Issuu on Google+

kate cholakis

design portfolio


landscape photography


Contents

Observe | Design Fundamentals

2

Practice | Early Architecture + Landscape Projects

4

Contextualize | Community Work

6

Integrate | Projects for Clients

10

Discuss | Selected Presentations

22

Designer’s Statement

23

Locations of photographed landscapes (Clockwise, beginning top left) • World Trade Center Memorial, NYC • Japanese Garden, Bloedel Reserve, WA • Japanese Garden, Torun, Poland • Scilla, Longwood Gardens, PA • Spanish Steps, Rome • Market Square, Wroclaw, Poland • Grand Canyon, South Rim, AZ • Market Square, Krakow, Poland • Battery Park Urban Farm, NYC (Middle, top to bottom) • Dr. Seuss Sculpture Garden, Springfield, MA • Garden of Contrasts, Cornerstone Sonoma, CA • St. Mary’s Church, Wroclaw, Poland

Spring ephemerals, Conway, Massachusetts


Observe [Design Fundamentals] Sketchbook Samples Sketches illustrate the underlying structure and genius loci of the landscape. The sketchbook serves as a space for recording ideas and making observations.

Searching for Patterns and Anomalies

2

DESIGN PORTFOLIO

KATE CHOLAKIS


Observe [Design Fundamentals] Early Work

“ARCHITECTURE IS... Corbusier’s cubist painting n

Corbusier’s Villa de Monzie

Villa de Monzie, Garches, France by Le Corbusier (1927)

the villa de monzie as the result of

pulling simple

and abstract objects

from a two-dimensional plane into a three-dimensional space.

refers to both corbusier’s paintings and the elevation drawing of the building.

ABSTRACTION and RECONSTRUCTION

“WITHOUT A PLAN THERE IS...

Floor slabs

pulling apart two-dimensional planes

Slender Columns

Cantilevered

“Primary forms are beautiful bea e forms because they are clearly earr legible.”

o

a i

r

di

Corbusier’s Dom-ino (1915) 19 as representative of architectural h themes

s

A series of exploratory projects completed during undergraduate architecture courses (2007-2009) explore light, volume, space, and form in multiple dimensions.

d e r,

r b

r a

t r i

n e

third floor plan as a two-dimensional component of the three-dimensional structure

ss.”

PRECEDENT AND PARTI

“THE REGULATING LINE IS A MEANS; IT IS NOT A FORMULA. ITS CHOICES AND ITS EXPRESSIVE MODALITIES ARE INTEGRAL PARTS OF... CORBUSIER’S USIER’S VILLA DE MONZIE

PALLADIO’S VILLA FOSCARI

application plic of Palladian systems of lin line i regulation to modern architecture h

“Spirit of Order, Unity of Intention.”

ARCHITECTURALL CREATION.”

REGULATING LINE: Inspiration to Realization of Design

“Architecture Suffocates... “MODERN LIFE DEMANDS, AWAITS A NEW PLAN FOR THE HOUSE AND FOR THE CITY.”

FIVE POINTS FOR A NEW ARCHITECTURE

“THE HOUSE IS A MACHINE FOR LIVING IN.”

DESIGN THEORY

DESIGN PORTFOLIO

1) PILOTIS 2) ROOF TERRACE 3) FREE PLAN 4) FREE FACADE 5) HORIZONTAL WINDOWS

in Routine.” “A GREAT ERA HAS JUST BEGUN.”

KATE CHOLAKIS

3


Practice [Early Architecture + Landscape Projects] Urban Infill Dance Studio Projects for upper level architecture studios (2008) apply design fundamentals to actual building sites with specific program requirements. This project involved the design of an urban infill dance studio that speaks to the role of dance as an expressive performance and that employs elements of sustainable architecture.

faรงade Large exterior panels attached to the faรงade control the amount of sunlight entering the rooms; their form responds to the movements created by dancers in space.

Sustainability in urban environments roof garden Sculptural panels employ a similar motif on a roof garden that insulates the building and facilitates water capture.

4

DESIGN PORTFOLIO

KATE CHOLAKIS


Practice [Early Architecture + Landscape Projects] Rhythm Ecology This design (2009) for a contemplative space on a college campus seeks to raise visitors’ awareness of the natural fluctuations of the nearby river. A boardwalk and interior pathways offer views of a bioswale that runs throughout this riverside garden. The boardwalk is intended to inspire the construction of a larger boardwalk system around the pond and along the river.

Applying design fundamentals to the landscape involved learning about riparian ecology and the art of crafting human experience in an outdoor space.

concept

Rhythm and Transformation Dry Rock Beds

Bioswale

DESIGN PORTFOLIO

KATE CHOLAKIS

5


Practice [Early Architecture + Landscape Projects] Mixed-Use Development This undergraduate project (Spring 2010) integrates landscape and architecture by transforming an abandoned strip mall with an impermeable parking lot into a mixed-use development that blends commercial and residential programs in order to foster a pedestrian-oriented, community-driven lifestyle. Design Partners: Gabrielle Giacalone, Sarah Kaplan, and Michael Meo

AutoCAD files were engineered for a 3D printer and Waterjet, which produced the pieces for the site model (far left) and metal sculpture (left). The sculpture represents how existing metal on site can be reused to create art pieces for the landscape.

Contextualize [Community Work] Participatory Campus Planning The work and semester-long visit of landscape architect Randolph T. Hester inspired this independent undergraduate project (Spring 2010). The process included devising and facilitating community participation exercises (surveys, transect walks, and workshops) in order to gain meaningful input about the strengths and weaknesses of the physical campus. Data collection and analysis led to the creation of a 57 page book (right) explaining the process of community participation and making the case for democratic design.

6

DESIGN PORTFOLIO

KATE CHOLAKIS


Contextualize [Community Work] Nature Signs for Urban Communities In Spring 2012, a project was launched by an AmeriCorps member at Peck Full Service Community School in the city of Holyoke, Massachusetts. The project sought to revitalize a pathway connecting Peck School with the adjacent high school; this pathway, also known as the “dingle,� is frequently vandalized and used for illicit activities. I participated in the project by helping to install native woodland plants and clean the space of trash and other debris. I also held plant identification workshops with the students during art classes, and used the drawings created by the students to design nature signs (below). Translation: Malena Maiz

Connecting Community with Nature

DESIGN PORTFOLIO

KATE CHOLAKIS

7


8

DESIGN PORTFOLIO Photograph © Peter Palombella

KATE CHOLAKIS

Creating the brochure required collaboration with the Pioneer Valley Transit Authority (PVTA), various city departments (Parks and Recreation, Planning), conservation and community organizations, and local printing companies.

