu Casa, Matisse Gallery for the Marrakesh Biennale, Marrakesh 2011 2010

Marque Déposée, Matisse Gallery, Marrakesh ’Kesh Angels, Rose Issa Projects, London 1430 in Casa, Bab Hotel, Marrakesh My Beautiful Rubbish, Freies Museum, Berlin

2009 1430 in Casa, Matisse Gallery, Casablanca Dakka Marrakesh, Galerie de l’INA, 8th Bamako Encounters African Photography Biennial, Mali 2008 Reuse 2.0, El Boutique at Lothan Exhibition Space, Kuwait City Dakka Marrakesh, Rose Issa Projects at Leighton House Museum, London

110

Hajjaj in his London studio, 2013. Photograph by Jenny Fremont

2007 2005

Noss Noss: Photographic Works and Other Moroccan Stories, The Third Line Gallery, Doha Arabic Film Posters, Dar Sharfia, Marrakesh Salon Enrique, Royal Festival Hall, London

2001- Graffix From The Souk, travelling exhibition: Apart Gallery, 2004 London; Taros, Essaouira, Morocco; Institut Français, London; and Dar Sharfia, Marakkesh 2000 Pop Art In The Kasbah, Ministero Del Gusto Gallery, Marrakesh GROUP EXHIBITIONS (SELECTED) 2014 Marrakesh Biennale, Guéliz, Marrakesh International Photo Festival, Knokke-Heist, Belgium Fotofest 2014 Biennial – Contemporary Arab Photographic Art, Houston, Texas 2013

10 photographes contemporains marocains, Marrakesh Museum for Photography and the Visual Arts (MMP+) at the El Badi Palace, Marrakesh My Rock Stars Experimental, Volume 1, Crawford Art Gallery, Cork In the Name of Honour, Christie’s, London Syri-Arts, Beirut Exhibition Center, Lebanon 1:54 Contemporary African Art Fair, 1:54 Forum, Somerset House, London Beyond the Cloth: The Kafiye Project, White Box Projects, New York

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BY HASSAN HAJJAJ PHOTOGRAPHY, FASHION, FILM, DESIGN


By Hassan Hajjaj: Photography, Fashion, Film, Design