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To the Reader: Term 2011 - 2012 for AIESEC Ateneo de Manila University is one of passion, commitment, growth, and learning. I am pleased to present to you this Year End Report to provide a view on the term’s experiences. With this, may you see our successes and failures and the local committee born from these. This report contains all pertinent information required by the AIESEC Philippines Member Committee and is a culmination of the term 2011 - 2012 of AIESEC Ateneo de Manila University. About AIESEC AdMU An overview of the LC’s infrastructure containing the Term Ambition, Focus Areas, Organizational Structure, the Executive Board, and the LC in Numbers Performance Report An extensive report of the 8 departments of AIESEC AdMU and contains Performance, Results and Activities, Process and Structure Assessment, Special Strategies and Initiatives, and Recommendations. Annexes Various databases and trainings delivered. Thank you for taking the time to get to know AIESEC AdMU in term 2011 - 2012. Sincerely,

Kathleen Rose G. Kho Local Committee President 2011 - 2012


1 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY


2

ABOUT AIESEC ADMU


RESPONSIBILITIES THE EXECUTIVE BOARD LC and Functional Planning and Strategy Manage functional direction, planning and strategy LC and Functional Participation and Representation LC and functional representation in national and international meetings and conferences LC representation to various stakeholders Opportunity seeking and mangement Performance Management towards LC ambition, AIESEC 2015, and AIESEC Vision Monitor and drive functional performance towards growth and results Constant evaluation and reporting of function performance to members,the EB, and the MC

Kathleen Kho LOCAL COMMITTEE PRESIDENT Dominic Santiago VICE PRESIDENT for FINANCE Carlo Enrico Rivera VICE PRESIDENT for TALENT MANAGEMENT Thomas Joel Godiaco VICE PRESIDENT for COMMUNICATIONS Claire Fuerte VICE PRESIDENT for INCOMING EXCHANGE Katrina Sanchez VICE PRESIDENT for PROJECTS Vincent Murga

Risk Management, Troublesho oting, and Crisis Management Learning Management LC Support and Synergy Management of LC legalities and Finances

VICE PRESIDENT for EXTERNAL RELATIONS Ann Dumaliang VICE PRESIDENT for OUTGOING EXCHANGE Ron Richard Habla VICE PRESIDENT for EXPANSION


TO BE A TOP GUN Providing life-changing experiences to ALL Exchange Participants

Implementation and maturity of ALL TM Processes

High volume of quality exchanges realized marked by absolute AND relative growth

Member empowerment seen through efficiency and complete AIESEC Experiences

Well-maintained, mutually beneficial relationships with ALL stakeholders. Management of both internal and external relationships for organizational growth.

LOCAL COMMITTEE


239 MEMBERS 132 GCDP ICX RE 57 GCDP OGX RE 2 GIP ICX RE 12 GIP OGX RE 558 TMP RE 102 TLP RE YEARS OF 42 EXISTENCE


THE ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURE S M

ICX

ER

A E T

PR

O

J

FIN

EX

P

CO

TM

M

EXECUTIVE BOARD OGX

M

ID

DL

E

GEMENT A N

MA

AIESEC Ateneo de Manila University operated with a team based organizational structure across 8 departments. The Local Committee President managed the Executive Board team of 8 vice presidents. Each vice president managed their team leaders, who managed their own teams. This 3-level organizational structure allowed the local committee to be intricately connected and made interaction between top management and members easier. Expansion was mostly horizontal with the addition of the Communications Department at the start of the year,and the Expansion Department mid-year.


Projects

Roxanne Lim Iris Alonso OCP for CODE RED Joseph Crisostomo Kazumi Shiroma OCP for GOLD Czare Aquino Raymond de Asis OCP for LEGACY Mita Veloso Levi Vitug OCP for EXPLORE Arbie Baguios Director for PBOX Education Katherine Campos Director for Project Management

Talent Management Georgia Macapagal Director for Pipeline Management Katherine Campos Director for Recruitment & Selection Jose Tabora Tuason Director for Competency Management Meg Yap Director for Talent Management Initiatives Martin Tee Director for Performance and Pipeline Management Shayne Diane Young OCP for ALDS

Expansion

Denise Pena Director for Expansion Marketing Kenric Uy Director for Expansion Marketing

Incoming Exchange

Nelson de Chavez Director for Service and Reception Cor Caoile Director for DT TN Accounts (PBOX) Mita Veloso Director for Corporate Accounts (GIP) Ryan Nicolas Director for DT TN Accounts Gabby Cantos OCVP Matching for CODE RED Kazumi Shiroma OCVP Matching for GOLD Katrina Ngo OCVP Matching for LEGACY Leonardo David OCVP Matching for EXPLORE Brian Barrios Team Leader for Housing

EXECUTIVE BOARD

Kathleen Kho LOCAL COMMITTEE PRESIDENT Dominic Santiago VICE PRESIDENT for FINANCE Carlo Enrico Rivera VICE PRESIDENT for TALENT MANAGEMENT Thomas Joel Godiaco VICE PRESIDENT for COMMUNICATIONS Claire Fuerte VICE PRESIDENT for INCOMING EXCHANGE Katrina Sanchez VICE PRESIDENT for PROJECTS Vincent Murga VICE PRESIDENT for EXTERNAL RELATIONS Ann Dumaliang VICE PRESIDENT for OUTGOING EXCHANGE Ron Richard Habla VICE PRESIDENT for EXPANSION

Outgoing Exchange

Brittne Lopez Director for GCDP - Central and Eastern Europe Ana Marie Antonio Director for GCDP - Iberoamerica Ron Habla Director for GCDP - Asia Pacific Charmaine Lozada Director for GIP Accounts Management Margaret Kho Director for GCDP - Asia Pacific Nathaniel Chan Director for GCDP - BRIC & Iberoamerica Michael Severino Director for GCDP - Europe Janice Apolinario Director for Recruitment & Selection Ram Tan Team Leader for Exchange Quality Committee

External Relations

Anjo Peralta Director for Financial Accounts Migi de Jesus Director for TN Accounts Mica Valencia Director for Accounts Management Carlyn Chuacokiong Director for Accounts Management Migi de Jesus Director for Accounts Management Gillian Pua Director for Accounts Management Dana Madulid Director for Alumni Relations

Finance

Jonathan Ty Finance Director for Incoming Exchange and Projects Justin Lina Finance Director for External Relations and Communications Jonathan Ty Director for Operations Joan Magno Director for Finance Initiatives

Communications

Monnik Togle Director for Information Management Inna Villa Director for Brand Management Joan Magno Director for Public Relations Kevin Lee OCP for AIESEC Week Ara Cabalonga Director for Brand Management - OGX Deej Fabian Director for Internal Brand Management Sarah Aquino Director for Brand Management - ICX/Projects Martin Tee OCP for SOMWEEK


“More than just the opportunity to drive for results and start initiatives for growth with amazing individuals, this term has given me meaning.� Ann Dumaliang VICE PRESIDENT for OUTGOING EXCHANGE


OUTGOING EXCHANGE Building upon the structural foundation and exchange practices in the previous term, this year, the outgoing exchange department has been able to pursue more initiatives for increased exchange support and delivery. This includes an exchange quality committee, a conscious effort at expectation setting as early as recruitment, as well as initiatives to improve GIP processes, among several others. Furthermore, a focus on member development ensured that members play a significant role in ogx activities and in driving results, and are coached in the process. Synergy operations started with Market Expansion and the Communications Department created targeted and strategic opportunities for recruitment involving better, product brand management in the process. Moreover, the commitment that the people involved has contributed and poured into the term cannot be discounted. It is through such sincere hard work, perseverance to function as one team and dedication to results, and more importantly, changing lives, that allowed for it to surpass difficulties and achieve. All of these led the outgoing exchange department 2011 to 2012 to ending with 100 percent growth in realizations for both the Global Internship Program and the Global Community Development Program. As its legacy, this term has left the next with even more foundations, more engaged members, more understanding of the programs and relevant external realities, and more ideas for the following years to anchor on and grow.


GLOBAL COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM JAN

10

5

ACTUAL

10

9

2

-

3

2

10

9

2

-

1

-

3

2

57 TOTAL

REALIZE

2

28 APR

3

2

-

MAR

2

-

239

FEB

7

1

120

JAN

MATCH

-

1

20

DEC

3

-

15

NOV

6

OCT

4

AUG

RAISE

-

TOTAL

DEC

15

APR

NOV

15

MAR

OCT

5

FEB

SEPT

-

SEPT

10

AUG

JUL

8

JUL

JUN

16

JUN

GOAL

MAY

MAY

GOALS and ACTUAL PERFORMANCE

3

3

12

15

27

4

78

-

-

2

-

-

1

5

19

10

51

2

28

57

-

RA-MA-RE Timeline 30

25

20

RAISE 15

MATCH REALIZE

10

5

MAY

JUN

JUL

AUG

SEPT

OCT

NOV

DEC

JAN

FEB

MAR

APR

Internship Issues 4

Multi-Subject Education

15

Cultural Education Entrepreneurship & Leadership

7

HIV/AIDs Language Education

1

Gender Equality

2

1

14

Environment Sustainability 0

2

4

6

8

10

Top 5 Countries

Countries Malaysia China Czech Republic Hungary Italy

4

Career Orientation %HIV/AIDs & Environment

9

12

14

16

Re

14 10 7 5 4


GLOBAL INTERNSHIP PROGRAM JAN

FEB

5

7

10

10

ACTUAL

1

2

1

2

1

1

1

1

1

SEPT

2

2

1

2

1

2

-

REALIZE

1

1

2

1

1

2

1

1

1

-

1

1

1

7 6 5

RAISE MATCH

3

12

6

5

2

30

1

1

10

1

12

-

RA-MA-RE Timeline

4

1

-

TOTAL

MATCH

-

111

APR

JUL 1

21

MAR

JUN 6

15

FEB

MAY 5

RAISE

-

TOTAL

DEC

10

APR

NOV

6

MAR

OCT

4

JAN

SEPT

7

DEC

AUG

12

NOV

JUL

4

OCT

JUN

GOAL

AUG

MAY

GOALS and ACTUAL PERFORMANCE

REALIZE

2

-

-

Top 5 Countries

Countries Colombia Egypt Azerbaijan Brazil Cameroon Canada Hong Kong Singapore United Kingdom US

Re

2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

AIESEC Background Background Re

1 JUN

JUL

AUG SEPT

OCT

NOV

Educational Attainment

Year Level 3rd Year Undergraduate Fresh Graduate Graduate '10 Masters

Re

2 5 4 1 12

TOTAL

Length Less than 3 months 3 months - 1 year 1 year - 1.5 year TOTAL

Duration Re

3 1 8 12

DEC

JAN

FEB

MAR

Exchange Participant Fields of Study

MAY

APR

WORKFIELD

Communications Psychology Political Science Management

European Studies Electronics & Computer Engineering TOTAL

With AIESEC XP Without AIESEC XP TOTAL

Track Advertising & Public Relations Track, Communications Technology Organizational Psychology, N/A N/A Finance, Economics, Legal International Relations, Internation Business N/A

7 5 12

Re

3 2 1 3 2 1 12


Breakdown of Realizations per Country COUNTRY GCDP GIP ASIA PACIFIC Malaysia 15 China 10 Vietnam 1 Thailand 2 Taiwan 2 Singapore 1 Hongkong 1 India 1 Total 31 2 MIDDLE EAST & NORTH AFRICA Tunisia 1 Azerbaijan 1 Cameroon Egypt Total 2

COUNTRY GCDP EUROPE Czech Republic 7 Hungary 5 Poland 3 Romania 1 Ukraine 1 Italy 4 Austria 1 United Kingdom United States Canada Total 22 IBEROAMERICA Brazil 1 Colombia Argentina 1 Total 2

1 1 2 4

Partnerships

EUROPE LC Praha

GIP

Brno 2 Karvina 2 Katowice 2 Miskolc 3 Timisoara 1 Berdyansk 1 Tomsk 0 TOTAL 11 ASIA PACIFIC LC Re DUT 1 XMU 5 UPM 3 UKM 2 FTU HCM 2 GDUFS 1 CKLC 1 UI 0 USM 3 SISU 1 FTU Hanoi 0

1 1 1 3 1 2 3

2006-2007

2007-2008

2008-2009

2009-2010

2010-2011

2011-2012

Yearly Performance

REALIZATIONS GCDP GIP TOTAL

0 3 3

0 4 4

2 3 5

9 12 21

26 6 32

57 12 69

Program % Growth

119%

GCDP

100%

GIP

Re 2

Chulalongkorn 2 TOTAL 21 IBEROAMERICA LC Re Manizales 1 Joinville 1 Itajuba 0 TOTAL 2 GRAND TOTAL 34

Comparative Graph over 6 AIESEC Terms 80

69

70

57

60

2006-2007

50

2007-2008 2008-2009

40 32 30

2010-2011

26 21

20

0

0

0

2 GCDP

12

12

9

10

2009-2010

3

4

6

3 GIP

3

4

5

TOTAL

2011-2012


Breakdown of Realizations per Country COUNTRY

GCDP ASIA PACIFIC China 28 Australia 9 India 8 Indonesia 8 Malaysia 7 Japan 6 Singapore 4 Cambodia 1 Hong Kong 1 New Zealand 1 Taiwan 1 Vietnam 1 Total 75 IBEROAMERICA Brazil 2 Total 2

GIP

Partnerships

EUROPE LC Praha

COUNTRY

GCDP GIP EUROPE Germany 14 Czech Republic 9 Russia 8 France 6 The Netherlands 2 Poland 2 Austria 1 Switzerland 1 Lithuania 1 United States 1 United Kingdom 1 Total 46 0 MIDDLE EAST & NORTH AFRICA Egypt 3 Pakistan 3 Cameroon 1

1 1

2

0

Total

7

Brno 2 Karvina 2 Katowice 2 Miskolc 3 Timisoara 1 Berdyansk 1 Tomsk 0 TOTAL 11 ASIA PACIFIC LC Re DUT 1 XMU 5 UPM 3 UKM 2 FTU HCM 2 GDUFS 1 CKLC 1 UI 0 USM 3 SISU 1 FTU Hanoi 0

0

2006-2007

2007-2008

2008-2009

2009-2010

2010-2011

2011-2012

Yearly Performance

REALIZATIONS GCDP GIP TOTAL

0 3 3

0 4 4

2 3 5

9 12 21

26 6 32

57 12 69

Program % Growth

119%

GCDP

100%

GIP

Re 2

Chulalongkorn 2 TOTAL 21 IBEROAMERICA LC Re Manizales 1 Joinville 1 Itajuba 0 TOTAL 2 GRAND TOTAL 34

Comparative Graph over 6 AIESEC Terms 80

69

70

57

60

2006-2007

50

2007-2008 2008-2009

40 32 30

2010-2011

26 21

20

0

0

0

2 GCDP

12

12

9

10

2009-2010

3

4

6

3 GIP

3

4

5

TOTAL

2011-2012


PROCESS AND STRUCTURE ASSESSMENT

Structures VP OGX

Recruitment and Selection Organizing Committee

1st Semester

2nd Semester VP OGX

BM OGX

Exchange Quality Committee

Exchange Quality Committee

GIP Team GIP Team

GCDP Team - AP

GCDP Team WENA & IBEROAMERICA

GCDP Team AP

BM OGX

GCDP Team BRIC

GCDP Team Europe

Recruitment and Selection

GCDP Team Central and Eastern Europe

Description of Teams GCDP and GIP Accounts Management

Recruitment and Selection

Exchange Quality Committee

The structure for Term 2011 - 2012 retains the team-based structure established in Term 2010 - 2011. The GCDP and GIP teams handle the entire exchange experience of each account from raising, matching, realization and up until debriefing. These teams are divided on a per region basis. During the first half of the term, a Team WENA and Iberoamerica existed. However, due to the small volume of exchange participants expected to actually go for these regions for their GCDP exchange, this team was replaced with Team BRIC, also in an effort to distribute Malaysia and China to different teams as these countries were expected create high volume exchanges.

The Recruitment and Selection team manages the recruitment and selection process along with the Brand Management for OGX team under the Communications Department. It was treated as an organizing committee during the first half of the term but was latter changed into a Directorial position for 6 months in the aim of making the recruitment cycle planning and execution more seamless and efficient. In each of these teams, there is a point person for logistics, program and accounts management.

The exchange quality comittee is a cross-GCDP & GIP team. Its members spearhead exchange preparation activities such as the Ambassador’s Day, Send-Off and Debriefing and the creation of servicing materials such as the Reception Bo oklet Compilation, VISA Research, Travel Agency Partner and the Exchange Participant Kit.

Recruitment Partnerships with ICX Entities Meetings with School Departments and External Entities In-campus Recruitment Campaign Preparation

Selection Orientation Session Assessment Center Review Board Interview

Raising / Matching Exchange Preparation On Exchange/ Post Exchange

EP Form Raising Matching Proper Ambassador's AN Forms Day Exchange Send-Off Dinner

General Process Overview

Check-Up


GIP Process Assessment RECRUITMENT

SELECTION

The GIP program, though given support to, was not focused on this term. As such, recruitment was heavily reliant on walk-ins. A pre-matching initiative with the Internship Mailer was started, however, with the lack of a structure and experienced matchers to conduct this, it was not sustained. Targeted Recruitment initiatives for language and technical institutions with Market Expansion were started during the latter half of the term. Communications were established however the recruitment proper was yet to be executed. Applications for GIP also came in during the Ateneo Job Fair 2012. While more than 350 sign-ups were garnered during the Job Fair for both GIP and GCDP programs, with most applicants being undergraduates or graduates, the lack of sufficient time to prepare and adjust supply and with the GCDP Peak underway, this event. along with the partnership with the Placement Office, was not maximized.

The Orientation Session for GIP is already separate from that of the GCDP and is therefore able to focus on information more relevant to GIP applicants (i.e. workfields, countries they can go for given the workfield, expectation-setting). The selection process for GIP is composed of an Assessment Center, where an initial screening for matchability is already conducted, and a Review Board Interview conducted by the Member Committee.

DEBRIEFING Debriefing has not yet been conducted to Exchange Participants on GIP as they have not yet returned to the country.

Special Initiatives SPECIAL INITIATIVE

RAISING - MATCHING - REALIZATION The GIP Team takes care of GIP Applicants, and delivers matching sessions to exchange participants. Matching sessions for TNs (including GEPs) may be done more consistently and even be implemented as a standard to increase EP Matching efficiency. Self-matching is the method of matching applied to GIP , with Exchange Participant Managers following-up to ensure that applications are moving. The GIP Team also aids EPs in acquiring information needed for VISA procedures, and follows up on them during Realization. The team was able to create 12 GIP Re. However,with more focus on GIP and a greater attention to continuously selling the product to the EPs even after exchange, matching ratios can be increased.

DESCRIPTION

Job Fair Recruitment and APO Partnership (COMM, OGX)

The APO Partnership and the Job Fair Recruitment opened opportunities and areas for growth especially for GIP. The APO Partnership allowed for the Internship Mailer to be tested though it was not given sufficient focus. From these series of attempts, CVs of various students that submitted during the Job Fair were collected, and a database is available for ICX's viewing. Various ICX entities have expressed interest in sustaining this practice. Finding a way to make this a standard practice has a potential of growing into an efficient pre-matching initiative.

Exchange Quality Committee (OGX)

The XQC created materials and activities for outgoing EPs to make sure that what is promised during the Orientation is given to them, and so that Exchange Preparatio can be more seamless for EP Managers. The XQC was able to create a Reception Booklet Compilation, VISA booklet, Exchange Participant Kit, and partnered with a travel agency. This has especially allowed for VISA problems to be put at minimum.

Market Expansion to Language Instutions and Technical Institutes (Market Expansion)

The Expansion Department's initiative to tap Technical and Language Institutes can increase our market reach, grow GIP, and increase exchanges for dry months.

GEP Matching Session (OGX)

The GEP Matching session conducted by the GIP Team allowed for Exchange Participants to gain a better understanding of how to get matched to Global Exchange Partners and what procedures are involved in such. This term, 6 matches are for GEPs out of the 14 matched/realized exchange participants, and out of the 9 managementrelated matches. However, an area for consideration may be to segment GEP GIPs/Multinational GIPs and Local GIPs for better product packaging and to sell Local GIPs better, to which matching is relative faster and less competitive.

GCDP Process Assessment RECRUITMENT

SELECTION

RAISING - MATCHING - REALIZATION

An April-May recruitment was conducted in order to sustain GCDP exchanges into Jun-Jul. Although an August in-campus recruitment was conducted, it lacked access to the graduate market and was not able to garner sign-ups to sustain realizations for the following months. The NovemberDecember and January-February cycles brought in numbers for the summer. As these were conducted at a later date compared to recruitment cycles in the previous terms, this also affected the Ra-Ma-timeline.