>

¿Sabias que… los árboles reducen los niveles de contaminación y de dióxido de carbono en el ambiente? Además la sombra de los árboles que bloquea el sol de las casas y edificios puede reducir el consumo de energía hasta en un 30%.

FSC-FPO

Photograph © Peter Palombella

FSC-FPO

¡ESPERAMOS VERTE EN ESTOS LUGARES! de Holyoke, en el folleto podrás encontrar la

Para más información visita:

información de contacto.

holyokefoodandfitness.org

revitalizar estos espacios verdes de la ciudad

apoyo. Tu puedes contribuir a mejorar y organizaciones, algunos

necesitan más

son cuidados por miembros de la comunidad y Aunque los lugares mencionados en este folleto

.org

visita:

comunidad. desarrollo de programas, políticas, y líderes de la

Este programa se enfoca en crear y mantener lugares saludable para la ciudad de Holyoke a través del

información sobre cómo llegar a estos lugares

Policy Council (HFFPC), financiado por Kellogg

caminando, en bicicleta o en autobús público.

Foundatio’s Food and Community program.

a una descripción de

Este folleto se hizo posible a través de un

en

donativo por parte de Holyoke Food and Fitness

lugares para visitar Holyoke. En el mapa podrás encontrar

íconos. Estos íconos corresponden a una leyenda y Al abrir este folleto encontrarás un

mapa con

COMO USAR ESTA GUÍA...

as, políticas, y líderes de la

(lbudd@holyokeymca.org). Food and Fitness Policy Council and Holyoke YMCA grupo, favor de contactar a Liz Budd de Holyoke entre grupos. Para más información sobre el al mes a discutir oportunidades de colaboración y actividades al aire libre. Nos juntamos una vez interesados en los recursos “lugares” naturales

Este foca en crear y es saludable para lyoke a través del

organizaciones sin fines de lucro de Holyoke

organizadores de la comunidad, diseñadores locales y representantes de negocios y de

de

SOMOS UN GRUPO

Community program.

>

Comida saludable + ejercicio

ACTIVIDADES al aire libre en HOLYOKE Participa en

financiado por Kellogg

Holyoke Food and Fitness

sible a través de un

>

“Caminar por el bosque… reduce los niveles de estrés en el cuerpo e incrementa los anticuerpos naturales del sistema inmunológico que combaten tumores e infecciones.”

rg).

y Council and Holyoke YMCA

- Jim Robbins “Why Trees Matter” NyTimes.com

© Peter Palombella

Padres de Familia, amigos y miembros de la comunidad de … ¿Qué lugares frecuentan en su ciudad?

LOCAL FARMERS MARKETS

Holyoke

HOLYOKE FARMERS MARKET High Street entre las calles Suffolk y Dwight frente a City Hall Jueves Mayo-Octubre 11:00 AM - 3:00 PM Para más información: manda un correo electrónico a: holyokefarmersmarket@ ci.holyoke.ma.us

Los edificios industriales, las maquinarias antiguas y los museos de Holyoke nos cuentan la interesante historia de esta ciudad. Pero es importante recordar que la ciudad

cambia y evoluciona

constantemente. Su historia continua

HOLYOKE OPEN SQUARE FARMERS MARKET 4 Open Square Way en el estacionamiento Sábados Mayo-Octubre 9:00 AM - 1:00 PM Para más información: contacta a Suzanne Rataj al correo electrónico farmersmarket@opensquare.com or visit opensquare.com

enriqueciéndose con las tradiciones y pasatiempos de los nuevos residentes que se alojan en la ciudad.

Ahora es tu momento para contribuir a la historia de Holyoke. Una de las mejores formas de hacerlo es

salir a explorar

el paisaje que

ofrece la ciudad. Hay organizaciones en la ciudad

DONAHUE FARMERS MARKET Donahue Elementary School 210 Whiting Farms Road Sábados Junio-Octubre 10:00 AM - 2:00 PM Para más información: contacta a jespinosa@nuestras-raices.org

que están esperando que visites sus propiedades y te unas a su misión de Holyoke.

mantenernos

mientras que disfrutamos de

Correr al aire libre, en comparación a correr en un lugar cerrado, incrementa la actividad de una persona en un 2-10% debido a la resistencia del aire. ¡Incrementar tu actividad corriendo al aire libre! - Stacy Berman “The Benefits of Outdoor Exercise” HuffingtonPost.com

>

“Los países con mayor transporte alternativo como la caminata o ciclismo tienen las menores tazas de obesidad. ¡Hay que hacer que nuestra comunidad sea un lugar más saludable y verde!” - ComeAliveOutside.com

15 minutos de manejar en bici al trabajo 5 días a la semana pueden quemar 5 kg de grasa por año. ¡Además ahorras dinero en transporte! - DenverBikeSharing.org

>

saludables

>

Las pequeñas granjas y los granjeros locales representan un beneficio para las comunidades. Ya que la mayor parte de las ganancias se invierten en la economía de la

Comida saludable + ejercicio

>

unidades de colaboración

s de lucro de Holyoke

N GRUPO

¿Qué esperas?

tar a Liz Budd de Holyoke

s información sobre el

>

re. Nos juntamos una vez

ursos “lugares” naturales

ACTIVIDADES al aire libre en HOLYOKE

s de la eñadores locales s de negocios y de

Participa en

ciudad comprando materiales de la localidad y contratando a personas de la comunidad. Los mercados permiten que el granjero venda directamente al consumidor.

Visual Communication Design Partner: Malena Maiz Planning Partners: Liz Budd, Bill Finn, Malena Maiz Padres de Familia, amigos y miembros de la comunidad de … ¿Qué lugares frecuentan en su ciudad?

