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4

mexican recipes

inside

guacamole

s

of STmu

s

s

taste mexican rice

buñuelos

a collection of Rattler recipes from St. Mary’s University, San Antonio, Texas volume 7, number 2, spring 2013

smokin’ hot

BRISKET


are you ready to

April 18 to April 28


contents

contents “This juicy dish is muy delicioso! It tastes great and brings everyone together.” s

smoked brisket page 5

page 8

page 10

Tomatoes, onions,

buñuelos page 12

s

Bring this tasty dish from

guacamole s

s

s

Enjoy traditional smoked

mexican rice

Felix Benavides on his smoked brisket

Save some room for

brisket with this chef’s

the depths of southwest

avocado, lime and cilantro

dessert with this sweet

recipe! Check out how to

Texas straight to your

- all mixed into one! Don’t

dish! St. Mary’s student

create a juicy entree for

home. Chef Marta shows

miss out on this chef’s

brings out her cooking

the perfect dinner.

how mexican rice is made.

recipe of guacamole.

skills after school hours.

taste of stmu \ spring 2013 \ 3


editor’s note

Editor’s Note I gained a lot of insight from my professor, Brother Dennis Bautista, S.M., my peers and other graphic design projects. If it was not for Brother Dennis’ repetitive asking of not be able to understand that there’s more to design than just simply putting together a design, and as a designer, it is your job to establish the reason and have your audience identify and connect with the real message being communicated. Design

After mixing all the communication

not coming together, exhausted from the

taking photos, writing, editing, reviewing,

long hours staring at my computer, and

designing - into one project, I feel the most

accomplished after printing out the final

prepared I have ever felt to design in the

draft.

“real world.” With this culinary magazine, I hope you are able to grasp each chef ’s

the pen and paper and, of course, the

story, the taste and textures of their dishes,

computer, I quickly learned that the

the Hispanic culture and what it feels to be

development of this project would be

a part of a family-like spirit at St. Mary’s

long, but well worth it. This Graphics

University. Now, what are you waiting for?

course was more than educational. It

Dive in!

Through this roller-coaster experience,

4

\spring 2013 \ taste of stmu

taste mexican mexicanrice rice

of Stmu of STmu S-/mu

4

mexican recipes recipes inside inside

guacamole tasty guacamole

buñuelos buñuelos

s s

Arts major could do – interviewing,

s

together, frustrated when my pages were

s

components an English-Communication

s s

excited when my pages were coming

hands accustomed to...well...design.

Brother Dennis Bautista, S.M.

Taste of StMU is not a real magazine; it is a class project for EA 4362 Graphics. Questions and reprint information, contact: Katherine Benavides, email: kbenavides@mail.stmarytx. edu, 1 Camino Santa María, St. Mary’s University, San Antonio, TX 78228.

s

appealing solution.

semester designed to get your eyes and

adviser disclaimer

at the opportunity to search for chefs

was a detailed and well, thought-out

Felix Benavides Marta Benavides Christopher Benavides Kathleen Benavides

project has begun. It is about working with what you are given and finding a visually-

As the person behind the camera,

chefs

is about seeing the final product before the an emotional experience. I felt ecstatic and discover what recipes were to come,

Katherine Benavides

s

Creating this magazine was definitely

editor

s s s s

pictures and words. There is reason behind

of Stmu

s

the four basic principles of design, I would

taste

a collection of Rattler recipes from St. Mary’s University, San Antonio, Texas volume 7, number 2, spring 2013

smokin’ hot

BRISKET


smoked brisket

SMoked dish unites family dad of six makes smoked brisket as a way to welcome children

C

The die-hard fan of the San Antonio Spurs and ex-mayor has been grilling for years and is known among his family members for his chicken fajitas, pork chops, sausages and hamburgers on the grill. He started grilling after noticing his admiration for “good-tasting” and “goodsmelling foods.” Some of his favorite dishes include enchiladas, barbecue, spaghetti and meatballs, Felix Ben menudo and lasagna. avides Benavides furthered his interest of grilling by watching cooking television programs, reading and experimenting his dishes “on his family.” He says by actually experiencing the cooking and cutting of the meat, “you learn how to cook.”

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oming home from a long day of work to prepare a meal where five of his six children will get to enjoy helps Felix Benavides get through the day. Benavides, parent of three St. Mary’s University students and a 17-year member of the Texas Department of Criminal Justice Briscoe Unit, only prepares his signature dish on special occasions, which includes Thanksgiving, Christmas, and of course, when his daughters and son come home to visit. “Smoked brisket is a dish that everyone likes in the family,” Benavides said. “It is hard to get the family together and on the rare occasions they do, I make brisket to unite the family and create a sense of community at the family table.” Benavides’ oldest son graduated from Texas State University and lives in Austin, Texas while his oldest daughter graduated from Columbia University and lives in New York City. His youngest son attends high school in his hometown of Crystal City and the remaining three children attend St. Mary’s University. The father of six encouraged his daughters to attend St. Mary’s after learning it was a “Catholic institution, renowned and had high academic standards.”

photos and story by katherine benavides

taste of stmu \ spring 2013 \ 5


smoked brisket

s

add toppings for the ultimate taste!

1

2

3

Remove the brisket from the wrapping.