Orientations were conducted as needed throughout the entire term. This is based on a standard powerpoint material given. The orientation session and assessment center, as based on the Global Competency Model, are conducted sufficiently but has a lot of ro om for improvement in terms of execution. The payment model allows for more applicants to go through the RBI but has also affected fall-out ratios from RBI to Raising, which stand at 61 raises -94 RBI Passers.

As attributed to the delay in raising and academic load at this point in the timeline raises to matches went further down to 41 matches - 61 raises (not including standing raises for Jun-Jul). This may also be attributed to the number of GCDP MIS students raised, coming from the job fair,that were not able to lo ok for OJTs applicable for their OJT (5 raises). Realizations are constantly watched over, and a FB group is maintained for quick communications with exchange participants.

DEBRIEFING

PARTNERSHIPS

An debriefing sheet exists for GCDP exchange participants. Multiple sessions were conducted for this from Jun-Jul while trickle down EPs are debriefed on a one-on-one basis. The XQC was strengthened as a result of the comments received, and initial partnerships were made based on the output of the debriefing. However, Only the VP and Interviewers are thoroughly familiar with the output.

Partnerships from last term were sustained. Iberomamerica was explored with two matches, and with partnerships in the region having a high potential of growing GIP exchanges. Two more European countries, Hungary and Poland, were also explored, and LC partners with these were established. Partnerships with Ukraine and Romania weakened due to strong VISA constraints. Partners within the Asia Pacific remain strong.


VICE PRESIDENT’S RECOMMENDATIONS RECOMMENDATION

DESCRIPTION

Stay conscious of student market timeline for the later half of the term. Recruitment, Raising and Matching must conducted according to timeline (preferrably with Loyalty to Student Timeline and Efficient recruitment starting November & January, not later). It is crucial for raising-matching Matching to be done efficiently as to avoid having the market consider other summer options, and to minimize fall-out ratios. Sales Culture & CRM

While OGX is operations, it handles a service product. This said, interaction of EP Managers with the exchange participants play a key role in continuously selling the product and maintaining EP loyalty and cooperation through the entire experience.

Net Promoter Score

Implementing the NPS will allow for a measurable way of assessing how well CRM is being conducted, more so enforce the idea of conducting it among EP Managers.

Investing in a GIP Team and GIP Sub- Investing in a GIP Team that will handle and develop the product will allow it to grow as vital for 2015. This will allow COMM and Market Expansion to sell it better and product Development OGX to match better. Matching Sessions for GIP || GIP EP Booklet

GIP Matching Sessions should be continued and standardly be given to exchange participants, so that they may understand how it is conducted and how they can do it properly should they self-match. Exchange Participant booklets may also be given to serve as quick reference for a possibly long GIP Matching.

A horizontal structural growth with small matching teams (3 members) will allow for Horizontal Structural Growth under the matching teams to focus on particular key countries/regions and minimize burn-out. This will, at the same time, will allow Directors to keep closer coordination with all VP their members. Revised Payment Mode and/or Selection Process

Bigger Orientation Sessions

Stories Shared GIP: CV Database for Pre-matching

Current payment model seems inapplicable to the Ateneo market in terms of ensuring how invested an applicant is to the program once he/she is passed (Application fee is only PHP 500.00). Adjusting this should minimize fall-out ratios following the RBI and allow for more efficient Ra-Ma-Res. Orientations, along with complete details, should be broadcasted in-campus to maximize walk-in pull. There are very little walk-ins for this term, whereas many of orientation attendees in the previous term come from walk-ins. This may serves as a way to increase Sign-up to OS Ratios. As well as this, while Orientations are conducted for walk-ins, small orientations should not be seen as a basis of how orientations should be conducted. Orientations must be done with the idea of selling the product and making it as catchy to the audience as possible. Using exchange experiences to sell the product has proven to be powerful and must be continued. CV Database initiative for GIP ICX, as tied with GIP OGX applications, have a huge potential of quickly and efficiently growing GIP OGX, but will require a skilled devoted point person handling this to make sure it is moving.

Debriefing and Evaluation

Debriefing serves as an avenue wherein one gain valuable information from exchange participants and must be used for analysis, on top of reintegration.

Advance Planning for Job Fair

The Job Fair for students will only be useful if the LC can find ways for more efficient GIP recruitment and/or if OGX can prepare in advance for GIP ICX partners.


“In all my years in Ateneo, one of the things I’m proud to take away is that I graduated with degrees in AIESEC and... that other major.” Claire Fuerte VICE PRESIDENT for INCOMING EXCHANGE


INCOMING EXCHANGE For the past few years, an underlying problem of the Incoming Exchange function was a lack of proper direction to match the growth needed by the local committee. Although this resulted to an increase in our exchange numbers, it to ok a toll on trainee relations that bred unsatisfactory feedback from our trainee customers. Because of this, the Incoming Exchange department needed to be fast and focused in order to match the growth of the Local Committee, growth needed in the Philippines and growth to make an impact globally. Centering its operations and initiatives to improve its matching and realization functions, the goal of the department was simply to make our customers satisfied with our products while achieving growth. For this, the department created strong synergies with External Relations, Projects and Finance departments to ensure all of the experiences we promise would be delivered.


GLOBAL COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM MAY

JUN

JUL

AUG

SEPT

OCT

NOV

DEC

JAN

FEB

MAR

APR

1

10

25

5

22

18

15

10

25

30

30

9

ACTUAL

2

12

35

8

5

2

4

21

20

21

2

MAY

JUN

JUL

AUG

SEPT

OCT

NOV

DEC

JAN

FEB

MAR

APR

TOTAL

TOTAL

GOALS and ACTUAL PERFORMANCE

RAISE

20

20

6

8

20

3

15

44

16

2

5

159

MATCH

13

22

13

4

2

5

14

35

13

6

REALIZE

2

12

35

8

5

2

4

21

20

21

GOAL

-

2

132

-

-

127

-

132

RA-MA-RE Timeline 50 45 40 35 30

RAISE

25

MATCH

20

REALIZE

15 10 5 MAY

JUN

JUL

AUG

SEPT

OCT

NOV

DEC

JAN

FEB

MAR

APR

Internship Issues Multi-Subject Education

24

Cultural Education

57

Entrepreneurship & Leadership HIV/AIDs

2 25

1

2 1

Language Education Social Sciences Environment Sustainability

19 0

20

40

60

Top 5 Countries

Countries China Germany Australia Czech Republic Russia India Indonesia

Re 28 14 9 9 8 8 8

200


GLOBAL INTERNSHIP PROGRAM AUG

SEPT

OCT

NOV

DEC

JAN

FEB

MAR

APR

10

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

1

-

-

1

-

1

-

-

-

1

-

1

-

-

-

JUN

MAY

-

1

2

-

2

-

TOTAL

-

-

-

5

13

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

-

-

-

-

2

RA-MA-RE Timeline 6

5

4

RAISE 3

MATCH REALIZE

2

1

MAY

JUN

JUL

AUG SEPT

OCT

Academic Backgrounds Re

Business Information TOTAL

Length Less than 3 months 3 months - 1 year 1 year - 1.5 year TOTAL

1 1 2

Duration Re

2 0 0 2

NOV

DEC

JAN

FEB

50

APR

-

-

MAR

REALIZE

-

FEB

-

-

JAN

-

-

1

DEC

MATCH

4

-

NOV

-

1

OCT

RAISE

-

SEPT

-

AUG

ACTUAL

TOTAL

JUL

4

-

JUL

GOAL

JUN

MAY

GOALS and ACTUAL PERFORMANCE

MAR

APR

Top 5 Countries

Countries Japan Malaysia

Workfield Business Marketing TOTAL

Re 1 1

Internship Workfields Re

1 1 2


Breakdown of Realizations per Country

2

0

GCDP GIP EUROPE Germany 14 Czech Republic 9 Russia 8 France 6 The Netherlands 2 Poland 2 Austria 1 Switzerland 1 Lithuania 1 United States 1 United Kingdom 1 Total 46 0 MIDDLE EAST & NORTH AFRICA Egypt 3 Pakistan 3 Cameroon 1 Total

7

0

GCDP

Program % Growth 189%

-71%

Partnerships

Country

Local Committee

Sinagpore Vietnam Indonesia TOTAL

RE

NTU FTU, Hanoi UI

3 1 3

2007-2008

7

2006-2007

REALIZATIONS GCDP GIP TOTAL

GIP

2 1 3

1 0 1

Yearly Performance 2011-2012

1 1

COUNTRY

2010-2011

GIP

2009-2010

GCDP ASIA PACIFIC China 28 Australia 9 India 8 Indonesia 8 Malaysia 7 Japan 6 Singapore 4 Cambodia 1 Hong Kong 1 New Zealand 1 Taiwan 1 Vietnam 1 Total 75 IBEROAMERICA Brazil 2 Total 2

2008-2009

COUNTRY

11 0 11

18 7 25

45 7 52

130 2 132

Comparative Graph over 6 AIESEC Terms 132

130

140

120

100 2006-2007 2007-2008

80

2008-2009 60

52 45

2009-2010 2010-2011 2011-2012

40 25 18

20

11 2

1

7 1

0 GCDP

0

0 GIP

7

2

11 3

1 TOTAL


GIP TN Information GLOBE Telecommincations Duration Company contact Contact Number and Email TN Manager and Email

Start

8 weeks Rase Eustaquio Mita Veloso (mita.veloso@aiesec.net)

Clearer communications between TN Manager and TN contact Providing an exact itinerary or program for potential trainees for expectation setting

24-27 weeks Ryan Marshall Carlyn Chua (carlyn.chua@aiesec.net)

Providing an exact itinerary or program for potential trainees for expectation setting

No new forms available Millet Gaurino N/A F

Providing an exact itinerary or program for potential trainees for expectation setting

SLATE Research Duration Company contact Contact Number and Email TN Manager and Email

Start

CB Richard Elis Duration Company contact Contact Number and Email TN Manager and Email

Start

AHEAD tutorial services Duration Company contact Contact Number and Email TN Manager and Email

Infinity tutorial services Duration Company contact Contact Number and Email TN Manager and Email

TN Manager and Email

TN Manager and Email

Assessments

Recommendations

Stop

Recommendations

Stop

Continue

Assessments

Conducting own internviews especially for specific needs and concerns

Exchange Participants have been satisfied with the program especially their market research activities.

Continue

Assessments

Recommendations

Conducting own Exchange Participants have Salary compromise that will be internviews been absorbed to the company able to provide food and especially for and have generally been valued accommodations. Otherwise, for specific needs and by the TN. Housing and salary the Local Committee to innovate concerns have been their general concern. in order to provide these needs.

Stop

Continue

Assessments

Recommendations

Stop

Continue

Assessments

Recommendations

Not applicable, no realizations as of April 30, 2012.

8-26 weeks Richard Backstrom Rich_radar@yahoo.com N/A

Stop

Continue

Assessments

Recommendations

Not applicable, no realizations as of April 30, 2012.

Start 24 weeks Angelito Chua Carlyn Chua (carlyn.chua@aiesec.net)

Union Galvasteel Corporation Duration Company contact Contact Number and Email

Start

Start

Bank of Makati Duration Company contact Contact Number and Email

Continue Conducting own internviews especially for specific needs and concerns

Not applicable, no realizations as of April 30, 2012.

12-52 weeks John Hunyh Via Abellanosa (via.abellanosa@aiesec.net)

Pancake House Duration Company contact Contact Number and Email TN Manager and Email

Start

12-40 weeks Florinda Mesa Ferisse Galgana (ferisse.galgana@aiesec.net)

Stop

Stop

Continue

Assessments

Recommendations

Not applicable, no realizations as of April 30, 2012.

Start

6-68 weeks Joseph Chamorro Carlyn Chua (carlyn.chua@aiesec.net)

Stop

Continue

Assessments

Recommendations

Not applicable, no realizations as of April 30, 2012.

GCDP TN Information Ateneo Center for Educational Development Duration

6 weeks

Company contact Earl Christopher Segales Contact Number and Email Jaz Matias TN Manager and Email (matias.jaz@aiesec.net)

Life Project 4 Youth Duration

Start

Start 6 weeks

Company contact Aude Couturier Contact Number and Email Monica Sillona TN Manager and Email (monica.sillona@aiesec.net)

Stop

Idle time for the Providing an exchange exact itinerary or program for potential trainees for expectation setting

Creating an immersion program for exchange participants For the LC, toto be more strict with matching given the specific needs of the TN.

Stop

Continue

Assessments

Recommendations

Immersion activities

Exchange deemed that the experience was satisfying.

For the AIESEC Exchange Program to be included in organization operations to maximize the potential increasing their number of volunteers.

Continue

Assessments

Recommendations

Providing the specific expectations setting that were laid out

Exchange For AIESEC ADMU to Participants properly package this recognize LP4Y as internship to be able to a legitimate bring in the right people for internship and are the TN. generally satisfied with the work that was provided for them. AIESEC


GCDP TN Information PHINMA Foundation Duration

Start 6 weeks

Child Hope Asia, Philippines 8-10 weeks

Company contact

Teresita Silva

Start

Contact Number and Email TN Manager and Email

Colayco Foundation

Start 8 weeks

Company contact

Joni Jocson

Start

Duration 12-16 weeks Company contact Zenaida Rosales Contact Number and Email Eyana Mallari TN Manager and Email (eyana.mallari@aiesec.net)

AHON

(Acts of Hope for the Nation) Foundation, Duration 6-12 weeks Company contact

Inc.

Stop

Stop

Start

Stop

6 weeks

L.E.G.A.C.Y. Duration

6 weeks

Company contact

Levi Vitug

Contact Number and Email levi.vitug@aiesec.net Katrina Ngo (katrina.ngo@aiesec.net)

GOLD Duration

6 weeks

Company contact

Kazumi Shiroma

Contact Number and Email kazumi.shiroma@aiesec.net Kazumi Shiroma (kazumi.shiroma@aiesec.net)

Explore Philippines Duration

6 weeks

Company contact

Katrina Sanchez

Contact Number and Email katrina.sanchez@aiesec.net TN Manager and Email

Continue

Assessments

Recommendations

Continue

Assessments

Recommendations

Continue

Assessments

Recommendations

Not applicable, no realizations as of April 25, 2012.

Start

Stop

Continue

Assessments

Recommendations

Laying out your measures of success for your trainees

Keeping your trainees idle

Keep your educational and community partners

Trainees tend to complain about the idleness of the project and the mismatch of its job description (marketing) with what is delivered during the realization. However, because of its goal and the educational content this project still shows a lot of potential to create a bigger impact.

Because of the potential impact this project can provide, of course this should continue. However, the heart of GCDP lies also in the impact all individuals involved. Trainees should be given more ownership and also be more involved with the project.

Start

Stop

Continue

Assessments

Recommendations

Company contact Iris Alonzo Contact Number and Email iris.alonzo@aiesec.net Gabby Cantos TN Manager and Email (gabrielle.cantos@aiesec.net)

TN Manager and Email

Recommendations

Herbel Santiago

Code Red

TN Manager and Email

Assessments

Not applicable, no realizations as of April 25, 2012.

Contact Number and Email Carlyn Chua TN Manager and Email (carlyn.chua@aiesec.net)

Duration

Continue

Recommendations Avoid idle time with exchange participants

Not applicable, no realizations as of April 25, 2012.

Contact Number and Email Carlyn Chuacokiong TN Manager and Email (carlyn.chua@aiesec.net)

CPTCSA (Center for the Prevention and Treatment of Child Sexual

Stop

Assessments Exchange Participant was satisfied with the internship.

Not applicable, no realizations as of April 25, 2012.

Claude Tolentino (claudine.tolentino@aiesec.ne t)

Duration

Continue

Providing an exact itinerary or program for potential trainees for expectation setting

Company contact Laurie Javier Contact Number and Email Cor Caoile TN Manager and Email (cor.caoile@aiesec.net)

Duration

Stop

King David

Laying out your Keeping Continue your The frame work of the project measures of your community heavily rellies on the necessity to success for your trainees idle insertion have projects members in during the Giving trainees activities project's activities. This means that more ownership unavailability of members causes set Taking weather backs and cancellation of activities. into consideration

Start

Stop

Ensuring your itineraries with partners Laying out your measures of success for your trainees

Keeping your

Start

Stop

Continue

Assessments

Continue your Problems with this project involved community confusion between AIESEC and insertion partners' expectations. This caused a lot of confusion for incoming trainees which impaired operations.

Continue

Assessments

Recommendations Clear up your expectation setting.

Recommendations

Laying out your Keeping Promoting the Explore had a great concept but had Study blog formats and measures of your unique poor follow through production techniques so that success for your trainees idle aspects of trainees will have a background trainees the Philippines to learn from. This will also Ensuring your Making through this prevent idleness during their itineraries with operations project stay and promote creativity partners complicated from them. Create a better business model and processes for better operations


PROCESS AND STRUCTURE ASSESSMENT

Structures Incoming Exchange GIP TN Management

External Relations Marketing Accounts Manager

Projects Organizing Committee Presidents

Finance

Incoming Exchange

Finance Manager for ER-ICX

TN Management

External Relations

Projects Organizing Committee Presidents

TN Account Managers

Finance Finance Manager for ERICX

GCDP TN Management

GCDP Projects matching teams

GCDP Projects Matching

Coordinator for Trainee Services

Service and Reception

Host Family

Host Family

1st Semester

2nd Semester

Synergy and Structure Assessment 1st Semester

2nd Semester

This structure was created based on this year’s departmental focus areas: Quality Exchange Experience, Securing Country Partnerships, Hands on Matching and Customer Relations Management with current TN partners and future TN partners. This structure was also influenced by the new AIESEC programs for exchange, the Global Internship Program and the Global Community Development Program.

This structure was created based on the activity of the members during the first half of the term. Due to heavy sales activity, but the lack of sealed exchange partners, most matchers had to deal with inactivity. Because of this, the department focused on a lot of training and understanding of processes with the External Relations department.

In support of the Local Committee’s (LC’s) focus on Massive Exchange Growth and Quality Relations, the GIP TN Management, GCDP TN Management and GCDP Projects teams were created to strengthen the core of the LC’s Incoming Exchange functions. In addition to Quality Relations, the Service and Reception team was continued from the previous term in order to create initiatives and opportunities for member - trainee interaction.

External Relations Marketing Accounts Manager

Because of the department’s focus on matching, the responsibility for raising was transferred to the External Relations department under the Marketing Accounts team.

Projects LEGACY, GOLD, Explore Philippines and Code Red

Also, another change in operations were necessary for Trainee Servicing. Because of the lack of structure and implementation within the function, one member was appointed to facilitate all trainee servicing. This required the full co operation of TN Managers in handling their respective trainees, also an initiative for better Customer Relations Mangement with the trainee.

To add to our exchanges, the Projects department worked hand-in-hand with Incoming Exchange through job description and itinerary creation; and follow-through while creating fulfilling and impactful exchanges in the Philippines.

Finance Finance Manager for ER-ICX

The Finance department handled all expenses and aided in initiatives to improve servicing such as the departmental pick-up rotation system and arrival kits.


In line with the linear Raise-Match-Realize Exchange Process, the synergy group created a “Process, Step, Needs” system which also indicated accountable personnel for a smo oth understanding of responsibilities among departments.

Raising Market Research Company meetings CRM Raising a TN

Matching Promotional strategies Assessment of the potential Exchange Participants Matching in the Myaiesec.net session

General Process Overview

Realization Intern's arrival CRM/Assessment of the intern's experience Intern's departure

As mentioned above, the raising process is performed by the PROJ and ER with the following steps indicated in the figure. However, ICX also participates in raising forms on Myaiesec.net through reviewing the previous departments’ created job descriptions. From Raising, ICX is fully in charge of promoting the created opportunities in the AIESEC network while matching them to deserving participants. In co operation with the FIN department; housing, pick-ups, drop-offs, dinners and other services are being provided during realization. ICX also has an evaluation system throughout the exchange to ensure that all that was promised prior to arrival were fulfilled.

Creating accountability is convenient but can also cause confusion in member activity. For Incoming Exchange operations, the bulk of realization activity fell on the shoulders of the Service and Reception team/Co ordinator for Trainee Services throughout the whole term. Visibility of TN managers were limited mostly throughout the whole stay of our trainees which caused disappointments. But despite those comments, the efforts of the S&R team/CTS were commended by exchange participants. In addition, pre-arrival/matching operations were seen as “Above Average” according to trainees through our post-exchange evaluations survey. These participants claim to appreciate the “fast and efficient” processes done to accommodate their application to our exchange opportunities.

Special Initiatives Host Family Program

One of the most unique initiatives to support Quality relations is the Host Family Program. Based on the increasing demand for housing and at the same time more opportunities to better know our culture, this program was created. In the implementation of the programme, six families were recruited and ten exchange participants were housed in the program. After which 100% of the exchange participants that answered our post-evaluation surveys have indicated that they would recommend other participants to take part in this experience as well.