Holyoke

© Peter Palombella

LOCAL FARM MARKETS HOLYOKE FA High Street Dwight fre Jueves Mayo 11:00 AM - 3 Para más inf electrónico ci.holyoke.m

This brochure (completed Fall 2012) uses maps, fun facts, and visuals to connect Holyoke residents with opportunities to exercise outside, access healthy, locally-grown food, and experience natural resources. Los edificios industriales, las maquinarias antiguas y los museos

de Holyoke nos cuentan la interesante historia de esta ciudad. Pero es importante recordar que la ciudad

cambia y evoluciona

constantemente. Su historia continua

HOLYOKE OP FARMERS MA 4 Open Squa Sábados Ma 9:00 AM - 1: Para más inf Suzanne Rat farmersmar opensquare.

enriqueciéndose con las tradiciones y pasatiempos

Dot surveys were created in order to gather input from the community about the spaces they currently use and would like to use in the city.

de los nuevos residentes que se alojan en la ciudad.

Ahora es tu momento para contribuir a

la historia de Holyoke. Una de las mejores formas de hacerlo es

salir a explorar

el paisaje que

As a member of the Holyoke Outdoor Recreation and Natural Resources Committee, I became aware of the potential for collaboration between organizations in the city. I helped to write a grant proposal for a project that would address this issue; the application was approved, and I proceeded to work with a design partner to create a brochure for the city. ofrece la ciudad. Hay organizaciones en la ciudad

DONAHUE F Donahue Ele 210 Whiting Sábados Jun 10:00 AM - 2 Para más inf jespinosa@n

que están esperando que visites sus propiedades y te unas a su misión de

saludables Holyoke.

mantenernos

mientras que disfrutamos de

>

¿Qué esperas?

Las pequeñas granjas y los granjeros locales representan un benefic comunidades. Ya que la mayor parte de las ganancias se invierten ciudad comprando materiales de la localidad y contratando a personas mercados permiten que el granjero venda directamente al consumidor.

Advocacy & Graphic Design

Contextualize [Community Work]


Contextualize [Community Work] Clean Water, Quality of Life: Design Competition Entry This proposal (Fall 2011) responds to an inquiry from the Riverscaping Design Competition, which prompted local designers to rehabilitate the connection between cities and rivers. Working with a colleague, I devised a creative solution for building this connection on the regional scale through activating city parks and improving river access in Holyoke. Our team designed a site-specific artwork that incorporates brownfield restoration, stormwater mitigation, and educating the community about CSOs and water quality. These proposals were rooted in both research and community interests. Design Partner: Malena Maiz

Activating Open Space final posters Ideas for the regional scale (left) use a series of advocacy, programming, and planning strategies to revitalize existing riverfront open space. They build on the concept of a watershed. The proposal for an outdoor, site-specific installation (above) practices these strategies, using a native grassland meadow to restore a brownfield site and to create gathering areas and places to display public art. A sketch demonstrating an idea for public art educates people about the health and environmental effects of Combined Sewer Overflows (CSOs).

DESIGN PORTFOLIO

KATE CHOLAKIS

9


Integrate [Projects for Clients] Revitalizing a Historic Town Park This project (Fall 2010) began with surveying a Veterans Park in a historic downtown area. After generating hand-drawn base maps, various site analyses were completed, including drainage, vegetation, soils, sun and shade, access, and circulation. Four design alternatives were generated that responded to the opportunities and constraints of the site, the history of the town, and the interests of the community.

existingexisting conditions conditions precedent research

Input was gathered from the client, the town Select Board, and various representatives of the Conway community. An accompanying plant list focused on mostly native, low maintenance plants tolerant of site conditions. Documentation took the form of a 23 page printed booklet. Client: Tara Guild, Parks and Recreation

Linking Social and Ecological Context PARK

Researching local ecology and using Nolli diagrams to map the downtown revealed an opportunity to link a riparian corridor (protected through NHESP) and cultural corridor (Main Street) within the town park.

ECOLOGICAL

10

DESIGN PORTFOLIO

KATE CHOLAKIS

SOCIAL


Reviving a Sterile Landscape

http://www.fundforlakegeorge.org

DRAIN DRAIN

VEGETATION in the back of the park increases water infiltration into the ground.

0’ 5’ 10’

20’

40’

95.6

LOW POINTS WITH ELEVATIONS

109.3

HIGH POINT WITH ELEVATION

LIMITED INFILTRATION (IMPERVIOUS SURFACES) LOW TO MODERATE INFILTRATION (MOWED LAWN)

3

6

MODERATE TO HIGH INFILTRATION (MULCHED AND WOODED AREAS)

96.8

IMPLICATIONS Untreated water from the roads empties into a river that is designated as priority habitat for rare species. Road salt and vehicular pollutants compromise the health of wildlife. During the summer, impervious surfaces collect solar heat that releases into the runoff. The warm, polluted water reduces the amount of dissolved oxygen in the stream, further compromising aquatic life.

95.6

DITCH 5

DRAIN

DRAIN

4

Shallow-rooting turf grass only allows for low to moderate water infiltration. Grading directs water that cannot infiltrate into storm drains, and possibly into a ditch in a neighbor’s backyard.

5 A LOW DITCH IN

THE NEIGHBOR’S BACKYARD occasionally collects water. Some water within the park may move into the neighbor’s backyard, contributing to the pooling water.

4 GRADING DIRECTS

EXCESS WATER FROM THE PARK into a storm drain located on Academy Hill Road.

109.3 HIGH POINT: HILL

DESCENDING INTO 3 SHALLOW-ROOTING DOWNTOWN AREA MOWED TURF dominates the open space of the park, limiting the amount of water that can infiltrate the ground.

Runoff into the nearby river and neighbor’s backyard is an example of the consequences resulting from separating the downtown from its ecological context. This presents an opportunity to connect these two landscapes: replacing the turf lawn with street trees and small shrubs would increase water infiltration while offering shade for park visitors. Rain gardens would slow down the movement of stormwater, increasing the possibility for infiltration while offering visual interest and educational opportunities for visitors.

NOT FOR CONSTRUCTION. THIS DRAWING IS PART OF A STUDENT PROJECT AND IS NOT BASED ON A LEGAL SURVEY.

kate cholakis

INFILTRATION RATES

fall 2010

UNDERGROUND DRAINPIPES

conway town park

6 DEEPLY-ROOTING

1

95.6

1) Impervious surfaces direct water into storm drains. Pipes empty this untreated water into nearby rivers. In Conway, runoff from Route 116 drains into the South River via storm pipes (see photograph on left). 2) More permeable surfaces, such as the grass turf and wooded areas of the town park, increase water infiltration into the soil. Deeply-rooting plants contribute to higher infiltration rates, whereas shallow-rooting plants allow for limited to moderate water infiltration. Therefore, the wooded areas in the back of the park allow for water infiltration, whereas the grass turf still produces runoff.

WATER FLOW

DRAINS

2

Analyzing the drainage within and near the park demonstrates two basic methods for processing stormwater:

LEGEND drainage

road flows across these surfaces into on-street storm drains. Underground piping directs the runoff into the nearby South River.

the Town Park on two sides and completely envelopes the planted traffic island. This prevents water infiltration along the road, concentrating water in storm drains.

Conway School of Landscape Design Graduate Program in Sustainable Landscape Planning & Design 332 South Deerfield Road / PO Box 179 Conway, Massachusetts 01341

2 RUNOFF from the impervious

1 IMPERVIOUS ASPHALT surrounds STORM DRAIN TO SOUTH RIVER

prepared for: tara guild parks and recreation committee conway, massachusetts

Drainage

analysis Gathering input from the community was paired with detailed analyses of physical conditions, such as drainage (left), exposure, views, pedestrian circulation, vegetation, legal concerns, and overall experience . This led to the development of several alternative designs (below).

6 /21

alternative designs

DESIGN PORTFOLIO

KATE CHOLAKIS

11


final concept Street trees and understory vegetation integrate the park with the nearby parking median and Town Hall, creating a gateway for vehicles entering the town and a physical landing for pedestrians. Within the park, the mown lawn is transformed into an intriguing shape that accommodates a variety of events and activities.

The memorials have been moved to a shady yet visible location on the edge of the lawn

Integrate, Insulate Private Residence

A brick crosswalk improves pedestrian safety and announces vehicular arrival to main street

Street trees with attractive fall foliage visually unite the park, Town Hall, and island. Red-twig dogwood stands behind the historic stone wall Stone seating defines an informal gathering area towards the front of the park. Private Residence Town Hall

Benches line a woodland walk towards the back of the park. 0’ 5’ 10’

12

DESIGN PORTFOLIO

KATE CHOLAKIS

20’

40’

The existing Amelanchier trees have been moved to frame the town Christmas tree. Low-growing juniper covers areas of the island currently filled with mown lawn.


Integrate [Projects for Clients] Evaluating the Potential for Local Food Production This project (Winter 2011) links landscape and participatory design with local food production. Analysis of land use in the area of study (Val di Merse region of Tuscany, Italy) using GIS data and interviews with people currently working towards a local food economy revealed opportunities for expanding agriculture.

Crop Cover in the study area (2009) Data Source: Province of Siena

Siena

Spannnocchia

The project concluded with a final report demonstrating how the people of this region can evaluate their current food system and utilize methods employed by organizations in New England to reduce dependency on external, petroleum-based food sources. Client: Spannocchia Foundation, Tuscany, Italy Design Partners: Erin Hepfner, Heloise Chandless

Overview The people of the Val di Merse have recognized that the way in which food is produced and exchanged needs to change in order to improve the economy, build community, revive historical traditions, and increase access to local, healthy food. Spannocchia has joined in these conversations about local food production, and is beginning to embrace the opportunity of connecting with the local community through integrating with the food system. In order to explore how people in the Val di Merse region can overcome obstacles to local agriculture, the components of the existing food system were studied. The first set of recommendations, titled “Obtain Relevant Data about Existing Food System,” will outline how participants of the food system can continue this evaluation in order to determine areas for improvement. The case studies revealed how organizations in both New England and Italy responded to similar obstacles, and how these responses might be applied in the Val di Merse region. The second set of recommendations, titled “Increase Collaboration,” will outline how Spannocchia can work with other members of the community to apply these methods to promote a local food economy.

Recommendation 1: Obtain Relevant Data about Existing Food System

Recommendation 2: Increase Collaboration

Information was conveyed through a 55 page booklet. Photographs, diagrams, maps, and text were arranged in two-page spreads, an example of which is shown to the left.

Recommendations Image Source: Spannocchia

Image Source: Spannocchia

Organically-grown grapes are processed at Spannocchia to make wine for visitors and program participants.

Spannocchia interns participate in team building exercises underneath the canopy of an organically managed olive grove.

FOOD SYSTEM STUDY FOR THE VAL DI MERSE, TUSCANY

39

Image Source: Spannocchia, Photographer: Paul Avis 38 FOOD SYSTEM STUDY FOR THE VAL DI MERSE, TUSCANY

DESIGN PORTFOLIO

KATE CHOLAKIS

13


Integrate [Projects for Clients] Ecological Design for Military Bases This project (Spring 2010) employed a wholesystems and multi-scaled approach to a landscape management plan for the 320-acre Westover Air Reserve Base in Chicopee, Massachusetts. The designs respond to recent budget cuts to landscape management, and to top-down directives from the United States Department of Defense for antiterrorism and Bird/Wildlife Strike Hazards. Ecological and social context drove the design process, which is summarized in a 61 page booklet with analyses, plans, and cost estimates. Additionally, a system for implementing this vision was prepared. A 40 page handbook offers a step-by-step, safe-to-fail approach of adaptive management. Together, the two booklets seek to make the transition from a high-input landscape of low ecological integrity to a low-maintenance, native landscape of improved ecological integrity.

Enhance Landscape Appearance

Improve Safety and Security

Use of Native Plants

Comply with AntiTerrorism Standards

Reduce Landscape Costs

Manage Invasive Plants

Improve ecological functioning of landscape

Utilize Xeriscaping

project goals

Reduce Chemical and Mechanical Inputs

Design + Maintenance

Client: Westover Air Reserve Base Design Partner: Laura Rissolo

14

X X X

X

Dense foundation plantings block sight lines. Antiterrorism Force Protection standards require that a 6� tall object placed within 33 feet of the building must be visible from both within and outside of the structure.