Exchange Participant Preparation Agreement

One of the biggest challenges for exchangers is to create and meet expectations for exchange participants. Because of this, the Exchange Participant Preparation Agreement was made. This agreement is a document which is sent prior to matching an individual to our projects or TN takers which contain AIESEC ADMU’s trainee services along its respective. It also has a checklist of instructions and reminders in aid for the trainee’s arrival to the Philippines. Because of this initiative miscommunication between AIESEC ADMU and our traineess regarding our trainee services have lessend since.

Standard for Job Description Creation

Packaging a project and a TN is essential because competition in matching is high among all AIESEC entities. In order to stand out, our packaging strategy was to impose a standard in writing job descriptions for our TN forms. Not only would this enable our projects and TNs to stand out among the many other opportunities in the network it also helps in the common exchange problem of incorrect expectation setting. Apart expectation setting, it also serves as training for the TN managers to sell the project/TN they would match. This allows the matcher to better understand their customer by understanding what possible questions to anticipate while selling their accounts.


VICE PRESIDENT’S RECOMMENDATIONS RECOMMENDATION

DESCRIPTION

Servicing TN Exchange Partners

Although there was a focus on CRM this year, this was not thoroughly exercised by the ICX department especially with the partner TN-taker. One way to become more involved with the trainee and to establish further relations with the TN is to create an evaluation system. Creating this evaluation system would allow the partner TN-taker to evaluate AIESEC's services and to possibly continue or improve processes with the partner. This would also allow the TN-taker to evaluate the exchange participants that they interact with which could also be sent to partnered AIESEC entities for their own reference.

Servicing Trainees

Due to the heavy demands in trainee servicing, it is imperative that proper expectation setting will be set and followed prior to the arrival of the trainee. Although this mindset was constant throughout the term, cases of improper expectation setting could not be avoided. One of its main causes is the lack of accountability felt by TN managers especially during their trainee's arrival. That being said, it would be best to constantly remind TN managers of their job description and for them to be able to understand the importance of their participation throughout each exchange process. Another issue in servicing is the expectation of trainees set by their home entity which, at times, are not aligned with the services of AIESEC ADMU. Expectations such as being given time to travel during exchange, culture presentations and LC integration are some expectations that are promoted in particular home entities which may clash with local services. The Exchange Participant Preparation Agreement may be able to solve this by editing the services that would meet the needs of the local committee. The Host Family Program is a wonderful activity to share AIESEC's global network to the local community as well as to share our Filipino culture to our exchange participants. Given the positive reviews, this program would be a great EWA activity to promote AIESEC's opportunities to more individuals.

Host Family Program

International Relations

However, recruitment is very essential in implementing the host family program which requires the help from other departments. The Communications department has a lot of experience in recruitment through our member recruitment for the local committee and exchange recruitment activities for Outgoing Exchange. In order to continue with this program, it is essential that a formal process would be made along with the Communications department to reap more and better results in the future. Email blasts and digital posters have been the usual promotional strategies for many Incoming Exchangers. However, this term, AIESEC ADMU had the advantage of international presence by having local participants engage in international conferences. Through relationship building, many other entities took notice of our local committee and trusted our brand and quality. Now that this has been established, it would best to have an arm to continue presenting our brand to the international network and systematically maintaining relationships with our entities. To do this, an International Relations division or initiative can be made through creating formal and informal partnerships. This could include monthly updates on the opportunities AIESEC ADMU has to offer (from merchandise, conference, CEED or others) as well as statuses of our partnership in terms of exchange numbers. This is so AIESEC ADMU can maintain relationships as well as presence in the global network.


“Sometimes, you find yourself being thrown around in a storm, looking for a way to get out, and wondering how you got there in the first place. Then you wake up to the fact that you have no other option but to keep moving forward and the the only way out, is through.” Carlo Enrico Rivera VICE PRESIDENT for TALENT MANAGEMENT


TA L E N T MANAGEMENT The Talent Management Department has always faced the challenge of translating go od sounding theories such as those of member motivation, alignment, and the like into relevant action. With that in mind, the TM Department approached this term with the mindset of impacting the LC with consistent action and output. TM’s relevance and performance this term was predicated on the proper execution of TM Processes, and nothing less. Processes executed in the past, continued to be executed, and were improved. Non-existent processes were initiated, executed, and evaluated, the most prominent of which are the LC Performance Appraisal System and Member Development Fund Rewards System. TM also went beyond the Processes as it saw fit, in the spirit of creating fulfilling AIESEC Experiences, particularly through initiatives in member relations and member feedback. It was the smallest department in the LC, starting with 4, and ending with 9 members. But throughout the term, it was run by driven individuals who believed in the relevance of Talent Management. And it was supported by a set of officers who believed in the practice of talent management. Together, these were invaluable elements to TM’s successes this term.


TEAM MEMBER PROGRAM TOTAL

APR

MAR

FEB

JAN

DEC

NOV

OCT

SEPT

AUG

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

79

7

4

168

17

34

241

-

-

-

-

558

APR

250

FEB

34

JAN

17

NOV

184

JUN -

TOTAL

N/A

MAR

N/A

DEC

N/A

OCT

N/A

SEPT

N/A

AUG

N/A

8

RAISE -

JUL N/A

MAY

ACTUAL

N/A

JUL

GOAL N/A

JUN

MAY

GOALS and ACTUAL PERFORMANCE

-

-

-

-

-

-

485

-

-

-

-

-

550

241

-

-

-

-

558

MATCH

79

7

4

168

17

34

241

REALIZE

8

79

7

4

168

17

34

RA-MA-RE Timeline 300

250

200

RAISE 150

MATCH REALIZE

100

50

MAY

JUN

JUL

AUG SEPT OCT

NOV

DEC

JAN

Top 10 Course Breakdown

FEB

MAR

APR

Year Levels

TOTAL

YEAR LEVEL

BS Management BS Management Engineering

40 37

BS Management, Major in Communication Technology AB Communications BS Management, Major in Legal Management BS Health Sciences

19 14 10 8

1 2 3 4 Exchange Students TOTAL

AB European Studies AB Management Economics AB Psychology BS Psychology Others TOTAL

7 7 7 7 65 221

COURSE

TOTAL 50 67 57 45 2 221

Gender Breakdown GENDER

Male Female TOTAL

TOTAL 91 130 221


TEAM LEADER PROGRAM

18

5

10

29

FEB

1

8

31

1

18

5

10

30

MATCH

8

3

1

18

5

11

29

REALIZE

28

5

3

4

18

5

10

-

TOTAL

APR N/A

130

-

-

-

-

102

-

9

29

MAR N/A

-

TOTAL

4

8

N/A

APR

3

RAISE

N/A

MAR

5

JAN

FEB

JAN

DEC

28

OCT

N/A

SEPT

N/A

AUG

N/A

DEC

NOV

OCT

SEPT

AUG

JUL

N/A

JUL

N/A

JUN

N/A

MAY

ACTUAL

N/A

NOV

GOAL N/A

JUN

MAY

GOALS and ACTUAL PERFORMANCE

-

-

112

-

-

-

84

-

-

-

102

RA-MA-RE Timeline 35 30 25 20

RAISE MATCH

15

REALIZE

10 5 MAY

JUN

JUL

AUG

SEPT

OCT

NOV

DEC

JAN

FEB

MAR

APR

MAY

JUN

JUL

AUG

SEPT

OCT

NOV

DEC

JAN

FEB

MAR

APR

RAISE

YoY Growth

Membership Count on Team Experiences

107

107

109

278

278

274

273

273

273

239

226

221 107%


PROCESS AND STRUCTURE ASSESSMENT

Execution of TM Processes TM PROCESS

Talent Planning

EXECUTION FOR TMP EXECUTION FOR TLP Talent plan was created and was used for all pipeline management related purposes. Specifically this included recruitment and selection, allocation/reallocation processes, and briefing/debriefing.

Branding was clear during the July recruitment. With the overarching theme "Share Yourself with the World" AIESEC AdMU was seen as a leadership development and international organization. Talent Marketing

It was difficult though to draw the lines with regard to attracting a specific kind of profile because all functions were in need of growth anyway. In any case, more promotional materials with job overviews could have been released, but the regulations imposed by the Council of Organizations of Ateneo limited the promotional materials we could use. The Global Competency Model was used as a basis for selection, and contributed to proper expectation setting.

Talent Selection

Talent Induction

Talent Goal Setting

Something to look into would be role-based selection, wherein the selection and allocation processes are streamlined into one process. However that would have implications to the timeline of the selection-induction-allocation processes. The AIESEC AdMU Leadership Development Seminar (ALDS) was a local conference which served also served the purpose of inducting new members. All induction elements were incorporated into the agenda. Clear execution of Talent Goal Setting (TGS) was done only during ALDS. Templates were given to Team Leaders to execute and document TGS but there was no followthrough. It was also assumed that executing TGS was common sense, which was not the case. Not all Team Leaders knew how to do TGS properly. Allocation in general is done based on all available data. New members were allocated based on Talent Goal Setting, MSI, and even their application forms.

Talent Allocation

The speed at which allocations had to be done though, given the tight timeline, might have given some members the feeling that they are being thrown into a role without them really knowing why, what to do, and how exactly they can contribute.

For most Team Leader positions in the LC, application processes are made in order to screen and select the best person fit for the role. The application process normally includes an application kit to be submitted, and an interview. From there, the Executive Board decides on the best people to allocate to the different Team Leader roles.

Also, a lot of members were allocated into roles with very minimal workload at the start. (e.g. ICX teams but no TN supply --supply and demand management) Vice Presidents exerted efforts in training their members with regards to their specific roles. Functionally speaking, members are trained (in theory at the very least). Talent Education and Training

However, overall LC knowledge and alignment is lacking. Other than ALDS, NLDC Bringback, and a few general AIESEC knowledge sessions before July recruitment, there was no clear followthrough to address member alignment and general education. Internal Communication can be improved in this regard as well.

Outside functional training and general AIESEC knowledge activities, a localized version of AIESEC International's LEAD Program was offered to Team Leaders exclusively. The program was geared towards training them in terms of their Management Skills, Leadership Skills, and AIESEC Skills. While improvements can be made in terms of frequency and execution, this is an initiative that the LC plans to build on in the coming terms.


Execution of TM Processes TM PROCESS

Pipeline Management

Performance Appraisal

Talent Review

Coaching & Mentoring

EXECUTION FOR TMP EXECUTION FOR TLP This term, allocation and reallocations were done generally on a per sem basis with most functions. That said, within each semester, there was not much movement done and members stayed in their respective roles.

That said, when a team or function would end up undermanned due to some members falling out, there was no clear system in place of quickly transferring and reallocating people in that function to cope even just on the short term. Clear efforts of executing Performance Appraisals across all teams to track individual performance and team health. Improvements can be made in the following areas: - Techinicalities of filling up forms - Providing actual feedback to members. PA for most tends to be purely about recording and not really communicating feedback. - Allowing for a more holistic Performance Appraisal through bottom-up (Team Member to Team Leader, and peer-to-peer) approach Talent review was being done based solely on hard skills training and experience, to see functional skills our members have. That said, review and tracking of soft skills, and the GCM for that matter is missing. Members of the EB clearly coach their respective members with regards their roles and output. Coaching accountability is also made clear among all TLs as well. The LC currently does not have a way of measuring or monitoring how well coaching is done. Also, there are very few people in the LC who are capable of doing mentoring, in the strictest sense.

The LC's most formal Rewards and Recognition system is the Member Development Fund, which involves allocating a fraction of the LC's funds to reward high performing members with merchandise, and subsidies. The system was only implemented in January though. Ideally it should have been done much earlier. Also, it is not creating Talent Motivation / the noise that it ideally should as an Rewards and Recognition scheme. Rewards and Recognition Communication, followthrough, and hype can be greatly improved. Aside from this, during the last AIESEC AdMU General Assembly, certain members were recognized for their efforts, and achivements in front of the whole LC. Ideally we would want more people going for roles and positions, than is available. Right now, that is not the case in the LC. Succession Planning

Career Planning

Fast Track

LEAD is an effort for Succession Planning, but scheduling and execution can be improved. Also it might be good to note that officers from other organizations in AdMU explicitly tell their potential successors early on that they are eyeing them. There was no focus on executing this TM process for the term. Considered to be a factor here was that the LC's External Relations Department did not focus on getting learning partners this term. The closest semblance of an attempt to execute this were talks from professionals during AIESEC AdMU Week. Top management is not afraid to give high performing members roles of bigger responsibility. The LCP was able to quickly prepare for fast tracking certain members. Some members of the Executive Board 2012-2013 can be considered fast-tracked members, as some of them only became members this term. A more consistent framework can be put in place though for members to be fast tracked. Right now, a member is fast track based on observation, feedback, and willingness of the member.

Exit Interview H4TF Processes

Exit interviews are open to members who decide to leave the organization. However, members who want to leave generally do not care enough to be interviewed anyway. Nonetheless, it is offered to all as a venue to look back on their AIESEC Experience and to give feedback to the organization. There were no efforts of executing this in AIESEC AdMU for the term.


Structures

2nd Semester

1st Semester

Role and Structure Assessment The Po ol Structure

Director for Competency Management

For TM SOP roles, instead of dividing the TM members into separate teams, all TM members were accountable to all team leaders in executing the TM Processes, wherein a Team Leader was in charge of focusing on certain processes. This allowed them to be exposed to multiple aspect of TM’s operations for more holistic learning and development. The nature and weight of their job descriptions allowed for this, and for this reason, for this term, it was generally effective, especially during the second half of the term, when the team was given go od job descriptions and a clear team purpose (for the first half of the term, the TM department encountered some problems related to member job descriptions and team purpose, not necessarily related to the po ol structure).

Managing the learning and alignment of an entire LC is challenging. It requires a high level of AIESEC Knowledge and skills in delivery and execution. Admittedly, through no fault of his own, the job description of the Director for Competency Management did not fit the strengths of the person chosen for the role, which therefore caused a bottleneck in learning management operations. In this case, the LCVP TM should have been more hands on with the role, and on hindsight the LCVP TM role should have just assumed the role himself.

Special Initiatives AIESEC AdMU Leadership Development Seminar (ALDS)

ALDS was a two-track local conference held on July 30 to 31 with the purpose of training and aligning the members of the LC. Old and new members were separated into different tracks in order to cater to the different levels and needs. For the new members, this served as their Talent Induction process, and thus the agenda for their track included all four induction elements. In addition to this, ALDS served as a venue for members to bond and have fun in order to increase LC camaraderie.

Talent Management Initiatives Function

During the first half of the term, it seemed that the LC had nothing much in store for the members but work, and while it illustrated how serious the LC was in terms of achieving its goals, members ended up burnt out and demotivated with the lack of member relation activities because to some extent, some of them felt like they were boxed in their teams, and did not really know other members, or the LC as a whole. During the second half of the term, TM responded to the seeming need to address member relations more, amidst all the work that the LC required of its members, by creating a function dedicated to doing this, among other things. Under the TM Initiatives function, the following initiatives were executed:

1 - Tambay Week During the AIESEC AdMU Week: Aviate, an open venue was reserved exclusively for AIESEC AdMU members to be able to hang out. While there were contests and programs put in place for members to participate in, the objective was simply to get members to stay in one area during their respective breaks, in order to bond, and get to know other members of the LC.

2 - Christmas Party The LC Christmas Party was a simple event after the last day of classes, before Christmas Break, for members to get together. Again while a short program was put in place, the objective was simply to get members together to bond over fo od, drinks, and a swimming po ol.

3 - X Games

4 - Internal Brand Audit (IBA)

X Games was an LC teambuilding and sportsfest event for members of the LC to unwind amidst the challenges both of academic and AIESEC work. With activities like “Over the Rope” and “Amoeba”, together with basketball, volleyball, and futsal, it was a venue for members to compete with each other,have fun, and showcase their physical talents.

The biggest documented feedback channel of the term, the IBA was designed to get feedback from the members regarding their AIESEC Experience so far. This touched on the four ELD Programs, alignment with the organization, and future plans. Results from the IBA are to be incorporated into the decisions that TM makes next term.


Rewards and Recognition: The Member Development Fund (MDF)

The MDF was launched in January as AIESEC AdMU’s primary rewards and recognition system. It involves allocating a fraction of AIESEC AdMU’s funds for rewarding high performing members with merchandise, conference subsidies, or Exchange subsidies. By fulfilling certain key performance indicators (KPIs), members are awarded points depending on the KPI they fulfilled, and once they accumulate enough points, they become eligible to avail of the aforementioned rewards. Since the MDF is dealing with LC funds, it is highly results-oriented in nature, which is a culture that AIESEC AdMU wants to foster in its members.

LEAD: AIESEC AdMU Program

Since AIESEC AdMU adapted a three-level structure across most functions, the role of middle managers became all the more important as they served as a link between top management and the members. In order for the LC to be successful, the middle managers have to be well equipped to lead their teams. That said, a local version of AIESEC International’s LEAD was launched in order to equip middle managers with AIESEC Skills, Leadership Skills, and Management Skills. However, more than just for the current term, the purpose of LEAD was to entice the current team leaders to go for more team leader roles in the future, such that by this time, they would have been equipped with more skills to lead and manage teams.

VICE PRESIDENT’S RECOMMENDATIONS RECOMMENDATION

DESCRIPTION

Treat TMP and TLP as Products

Currently, TM's performance is tracked mainly through the execution of the TM Processes. While it is a good foundation for any TM Department, it is not enough if TMP and TLP are to be treated as products. More than the processes, TM's goals should be grounded on the TMP and TLP business model canvass and product definitions in order to know whether or not AIESEC AdMU is indeed delivering its products well.

Make Performance Management a focus

Performance management means creating an environment with the end goal of individual and team performance efficiency. It sees skills and competency development, alignment, and motivation, as constitutive of driving performance. It rebuts the mindset that focusing on performance is different from focusing on the development of members, as it puts both aspects together, with member development as constitutive of member performance.

Align members by virtue of standards for AIESEC Knowledge

The weight of individual department trainings and operations may tempt TM to postpone, or even do away with instilling standard AIESEC Knowledge in its members, however this should not be an excuse to do so. It is important that members always see the bigger picture of what they are or will be doing, and instilling standard AIESEC Knowledge, including AIESEC Philosophy, and LC-wide plans, structure, and synergy is essential in doing so.

Utilize the Global Competency Model (GCM) for member development

In the past, the use of the GCM stopped with recruitment and selection procedure. However, more than just a selection tool, the GCM should be utilized as a development tool for members, and consequently as a tool for tracking ELD delivery. It is recommended that TM establishes a framework for utilizing the GCM beyond recruitment and selection.

Improve allocation with additional screening procedures

This term, a lot of members felt that they were misallocated to their roles. More than relying on data from recruitment and induction processes, it is highly recommended that additional measures be put in place in order to minimize cases of misallocation. This can include an additional screening process for specialized roles, which might require more specific skills, or abilities. In relation to this, profile-based recruitment might be a good idea as well, especially if the LC gets to the point that not all departments are in need of growth anymore.

In the term 2011-2012, most member relation activities were conducted during the second half of the term. While it was a good initiative that the LC can build up on, it did not provide optimal results as seen with member participation in these events. It Conduct more member relation activities during the first half of the term is highly recommended that these events be conducted during the first half of the term to establish member relations and camaraderie early on when members, especially the new ones, are still "high" about the term.


“This term would make me think twice about accepting a letter from Hogwarts.” TJ Godiaco VICE PRESIDENT for COMMUNICATIONS


COMMUNICATIONS In its first term of existence, the Communications Department sought to make strides in centralizing marketing and information management support for all the departments. Its foci were on the fundamentals of brand management, information management, and public relations, with the objectives of first supporting functions more specifically in Talent Management and Outgoing Exchange by collecting more interested customers and crafting systems for feedback and evaluation. Moreover,the department continued efforts to expand its network through tapping different departments and offices around scho ol, eventually gaining the endorsements of many department chairpersons and program directors, as well as access to the vast network of the Ateneo Alumni Association, and participation in the annual Ateneo Job and Practicum Fair through the Ateneo Placement Office, and the Ateneo Development Sector Job Fair through the Development Studies Program, among others. Furthermore, Communications successfully launched AIESEC Week 2011 and participated in SOM Week 2011 with the objectives of raising customer familiarity on campus as well as raising member association with the organization. Truly it was a tough and difficult year for the infant department, but with all it has accomplished within the span of just one term, it is safe to say that next term, the Communications Department will be all set to sprint.