DESIGN PORTFOLIO

KATE CHOLAKIS

X

X

PROPOSED CHANGES

EXISTING CONDITIONS

Antiterrorism Standards for the Landscape

Low groundcovers and tall shrubs and trees maintain sight lines within 33’ of each building.


context

precedent research

GIS analysis and consultation with ecologists led to a multilayered understanding of context: •

Geologic: the site occupies a flat, sandy outwash plain that was left behind by glacial Lake Hitchcock.

Natural Resources Inventory (Water Quality, Vegetation, Threatened and Endangered Species): Sand plains are rare in the Northeast and are desirable for development, making any remnants of these communities havens for many threatened and endangered species.

Land Use and Cultural History: although the land has been manipulated over time for human uses, the base has the potential to contribute over 2,000 acres to a rare ecosystem.

Finding analogues for plant palettes in similar environments (pine barrens, heathland dunes)

PINE BARRENS

HEATHLAND DUNES

INACTIVE MEDIUM YIELD AQUIFER

NATURAL HERITAGE AND ENDANGERED SPECIES PROGRAM PRIORITIZED SITE FOR RARE SPECIES

CANTONMENT AREA

CANTONMENT AREA

AIRFIELD

LEGEND

LEGEND

Waterways Waterbodies MediumYield Aquifer Wetlands

0

0’

50’ 1 mile NORTH

Source: Office of Geographic Information (Mass GIS), Commonwealth of Massachusetts Information Technology Division, April - June 2011.

Waterways

0

Waterbodies Wetlands NHESP Priority Habitat for Rare Species

0’

50’1 mileNORTH

Source: Office of Geographic Information (Mass GIS), Commonwealth of Massachusetts Information Technology Division, April - June 2011.

developing landscape patterns The base’s sandy soils make conventional landscaping difficult. However, the solution to high landscape maintenance costs at the base has roots in this very problem. Native, sand plain plant communities require fewer inputs, as they are already adapted to the site conditions. These plants also support many rare and endangered species, increasing overall ecological integrity. Additionally, these plant communities naturally abide by Antiterrorism Force Protection standards. The heathland, a plant community common to glacial sand plains and barrens, consists of low groundcovers and leggy shrubs, which would maintain sightlines. Two additional sand plain plant communities, the grassland/meadow and open woodland, are useful in areas of the base that lie beyond the 33’ antiterrorism buffer.

THE ELLIPSE AND MEMORIAL AREA remain as irrigated turf grass to accommodate heavy foot traffic during events held at the base.

LEGEND Heathland Garden Mixed Lawn Grassland Native Forb/Grassland Open Woodland

INDUSTRIAL AREA: LIMITED HABITAT VALUE

0’

0

Heathland Garden

Grassland/Wildflower Meadow

Open Woodland

typologies

Applying landscape patterns: the heathland, grassland, and open woodland plant communities were distributed across the base according to existing conditions analyses and building program.

DESIGN PORTFOLIO

KATE CHOLAKIS

15

50’

NORTH

0.5 miles


pattern 1: heathland garden The heathland garden conforms to the strictest guidelines for antiterrorism. Low groundcovers, individual accent grasses, and appropriately spaced, airy shrubs maintain sightlines. C: Conference Center: Final Plan

Unique, site-specific designs, complete with plant lists, sources, and estimates, were created for 10 high-priority sites on the base.

Objective

New planting beds at the front entrance enhance this area, complementing the mature maple trees and framing the outdoor gathering area. Added beneath the mature red maple to the northwest of the building, Carolina silverbell (Halesia tetraptera) is an elegant non-native understory tree that offers four season interest. Plants extend to the building’s parking lot median to unify the space. On the parking lot median, existing dogwoods have been moved to frame sidewalks. Grasses and lilies fill in the space

Legend, Materials, and Costs

between the crabapples, which can be replaced with serviceberry (Amelanchier arborea) upon decline. Beneath the existing canopy trees to the southeast side of the building, shade plants such as ferns and yellowroot define the space. The leaves are left to fall and remain underneath the canopy trees. Mulch creates a distinct line between this shaded gathering space and the mixed lawn. The Conference Center is integrated into the wider landscape through the grassland meadow that encircles it.

QTY

SYMBOL

NAME

COST

Trees and Shrubs 4

AA

Amelanchier arborea

$220

1

HT

Halesia tetraptera

$105

Grasses and Perennials 368

ES

Eragrostis spectabilis

224

HC

Houstonia caerulea

20

LPi

Lilium philadelphicum

4

SS

Schizachyrium scoparium

$456 $4 $120 $5

Groundcovers ANe

Antennaria neglectia

74

AU

Arctostaphylos uva-ursi

$537

122

DP

Dennstaedtia punctilobula

$265

56

EN

Empetrum nigrum

$658

56

FV

Fragaria virginiana

14

PA

Pteridium aquilinum

90

XS

Xanthorhiza simplicissima

9

Meadow

Leaf litter is left beneath the trees

Mixed lawn

$120 $40 $710

Materials

HT Mixed lawn AA AA

$19

73 lf.

Edging 73 lf. = $236 8 corners = $60

1273 cf.

Leaf Mulch 2” depth (owner supplied)

$0.00

285 cf.

Wood Chip Mulch 2” depth

$1615

Plants and materials

$5,120

Delivery (plants and materials)

$2,560

Installation (plants and materials)

Meadow

$246

Site preparation ($0.15 per sq. ft.) Project Total without contingency (site preparation, materials, plants, delivery, installation)

$7,680 $202 $15,652

LEGEND Proposed Edging

AA

Transplants

AA

Leaves/Needles left under trees Mixed Lawn

Refer to following page for larger plan

Meadow

0

50’

NORTH

LANDSCAPE MANAGEMENT PLAN KATE CHOLAKIS AND LAURA RISSOLO

47

Repetition, Tessellation Template A (214 Sq. Ft.) 15’

Template C (125 Sq. Ft.)

Perennial

For 51 buildings that receive less visibility, modular templates were designed that simplify maintenance and unify the landscape through repetition and tessellation.

5’

Groundcover Shrub Grass Template B (146.5 Sq. Ft.) 5’

30’.6

25’

30’

15’

16’

5’

15’

5’

The templates are modular pieces that are placed along sidewalks and around entrances. Template C can be divided in half into smaller segments to fit to the site.

16

DESIGN PORTFOLIO

KATE CHOLAKIS

templates


CR

FV

1) Lawn Alternatives: three options for lawn alternatives were presented for areas currently managed as high-input, mown lawn around buildings. These options include low-growing buffalo grass lawns, fine fescue lawns, and mixed flowering lawns. Pros and cons of each lawn type were presented along with installation and maintenance guidelines. 2) Wildflower/Grass Meadows: seeded meadows replace 200 acres of turf grass, visually connecting the buildings across the landscape while also connecting ecologically important habitats. To increase ecological integrity on the base, a plan for installing the meadows was devised that avoids the use of chemicals.

pattern 3: managed open woodland Plants and maintenance strategies were proposed for the areas underneath mature trees. These strategies improve landscape appearance, reduce maintenance, and protect trees from damage. They involve planting understory shrubs and herbaceous material and shifting maintenance practices in order to allow leaves to remain where they fall.

Janet Novak, CT Botanical Society

Duke.edu

SA

FR

North Creek Nurseries

Susan Harris

TRe

ACe

meyerseedco.com

SS

North Creek Nuseries

AV

North Creek Nurseries

wildflower/grassland meadows

The grassland has two interpretations for the base. One application adheres to antiterrorism guidelines for the area around high-profile buildings. The other adheres to less stringent requirements for areas further away from structures.

mixed flowering lawn

pattern 2: grassland

MF

Janet Novak, CT Botanical Society

SB

Janet Novak, CT Botanical Society

Eleanor Saulys, CT Botanical Society

AT

DF

North Creek Nurseries

Cost estimates revealed that converting 200 acres of high-input lawn to native forb/grass meadows would yield $1,000,000 in savings over ten years

North Creek Nurseries

SN

SAn

Janet Novak, CT Botanical Society

Janet Novak, CT Botanical Society

calculating savings INPUTS

COST PER ACRE (ANNUALLY)

TOTAL COST (ANNUALLY)

Current Expenses for 250 acres of high-input lawn Mowing (170 hrs/wk, 5100 hrs/season)

$650

$162,500

Seed (1x year)

$125

$31,250

Fertilizer (May include lime, 1x year)

$170

$42,000

Aeration (2x year)

$255

$63,750

Total lawn expenses

$1200

$300,000

Preliminary estimates for 200 acres naturalized grassland - Installation Site preparation

$640,000

Materials (seed)

$200,000

Seed application

$20,000

Subtotal

$860,000

Contingency at 15%

$129,000

Project Total

$989,000

Preliminary estimates for 200 acres naturalized grassland - Maintenance Brush hog (mow) 1x year

$10,000

Spot herbicide treatment for invasive species (monitoring, herbicide application, removing) Total annual maintenance for 200 acres naturalized grassland

$5000 (minimum) $15,000 for 200 acres ($75 per acre)

Due to the installation cost of the naturalized grassland, savings would be observed after the fifth year of implementation. According to these preliminary cost estimates, converting 200 acres of lawn to 200 acres of grass/forb meadow would save approximately $225,000 annually in maintenance.

DESIGN PORTFOLIO

KATE CHOLAKIS

17


Integrate [Projects for Clients] Ecological Design and Planning for University Campuses

project goals

Current professional work focuses on increasing the efficiency of grounds maintenance and maximizing the ecological integrity and beauty of landscaped areas on university campuses.

LAND

Integrate Ecological Function

Define Landscape Experience

Reinforce Regional Identity

Improve Sustainability

FSU Community

A project for Framingham State University (Spring 2012) draws ecology into a highly manicured landscape by integrating native and innocuous nonnative plants within a culturally-accepted structure. The final documents included planting plans with renderings and estimates for three areas on campus; installation and maintenance guidelines; strategies for involving students, faculty, and staff in the landscape (e.g., creating pollinator habitat); text and graphic recommendations for interpretive signage; and a landscape management plan for the entire campus suggesting how areas on campus can transition from high to low maintenance.

Undertake Pilot Projects

Improve Maintenance Efficiency

Foster Landscape Stewardship

SUSTAINABILITY LANDSCAPE?

WHAT DOES LOOK LIKE IN THE

How do we make the FSU campus more

resilient, diverse, & ecologically functional

while fostering a unique sense of place?

Join the Discussion May 3rd | 1:00pm Alumni Room [3rd floor of the McCarthy Center]

Client: Warren Fairbanks, Director of Facilities, Framingham State University Design Partner: Laura Rissolo

Goals emerged from conversations with the Massachusetts Department of Capital Asset Management, the FSU Director of Facilities, and the FSU Grounds Maintenance Crew. A process presentation was also delivered to campus staff and faculty.

Preview FSU’s Sustainable Grounds Maintenance Plan presented by Kate Cholakis & Laura Rissolo

ecological gradient I developed an ecological gradient to describe how the campus is maintained. The gradient is a spectrum tracking the amount of maintenance occurring on the landscape and the amount of ecological integrity (biodiversity, plant health).

High Maintenance

Low Maintenance

Maintenance

Ecological Integrity Limited Ecological Integrity

The majority of the campus falls within one location on the gradient (highly maintained, low in plant diversity, consisting of limited native species)

18

DESIGN PORTFOLIO

KATE CHOLAKIS

Maximized Ecological Integrity

The fragmented woodlands at the periphery of campus fall towards the right end of the spectrum (minimally maintained but subject to disturbance by erosion and trash disposal)

Applying the gradient to an aerial view of the campus reveals a lack of transition between highlymaintained areas (shown in orange and yellow) and the disturbed woodlands (shown in green). This map also reveals that much of the campus receives an equal amount of maintenance.


context Guiding the transition from a high to low-input landscape requires studying the patterns of change in the landscape. This research helps to best guide and predict future change. •

Geologic: the campus occupies a glacial drumlin; its domelike shape creates numerous microclimates. Areas on campus therefore vary in exposure to sunlight (aspect), drainage patterns, soil type, and vegetation. Therefore, each site must be designed according to the specific microclimate.

Land Use: the landscape was cleared of all vegetation for agriculture prior to use as a campus. This history, combined with ongoing soil manipulation, has drastically changed the composition of native vegetation that once occupied the site.