What were your expectations coming into AIESEC AdMU? Positive leadership skills/opportunities exchange/internship networking meeting new people active involvement provided opportunity to improve self get to know international students make impact outside ateneo business like setting personal development

29 13 13 11 8 8 7 6 5 5

Negative thought I'd have more things to do other than pick up the requirements for trainees

1

lack of knowledge in some members

1

To gather results for brand management, Communications and Talent Management designed an internal brand audit tackling the Team Member Programme, Team Leader Programme, Global Community Development Programme, and the Global Internship Programme. The results garnered are split into quantitative and qualitative data and are the following:

Level of Engagement in Teams 38

40 35 Respondents

Internal Brand Audit Results

BRAND MANAGEMENT

29

27

30

25

25 17

20 15 7

10

2nd Sem

7

5 0 1

2

3

1 1 1 1

9

Mean Values

Positive 44 14

2 2 2 1 1 1

1

TLP

GCDP

GIP

Association with AIESEC vision and AIESEC 2015

3 1

5 1 1 1

2.73

AIESEC Products

1

1 1 1 1

3

2.96

TMP

56

60

AIESEC Vision

50 Respondents

hard to harness if not proactive connected, but segmented some members more active than others organized but work is too centralized too work based Neutral lots of work takes a lot of time department exposure exchange participant resume buffer

3.26

3.3 3.2 3.1 3 2.9 2.8 2.7 2.6 2.5 2.4

Negative not united

5

Mean Rating of AIESEC Products

In your own words, please describe AIESEC AdMU as an organization family creates impact accomplishing greater goals/more potential diverse gateway to other cultures gives global mindset big and nice projects company chapter extends limitations as student leaders fun

4

Rating

5

resume buffer

1st Sem

13

11

Neutral lots of work takes a lot of time department exposure exchange participant

23

40

34

30

21

20 10

39 AIESEC 2015

5

1

19 13

9 3

0 1

2

3 Rating

4

5


AIESECers who are members of other orgs N

LC Activities Feedback for TMP/TLP: LCMs/Gas Positive

19

81

Y

0

10

20

30

40

50

60

70

80

90

Respondents

good attendance good except the one in Matteo

1 1 1 1

Negative 61

60 42

breaking into teams was weird

40 23

22

20

9

AP

CEE

IBE

MENA

1

low attendance

1 Neutral

WENA

meeting for updates

Regions

2

should be every 2 months should start on time

AIESECers Interested in Going on Exchange

2 1

Comments on Programmes: TMP Positive

2

Y

98

liking it

4

great opportunity better member than leader

2 1

engaging 0

1

needs more subject matter

0 NP

22 5

met new people

53

50

10

N

3 2

great and fun

70

Respondents

5 4

learned the dance nice discussion

Interested AIESECer EPs for

30

informative organized/structured fun motivation

20

40

60

80

100

120

Respondents

improving develops work ethic time to learn tasks fun challenging but helpful

How do you benefit from AIESEC? Positive improved skills/personal development meeting new people/networking/connections leadership development learned how to work with people organized time management/work ethic improved social awareness/global impact exchange opportunities corporate/business exposure/professional development preparation for future job conferences Negative would have to start from scratch to benefit Neutral pressured/pushed to work

1 1 2 1 1 1

Negative 23 20 19 17 10 10 9 6 4 1 1 2

haven't done much didn't feel part of a team don't know how to engage "petix" needs to be more defined stressful need more manpower burned out Neutral still figuring out not sure if engaged can be improved by TLs needs more member development

3 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1


Association and alignment with AIESEC and 2015 Positive in line with my goals/beliefs wants to contribute high hopes for AIESEC match as much as I can good grasp of vision greater purpose competetive worldwide part of projects in line with goals want to learn more as ambitious as I am work in a global environment Negative need to know more about it haven't done anything/don't know how to contribute 2015 not objectified/vague not interested/committed there are inconsistencies less tangible very idealistic only convinced with BHAG lost passion and drive not too keen

34 7 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

10 7 4 3 2 1 1

very big goals not sure on commitment more concerned with own project hope to identify with @ vision and 2015 Projects really address vision 2015 is necessary for vision still new going to graduate

Positive great learning experience

2

learning more about org

1

engaging straight to the point turning point of AIESEC career LEAD is great Negative wasn't ready extremely difficult JDs not clear burned out need more manpower hard to delegate and meet members confused/lost/helpless

1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1

Neutral led to something else temporary can be improved by EB

1 1 1

LC Activities Feedback for TMP/TLP: ALDS Positive

1

great and fun

22

1 1

met new people informative

5 3

3

successful engaging good introdcution into AIESEC fun chance to bond with old members new perspective

2 1 1 1 1

Neutral neutral

Comments on Programmes: TLP

2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1

Negative "nosebleed" crammed hassle for OC

1 1 1

too many talks

1

tiring and draining

1

Neutral should create better tracks for old members more "getting to know" activities more comfortable sleeping area needs to happen more

1 1 1

better to give out AIESEC information before ALDS

1

1


Also, we conducted a 300-respondent brand audit with the objective of discovering the AIESEC AdMU brand in the university campus (among students). The following are the main results collected:

External Brand Audit Results

PHYSICAL REACH, COLLABORATIVE ENVIRONMENT AND EXPANSION

Presence of the Organization in the University

Aside from what the brand audit results mean, AIESEC AdMU made significant steps to create quality relations with particular people in the university. First, AIESEC AdMU has been consistently and strongly represented in events and seminars of the Council of Organizations of the Ateneo, which directly connects AIESEC AdMU to the rest of the fifty accredited organizations in the university, most especially in the John Gokongwei Scho ol of Management, and the Business Cluster of the Council of Organizations. Other than that, physical reach on campus has spread to the administration and faculty departments. Partnerships and accreditation were created with major offices such as The Ateneo Placement Office, the Ateneo Alumni Association and major departments and scho ols such as the John Gokongwei Scho ol of Management (and all the programs that fall under it), the Chinese Studies Program, the Development Studies Program, the European Studies Program, and the Department of Sociology and Anthropology. Contact departments and offices are the following: Office of International Relations, Department of Communications, Department of Economics, Department of English, Department of Information Systems and Computer Science, Department of Interdisciplinary Studies, Department of History, and the Department of Psychology.

Presence in University Media and Virtual Reach

In university media, usually through the Council of Organizations of the Ateneo, the official representation of all accredited student organizations on campus, AIESEC Ateneo de Manila University has been featured or mentioned many times. The Business Cluster Twitter account has Tweeted about AIESEC AdMU approximately 20 times, while the Business Cluster Facebo ok page has done this approximately 25 times. The Council of Organizations page has done this approximately 31 times, while their Twitter account has done so at least 25 times as well. Moreover, through its partnership with the Ateneo Alumni Association, AIESEC AdMU has been present to approximately 11,000 Ateneo alumni by means of online mailers. Also, the same can be said about presence in official communication channels for Batch 2012 and Batch 2013 of Ateneo which targeted approximately 2,500 Ateneans. Finally, AIESEC AdMU has managed to land a feature on the official student publication of the Ateneo, The Guidon. This is monumental not only because it is highly unusual for The Guidon to cover student organizations as subjects, but also because this is an indication of AIESEC AdMU being newsworthy. (The Guidon by their values, is not allowed to accept for-publicity articles from student organizations unless deemed newsworthy. This article is scheduled to be published in June 2012.

Media Appearances *Collaboration with other Entities for ELD Program delivery to be shown in the Expansion Department Section

Code Red’s efforts, in collaboration with Standard Chartered Bank, was featured in The Inquirer (August 2011), “Standard Chartered Philippines aims to continue to bring the Living with HIV program to greater heights. The bank is forging partnerships with organizations that share its advocacy. Just recently, the bank sealed its partnership with AIESEC Ateneo through the youth organization’s program dubbed as “Code Red”—a series of learning activities on HIV and AIDS targeting the youth.” http://business.inquirer.net/14601/standard-chartered-bank-intensifies-campaign-against-hiv-aids


INTERNAL AND EXTERNAL COMMUNICATION The AIESEC AdMU campaign is always two-point campaign. While positioning ourselves as a platform for the youth market to gain both cross-cultural and work experience (another major program in our university also offers cross-cultural experience), we have two prime objectives for each campaign. First is to go out into the market and convey our products and services to the youth through our members. Second is to induce an association between our members and the organization and its products and services. It is always combination of internal and external branding. The following campaigns are ordered chronologically. Share Yourself With The World (TMP and TLP) The Share Yourself with the World campaign was created for the AIESEC AdMU Member Recruitment Week 2011. The concept revolves around the idea that each person (student/youth) has something to share with the world, whether or not he knows it, and also that the world has something to share with him/her. We po oled together AIESECers from AdMU and the MC, as well as our Trainees, some being AIESECers themselves, to share on video what they are sharing with the world (business skills, cultural understanding, recipes from home, etc.). Design-wise, the campaign was fleshed out with simple, but colorful ways, highlighting the diversity of sharing oneself with the world. Cho ose The World (GCDP and GIP OGX) The Cho ose the World Campaign in AIESEC AdMU was taken from the MC national campaign and localized for the university based on the target of the campaign. This campaign was launched in September, targeting those who are (but not limited to) graduating or have already graduated with the premise that these graduates are now faced with the options of employment, further studies, etc. In this campaign, we positioned Exchange as one of those options, but exciting, free, and completely in their hands. The campaign was fleshed out in three ways: online (website and social media), The Exchange Exhibit (a large exhibit with photo collages, one-liners, and TN portfolios), and the standard recruitment bo oth. Design-wise, we made use of many photos of people on Exchange as well as comprehensive one-liners from those who have already gone on or are on Exchange. This way, the market can project themselves into those very experiences. Ask Me About Exchange! (GCDP and GIP OGX) This campaign was launched in November as the beginning of the recruitment for summer Exchange. This campaign highlights the accessibility and transparency of Exchange information for our youth market. This time, instead of simply using the website as the primary source of information, we used our members themselves as the targets for inquiries and questions. Each LC member had a Facebo ok profile picture in which he/she is holding up a sign that says “Ask Me About Exchange!” Also, there were biweekly Status messages encouraging the public to ask about Exchange. To help members, info sheets (kodigo) were sent to them including trends, partner countries, sample internships, and the like. This way, many students, relatives, friends, and even teachers were able to AIESECers about Exchange, and at the same time, members were quick to learn basic information about Exchange.

AIESEC Week (AIESEC as an organization) Aviate was a week-long campaign with programs to showcase AIESEC to the campus (students, administration, and faculty alike) as well as to give the members the opportunity to celebrate their membership in AIESEC. We tackled introducing the AIESEC Values to the campus through info sessions and meeting of the minds, some of which were included in the curricula of courses in Marketing, Social Sciences, and Philosophy for extra credit, by externals expert in development, business, volunteerism and youth leadership. Within AIESEC Week were several other campaigns.

Be A Host Family! (GCDP ICX Servicing) This campaign’s objective was to gather AIESECers and Ateneans interested in being host families for trainees coming in the Q1 PBOX peak. This was conceptualized as support for ICX to help alleviate the pressure on FIN to find cheap, quality homes by the peak. The idea for the campaign was meant to be a first step towards making the host family program a product of AIESEC in itself. “If you can’t go on Exchange this summer, bring Exchange home with you!”


Internal OGX Campaign This campaign was an internal version of the Q1 campaigns for Q2 Realizations. The working idea for this campaign was for AIESECers to complete their AIESEC Experiences by going on Exchange. Basically, the campaign was to push members to take other ELD programs, and the design of the materials straightforwardly communicates this (Checklist with TMP and TLP ticked off and Exchange as the next to-do). The information system for this campaign was linked to that of the main campaign, so the database was combined. (It’s hard to find out which we can attribute AIESECers going on Exchange to at this point.)

Let The World Be Your Office (GIP and GCDP OGX) This campaign was created exclusively for two waves of job and internship fairs in the university campus targeted at those lo oking for internships and work opportunities: The Ateneo Placement Job and Internship Fair, as well as the Ateneo Development Sector Job and Internship Fair. The working idea for the job and internship fairs was to let the youth market open their opportunities to GIP (for both job fairs) and GCDP (for Development Sector Job Fair) and to reinforce the “employment” (work and internship opportunities) branding of AIESEC by association with the fairs.

PROCESS AND STRUCTURE ASSESSMENT Structures

1st Semester

2nd Semester

Synergy and Structure Assessment 1st Semester The main features of this structure are the following:

2nd Semester Structure for Second Semester of term 2011-2012

sponsible for the growth of his or her field. Given that the Communications Department was new, the idea was to create experts in those fields for the coming terms.

The main features of this structure are the following:

Public Relations, and Information Management are highly interrelated and interdependent, there is a clear requirement for the Directors to work together. This was not only to promote synergy, but also to make it mandatory.

focus instead of function focus, each brand management team is responsible for all communication functions for their products. BM OGX handles GCDP and GIP for Outgoing Exchange, BM ICX/PROJ the same for Incoming Exchange, while IBM for TMP and TLP.

responsible for specific products they can delve deeper into exploring the products they are handling.


Special Initiative

Shifting Structures

The shift from a function-based structure to a product-based structure was a remarkable strategy that shifted not only accountability, but also the mindset of and towards the Communications department. COM resembled an advertising agency more, plus it became more of a strategic think tank instead of being the poster factory it was trying not to be. With this shift came brand maturity and more intensive knowledge of the products.

VICE PRESIDENT’S RECOMMENDATION Combining Structures A recommendation would be to decentralize the brand managers and make them directly accountable to the LCVPs responsible for the delivery of the product itself. For example, instead of BM OGX being accountable only to LCVP COM, BM OGX will be directly accountable to LCVP OGX and will consult with LCVP COM. This way, function-dependence is resolved, and LCVP COM will have more space and opportunity to delve into branding the organization itself, and not just its products. With BMs decentralized, Directors for Public Relations and Information Management can be added into the structure directly accountable to LCVP COM, especially Director for Information Management because it is skill-dependent.


“I’m proud. Finance didn’t just grow cash, it grew a family of financiers.” Dominic Santiago VICE PRESIDENT for FINANCE


FINANCE Finance was never really just about the money in AIESEC. We did our best to keep it in perspective. Money is the to ol with which to push all our efforts. It may not have been exactly necessary for departments to work individually but it definitely allowed all of them to grow. This year, we not only supported our immense growth but we were able to leave enough money for the succeeding years to work with. This entailed creating new tracking systems, revenuegenerating initiatives and expanded the legal functions to be able to mitigate liabilities through contracts. The systems are nothing without the members and I was gifted with a wonderful group and all cash flow is a reflection of it. I’m glad we didn’t waste their efforts. In order to maximize the LC members’ potential, training, new structures and new activities were created. Rewards and Recognition was an example of our way of giving back. I’m overjoyed that the mindset of finance has definitely started to grow and span across the LC. We may be the ones focusing and doing it but it is an effort of the whole LC without whom it would have not made the successes possible.


FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

AIESEC Ateneo de Manila University Balance Sheet As of April 30, 2012 ASSETS: Cash Accounts Receivable Inventory Deposit Equipment Less: Accumulated Depreciation TOTAL ASSETS

46 , 327 . 71 115 , 000 . 00 18 , 920 . 00 ( 13 , 561. . 00)

LIABILITIES and EQUITY: Liabilities: Accounts Payable

5 , 359 . 00 166 , 686 . 71

-

Equity: 166 , 686 . 00 166 , 686 . 00

Retained Earnings TOTAL LIABILITIES AND EQUITY AIESEC Ateneo de Manila University Income Statement For the Year Ended April 30, 2012 LC Servicing: Less: Cost of Service Gross Margin Other Revenues External Relations Subsidies Talent Management Miscellaneous Revenues Subtotal Revenues Expenses: Affiliation Fees PBOX Expenses External Relations Depreciation Expense Talent Management Miscellaneous Expenses Subtotal Expenses NET INCOME

374 , 712 . 34 ( 598 , 817 . 13 ) 542 , 999 . 99 88 , 661 . 25 61 , 600 . 00 15 , 560 . 00 ( 144 , 674 . 76 ) ( 35 , 431 . 05 ) ( 8 , 450 . 67 ) ( 7 , 568 . 04 ) ( 6 , 256 . 34 ) ( 244 , 611 . 08 )

973 , 529 . 47

77 , 1 60 . 00

( 446 , 991 . 94 ) 603 , 697 . 53


FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

AIESEC Ateneo de Manila University Statement of Cash Flows For the Year Ended April 30, 2012

108 , 467 . 12

Starting Cash Operating Activities Received from Sponsors Received LC Servicing Revenue Received OSA Subsidy Received Membership Fees Received from Misc. Sources Add: Depreciation Expense Paid Servicing Fees Paid LC Fees Paid for Misc Expenses Accounts Receivable Paid PBOX Expenses Paid ER Subsidies Paid for Member Recruitment Week Net Cash Flow from Operations

542 , 999 . 99 374 , 712 . 34 88 , 661 . 25 61 , 600 . 00 15 , 560 . 00 7 , 568 . 04 ( 598 , 817 . 13 ) ( 144 , 674 . 76 ) ( 244 , 611 . 08 ) ( 115 , 000 . 00 ) ( 35 , 431 . 05 ) ( 8 , 450 . 67 ) ( 6 , 256 . 34 ) ( 62 , 139 . 41 )

Investing Activities Net Cash Flow from Operations Financing Activites Loan from UPD Reimbursement to UPD Net Cash Flow from Financing Net Cash Flow Ending Cash

0 . 00 50 , 000 . 00 ( 55 , 000 . 00 ) 0 . 00 ( 62 , 139 . 41 ) 46 , 327 . 71


LEGALITY Office of Student Affairs There were a few infractions done due to the shifting of responsibilities for the legal function. The legal function was split among the different point people that were heading initiatives. Things like submission of Project Proposal Forms, Memorandum of Agreements and other such forms. Though it may not have been a “truly legal� concern it could have affected the accreditation of the organization. By increasing communications through giving LC wide sessions for OSA processes, having more active tracking through a PBOX tracker and conscious Team Leaders and LCP visits to OSA for process consultation, the organization was able to prevent later crises from happening. Through the LCP efforts of working closely with both the Council of Organizations for better relationships with our representatives and the OSA director, revisions to the organization template of OSA to better facilitate more efficient processes that are more organization friendly. Breach in Contract for PBOXes Due to the inexperience in PBOX creation, some agreements were verbal in nature. It is due to this that there was an incident where the trainees came expecting a certain JD only for it to be changed in the middle of the project execution by the learning partner. In order to address this, renegotiations were held in order to try and salvage the partnership. After multiple warnings, the project had to be closed and the trainees were given options to move to different projects. Those that were not satisfied were allowed to return home with compensation through some monetary reimbursement that was negotiated upon as well. In order to protect the organization, there was an Indemnity Agreement drafted in order to waive liabilities considering all the necessary XPP were accomplished. The legal infrastructure for tracking was not followed and this incident has kept upper management in line for steering their teams better. The organization also has included it into all transitions for PBOXes and has increased consultation with the legal function of the Finance department.

Excerpt from the Council of Organizations, Business Cluster Code of Internal Procedures

COUNCIL OF ORGANIZATIONS OF THE ATENEO BUSINESS CLUSTER Ateneo de Manila University, Loyola Scho ols AY 2010 - 2011 CODE OF INTERNAL PROCEDURES PART I: MEMBERS The Business Cluster, one of the nine (9) clusters of the Council of Organizations of the Ateneo, is comprised of the following business organizations accredited by the Office of Student Activities: Ateneo Association for Communications Technology Management, AIESEC Ateneo de Manila University, Ateneo Junior Marketing Association, Ateneo Lex, Ateneo Management Association, Ateneo Management of Applied Chemistry Association, Ateneo Management Engine ering Association, and Ateneo Management Economics Organization.


PROCESS AND STRUCTURE ASSESSMENT Structure

General Job Descriptions LCVP Finance- The LCVP finance role is that which sets the direction and goals for the Finance function. He provides training for the members and is the liaison for financial operations for the Talent Management and Expansion departments. Director for Finance Initiatives- The Finance initiatives group is the group that allows the integration of both new members in training and experienced finance members that are not specifically allocated for an account (department, project, etc.) They hold fund-raising projects and support the finance account liaisons and OCVPF’s by aiding with extra requirements such as procurement and create necessary paperwork. Liaisons & OCVP Finances- The liaisons (for departments) & OCVPF’s provide the finance functions as stated below.

Processes The organization does financial tracking by providing the required financial statements to the MC. This is used in order to check the actual financial health of the organization. This allows the organization to understand whether or not in can continue on its expenses. This is done by keeping tabulation of all expenses and revenues through accounting but has the paper trail to back it up. Receipts are required for expenses for them to be shouldered by the organization. This can be used to ensure that members are using funds properly and truthfully. It also serves as a way to validate claims to third parties should the need arise. These are all stored in a filing cabinet in the organization ro om. A copy is also left with the scho ol in case there should be any unforeseen problems that may cause the documents to be lost.

Financial Tracking

Aside from this there is a budget tracker for the new projects departments in order to run pseudo-independently from the Finance function of the LC. This is a form that has a process that allows it to be simple to create and easy to analyze for the finance members of OC’s that are not as versed with more advanced financing. This was important given the shortage of talent in the function that was present at the start of the LC term. Currently that has been tested for about two months, there is a new online FS process that allows the LC to provide up-to-date daily reports of the Balance Sheet, Income Statement and Statement of Cash Flows when it is filled up. The organization also works in tandem with the Accounting department of the university. This is the way in which the organization can have a preliminary audit. The reason behind this is that they have a ledger for the cash flows of the organization as well. Though it may not indicate the accruals done, it can give a hint on how effective the accounting of the members have been. It is through this body that the organization can release official receipts as well. AIESEC ADMU reports to different stakeholders: the University, the MC, the EB and members. Financial reporting to members is done through the tracker that was given to them. It is an online tracker that is easily seen by all members of the team. This allows the team to understand the financial health of the project as well as make sure that there are no errors in accounting. It is easy to read because it is a table that shows a timeline and on the timeline different expenses. The OCVPF’s do informal reporting during meetings updating whether or not financial goals are being met. Sometimes they give recommendations. These OCVPF’s also report to their superiors in order for them to get feedback. The online financial tracker is only available to the Finance department and can be lo oked at only upon request of members in order to ensure that there is no misinterpretation of the results. This however increases accountability between the different financiers. They see where some other departments are falling behind and where they should compensate.

Financial Reporting

Financial reporting to the EB is done by the LCVPF. These are done every EB meeting and involve the assessment of the whole LC. Due to the regular reporting (every week) this is usually done verbally and noted in the Minutes of the Meeting for later reference. Should the other EB members want to lo ok at the Financial Statements, they are free to lo ok at all available statements. Again, recommendations and effects between performance as well as motivating operations for cash flow are done at this point when necessary. (sometimes this included reinforcement of policies or institution of new ones). The MC is given the monthly financial statements for their review. Individual consultations with the LCVPF for the MC were also available. The University got different reports from the LC. Here they were given the budget proposals as well as the Statements of Receipts and Disbursements every start and end of the semester and project. There is a mid-year report and Year End Report. Here the financial statements again are presented as well as explanations for investments and cash flows. This is a written consolidated report as well as a verbal presentation that may include graphics.


Special Strategies & Initiatives Credit Rating System and AIS

Finance Initiatives

This year, the Finance department tried to innovate by creating a Credit Rating System, co-create the AIS or a project management system that would allow member to suggest projects. This hoped to diversify projects in order to find the most financially viable ways to create community impact while earning money. The CRS lo oked at the performance of members to see their credibility and the probability of their proposal. The AIS was a set of forms that would allow any member to give suggestions to a project that included budgets, timelines, goals and members. It would then be used to track the performance of the investment then assess through the data placed in it such as the turnover rate and the ROI. The Finance department also introduced the Finance initiatives branch. This not only allowed the Finance department to have a group of trained members for any new initiatives but it also allowed them to keep fundraising. Due to the fundraising nature of the team, it could serve as a point of motivation for non-Finance members to take interest in the function. This hoped to help solve the pipeline of the department.

Trainings

Special Trainings

Finance Dept Processes Accounting

The last was the increase in different trainings given. These were based on a wide array of topics such as FInance, Self Management, and Leadership.

Budgeting Financial Assessment Financial Ratios How to Study JD creation Basic Marketing Operations Management Leadership Styles Financial Statements

Description This is the first introduction to the department. Here they are shown what their roles can be and the different opportunities that are available. Learn how to do bookkeeping in order to help journalize entries for Finacial Statements This is the process of budget creation in the context of the project This is the training day for the AIS and CRS training Listing and explanation of how to use them for AIESEC Work life balance How to create proper position JD's Marketing priniciples to help with business model creation for Financial models Timeframe planning including principles like bullwhip effect How to deal with your teammates, members and leaders given your character How to do interpretation of Income Statements


There was no set or formal investment plan that included financial instruments. Rather investments were based on the effects necessary whether or not they were individually and specifically an aspect for being the cause of financial sustainability. This included the investments into members both for motivation and training. These may not have resulted in immediate financial returns and cannot be attributed to the financial outlay per se. However, member activity was raised to 80% and there was an increase in the member base as well to about 200 members. As outlined above, this includes the Member Development Fund and the projects like AIESEC week and ALDS. Investments were also put into the website worth Php, 15,000. This allowed the organization to be more visible and allowed for the OGX function to increase its recruits. By the end of the year, the LC had8.654 months worth of reserve. This however does not include the Accounts Receivable. Should this be added, it would grow even further. The reserves plan is shown in the graph below. Revenue Expenses OGX Reserves Projects & Trainee Servicing ICX TM ER Admin Costs

VICE PRESIDENT’S RECOMMENDATIONS There were difficulties in getting the members trained in time for them to be ready for their roles. Because of this there were difficulties with motivation. It might be go od for the next member allocations to get people who already have competencies with the roles required. (Experienced AIESECers from other departments will be help in synergy.) Furthermore, stricter tracking has to be enforced in order to best assess the budgets. Training for this has to be more than just talks and it should have more bonding sessions in order to keep motivation up. Motivation is key for keeping the department running. Investments should be limited for PBOXes and they must have internally sustainable projects that don’t rely on external sponsorships in the long run. Pushing for tracker cultures will be important for the new initiatives for loaning and initiatives to be supported. This will require full co operation between all TLs’ and a push for increased synergy for everyone to understand the help Finance may do to help.


“Seeing the growth and potential unleashed by this LC this term gives me the inspiration, the passion, and the drive for even more growth next term. I am so excited to see where it can go!” Ron Richard Habla VICE PRESIDENT for EXPANSION LOCAL COMMITTEE PRESIDENT 2012 - 2013


EXPANSION The Expansion Department, an infant department, is essentially responsible for the external operations of AIESEC AdMU. Arising from AdMU’s desire to expand to other entities, it then handles two key initiatives: AIESEC XP Market Expansion Initiatives and LC Extension Initiatives. For delineation, the AIESEC XP Market Expansion Initiatives deal with the marketing of AIESEC and its platform (AIESEC XP) to interested entities with no knowledge or little knowledge of AIESEC. As such, the Expansion Department co ordinates with the initiative group primarily to conduct market research, obtain endorsement from the administration, if necessary, and organize OGX cycles to successfully market two of the four main products of AIESEC: GCDP and GIP. For the LC Extension Initiatives, the Expansion Department essentially assists the initiative group with the “modeling” of its operations for eventual transition to a full-member LC. Modeling, in this context, includes functional training of the initiative group, systems/processes formulation and implementation, and continuous tracking and troublesho oting. The Expansion Department effectively acts as a mentor to these aspiring LCs. This ensures that, once the extension LC transitions to a full-member LC, its operations are successful and sustainable.


UNIVERSITY AND AIESEC EXPERIENCE MARKET EXPANSION LC EXTENSION INITIATIVES

COMMENTS

RECOMMENDATIONS

DAVAO

After the recent disbandment of AIESEC Davao has capacity to become independent Davao, they appealed to be put on quickly as soon as all foundations are Extension LC status under AIESEC AdMU. rebuilt and fortified. Also, it is recommended After many discussions and agreements to that Davao focus on their capacity first, their assist Davao, it was legislated. Davao is members, and their pipeline. As soon as now an official Extension LC of AIESEC these are fixed, they can get back on track AdMU. as a full member LC again.

CEBU

Cebu is now an official Extension LC AIESEC AdMU, which started as an Expansion Initiative. It has conducted Cebu Launch, member and OGX recruitment and a Code Red session.

It has to improve its internal communications as it is proving to be a challenge being a city-based LC. It has to smoothen major operations as well.

UNIVERSITY BELT

University Belt was an initiative to cluster IG for UE was, at first, unstable and IG for three big universities, namely UE, FEU and FEU non-existent. However, they are now CEU. IGs for UE and FEU have already stable. Given this, more training on AIESEC knowledge should be given. been established.

CHIANG KAI SHEK COLLEGE

CKSC was targeted for potential ChinesePotential for Chinese-speaking EPs still speaking EPs. The point of contact there looks promising so continue but should be was the student council. Problem lies in the then treated as an institution until such time administration and red tape. the administration allows AIESEC.

MARKET EXPANSION INITIATIVES

COMMENTS

RECOMMENDATIONS

Goethe Institute

Goethe Institute is one of the language institutions tapped by AIESEC AdMU to cater to the Education TNs available in the system.

MOA should be finalized and signed to begin proper recruitment for GIP EPs. There should also be clear contact person for proper CRM.

Philippine Instutute of Certified Public Accountants

PICPA ideally supplies accounting graduates for AIESEC AdMU to cater to TNs that require expereienced and skilled accountants.

MOA should be finalized and signed to begin proper recruitment for GIP EPs. Also, there should be a pre-selection to determine those who are matchable.

Technological Institute of the Philippines

TIP can provide EPs versed and knowledgeable in the information technology field, which is one of the key suppliers of TNs.

MOA should be finalized and signed to begin proper recruitment for GIP EPs. AIESEC AdMU can take advantage fully if it is accredited with the university.

Asian Institute of Management (AIM)

Director for Expansion Marketing-Universities

Expansion Marketers

Director for Expansion Marketing-Institutions

Expansion Marketers

Expansion Operations

Expansion Department

IG PRESIDENT

PROCESS AND STRUCTURE ASSESSMENT

Structures LCVP EXPANSION

AIM can supply potential MT EPs who are MOA should be finalized and signed to globally competitive since they are begin proper recruitment for GIP EPs. Also, undergoing or have completed their there should be a pre-selection to Masteral degree. determine those who are matchable.

VP TM+OGX

Members

VP ICX+PROJ

Members

VP ER

Members

Initiative Group Structure


Conducting a wholistic X Recruitment to test the market as well as train the initiative group on TM and OGX processes

conduct X recruitment and can provide EPs

Presenting, at

X RECRUITMENT

Conducting X Recruitment to test the market

the AIESEC Way (who we are) and AIESEC XP (what we can offer)

STEP 5

contacts interested in

AIESEC XP SESSION CONDUCTED

STEP 4

Conducting market research on institutions that can provide GIP EPs based on the

OBTAIN CONTACT

STEP 3

MARKET RESEARCH CONDUCTED

STEP 2

STEP 1

Process for AIESEC XP Market Expansion Initiatives

EVALUATION POINT institution being an expansion institution

STEP 6

Forming the actual initiative group (minimum of 4) that will overlook all operations conducted in the university

X RECRUITMENT

EVALUATION POINT

STEP 6

Overseeing the viability (primarily) of GCDP/GIP products for the student market

INITIATIVE GROUP FORMED

STEP 5

Presenting, at the very least, the AIESEC Way (who we are) and AIESEC XP (what we can offer)

MARKET RESEARCH CONDUCTED

STEP 4

Obtaining initial contacts interested in building an AIESEC entity in the university

AIESEC XP SESSION CONDUCTED

STEP 3

OBTAIN CONTACT

STEP 2

STEP 1

Process for University(LC) Extension Initiatives

CUSTOMER RELATIONSHIP MANAGEMENT

Evaluating the performance of the IG and the market TO DETERMINE IF VIABLE TO BECOME AN EXPANSION INITAITVE

Constant communication with the institution

(MOA signing takes

Assessments and Recommendations integrated with other parts of the Expansion Department Section

Special Strategies & Initiatives

SPECIAL STRATEGIES AND INITIATIVES

LC VISITS

These are 4-day LC Visits, which consist of team building activities, soft-skills training, functional trainings and troubleshooting. Agenda-wise, the visit was successful and achieved its objectives. However, a point of recommendation would be the scheduling and the follow through. Intiatially, there were two LC Visits scheduled but was not followed through. There should also be a way to track learning of the IG.

ONLINE MEETINGS

Online meetings were scheduled at least once every two weeks. Main agenda would always be tracking and troubleshooting on top of other pertinent matters of course. This ensured consistent tracking of performance. Also, this was a good tool to oversee the overall health of the membership. Point of recommendation or improvement would be attendance of EB members. This should be made an IG culture.

RELATIONSHIP BUILDING

Relationship building as a focus was not fully enforced. On the Expansion Marketing-Universities side, the initiative group were integrated as much as possible to the LC. This included attendance in AdMU's projects and events. However, for the institutions, minimal to no efforts were done to integrate them into the local committee. In terms of communication line, it was also harder since contacts in the institution often changed.

OPERATIONS MODELLING

In terms of operations modelling, the major difficulty faced by the department was the distance between the expansion initiative and the LC. Modelling became almost impossible and proved ineffective as a strategy. It resulted to more trainings instead of actual modelling. A point of recommendation would be to integrate more operations modelling during the actual LC Visits rather than after the visits.


VICE PRESIDENT’S RECOMMENDATIONS The standard operating procedure was conducted for every initaitive. It followed a systematic process of going about LC Extension Initiatives that proved quite effective. However, it was solely focused on the OGX market and not ICX/Projects. OGX is a fast, revenue generating operation, and the key reason behind pushing for this is to ensure financial sustainability of the potential Expansion Initiative. Points of recommendation would include developing another SOP for an ICX/Projects track or even TM track. Tracking of these processes could also be improved as well as establishing clear evaluation points or criteria for moving on to Expansion Initiative. The standard operating procedure for institutions was not really followed exactly. Each institution had a different process that they wanted or had to follow so the account manager had to adjust. At some point, these procedures were eventually conducted of course. Also, institutions did not really undergo X Recruitment just yet. It is recommended that X Recruitment be followed through. Likewise, evaluation point and criteria should really be identified. CRM was followed through, however the contact persons constantly changed so delivery was somewhat compromised. For thorough recommendations, check the first part of the Expansion Department Section.


“On my last year, AIESEC AdMU made me encounter inspiring leaders committed members and the best workers” Vincent Murga VICE PRESIDENT for EXTERNAL RELATIONS


EXTERNAL RELATIONS External Relations is the primary sales division of AIESEC AdMU. It handles all the financial, exchange, and alumni partners and its main objective is to give them quality partnerships, which are sustainable, through proper customer relations management and delivery. Its members, often called account managers, are some of the most competitive individuals you could ever meet. They have that mindset of winning; more specifically, that passion for winning, which is integral to the development of a proper sales culture. This allows them to face externals with both the competence and charisma typical of professionals who are already in the workforce. It is with this standard of professionalism that the department was able to form sustainable partnerships. Just this year, several multinationals like Standard Chartered Bank, Slate Global LTD, Colgate-Palmolive, together with giant local firms like the San Miguel Corporation, Globe Telecom, and PHINMA were able to experience AIESEC through the partnerships that External Relations has formed with their respective entities. Beyond all these achievements, however, it is the culture in External Relations that brings the professional and personal development of its members together. It is that right mix of challenges and enjoyable activities that makes life in ER exciting.


Partner

PARTNERS, ENABLERS, AND SUPPORTERS

San Miguel Corporation

Assessment Partnership enabled us to have a large amount of money and the lockout did not really constrain us since they were generous with goods when we needed

Petron Corporation

Partnership was able to cover the entire AIESEC Week and their booth for their value cards were very popular at the venue

Citisec Online

Partnership was generous but not visible at all

Standard Chartered Bank

Colgate Palmolive

Ruby Veridiano

Name of Partner Bank of Makati CB Richard Ellis Globe Infinity Tutorial Services Slate Visari Home Solutions Union Galvasteel

Recommendation Expand partnership to more than just financial because the company seems very generous and interested in what the organization stands for Expand partnership to more events so that the partner will have more opportunities and chances to make their generous support worthwhile Make partner more visible by offering packages for the events

Have a plan prepared before Partnership almost failed because approaching again so that they will we were not immediately able to be confident that we have learned fulfill our end of the deal from our past shortcomings Partnership was more of a one time thing due to weather constraints and the lack of availability of company personel during events Partnership was good during AIESEC Week but became more difficult when we could no longer give what the partner was asking for

Start of Partnership 3/1/12 3/1/12 6/1/11 1/1/12 9/1/11 6/1/11 4/1/12

Expand partnership by offering them packages into more events for the year Need to reset expectations because the partner has her own priorities and thinks we can still help her out on it

End of Raised Available Matched Realized Partnership 12/1/12 2 2 0 0 12/1/13 2 2 0 0 9/1/11 4 3 1 1 4/1/13 2 2 0 0 5/1/13 2 1 1 1 12/1/11 1 1 0 0 12/1/12 1 1 0 0


ALUMNI MANAGEMENT The alumni were managed by the Director for Alumni Relations under the VP External Relations. Her team was in charge of Alumni Night and they needed to contact the alumni based on what was on our database. There was a weak showing of alumni during the event and throughout the year, the local committee was only actively in contact with 5-8 alumni members consistently. It was only during the latter part of the year,when some members of the EB as well as some alumni, who eventually served as BOA, planning for setting up an alumni organization and a commitment to better and more effective alumni communication were recommended. With the EB being more hands on with the alumni towards the end of the term, the team that originally handled the alumni had a change of assignment into what the other ER teams were doing.

PROCESS AND STRUCTURE ASSESSMENT Structure Process

VPER

Fin Partners Choose Package MOA Signing Check with Finance

X Partners JQ Drafting Raising Transfer to ICX

Director for Accounts Management (4) Account Managers (4-6)

The current process showed that although financial and exchange partners follow the same step of contacting and eventually setting up a meeting, financial partners were much more easier to work with in partnership with the finance department compared to exchange partners that needed the partnership with ICX. This is because of the difficulty in JQ drafting and matching compared to the cho osing of packages and MOA signing. ER members did not have enough understanding of the JQ and matching that were necessary to speed up the process. Structure-wise, the team-based structure proved more effective after implementation in the second semester.


Initiative

Description

Special Strategies & Initiatives

Portfolios

The presence of portfolios with packages this year has delivered two very important qualities to our sales scheme better flexibility & customization for our partners and a standardized professional material for selling

Team-Based Structure

The team-based structure implemented during the second semester took advantage of the competitive nature of ER members and thus produced more results, particularly in the number of potential TNs. This pushed team leaders to challenge, train, and innovate with their members in order to deliver results.

EB Intervening with Alumni

The intervention of the EB with alumni relations towards the latter part of the term gave the local committee the opportunity to seek out new ways of expanding their relationship with the alumni. It was able to address the issue that the alumni have consistently brought up during the term that they do appreciate it when its the EB that reaches out to them.

VICE PRESIDENT’S RECOMMENDATIONS Recommendation

Description

CRM

Best CRM is delivery. Aside from expanding partnerships, one thing the sales department has to ensure is the delivery from the side of the local committee to the partner. Whatever they promise to the partners must be their responsibility to push to the rest of the local committee to deliver.

Knowledge of Raising and Matching

No point of raising without potential for matching. One of the biggest problems this year was that a lot of companies were interested in being raised but the potential for matching was low. This is because the sales people don't have that much knowledge on the matching side. Hence, knowledge on both raising AND matching must be assured for each and every member of the salesforce handling exchanges.

EB should directly handle alumni. The alumni appreciate it when they are talking to the LCP and his/her EB because they feel as if their presence is valued. It also gives the EB an opportunity to discover how EB directly handling Alumni the alumni can help their respective functions. This type of setup has the potential for very good relationships between the alumni and the local committee members.


“We often mistake impact for how much we’ve changed something overnight. But sometimes, all you have to do is look around, and realize that you’ve got people on board to help fight your cause with you.” Katrina Sanchez VICE PRESIDENT for PROJECTS


PROJECTS If I were to simplify the role of the Projects Department in the greater scheme of things, it is bridging the needs of the development sector and the resources of the for-profit sector, while developing young leaders aka our project managers and functional team leaders. This is something we have committed to accomplish in the last 12 months, and in striving to do so, each member who has fought for the causes of our PBOXes has, more than ever, felt a stronger sense of purpose, sharing oneself and one’s skills to something greater than ourselves. It is no easy task, definitely not for the close-minded and weakhearted. Interestingly, the experience has taught us more than we’ve bargained for. The term c‘ ross-cultural collaboration’ has never been more real to us, having been blessed to work with over 20 NGOs on social advocacies, from HIV/ AIDS to hunger, and almost 100 other young people from all over the world. Where does the passion to make the world a better place come from, you ask? Well, nothing is as exciting as knowing that you can be part of the solution, while having fun and discovering yourself along the way.