Ecological: exotic invasive plants on campus compromise the aesthetics and ecological integrity of the campus. In addition, a high percentage of impermeable surfaces contribute to erosion and pollution of water resources. However, the site’s location just beyond a proposed greenway reveals potential to contribute to larger habitat corridors. Social: the landscape’s agrarian past (1800s) and traditional New England campus aesthetic contribute to the social context and character of the modern landscape. The university has begun to build upon these traditions while embracing sustainability through a variety of green initiatives.

proposed landscape patterns

WO OD EC LA OL ND OG ST ICA EW LE AR DG DS E H

Due to the degree of manipulation that this landscape has experienced, the goal of the proposed design is not to restore a plant community that once inhabited this landscape, but rather to reconstruct multiple plant communities that emulate processes found in nature and appeal to an accepted aesthetic.

Current Compost Site

Hemenway May

HighlyMaintained Quad

McCarthy

E

DG

LE

Dwight

ICA

Scheme 1: Adaptation

Scheme 2: NatureScheme 3: Scheme 4: Inspired Ecological Woodland Associations Edge Stewardship

OG OL EC

Four schemes developed for application to the campus offer varying levels of formality and maintenance. Their application responds to the programming of buildings, circulation patterns, and proximity to the center of the campus.

IP

ECOLOGICAL EDGE

Storm Drains Surface Water Movement

Studying Water Movement on Campus: runoff is concentrated on impervious roads and pathways, and is channeled into storm drains that transfer the runoff. The map above suggests how the topography of the drumlin and impermeability of surfaces contribute to the quickly-draining nature of the site.

Proposed Compost Site

Community Garden (Extg) NORTH

Maintenance

Ecological Integrity

Schemes 2 and 4 are shown in greater detail on the following two pages. Scheme 1 (Adaptation) involves removing and replacing invasive and non-functional ornamental plants. Scheme 3 (Ecological Edge) creates transitional areas between the more highly maintained core of the campus and the woodlands DESIGN beyond. PORTFOLIO

KEY

Scheme 1: Adaptation Scheme 2: Nature-Inspired Associations Scheme 3: Ecological Edge Scheme 4: Woodland Stewardship

KATE CHOLAKIS

19


scheme 2 example: nature-inspired associations* In this scheme, landscaped areas are redesigned based on biological patterns found in nature. Plant selection is guided by existing site conditions and by groups of plants that naturally grow together. Natural distribution patterns guide the arrangement of these plants within the garden. The layers that characterize natural ecosystems guide the vertical structure of gardens. Scheme 2 has three variations, including a native meadow, rain garden, and woodland garden. *This term was coined by Sue Reed in her new book, Energy-Wise Landscape Design

plant palette

The woodland and rain garden variations were applied to a site on campus (below) that currently contains a juniper bed infiltrated with weeds, a steep and eroding slope, and limited plant diversity. In the proposed design, a rain garden mimics the ability of riparian plants to encourage water infiltration and stabilize banks. A woodland understory on the opposite side of the path mimics the ability of the New England deciduous forest to recycle nutrients between the various vertical layers (leaf litter, herbaceous, shrub, small tree, canopy tree).

Water level after extreme rain events Water level after rain events

Water level between rain events

existing conditions Zone 1 OBL/FACW

20

DESIGN PORTFOLIO

Zone 2 FAC

KATE CHOLAKIS

Zone 3 FACU/UPL


Peirce and Athletic Center Lane MAINTENANCE Framingham State University 100 State Street Framingham, MA 01701 May 2012

Weed-whack allium seed heads shortly after blooming to maintain a tidy appearance in the garden and limit seeding. In the fall, take care to remove leaf debris from the Phlox stolonifera to promote a dense groundcover.

SUSTAINABLE GROUNDS DEVELOPMENT Laura Rissolo 53 Hipp Road | New Milford, CT 06776 wild.rooted@gmail.com | (860) 671-8088

Remove weeds from Carex pennsylvanica and Deschampsia flexuosa areas. Avoid letting weeds set seed; if hand weeding is too time consuming, weed-whack weeds when in flower. Mowing is not necessary in these areas.

Kate Cholakis 116 Nonotuck Street | Florence, MA cholakis11@csld.edu | (508) 265-1114

SPECIAL INSTRUCTIONS

Installation • Juniper bed: Remove areas of the juniper infested with undesirable weeds. Replenish lost soil with clean fill. Plug perennial plants into these areas (Coreopsis in the sunnier, northern part of the juniper bed, and Phlox in the shadier, southern part of the juniper bed). • Grading - Juniper bed: Slightly flatten hill at southern corner of juniper bed to reduce the pitch from the bed to the cherry tree understory. • Grading - Swale: It is recommended that the grading for this site be reconsidered by a civil engineer. One strategy could involve creating a more consistent pitch from the corner of Peirce to the storm drain. Water percolation tests and analysis of water movement through this space is highly recommended. It might be necessary to regrade the swale and/or install a percolation pipe with crushed stone underneath the existing swale. This swale should slope continuously in the direction of the storm drain at the base of the hill. Pebbles may be applied to the swale surface. • Before applying mulch during site preparation in the rain garden, install an erosion control blanket. If necessary, cut away erosion material to install plants. Refer to Appendix C: Specifications for general installation guidelines.

Attractive seed heads, such as those of Porteranthus (Gillenia) trifoliatus and Iris versicolor can persist throughout the winter. Allowing them to stand until the following spring also provides important cover and forage. Trim back Carex crinita and Carex laxiculmus ‘HOBB’ Bunny Blue only if desired in the spring.

Low-Mow Lawn (TYP)

Chasmanthium latifolium, Northern sea oats grass, is a prolific seeder. While seed heads can remain attractive into the winter and provide forage for winter birds, the plants may need to be cut back in fall if they prove to increase spring weeding. Cut Back in Spring

wikimedia.org

Cut back in Spring or Fall

00

5’

10’

10’

20’

20’

NORTH

Cut back in Fall

40’

The common weed Linaria vulgaris, or toadflax, has taken root in the juniper bed. The plant reproduces by seed and advantageous roots. Hand weeding will be required to eliminate the plant; however, if the plant persists, trim it back when in flower to discourage seed set.

North Creek Nurseries

The leaves of Tiarella ‘Iron Butterfly’ and fronds of Polystichum acrostichoides protect the crown of the plants from winter extremes and therefore should be trimmed back in the spring.