PROJECT PORTFOLIO

Through the Projects Department, we hoped to provide an intense leadership experience to members, as they gain a perspective of AIESEC operations through the integration of Communication, Exchange, Marketing and Finance functions in the Global Community Development Program. Fostering a culture of shared knowledge, our projects pave the way for members and exchange participants alike to learn the most pressing social issues of the Philippines. We talk about them in a truly global learning environment. And more often than not, we try to solve them directly. In February 2011, a partnership with the United Nations Development Programme concretized a Project Based on Exchange in ADMU, realizing 8 exchange participants from Indonesia, Mainland of China, Taiwan, Japan and Austria. They went around 8 scho ols in Metro Manila, delivering workshops to almost 2100 students, educating them on the youth’s involvement in achieving the United Nations Millennium Development Goals. In May 2011, AIESEC ADMU decided to branch out from the 2015 talks and apply the Millennium Development Goals as a basis for the creation of action-oriented projects, collectively contributing to the end of poverty. It was time to walk the talk and be part of the solution. This term’s project line up consisted of areas of the MDGs where the Philippines is lagging in progress, namely MDG 1: Eradicate Hunger & Poverty (GOLD), MDG 2: Achieve Universal Primary Education (LEGACY) and MDG 6: Combat HIV/ AIDS (Code Red). Explore Philippines, though not explicitly contributing to the MDGs, tackled tourism, which we recognize to be a potential main contributor to the Philippine economy. Through prototyping and expansion, Projects Based on Exchange contributed to almost 150% growth of in GCDP Incoming Exchange operations this term.


“Those 6 weeks I have spent in Manila involved in Code Red I’ve learnt a lot about the situation with HIV/AIDS and became a certified educator in the sphere of teaching people how to avoid spreading HIV/AIDS. I am glad to have a feeling that I was useful in some ways for this project and the Philippines. I believe that many of these kinds of projects can really make the world better for us and for the next generation.”

“Code Red is an inspiring initiative of the young people of AIESEC. Take The Test is working with them in bringing adequate HIV information to the community. As we work together towards educating the youth, the highly affected population today, we also hope that they feel the importance of knowing their status. Congratulations AIESEC! Take The Test is very proud of partnering with you.” - Ryan Pinili, Facilitator at Take The Test Project

- Alexandra Kolesova in AIESEC ENGEC-GAAP in Russia

Executive Summary Code Red is an advocacy campaign on HIV/AIDS coursed via peer education and other youthoriented activities. Code Red provides universal access to both treatment and prevention of HIV through the use of youth campaigns, social media, events and peer-to-peer education. We dare Filipinos to speak up and not be ashamed to talk about HVIV/AIDS. Code Red believes that education, prevention and treatment information should be forwarded to vulnerable sectors of society, most especially the youth, as the age bracket for HIV infection becomes younger and younger. Education, after all, is still the best prevention necessary to initiate and pioneer the paradigm shift needed to increases the chances of an HIV-free generation. Code Red utilizes interactive activities, film viewings, parties and short lectures that allow participants to understand HIV with its technical health terms, as well as a social issue. Participants are encouraged to take part in games, open forum and quizzes that allow the insights to be drawn by the participants themselves. This way, the project is able to empower the youth to speak their mind on a topic that has long been considered a tabo o in Philippine society.

“Code Red not only brought me the amazing experience of living and working in an interesting country, but also gave me the chance to meet the most outstanding persons. Working for Code Red, I felt myself more responsible for the society and the world. This internship has changed my life forever-I start to think big and dream high.” - Karen Khanh Huynh, Trainee from AIESEC FTU HCMC in Vietnam

“Code Red has an organized and well-prepared presentation regarding HIV/AIDS. They made sure we understood it better. The session they had that time began from simple information to more important ones. They showed us a video of those affected by HIV/ AIDS and had a lot of interactive games.” - Marijan Benneth Castillo, Student from Arellano University


Attendees

Events for Peer Education

Attendance

Profiles

Externals Involved

Peer Education Sessions in IntACT Classes

117

Freshmen students from ADMU

Peer Education Sessions at Far Eastern University

59

NSTP students

Peer Education Sessions at Miriam College

40

Mixed undergraduates

Screening of HIV: Si Heidi, Si Ivy at si V at Escaler Hall, Loyola Schools Campus

228+70

ADMU students, professors & outsiders

Exogain Productions, Department of Health & Red Cross Youth

Train the Trainers Sessions with Standard Chartered Bank

64

ADMU students, Student organization officers, Representatives from Ateneo Junior Marketing Association & Ateneo Management Economics Organization

Standard Chartered Bank, Red Cross Youth

Red Alert: Code Red Launch Party

71

Varied

Take the Test, YAFA, YPEER, UNAIDS, Pinoy Plus Association

Screening of HIV: Si Heidi, Si Ivy at si V at SM Manila

1600

Philippine Normal University Students

Exogain Productions

Peer Education Sessions at Arellano University

243+30

NSTP Students, Student organization officers

Peer Education Sessions at Bagong Silang, Caloocan

260

Barangay Health Workers, Parish Youth

Take The Test

Staff Peer Education Sessions for AIESEC ADMU

30

AIESEC ADMU

Rock Assault (Event partnership with Ateneo Women’s Week)

125

Varied

Exchanges Realized

July 2011

7

August 2011

1

November 2011

3

January 2012

8

February 2012

6

Total

25

High Frequency Productions, Ateneo Women’s Week

“Being a part of the operations committee of Code Red was really an experience unlike any other. It is really an unbelievable experience when you are given a chance to really work for and fight for a cause such as HIV/AIDS. I have never worked with such a passionate group such as the OC and the many trainees that have come to join in this project. It is with the activities and the people that I have come to meet throughout this project that have really inspired me to have a new perspective of such causes; not just with HIV/AIDS, but with others as well. I will truly bring my experience with Code Red throughout the rest of my life and hopefully I may use my experiences with this project throughout my AIESEC experience and in everything I do as well. “ - Alejandro Dizon, Code Red Operations Manager


Timeline of Events

July 2011

Partnership Initiation with HIV NGOs

August 2011

First Train the Trainers Session with Standard Chartered Bank

September 2011

Peer Education Sessions in ADMU Campus

November 2011

Red Alert: Code Red Launch

December 2011

Peer Education Sessions in Metro Manila Universities Screening of HIV: Si Heidi, Si Ivy at Si V in ADMU Campus

January 2012

Peer Education Sessions in Metro Manila Universities

February 2012

Peer Education Sessions in Metro Manila Universities & Bagong Silang, Caloocan Screening of HIV: Si Heidi, Si Ivy at Si V at SM Manila ‘Silence is Not Sexy’ Merchandise Sales

March 2012

“Nakakatulong ng malaki sa larangan ng edukasyon at kalusugan. Maraming natuto at namulat ang kanilang kaisipan tungkol sa HIV. Lively ang discussion sa area at hinahanap pa kayo sa ibang areas. Natutuwa sila kasi nakakakita rin sila ng foreigners dito sa area at bukod doon, natutuwa sila kasi natututo pa sila.” - Aida Corrales, Kagawad from Barangay Bagong Silang, Caloocan

Peer Education Sessions in Metro Manila Universities Rock Assault Partnership event with Ateneo Women’s Circle

Sponsors, Supporters, and Enablers

Standard Chartered has over 85,000 employees, representing 129 nationalities in 71 markets. Their efforts in Africa and all over Asia for their Living with HIV program have been recognized globally through their network of employees whom they call HIV champions. The company also invests in curing malaria and blindness and women empowerment. The Youth Peer Education Network (Y- PEER) is a groundbreaking and comprehensive youth-to-youth initiative pioneered by UNFPA in 2001. Its membership includes thousands of young people who work in the many areas of adolescent sexuality and reproductive health. Pinoy Plus Association Inc. is the only association of its kind in the Philippines with 100% of its members people living with HIV and/or AIDS. The organization offers services such as counseling, referrals and care and support programs, skill building for PPAI members and/or similarity-minded groups. Take The Test provides HIV testing and counseling in avenues that will be most accessible to the public. They promote their services through innovative projects, parties, and theater productions, effectively attracting the participation of celebrities and passionate young people. Exogain Productions is an independent production house that produced the FAMAS Best Advocacy Film, HIV (Si Heidi, Si Ivy at si V). Ateneo Women’s Week focuses on artistic means of expression to reveal the political and social issues surrounding women, adding knowledge and learning to events in line with International Women’s Day. They believe that feminism is not a fight or a plight, but a celebration, a recognition of the healthy and productive coexistence of men and women in Philippine society.


Executive Summary

LEGACY stands for Link Endeavors, Generate Action and Challenge the Youth. These sum up the framework of our education initiative that can be adapted to several kinds of output, from a mobile library to a physical extension of the classro om. Our cause starts with the belief in linking endeavors. The power of collaboration among experts in the education sphere, both in the private and public sectors, will ultimately magnify the impact of all our individual actions combined. Sustainability is possible when we generate action from both ends. Mere charity leads only to a culture of dependence. But humanitarian acts backed by a sustainable framework that necessitates the own initiative of its beneficiaries to support the growth of the process will change the course of philanthropy without compromising the generous involvement of major stakeholders. Last but not the least, we want to challenge the youth because we know they can. The project plans to create a Pay-It-Forward Movement wherein gratitude is not a one-way street, but instead a culture that breeds a sense of responsibility for the other driven by the mutual desire of beneficiaries to share the go od bestowed upon them and inspire others to do even better. LEGACY is a supplement to the current public education system, beginning with the cultivation of a reading habit among elementary scho ol children through 2-hour reading & learning sessions for grade scho ol children after scho ol. Though it does not directly affect MDG 2: Achieve Universal Primary Education, the project aspires to extend the learning environment in the classro om to the neighborho od where kids spend most of their time after scho ol and somehow reach out to those whom the culture of reading doesn’t trickle down due to the environment at home that is not conducive to learning.

Events for Peer Education Marytown

Rona’s Garden

Daang Tubo

St. Vincent de Paul Shelter for Girls

Attendance

Attendees


Exchanges Realized July 2011

6

November 2011

1

January 2012

12

February 2012

5

Total

24

“I am proud to have a second home and family in this world, participating in GCDP in the Philippines is the first ever experience in my life. I never thought that I would actually make a positive change in another part of the world as well as the people, the culture, and the kids has changed me into a better person.” -Sarah Shi Ming, Trainee from AIESEC UTM in Malaysia

Timeline of Events

July 2011

Community Profiling around District 3, Quezon City

August 2011

LEGACY Reading Sessions along communities in Balara, Commonwealth and Katipunan, Quezon City Training Session with Quezon City Public Library Official LEGACY Launch at the Quezon City Hall

NovemberDecember 2011

LEGACY Reading Sessions in 1 Community in District 3, Quezon City

January-February 2012

LEGACY Reading Sessions in 3 Communities in District 3, Quezon City

January 2012

Training Session with NGO, BASA

February-March 2012

LEGACY Reading Sessions in 3 Communities + 1 Orphanage in District 3, Quezon City

Sponsors, Supporters, and Enablers Quezon City Public Library is Metro Manila’s largest public library located in 18 branches. Adarna Publishing House is the Philippines’ first & largest publisher of children’s bo oks. Eduk, Inc. (Edukasyon para sa Kinabukasan, Incorporated) is the organization behind Aklatang Pambata (Children’s Library) active in 8 communities in Luzon & Visayas The National Bo ok Development Board is the official Philippine government agency mandated to develop the publishing industry. The ilove2read Program is a weekend reading program launched by the Office of the Legislative Representative of the 3rd District of Quezon City Hon. Jorge Banal in 2007. Banal filed House Bill 1457, an act declaring November 27 as Araw ng PagBasa, a regular working holiday.


Executive Summary

Explore Philippines is an initiative to promote Philippine tourism locally and internationally through the online publishing of the unique, personal experiences of AIESEC exchange participants, who will be deeply immersed in the fascinating Filipino culture. Through creative projects such as feature writing, photography and videography, the project aims to provide a cultural immersion by giving its participants the opportunity to gain new perspectives and share these by expressing themselves in their own extraordinary ways. By making these artistic works available to the public, it is our hope that people of all ages, nationalities and backgrounds may not only take a peek into what the Philippines has to offer, but also be inspired to develop a certain curiosity, open-mindedness and an appreciation of different cultures that will fuel the growth of each one’s global outlo ok. Through curriculumbased itineraries composed of historical trademarks, Filipino popular cultural icons and environmental excursions, exchange participants acquire an inside lo ok into the Philippines and in turn, provide a stranger’s perspective in telling the story of 107 7, islands. From the processing of the infamous duck egg (aka balut) to the exploration of the hanging coffins of Sagada, the itineraries veer away from the mainstream tourist spots and encourages getting lost and finding the unexpected. Likewise, the online platform (Jeepney Diaries) will deliver the foundation of the Local Ambassadors Program, inviting local explorers to join our exchange participants in seeing the Philippines with new eyes. It is the project’s hope that locals no longer are tourists in their own country. Facebo ok page garnered 1558 likes from May 1, 2011 to December 31, 2011

Exchanges Realized

May 2011

1

June 2011

6

July 2012

14

August 2011

1

October 2011

1

December 2011

10

February 2012

4

March 2012

1

Total

38

“From April to June 2011, I had the great opportunity and pleasure of being a part of the Explore Philippines project as a photographer. It was a once-in-a-lifetime experience and I would not want to miss it for the world. The internship made it possible for me to discover Manila and various different locations all over the Philippines. And thanks to the extremely hospitable friends of the LC, I enjoyed insights on Filipino culture that I would have missed otherwise. Next to having found new friends in the Explore Philippines project, I widened my horizon and exposed myself to a whole new culture. I cannot wait to go back to the Philippines and explore more of this beautiful country. Thank you for an unforgettable journey.” - Alessio Biribicchi, Trainee from AIESEC Bern, Switzerland

Sponsors, Supporters, and Enablers Ayala Museum Museum Cafe (Raintree Restaurants) Cantina (Tia Maria’s) Club Mwah Department of Tourism Department of Environment and Natural Resources Grande Island

Microtel Big Better Burgers Enchanted Kingdom Flapjacks (Bistro Group) Avilon Zo o Fruit Magic LazerExtreme Zo omanity Group


Executive Summary Samahan ng Mamayan-Zone One Tondo Organization (SM-ZOTO) was a national partner of AIESEC Philippines. Garden of Life & Development is an initiative started by SM-ZOTO for their communities’ transition site in Towerville, Barangay San Jose del Monte, Bulacan. A sustainable venture that hopes to benefit all 24,000 families in Towerville. Residents, particularly the housewives, have taught each other to cultivate their vegetables and share their yield to their neighbors. GOLD by AIESEC ADMU is simply an extension of SM-ZOTO’s advocacy for urban development in line with the United Nations’ Millennium Development Goal #1: Eradicate Hunger and Poverty. The project directs focus on promoting urban farming and advocating community nutrition with the help of exchange participants who will be closely working with the local committee and its partner establishments, including Boystown Community in Marikina, Balara Elementary Scho ol and Barangay Pansol in Quezon City.

GOLD is designed with a specific focus on the mothers within these areas. The team will be conducting seminars and interactive activities on the importance of nutrition. In the Nutrition Campaign, guest individuals in the culinary industry would give a demonstration to mothers on how to prepare nutritious fo od for children using cheap and available vegetables and ingredients. GOLD also aims to introduce partner communities with alternative methods on fo od sustainability and fo od security by introducing the concept of urban farming through sessions delivered by exchange participants, such as vertical farming, organic fertilizer production and the like, and maintenance of the introduced system of urban farming, thus contributing to the overall sustainability of the initiative.

“My one-month stay in Manila, the Philippines is definitely wonderful. I love it not only because I could spend my holiday traveling, but also because I gained many other things, friendship and hard-work experience from this very short yet memorable project called G.O.L.D, garden of life and development. “ - Yanjun Ji. Trainee from AIESEC NUS in Singapore

“GOLD gave me a venue to push my limits, challenge myself and do what I love--do what I love in an impactful way that allowed me to pursue my personal advocacies by helping my organization” - KC Shiroma, Team Leader for GOLD


Exchanges Realized July 2011

1

August 2011

3

December 2012

11

February 2012

4

Total

19

Attendees 26 children attending the Boystown Complex Community Nutrition Session.

Timeline of Events December 2011January 2012

Farming Activities in Barangay Pansol, Quezon City and Boystown Complex, Parang, Marikina

December 2011

Farming Activity & Immersion in Rizal Park, Manila

January 2012

Community Nutrition Awareness Session for Boystown Complex Children

February 2012

Farming Activities & Immersions in Mendez Farm, Cavite

Sponsors, Supporters, and Enablers

Boystown Complex in Parang, Marikina is a residential care center for Manila’s underprivileged male children, ages eight to 16. Aside from Boys Home, the present Town includes Girls Home (for girls aged three to 16), Home for the Aged (for homeless, abandoned and neglected elderly people aged 60 years and above); and Foundling Home (for younger boys three to seven years old). Most of Town’s young wards come from the po orest communities in Manila whose families are unable to care for them.


PROCESS AND STRUCTURE ASSESSMENT Step Select an Issue.

Prerequisites? Must know limitations & qualifications of a PBOX.

Basis/Framework/Guidelines? Responsible? 1 United Nations Millennium Development Initiator group Goals 2 Statistics 3 International & Local News

Initiator group

LCVP Projects

Completed Business model

Initiator group

LCVP Projects

The purpose, goals and objectives of the PBox

Initiator group

LCVP Projects

Concept note

look for potential OCVPs and OC members that show interest in the issue

Initiator group

LCVP Projects and TM

At least an OCVP position is filled

Teach OCVPs and OC members how to use PMS

Initiator now OCP and LCVP & Director for Proj

LCVP Projects and Director for Proj

OC is knowledgeable of how to use the PMS tracker

aiesec.net account + issue

search for potential supply from @ entities

Initiator group

suppy and demand +issue

Product, Price, Place, Promotion, Policy

Initiator group

Marketing Mix

Business model canvas

Create Logic Model.

Business model

Logic model template

Write a Concept Note.

Description + Objectives + Measures of Success + Mechanics & JD of trainee and OC + Calendar

Recruit OC.

Concept note + JD of the OC

Give PMS Training.

OCVPs + OC members + Logic Model

Talent Management Template on Team Goal Do Team Goal Setting OCVPs present +PMS training Setting & Gantt Chart Collect Contacts & do Market Research Cold Calls. Create a Gantt Chart Communications Plan. Business Model + Logic Create Dummy Model + Concept Note + Itinerary. Gantt Chart Create Financial Dummy Itinerary + Gantt Chart + Budget History Chart. Create Bare Minimum Business Model + Logic Model + Concept Note + Portfolio for Local Dummy Itinerary Partners.

Issue

LCVP Projects and ICX LCVP Projects and ER

BD

Check Supply & Demand. Do 5Ps of Social Marketing. Create Business Model.

Final Output?

LCVP Projects

Entities that could become potential financial or learning partners Potential country partners for supply Completed Marketing Mix for issue

Search for potential partners, supplementary information, exisiting initiatives for the issue

Do Market Research. Issue

Consult with?

OC

LCVP ER

LCVP Projects and Director for Proj LCVP Projects and ER

Proposed gantt chart and goals Partners that are willing to invest in the PBox

list of companies and entities to contact

OCVP MKT

Communications Plan from Communications Department

OCVP COM

LCVP Projects and Comm

Communications plan

Main activity partners, learning partners, partner area entities

OC

LCVP Projects

A flexible and malleable itinerary

financial history chart template

OCP+FIN

LCVP Projects and Fin

Proposed financial history chart

LCVP Projects, ER and Comm

Bare minimum portfolio

LCVP Projects and ER

Main activity partner

LCVP Projects

At least one learning partner

OCP+OCVP Agreed on Product Developed with Current line MKT +OCVP up of Partners COM look for partner(s) willing to give financial aid OCVP OPS and whose advocacy mimics or is exactly the +MKT same as the OC's look for partners willing to give training and OCVP OPS information for the trainees to execute project +MKT

Secure Main Activity Partners.

Bare Minimum Portfolio

Find Learning Partners.

Bare Minimum Portfolio

Create New Portfolio for Local Partners.

Bare Minimum Portfolio + create a presentable portfolio to attract more Main Activity Partners + Input partners from Learning Partners

OCVP COM +MKT

LCVP Projects, Comm and ER

A finalized portfolio

Dummy Itinerary

looking for supplies for operations

OCVP OPS

LCVP Projects

Detailed itinerary

Financial History Chart

ideas to raise funds for the project

OC

LCVP Projects

Concept Note of Fundraiser

filling out PPF to submit to OSA

Approved PPF from OSA Budget approved by Finance Department

Depending on project design

OCVP Fin + OCP OC

Cost-Revenue Streams of LC

OCVP Matching

Communications Department

OCVP COMM

LCVP Projects and COMM

Content complete

OCVP Fin + OCP

LCVP Projects and LCVP FIN

Approved PPF

Canvass Supplies Needed for Itinerary. Brainstorm for Fundraiser. Submit PPF for Fundraiser. Run Fundraiser Secure Housing for Trainees Create Wiki, Matching Pubmat for @.net and website Compose Final Budget for Submission to OSA Draft JQ for Applicants Create Risk Plan

necessary and complete info of PBoX for trainee Completed PPF requirements

LCVP Projects LCVP Projects LCVP Projects and LCVP ICX

Fundraisers ready for implementation fundraiser to be executed by OC Funds for OC Housing for trainees

Approved PPF for project

JQ Template from ICX

OCVP Matching

LCVP Projects and LCVP ICX

Gantt Chart

Risk Plan Template

OCVP OPS

LCVP Projects

OCVP OPS

LCVP Projects

MOA templates

OCVP MKT

LCVP Projects and LCVP ER

MOA templates

OCVP OPS

LCVP Projects and LCVP ER

Reservation form

OCVP OPS

LCVP Projects

Reserved venues

Communications Department

OCVP COMM

LCVP COMM

Finalized pubmats

LCVP Projects and ICX

Performance appraisal to be executed by TM Stipulated number of trainees per cycle

Contact Communities and Partner entities Submit MOA with drafted MOAs local partners Submit MOA with drafted MOAs communities and entities Program flow and reservation Reservations for inform requirements and school activities approved PPF Create pubmats for Details of Activities + Theme from Concept Note activities Get pubmats finalized pubmats from OCVP COMM approved by OSA Performance JDs of OC members Appraisal Raise and Match on Raised forms and JQ @.net Arrange Pickups for Matched trainees and flight details Trainees

OCVP FIN Talent Management Department Template

Visa extension needs

approved pubmats

TM OCVP Matching

Drafted JQ ready once PPF is approved Contingency plan for operations Edited itinerary for partner communities and entities Signed and approved MOA by partners and OSA

OCVP Matching LCVP ICX


Special Strategies & Initiatives

Project Itinerary 6-Week Checklist WEEK 1 (ORIENTATION) DAY 1

MDG Theme

OC must be present Overview of PBoX issue and framework Job description

As a collective theme, AIESEC ADMU applied the Millennium Development Goals as a basis for the creation of action-oriented projects. This created an easier framework in terms of product development with externals. It was also an opportune marketing strategy in terms of positioning the LC as a GCDP PBOX destination, as other countries (such as Portugal and Greece) started tapping the MDGs as the central subject matter of PBOXes that revolved around youth-oriented workshops.

Expectation setting Daily Itinerary Documentation requirements Servicing fee collection Visa extension requirements Calendar of LC and other activities Team building of Trainees and OC Final announcements and reminders DAY 2-3 (TRAINING BY LEARNING PARTNERS)

Throughtbox and Issue Education

Venue Hard copy of learning materials Pens and other materials

This aided in product development, as Thoughtbox sessions opened the flo or for general discussion of pertinent social issues. In the university, there was no avenue for a learning environment such as this beyond the classro om. These equipped members with the proper knowledge on the developmental context of the projects. Beyond product development, this also was the first time that issue education was introduced to the LC, making PBOX creation and operations more accessible to members who are not part of the Projects Department. Non-Projects members get to voice out their opinion on the positioning of the issue in the project and the potential avenues and audiences that the project can tap.

Processing framework/guide questions Honorarium Food and Beverage for partners WEEK 2 (MID-PROJECT EVALUATION) DAY 10 Framework Progress report Update partners Points of Improvement and Expansion Strategies for Improvement and Action steps

AIESEC Initiative System shift to simplified Project Management System

Although this was initially founded on managing the project on a financial perspective, members got intimidated by the number of tabs and intricate frameworks. This only left project trackers blank and not updated on a regular basis. During the second semester, a Director for Project Management was allocated, a member solely in charge for co-creating a tracking system that integrated all functions in the project, including exchange, finance, communications, operations and sales.


VICE PRESIDENT’S RECOMMENDATIONS

C O D E R E D

RECOMMENDATION

DESCRIPTION

Create a basic operations model for running HIV peer education sessions

Given the success of the sessions reaching almost 3000 young people in 4 months, the next step for the project is expansion. Among its activities, peer education sessions are the easiest to replicate. By forming the proper framework and publishing the appropriate tools and guidelines, AIESEC ADMU can move on to expanding Code Red operations in its extension entities in Cebu and Davao if market research affirms the need and feasibility of doing so. Aided by a locally based learning partner based, city-wide operations can definitely boost the brand of the project, leverage for better sales and project sponsorships, as well as the tri-city impact. If learning partners in Cebu and Davao cannot be established, a seeding program to those different cities can add value to the cultural experience that exchange participants avail of in our projects.

Establish key partnerships with local government and the Department of Education

One of the main bottlenecks in reaching more people for peer education sessions was the delay in the process of administrative approval per school. Endorsements from the proper governing bodies will speed up the process of garnering an audience. This will also add diversity to the audiences the project can reach if cities or school systems approve of Code Red collectively.

Integrate the Ateneo community

Although the project was able to reach a strong audience base, it has not established its presence in its home market. The organizing committee can approach either administrative offices or the Council of Ateneo Organizations and run through long-term plans together that would cover a wider range of audiences and would integrate activities that have already been planned by these entities. The content of the peer education modules can also be endorsed to the School of Science & Engineering and can be incorporated in certain classes, as general as Science 10 or as specific as Health Science electives.

Strengthen Human Resources’ Knowledge and Alignment L E G A C Y

Create Educational Modules These educational modules can provide the standard for subsequent trainees in dealing with the children of the community and tracking the progress of activities from the previous immersions. for Community Visits

Plot out and Support with a Communications Plan

E X P L O R E

G O L D

Project Feasibility

Find established learning partners in fields of agriculture and human nutrition

The idea of the project is simple and operations are easy to implement. Local volunteers can be rounded up to join and contribute to the daily activities in these communities. The impact of the project has very high potential in attracting more support from different partners. Nonetheless, these need to be communicated and shared through posters and online platforms. Despite the high number of exchanges brought in by the project, Explore Philippines is not recommended to continue operations as a Project Based on Exchange. It is best to use the project or initiative as an avenue instead for trainees to showcase learnings from issues and their trips around the Philippines. This would require the team to create of a financial model to support the various trips of the trainees, given that trips in bulk can actually be an income-generating scheme to support Incoming Exchange operations. With the introduction of the ‘It’s More Fun in the Philippines’ Department of Tourism campaign, the initiative can align itself to the national campaign either by design or through a partnership to capitalize on the noise on social media. Work with local organizations and governments as well in order to maximize local support, most especially in terms of finding the optimal itineraries and spotting inexpensive housing.

This will supplement the learning environment of the project for both the members and the trainees, thus contributing to potential expansion points and innovation. This will also garner more support with externals if reinforced by credible sources.

Create separate tracks for This would pave the way for more realizations, as well as focused efforts in developing both concepts. urban farming and nutrition. The project will also have a wider and more diverse audience reach.

Streamline Exchange Operations in Project Management D E P A R T M E N T

As the PBOX grew, there came a need to add more people. However, this shift of members was not supported by the proper skills training and the proper foundations in team synergy and persona alignment. For planning subsequent cycles, take into consideration the speed of member education cycles to be in sync with the level of operations growth.

Although this might increase the burden on project managers and members of the operations team, this gives more ownership to members in terms of integrating the exchange function into actual operations. The accountability of taking care of trainees will no longer rely on the service and reception team, as the integration of these trainees should actually be seamless – all members of the LC should take part of this experience. Streamlining processes will also pave the way for proper standards being put in place, putting equal weights on exchange and project operations.

This is a good case practice from Code Red that was able to reach more people and a more diverse Continue Expanding Network audience reach. Learning also grows, as various learning partners of a specific issue actually have their for Learning Partners, even own expertise on particular areas of the issue. Product development as well becomes an easier process, in terms of innovating on activities and co-creating these with experts. This also calls for instilling a culture Local Governments of customer relations management that is yet to be implemented across different departments of the LC. Include Risk Management in There should be a shift from crisis management to risk management in order to better mitigate or avoid Planning risks and preventable scenarios. This will also contribute to GCDP ICX’s Net Promoters Score. The project in itself should be self-sustainining, such that ICX does not become a burden to ER’s Create supplementary product to generate sales or operations and solely relying on revenue streams from OGX. This could also support the push for innovation within PBOXes, such that partners can help co-create products that can uplift their brand and enter contests increase cash flows for the project.


“Everyday, in the best way I know how.” Kathleen Kho LOCAL COMMITTEE PRESIDENT


OFFICE of the PRESIDENT 2011 – 2012 for AIESEC AdMU has been a year of successes and growth. As of the end of the term, AIESEC AdMU has ranked overall #1 Local Committee in the Philippines based on performance and growth in various programs and has garnered the Local Committee Excellence Award. The LC also received other awards and was able to rank #6 globally for GCDP TN Realizations in Q1 2012. AIESEC AdMU delivered 201 exchange experiences. 98 leadership experiences was offered to our 239 members. 87% of our membership was active, the highest percentage we’ve ever achieved—a percentage that is not easy to do for organizations in ADMU. We’ve implemented 4 Projects Based on Exchange (PBOXes), which tackle issues like HIV/AIDS, Tourism, Hunger,and Education. The LC has also become the official extending entity of AIESEC in Cebu and AIESEC in Davao through the efforts of its expansion department. Overall, all departments, in all aspects, have exhibited immense growth, development, and performance. It was an honor to have been trusted to steer the LC for a remarkable year such as this one. Leading the Executive Board team, and together leading the entire LC was an unforgettable learning experience and I can only hope for more growth and more lives changed through AIESEC AdMU.


AWARDS RECEIVED

Council of Organizations of the Ateneo Executive Board of the Year Awarded as Executive Board of the Year among 48 other organizations in Ateneo de Manila University


DEPARTMENTAL ASSESSMENT DEPARTMENT

BRIEF OVERALL ASSESSMENT

OUTGOING EXCHANGE

With 119% growth in GCDP Realizations and 100% growth in GIP Realizations, OGX displayed healthy performance for the term. Also, less dead months were seen compared to previous terms. The biggest point for improvement would be account management and applicant retention. OGX had the opportunity to gain even more results for the term but the LC lost most of its applicants for GCDP and GIP.

INCOMING EXCHANGE

Incoming Exchange, interestingly, achieved the most and least results for the term. With 189% growth in GCDP realizations and record breaking performance, the GCDP program in ICX had the most impressive performance among all departmental operations.This actually allowed the LC to rank #6 globally for Quarter 1 of 2012. On the other hand, GIP Realizations declined with -71% growth. This was due to late TN raising and lack of focus on this program. It is the weakest program performance of the LC for term 2011-2012.

TALENT MANAGEMENT

Talent Management in AIESEC AdMU is already a continuously operational machine. TM Processes, especially those most focused on run efficiently and on time. Few delays happened but performance was very good. TM was also able to develop new initiatives that addressed the real needs of the LC. Also, new innovative programs like the Member Development Fund were created and implemented. Overall, operations ran smoothly for the term. It would have been better for TM though if innovation started earlier in the term, and if actual program/product perspective were adapted for TMP and TLP.

COMMUNICATIONS

Performance for this department was stronger in the latter part of the term. There were a lot of hurdles in building the foundation of the new department in the 1st semester. Delivery of results was good in the 2nd semester as seen by OGX recruitment results, and more importantly, the strong brand we have as AIESEC AdMU to various stakeholders. Internal communications and information management could have been improved further and a thorough year-long communications plan should have been implemented to know better how to operate during the entirety of the term.

FINANCE

For daily and regular operations, Finance was consistent throughout the term. They knew what to do with the LC financial matters and invested quite smartly. Better financial reporting in the first half of the term could have been done and a more strict hold on LC reserves should have been implemented. There were also a few bad investments that could have been avoided.

EXPANSION

Being a very new department, Expansion was able to achieve a lot. Officially, AIESEC AdMU has 2 extension LCs(Cebu and Davao), with new initiative groups on the way. Also, market expansion was started well given the very few people in this department. Standard operating procedures were also created to build systems to be followed by the department. It would have performed even better if the department had more members.

EXTERNAL RELATIONS

As a function, ER was able to grow a lot from the previous terms and actually performed well enough to sustain LC finances. This was a big step forward from the previous terms and we were able to gain sustainable partnerships. TN raising is one big point for improvement because it led to the low GIP ICX performance. Another would be member knowledge. Most members were limited to the ER perspective and it would be healthier to have members more rooted in AIESEC as an organization rather than the function alone.

PROJECTS

It is very difficult to run 4 projects based on exchange and the Projects Department definitely achieved a lot for the term. Their collaboration with ICX was one of the strongest seen in the LC for the term. One big point for improvement would be project management. Conceptwise, the projects were very good but sometimes implementation fell short. There were many bottlenecks during the term that could have been avoided or mitigated better.


AIESEC 2015 EXECUTION - YOUTH ENGAGEMENT ( 1 ) Thoughtbox is a monthly open forum designed to provide a development context on issues tackled by PBOXes of the LC. Participants get to share their thoughts on current affairs, as well as discuss short-term and long-term solutions. Three sessions were conducted this year, discussing Tourism, Poverty and HIV. 70 people participated in these talks in late 2011, including students in ADMU who are not part of AIESEC. ( 2 ) LEGACY Insertions cover of majority of the trainee itinerary for LEGACY. Activities include reading aloud to young scho ol children of a particular age bracket, and providing exercises and activities to improve reading comprehension and English speaking skills. Each session can engage a maximum of 30 scho ol children. For the first cycle, our 6 trainees ran sessions to 300 children spread out along 11 communities of Quezon City District 3. For the subsequent cycles, insertions were focused on communities nearby the Ateneo campus, such as Marytown (200 families), Rona’s Garden (210 families), Daan Tubo (200 families) and the St. Vincent de Paul Shelter for Girls 1( 1 children). ( 3 ) LEGACY was officially launched on 23 Au-gust 2011 through a photo exhibit at the Quezon City Hall. Trainees of the first cycle shared testimonials and imparted message of hope for the education of the children they’ve taught. Partners, such as the Quezon City Public Library, Adarna Publishing House and the National Bo ok Development Board, were there to witness the exhibit. Around 40 people from Quezon City attended the launch, as the audience eagerly interacted with the trainees about their experience. ( 4 ) Code Red was officially launched on 26 November 2011 through Red Alert, a launch party held at the Palladium Clubhouse, Shaw Boulevard in line with the celebration with World AIDS Day 2012. The launch party served as an opportunity to introduce to the public the line up of activities prepared for December 2011-March 2012 through a life-size exhibit of the project portfolio and serve as an avenue for engagement and interaction for learning partners to mingle with students and other partners in an informal setting. The event culminated with the release of LED ballo ons to the sky, in memory of those lives HIV/AIDS has taken away. 75 people attended, including our partners from UNFPA, UNAIDS, Take the Test, YPEER, Go Twist and Pinoy Plus Assocation. ( 5 ) Code Reducation are peer education sessions on HIV prevention, transmission, testing, treatment and positive living designed to engage students through interactive modules provided by Standard Chartered Bank’s Living With HIV CSR initiative. Short quizzes are answered by participants to gauge their comprehension of concepts. Participants also join a pledge system, committing to share their newly acquired knowledge on HIV to 3 other young persons. From November 2011 to mid-February 2012, the project has sought to educate 3000 students from the Ateneo de Manila University, Far Eastern University, Miriam College and Arellano University. Sessions were also held to 260 barangay health workers and members of the parish youth ministry and barangay office staff in Bagong Silang, Calo ocan, the largest barangay in the country. ( 6 ) In partnership with Exogain Productions, the film screening of independent film entitled HIV: Si Heidi, Si Ivy at Si V aimed to further HIV awareness of the community through the stories of 3 different characters. There were 3 screenings of the movie held in December 2011, in line with the celebration of World AIDS Day, attended by 120 students in the Ateneo campus. Another special screening in SM Manila was also held with 1600 students from the Philippine Normal University as members of the audience. Immediately after the show, a certified physician from the Department of Health clarifies inquiries from the audience. Short quizzes are answered by the audience to gauge their understanding of the concepts in the film. The film showing also served as a fundraiser, as 50% of ticket sales were donated to Pinoy Plus Association. ( 7 ) GOLD’s farming activities were designed to train the trainees that they may demonstrate these simple urban and vertical farming techniques to members of the community through small group hands-on activities on-site. The initial session was conducted by an agriculturist Dr. Pepz Cunanan. The subsequent activities were held in Barangay Pansol and Boystown Complex. As the trainees engaged with mostly adults in the former community, the latter community’s crops benefited more than 20 orphans through the help of 3 gardening staff that the trainees instructed as well. A follow up awareness session on nutrition “What Makes You Healthy?” was prepared by the trainees and delivered to 20 young orphans in Boystown community. ( 8 ) The LC was able to recruit 800 applicants for the Team Member Program and 923 sign-ups for the exchange programs. Other people engaged can be seen in TMP , TLP , GCDP , and GIP performances.


Special Strategies & Initiatives 2 New Departments: Communications and Expansion

This term saw the creation of 2 new departments for the LC. At the start of the year, Communications was created. It has been a department that the LC had needed for several terms already to manage the AIESEC AdMU brand. Halfway into the term, the Expansion Department was created. It addressed the need for a specialized department to manage LC extension initiatives and AIESEC XP Market Expansion. This was done to keep the previous 7 departments focused on their own functions, in the scope of the LC only.

International Perspective and Presence

We were represented in 7 international conferences from 2011 until April of 2012. These are: APXLDS 2011, SEA Summit 2011, International Congress in Kenya, Indonesian Youth Leadership Conference, Asia Pacific LCP Meeting, APXLDS 2012, and SEA Conference 2012. First of all, this improved the brand of the LC and allowed delegates to directly make connections and partnerships with other AIESEC entities. Second, this strategy kept the LC aligned with the global direction and up to date with the latest and most innovative strategies from AIESEC International. Lastly, it provided go od insight for the LC from other AIESEC entities. We were able to obtain best case practices, while gaining insight on how others perceived our operations.

Conference Attendance and National Participation

Members were highly encouraged to join conferences and participate in national initiatives. This led to AIESEC AdMU having the biggest delegations to conferences such as NLDC, National Congress, and Strategic Conference. Also, the LC was well represented in various national initiatives and was a strong contributor to each one. The mindset developed in the LC is that of AIESEC AdMU being only a small part of a bigger entity, that is AIESEC Philippines. And that whatever achievements we have as an LC will only matter if AIESEC Philippines is successful as an entity as well.

LC STRATEGIES TALENT MANAGEMENT DEVELOPMENT TMP

TLP

GCDP ICX GCDP OGX GIP ICX GIP OGX Team-based LC Structure and Culture LC-Wide Synergy Training Midde Manager Development Performance Management Member Relations and Alignment

F&L

GCDP ICX GCDP OGX GIP ICX GIP OGX Market Research and Segmentation Standardized Operations Market Capitalization Product Packaging Showcasing Impact

F&L

GCDP ICX GCDP OGX GIP ICX GIP OGX Customer Relationship Management Synchronized Internal Communications Synchronized External Communications

F&L

PRESIDENT’S RECOMMENDATIONS

MASSIVE EXCHANGE GROWTH TMP

TLP

QUALITY RELATIONS

TMP

TLP

Most recommendations about functions and operations have already been mentioned in the individual departmental performance reports. Rather than provide more technical recommendations, I’ d like to share recommendations on how AIESEC AdMU achieved things through people and attitude.