Low-Mow Lawn (TYP)

Maintenance maps were prepared for each site design, specifying when to cut back particular plants, and presenting concerns specific to each site.

Maintenance • To increase efficiency, many plants like Carex crinita, Chasmanthium latifolium, Deschampia flexuosa, Monarda didyma ‘Fireball’, and Smilacina racemosa, can be trimmed back using a weedwhacker, • Plants are encouraged to mingle. Overly dominant plants may need occasional weeding if they are compromising the garden aesthetic. • Carefully remove sediment (soil buildup) from the bottom of the swale as needed. • Apply leaf mulch as specified in Appendix C.

NORTH SUSTAINABLE GROUNDS DEVELOPMENT

KATE CHOLAKIS AND LAURA RISSOLO

33

scheme 3: woodland stewardship This scheme emerges at the far right end of the ecological gradient, where low maintenance coincides with greatest ecological integrity. Small interventions in the woodlands surrounding the campus support the health and vigor of the environment. Examples of interventions: monitoring and controlling invasive plants, achieving Certified Wildlife Habitat certification from the NWF to foster stewardship and engage students, selective thinning, seedling planting, and habitat building. Improving the health of the woodlands will connect these areas with larger wildlife corridors, posing the university as a wildlife patch.

A nesting box at the woodland edge, Cape Cod Community College

balancing community and ecosystem needs Large scale ecological influences (e.g., water quality concerns, invasive species colonization) and local community changes (e.g., increasing student residential population) are inevitable. The schemes proposed for the landscape serve different functions, filling niches within the campus in order to increase the flexibility of the landscape as changes in the needs of the community and ecosystem occur.

SUSTAINABLE GROUNDS DEVELOPMENT Framingham State University Framingham, Massachusetts Spring 2012

For example, an area currently receiving less maintenance may become more visible to students upon construction of a new building; this space, previously maintained using Scheme 3 may transition into Scheme 1 or 2, requiring a more formal appearance and more frequent care. Additionally, natural succession may transition Scheme 3 areas into Scheme 4 areas (ecological edge to woodland).

Kate Cholakis | Laura Rissolo Land People Habitat LLC

Embracing change through the development of flexible systems for land management is a tenet of sustainability; resilience depends upon the ability to adapt. Applying this approach to the Framingham State University campus will increase its resilience in face of global and local ecological, economic, and social change. DESIGN PORTFOLIO

KATE CHOLAKIS

21


Discuss [Selected Presentations] Massachusetts Department of Planning, Design, and Construction | Fall 2011

Landscape Patterning

Landscape Patterning Location: Dept. Capital Asset Management (DCAM), Boston, MA Event Description: Planners, landscape architects, and representatives from state universities in Massachusetts congregated for a three-hour workshop dedicated to the theme of applying ecological design to university campuses. Laura Rissolo

Bing Maps

“Towards an Ecological Approach to the Design of Campus Landscapes” Massachusetts Department of Capital Asset Management (DCAM) 21 November 2011, 1-3:00 P.M.

Kate Cholakis and Laura Rissolo Conway School of Landscape Design 2011 Project Completed June 2011

Annual Sustainability Symposium | April 2011 From Green Roof to Green Street: Landscape Design for How We Live and What We Eat Location: Darrow School, New Lebanon, NY Event Description: Speakers working towards sustainability in a diversity of fields delivered 45-minute concurrent presentations to high school students, teachers, and visitors. From bioswales to rooftop farms, a range of design concepts was introduced. Kate Cholakis

Conway School of Landscape Design ‘11 Smith College ’10 Darrow School ‘06

Independent Study Presentation | May 2010 Place Matters: Identifying the Sacred Spaces of the Smith College Campus Location: Smith College, Northampton, MA Event Description: An independently motivated and executed student project was presented to the student body through an exhibition, to the Facilities Department and later to the Smith College President, Carol T. Christ.

Celebrating Collaborations | May 2010 Cornelia Hahn Oberlander: Six Decades of Sustainable Design Location: Smith College, Northampton, MA Event Description: Fifteen-minute concurrent sessions showcased student/faculty research to celebrate their collaborative efforts and interdisciplinary projects. This project derived from an internship completed under the direction of Smith College professor Nina Antonetti.

22

DESIGN PORTFOLIO

KATE CHOLAKIS

Cornelia Hahn Oberlander

Six Decades of Sustainable Design


Designer’s Statement

Solutions Grounded in Ecology....

Applied to Communities....

Adapted over time...

Through work and study at Smith College and the Conway School, I learned how analyzing the existing conditions of a physical site – water movement, wildlife presence, etc. – leads to the creation of a design appropriate to the ecological context. I gained a strong command of this process through undergraduate and graduate level projects. Today, I specialize in design that looks to naturally-occurring plant communities for inspiration and for concrete ideas for reducing maintenance and maximizing ecosystem services.

These environmentally-driven solutions must also respond to the needs and desires of people, or they will fail to generate stewardship. I practiced community-driven design as a student and continue to do so as a professional, taking on work that incorporates participation. Involving the community in the design process is critical to the creation of truly democratic places. My interdisciplinary background enables me to find opportunities for building connections between organizations that are working towards similar goals.

The social and ecological stories of the landscape should guide the design process. Anne W. Spirn writes in Language of Landscape (2000) that designers are storytellers, that the results of design express the values of those that dwell within the landscape. However, designers must also be planners, and need to consider how landscapes will change in the future. Over time, the values of a society change, as do the ecological processes that take place within the landscape. Through the process of investigating context and applying systems-thinking, designers gain the knowledge necessary to propose designs that will maximize a landscape’s ability to adapt. Sustainable landscapes not only plan for but also embrace change. I practiced this approach most recently in my work for a university, where I generated ideas for transitioning areas from high to low maintenance, and for involving students in the evolution of the landscape.

As a designer, I believe in interdisciplinary collaboration and continued professional development. In addition to taking on design work for communities and private clients, I regularly attend conferences and explore natural and designed landscapes. I am also working on a book project, an excerpt of which was accepted for presentation at an ECLAS event in Warsaw, Poland. My personal and professional interests revolve around landscape studies.

DESIGN PORTFOLIO

KATE CHOLAKIS

23


Portfolio