“So as someone who has just officially left the LC, I have a few thoughts I’d like you to keep remembering: You have no right to underestimate yourselves, because people like me have always believed in you, and will always believe in you. Always be hungry. Do not settle because being in AIESEC means striving for excellence. It means believing that somehow, you can create significant change in this world as early as now. Do not stop fighting for what this organization stands for. Go ahead and fail, and don’t be afraid of failure. How else will you get better? You just have to remember to always get back up. There will be times when you’ll get tired, feel lost, or even demotivated. That’s okay and it’s a reality you have to accept. But if you can say now that you believe in youth responsibility and everything else AIESEC stands for, these things shouldn’t ever bring you down. Just keep going back to the essence and why we do the things we do, and keep moving forward. Keep remembering the meaning behind every result, every story, and every experience.” Taken from LCP 2011 - 2012 Final Speech


Content Prepared by: Executive Board 2011 - 2012 Kathleen Kho Dominic Santiago Carlo Enrico Rivera Thomas Joel Godiaco Claire Fuerte Vincent Murga Katrina Sanchez Ann Dumaliang Ron Richard Habla Compilation, Layout, and Editing by: Kathleen Kho Photos by: Sarah Aquino Derrick Jason Fabian Jonathan Sewell Meg Yap


4 ANNEXES


General and LEAD PRE-JULY RECRUITMENT Training Title Review of AIESEC Basics: AIESEC Way and AIESEC Experience

Introduction to 2015

Exchange: The Heart of AIESEC Operations SUMMER Training Title

AIESEC Philosophy

AIESEC Network and Opportunities

Branding Guidelines and the AIESEC Brand Experience

Training Title

Team Management

Processes that Drive TMP

Motivating Members

Number of Attendees Brief Description Aligning members by reviewing the content of the AIESEC Way and the new AIESEC Experience 40 Aligning members by introducing the 2015 BHAG and the 3 Wheels of Change as the direction toward which AIESEC is headed 45 Reviewing concepts of Exchange and allowing members to see how all functions ultimately support Exchange operations 22

Attendee General Profile

Mode of Delivery

Output of Training

Expected Increase in Performance

All members

Lecture and discussion (During Department Meeting)

None

Alignment: Knowing the essence of the organization

All members

Lecture (LCM)

None

Alignment: Knowing the direction of the organization

All members

Lecture

None

Seeing how one's role ultimately contributes to Exchange operations

Mode of Delivery

Output of Training

Expected Increase in Performance

Lecture

None

Alignment: The beginnings of AIESEC, and why we do what we do

Lecture

None

Alignment; Seeing the bigger picture in terms of AIESEC's structure

Lecture

None

Branding knowledge

Number of Attendees Attendee General Profile Brief Description A comprehensive review of AIESEC Basic Knowledge to ground and align members: AIESEC History, AIESEC Way, ELD Programmes, and Global Competency Model 5 All members An overview of the AIESEC Network; structure and role of different entities from AIESEC International to the Member Committee 8 All members Brand basic concepts; branding guidelines and a discussion of the contents of the AIESEC Brand Experience 6 All members

Brief Description Number of Attendees Attendee General Profile Team Management stages, tips, how to set expectations and open forum 24 Team Leaders Emphasizing how Team Leaders (TLs) drive TMP; Processes that TLs are accountable to: Performance appraisal, Talent Goal Setting, and myAIESEC.net team assignment 20 Team Leaders Discussion and open forum: What motivates you, and tips on how to motivate members to perform 8 Team Leaders

Start

Including more softskills training Having a communication plan for the general learning plan in order to gain more attendance Screening facilitators for consistency of delivery Scheduling activities in a cycle format that can be spread out more evenly throughout the term

Stop Allowing operations and functional trainings to compromise the general learning plan

Mode of Delivery

Output of Training

Expected Increase in Performance

Lecture, discussion, and open forum

None

Effective team practices

Sample performance TL ownership of their members' metrics per experiences; talent goal setting and department performance appraisal execution Self motivation, tips on motivating members, and dealing with None underperfomance

Lecture and activity Discussion and open forum

Recommendations

Continue

Establishing the standard knowledge that all AIESEC AdMU members should have

Start Stop Earlier scheduling with team leaders and full day lead sessions (conference type)

Continue

Consulting with Externals Getting partners for session delivery

Framework

TM and Finance Training Title

Talent Management in AIESEC AdMU How to conduct Individual Consultations

Pipeline Management

Performance Management

Trainings

Finance Dept Processes

Accounting Budgeting

Financial Assessment Financial Ratios How to Study JD creation Basic Marketing Operations Management Leadership Styles Financial Statements

Brief Description Explanation of TM's role in AIESEC AdMU and the TM Processes; contextualization of TM using the ELD and the Global Competency model; plan and structure presentation

Number of Attendees

Simple guidelines when conducting indivudual consultations Different aspects of Pipeline Management and its importance in driving organizational performance and member development Instilling the mindset of creating an environment to maximize performance; understanding the systems and processes that are currently in place, and that need to be improved in order to effectively maximize performance

Attendee General Profile

Mode of Delivery

Output of Training

Expected Increase in Performance

9 TM Members

Lecture

None

7 TM Members

Lecture, discussion, and simulation None

Understanding why TM exists Having guidelines and pointers to remember when conducting Individual Consultations

Non-graduating TM 5 Members

Lecture and Pipeline Understanding the importance of Management Pipeline Management Pipeline Management, and its different exercise Exercise worksheet aspects

Non-graduating TM 5 Members

Lecture and discussion

Description No. of Attendees Introduction to the department and presentation of available roles and opportunities within the department Learning how to do bookkeeping in order to help journalize entries for Finacial Statements Budget creation in the context of a project Training day for the AIESEC Initative System (AIS) and Credit Rating System training (CRS) Listing and explanation of how to use financial ratios for financial analysis Work life balance How to create proper JD's Marketing priniciples to help with business model creation for Financial models Timeframe planning including principles like bullwhip effect How to deal with your teammates, members and leaders given your character How to do interpretation of Income Statements

General Profile of Attendees

None

Understanding how different systems and processes should contribute to individual and team performance

Mode of delivery

Output of training

8 FIN Members

Lecture

Member allocation

8 FIN Members 8 FIN Members

Lecture Lecture

None Budgets for respective projects

8 FIN Members

Lecture

None

8 FIN Members 8 FIN Members

Lecture Lecture

None None

8 FIN Members

Activity

Create their own JD for motivation

8 FIN Members

Lecture

Recommendations for Finance Initiatives

12 FIN Members

Lecture

None

12 FIN Members

Activity

Leadership characteristics

12 FIN Members

Activity

None

TRAININGS DELIVERED


RECOMMENDATIONS Start

Stop

Recommendations

Continue

Start

Setting expectations well with members and allowing them to give feedback and recommendations on their job descriptions

Integrating more activities as opposed using lecture as the only mode of delivery

Stop

Conducting training earlier in the term, as most of these trainings were done after October Designing TM's learning plan , focusing on TMP and TLP as products Integrating concepts of organizational behavior in TM trainings

Continue Contextualizing the existence of TM and setting expectations

Making a learning plan that forces useable output for experiential learning

ICX and OGX Name of "Event"/training

Brief Description

Raising

Making a JQ, and importance of JQ and JD; knowing our value proposition/product packaging, and uploading information to Myaiesec.net

Not tracked

ICX Members

Matching

Introduction of entire matching processes, templates and documents Not tracked (DAAL and AFT) for promotion

S&R Processes

Handling Externals (CRM)

Training Title

# of Attendees

Output of training/Expected Increase Performance

Expected Increase in Performance

Lecture

Sample JQ and JD Creation

Understanding the importance of a JQ, and having a detailed understanding of ICX raising processes

ICX Members

Lecture and simulation

None

Detailed understanding of ICX matching processes and responsibilities

Session on pre-arrival and on arrival information and knowing the responsibilities of the LC towards our Not tracked trainees (pick-ups, evaluations, and so on)

ICX Members

Lecture

None

Detailed understanding of ICX raising processes and responsibilities

Introduction of how to approach externals (TN takers)

Service and Reception Team

Lecture

None

Detailed understanding on how to approach externals and AIESEC's relationship with them

Not tracked

OGX Department

Brief Description Introduction to the Outgoing Exchange Department's what, how and why, timeline, structure and accountabilities, current realities, and synergies involved

Ra-Ma-Re Exchange Tools, & Myaiesec.net

How to conduct basic Exchange processes, and how to use myaiesec.net as a tool for ra-ma-re

Attendees General Profile

Attendees General Profile

# of Attendees

Working in a Team

Pointers and tips for team management and how to maxximize member activation Aims to introduce the relevance of working in a team, to increase understanding of team members and team leaders of how they each work, and to get everyone introduced to each other better

Mode of Delivery

Output

Lecture

Role Clarity

OGX Members, specifically Matchers

Hands-on

None

OGX Members

Lecture

None

OGX Members

Lecture

None

Lecture

Team Role Style of Members

Increased relevance of quality relations to exchangers; understanding of cooperations as a strategy for efficient matching Increased understanding of the Directorial role as a team leader role; increased understanding of how to manage people

Group activity

Working style of attending members in teams

Increased understanding of group relevance, their role in each

20 OGX Members

15 to 20

Discussion of the Exchange Policies and Procedures and XPP how these affect operations 10 to 15 Aims to introduce partnership-building to Exchangers and key points to note to maintain and grow Partnerships & Quality cooperation; aims to further increase understanding of Relations for Stake the role of quality relations with multiple stakeholders in Exchange operations Holders Involved 15 to 20

Team Management

Mode of Delivery

5 OGX Team Leaders

15 to 20

OGX Members

Recommendations Start

Stop

Having simulations with evaluation of performance and tracking performance that include expertise levels

Expected increase in performance Expectation setting, setting accountabilities, and understanding OGX synergies Pppreciation for Exchange tools, where they can be used; Basic ra-ma-re theoretical knowledge Knowledge of how to address basic concerns of Exchange Participant with consideration to exchange policies

Recommendations Start

Continue Emphasizing on the importance of the job questionnaire and the job description

Conducting Supply and Demand Management and Data Analysis for more advanced and senior members Inviting other relevant functions to training (e.g. BM OGX and Expansion)

Emphasizing the importance of expectation setting with trainees early on Emphasizing synergy with related functions

Rewarding and recognizing attendance to trainings Syncing training with needs based on the Ra-Ma-Re calendar

Projects, ER, and COM Training Title

Introduction to Projects

Supply and Demand Analysis

Business Model Creation

Selling AIESEC Selling the Issue

Project Conceptualization Logic Model Creation (Part of Planning) Project Management System (PMS) Training & Control

Brief Description Number of Attendees Attendee General Profile Includes discussion of the following: What is a PBOX, BM of GCDP, GCPs, Dept Structure, JDs 80 PROJ Members Important and useful tools for members: myAIESEC.net, Supply and Demand, Rankings, DAAL, AFT 35 PROJ Members The Business Model Canvass: What is it, and how it is useful Includes discussion of the following: AIESEC Way, AIESECer (Ice Cream Cone Analogy), AIESEC Philippines + ADMU, Value Proposition (Platform + Resource Management) UN Millenium Development Goals and the Philippine Context; PBOX GCPs Feasibility Studies, Issue Selection, Idea Generation, Stakeholder Segmentation, GCPs (AIESEC and International NGOs, HBR, SSIR) Project Logic Model: What is it, and how is it useful; Logic Model creation Introduction of the Project Management System Not tracked

Mode of Delivery

Output of Training

Expected Increase in Performance

Lecture and discussion

Member allocation into specific PBOXes

Expectation setting and increasing accountability

Hands-on

List of target countries and LCs for peak planning

50 PROJ Members

Lecture and activity

Revised business model for each PBOX

Understanding how to use available tools for leverage Understanding how the project works and delivers its value proposition

15 PROJ Members

Lecture and activity

35 PROJ Members

Lecture and activity

Members create their own AIESEC pitches List of NGO's to tap, GCPs on myAIESEC.net

Alignment: Greater understanding and appreciation of AIESEC as a whole More in-depth understanding of the PBOX issue

20 PROJ Members

Lecture and activity

20 different activities to propose to partners Project planning

Lecture and activity

Logic models and gantt charts

Improved PBOX framework

Lecture

PMS used for all PBOXes

Improved tracking

8 PROJ Team Leaders PROJ Members

Recommendations Start Improving expectation setting with department education cycles Regularizing training schedules Syncing training with needs based on the Ra-Ma-Re calendar Integrating team leaders' knowledge and skill level into training sessions Standardizing training materials for knowledge management Inviting members from other departments in order for them to understand better Projects in AIESEC better, how their departments contribute to Projects, and provide external perspective/feedback

Stop Doing training sessions in bulks Executing sessions with outputs that have no follow through

Continue Providing learning materials outside AIESEC Integrating all project functions in trainings Doing small group sessions Mandatory attendance to the Introduction to PBOX session, or its future equivalent


Training Title

Brief Description Number of Attendees Attendee General Profile Learning session on the AIESEC Way 20 New ER members Briefing on the exchange process 10 ER members focusing on TNs Briefing on the projects for the ER members focusing on project year 10 partners Simulation and actual execution of the cold calls with companies researched on their own 20 ER members Follow up from cold calls that involves both sample emails and actual emailing of those interested 15 ER members Opportunity for members to meet partners in meetings led by the team leaders 15 ER members Training based on the JQ draft with guides given by ICX 5 ER members focusing on TNs Training on basic OSA guidelines for MOAs 4 ER members Brief training on how to use the ER tracker 20 ER members Clarification on the PA and standard format for the member trackers 4 ER Team Leaders Discussion of basic framework for Ics 4 ER Team Leaders Discussion on motivating team members 4 ER Team Leaders

AIESEC Knowledge Training Exchange Knowledge Project Knowledge

Cold Calls

Email/Updates Meeting JQ Drafting MOA Signing Tracker Updates

PAs/Member Trackers Individual Consultations Motivational

Training Title

Introduction to Communications

Introduction to the AIESEC Brand XP

Introduction to Branding

The Branding Cycle

OGX-FIN Synergies

Brand Damage Control

Brief Description This introductory session focused on orienting new Communications members to the role of the Communications department in the LC as well as the rationale behind the structures, JDs and synergies. This session's objective was to educate each member in the LC about the brand experience each external or AIESECer should go through, as well as the different kinds of people involved in AIESEC. This session introduced attendees to the field of branding and communications. Content included definitions, case studies, and and the branding cycle. This session brought Team Leaders together to learn about the processes of branding and creating feedback channels with their stakeholders. The objective of this session was to orient team leaders and OC members on the workings between Communications and Finance, and the boundaries involved. The objective of this session was to introduce the need of preparing for brand damage, defining types of brand damage, and to introduce a framework to prepare for brand damage control.

Lecture

Output of Training Expected Increase in Performance Knows AIESEC Way, History, Better grasp of AIESEC and how to and Products market it Knows processes involved in More familiarity with the exchange the exchange programs products Knows the activities involved in the projects/events More familiarity with the projects

Simulation and Field Work

Capable of doing company cold calls independently Confidence in doing cold calls

Simulation and Field Work

Capable of emailing based on indicated format

Lecture

Simulation and Field Work

Carries self accordingly during the meetings Understands requirements for JQs Understands standards for MOA contracts

Simulation and Field Work

Updates the tracker weekly

Simulation and Field Work Simulation and Field Work

Consistently submits PAs and member trackers Conducts individual consultations with members Members are motivated based on performance

Meeting Meeting Meeting

Confidence in contacting partners through mail Confidence in carrying out meetings Better JQ compatibility with matching Standardized MOA format Scheduled update of the ER tracker

Proper submission of PAs Utilization of individual consultations Right motivation for members

Number of Attendees

Attendee General Profile

Mode of Delivery

Output of Training

Expected Increase in Performance

Approx. 25 attendees

COM Members

Lecture

Clarity of roles and objectives.

Less unclear lines, and job descriptions.

All LC members

All LC members

Video Session

Video session

Better dealing with externals.

Approx. 25 attendees

COM members

Lecture

n/a

New strategies and understanding towards work in Communications

Approx 20 attendees

Team Leaders

Lecture and Groupwork

Approx. 10 attendees

COM Directors and A-Week OC

Lecture

Better orientation towards dealing Ideas on two-way feedback with relationships and how to piece systems for all stakeholders together branding processes Clarity of boundaries and processes between Communications and Finance (especially in purchasing!) Less bottleneck with FIN

Approx. 30 attendees

NLDC Delegates and NLDC Bringback Participants

Lecture

Framework for identifying potential brand damage

Recommendations Start

Stop

Continue

Training on JQ drafting early

Separation of project and exchange knowledge

With AIESEC Knowledge as the first training

Motivation of members by all TLs Expectation setting facilitation training with TLs

Mode of Delivery Lecture

Start

Simulation and hands-on training on cold calls, emailing, and meetings Motivational training

Better understanding of how dynamic brand damage can be

Stop

Testing out internal synergy using scenarios Branching out the COM synergy with other departments aside from OGX and TM Having creative circles Researching about Communications from OUTSIDE AIESEC!

Continue Introducing Management practices Having sessions with little or no follow-through to "COMM people" Keeping the fun, creative environment!

ALDS and NLDC Bringback Activity S&R Lab What is your leadership style Team Management

Challenging Your Worldview + Social Issues AIESEC Way

AIESEC 2015

Simulation and Structure Simulation and Structure ++

Quality Relations

AIESEC Brand Experience

AIESEC Brand Experience ++ LC Goals and Opportunities LC Goals and My Commitment

Talent Goal Setting - Basic

Talent Goal Setting - Career Induction Ceremony Faci Sharing

Brief Description

Presentation of some of the world's social issues and linking AIESEC's relevance to the existence of these issues AIESEC Way basic content An introduction to AIESEC 2015: BHAG, 3 wheels of change, and the AIESEC Experience Introducing the AIESEC AdMU structure to the new members and simulating functional operations working in synergy Discussion on how AIESEC AdMU is accountable to the following stakeholders: members, campus, externals, and trainees Introduction of the concept of a brand, and the AIESEC Brand Experience content Review of the concept of a brand, the branding cycle, and discussion on the current state of the AIESEC Brand Presentation of LC goals and available roles for new members Importance of talent goal setting, and execution of talent goal setting with new members mainly for initial allocation purposes Importance of talent goal setting, and execution of talent goal setting with the old members to see their AIESEC career plans A special ceremony to welcome the new members of AIESEC AdMU Each faci shares his/her AIESEC story to a group assigned to him/her

Attendee General Profile Newly selected members Old members Old members

Mode of Delivery

Output of Training

Expected Increase in Performance

All members

Lecture

None

All members

Lecture

None

Grounding on the existence of AIESEC Alignment: Knowing the essence of the organization

All members

Lecture

None

Alignment: Knowing the direction of the organization

Newly selected members Old members

Lecture and simulation Simulation

Dummy TN and EP Forms, OGX promotional materials

Familiarity with the basics of AIESEC operations

All members

Small group discussions

None

Newly selected members

Lecture

None

Old members

Lecture and discussion

Group discussion notes on the state of the AIESEC brand

Newly selected members Old members

Lecture

None None

Newly selected members

Activity

Talent Goal Setting form

Alignment: Personal goals with organizational goals

Old members

Activity

Talent Goal Setting form

Alignment: Personal goals with organizational goals; AIESEC career path

Newly selected members

Activity

None

All members

Sharing

None

An understanding of the concept of stakeholders; an understanding of some of AIESEC's stakeholders Understanding the concept of a brand, and familiarity with the AIESEC Brand Experience content

A critical sense of the current state of the AIESEC brand Knowing the available opportunities in the organization

Member morale Providing a sense of motivation and inspiration for members


Activity

AIESEC Way, Experience, and 2015 BHAG

Business Models of the 4 ELD Programmes

Brief Description Attendee General Profile Discussion of the AIESEC Way, AIESEC Experience, and 2015 in such a way that it makes members look back on why they decided to join and stay in AIESEC All members Understanding how AIESEC works and operates through busines models; business model creation activity for chosen products All members

Exposing the LC's current issues and finding solutions through creative thinking Understanding the needs of the market, and capitalizing on this through market Market Segmentation segmentation A discussion on how to act whenever there is an external force that is threatening to damage the Brand Damage Control AIESEC brand Staged fake crisis during NLDC Bringback, during which, the participants' responses and behaviors will Crisis Management be monitored Discussing the importance of writing an good JD for ICX-PROJ; writing sample JDs and questionning their How to Write a JD content Testing the members' knowledge on the content of the XPP; reminding the members of pertinent XPP contents of XPP A discussion on GIP TNs: their importance and tips on Raising Corporate Partners raising them Testimony from the NLDC Delegates regarding their My NLDC Experience conference experience Idea and Campaign Generation

Speech from Delegates

Inspired motivational speech by the NLDC Delegates

Mode of Delivery

Output of Training

Expected Increase in Performance

Lecture

None

Reflection on motivations for joining and staying in AIESEC

Group activity

Understanding the business model as a tool to see how things work; Business Model Canvass for seeing how products deliver their selected products value propositons Ideas to address the following issues/tasks: Member activation, PBOX financial sustainability, and Awareness of some LC issues; repackaging PBOXes insights to alleviate these issues

Lecture and group activity

Market research on a given product

Market segmentation and market research

Lecture and activity

None

A sense of brand consciousness, and responding to deterrents

Group activity

None

A reminder of how to act in the face of crisis

ICX, PROJ

Lecture and simulation

Sample JDs

JD writing

ICX, OGX

Quiz show

None

XPP knowledge

ER, ICX

Lecture

None

A better understanding of GIP TNs, and how to get results from them

All members

Sharing

None

Motivation

All members

Sharing

None

Motivation

All members

COM, OGX, ICX, ER

COM, ER

All members

Lecture and group activity

Continue Making ALDS a multi-track conference catering to both old members and new members Having non-officers organize and facilitate NLDC Bringback. It is one thing for AIESEC AdMU officers to speak about how inspired they are in the organization. But sometimes non-officers are able to reach their co-members more effectively than officers can. NLDC Delegates, specifically the non-officers should be given the oppotunity to inspire their co-members through an bringback they prepared themselves. Officers should be present for guidance nonetheless.

Some data not included for confidentiality purposes.


AIESEC Ateneo de Manila University: Year End Report 2011 - 2012