Then, using the same spoon, lather

Once completed, bring the extra foil to

With a large knife, remove 3/4 of the fat

both sides of the brisket. After lathering

cover the top of the brisket. The entire

from the meat. Then, place the brisket

the meat, sprinkle seasoned salt on the

slab of meat should be covered in foil.

on foil. Make sure to have enough foil

brisket. Estimate how much is needed

Crumble the edges to ensure it stays

to cover the top of the brisket. In a small

depending on the individuals eating the

secure within the foil. Leave the brisket in

bowl, combine the lemon honey and

meal, but usually one or two layers on

the refrigerator to marinate overnight.

barbecue sauce with a spoon.

top of the brisket is enough.

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\spring 2013 \ taste of stmu


smoked brisket

ingredients s

medium-sized brisket (12 lbs)

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1/3 cup of lemon honey

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1/3 cup of barbecue sauce

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seasoned salt

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tomato

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cilantro

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onion

serving size s

20 people

chef’s tip s

4

Keep in the refrigerator to marinate overnight. This will allow the spices to sink in and give it a great taste.

5

6

In the morning, prep the grill to begin

Leave the brisket to cook for 5 1/2 hours.

With a cup, scoop some of the remaining

cooking the brisket by adding coal and

Every hour, flip over the foil package.

juices in the foil package and pour onto

starting a fire. The coal will be placed on

Once it has been cooked, remove the

the brisket for extra taste. With a knife,

opposite sides of the inside of the grill.

brisket from the grill and open the foil

slice the meat against the grain. Continue

Wait 30 minutes for the fire to start up.

package. Take the brisket out of the foil

until the entire brisket is cut. Once

After the grill has been prepped, place

and onto a clear area or plate in order to

done, it is ready to serve. Add tomotoes,

the brisket in the grill.

be cut.

cilantro or onions for extra flavor!

taste of stmu \ spring 2013 \ 7


Chile, spice and everything rice mexican rice

“family chef” debuts her most favorite recipe - mexican rice

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make it – “really spicy and full of chile.” Marta says her inability to complete college helps her encourage her daughters to obtain their undergraduate degree. Throughout her experience of working with the Crystal City Independent School District for 36 years, she learned it was valuable to continue an education. “I like St. Mary’s because it is is not that large, it is a Catholic university and my daughters are not that far away from home,” Marta says. Marta values having a a big family, citing that doing so allows her children to “have their first introduction with people. It is an education in which you learn how to socialize. You also learn how to t o love, forgive, share and care, despite everyone’s differences.”

s

arta Benavides never knew watching her mother cook when she was younger would help establish her as the “Family Chef ” among her family members. After years of learning from her mother, Marta later got married and dived into the world of cooking. While mastering meals on a daily basis, she knew she had to not only provide love and care for her husband and six children, but also make sure her family had a warm plate during meal times. Marta learned to make and prepare chicken envueltos, potpie, enchiladas, carne guisada, baked chicken, pork chops, tortillas, chorizo and her most famous and favorite dish yet – rice. “What makes rice special to make is that all of my children love it,” Marta says. “At times, rice seems like the perfect side dish to a meal like enchiladas, chicken envueltos, fajitas or brisket. My daughters at St. Mary’s always tell me to make it for them when they come home for a visit.” Another dish she is a big fan of is carne guisada with chile. Marta enjoys the sauce incorporated into the dish because it reminds her of the way her mother used to

Marta Benavides

photos and story by katherine benavides

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\spring 2013 \ taste of stmu


mexican rice

ingredients

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half a tomato, cubed

3 cups of water

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s

2 garlic cloves

1 tspn of pepper

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s

1 pinch of cumin seeds

1 tbsp of salt

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s

1 tbsp of oil

8 oz. can of tomato sauce

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s

cilantro

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s

1 1/3 cups of rice

2 garlic cloves

serving size s

6 people

directions

1

1

Cube the tomato. Crush the cumin seeds into a powder. Crush the garlic cloves. Cube the onion. Place the pan on the stovetop and turn on to high heat. Put enough oil to cover the bottom of pan.

2

Spread 1 1/3 cups of rice in the pan. Continue to stir the rice until brown. When it browns, lower the temperature to medium heat. Pour tomato sauce and three cups of water into the pan. Then, add the cubed tomatoes and onions to the mixture.

3

Stir the mixture. Then, add the cumin powder, crushed garlic, salt and pepper into the pan. Turn to high heat. Remember to stir frequently and check the mixture constantly. Bring to a boil.

4

When it comes to a boil, put on medium heat. Cover the pan with the top for eight minutes. Continue to stir and check frequently in order to prevent the rice from sticking to the pan.

5

Stop stirring when the rice absorbs the water and looks fluffy. When done, turn off the stovetop and remove cover from pan. Leave uncovered for five minutes, so rice absorbs remaining sauce. After it has cooled, add cilantro for taste. It is ready to serve.

2

5

taste of stmu \ spring 2013 \ 9


guacamole

GUACAMOLE 101 college years helps texas state university alumnus learn to cook

C

s

Christopher Benavides

hristopher Benavides did not see Culinary 101 on his course schedule, yet he found himself researching recipes and cooking a dish most nights during his college years. The Texas State graduate never thought he would have to use food utensils other than to eat a meal. Instead, he found himself mixing vegetables and spices, slicing meats and getting creative with what dishes he was able to make in his small dorm room. “I had to learn to cook during my college years,” Benavides said. “You learn to do a lot of things when you do not have money. My roommates refused to cook so I took it upon myself to learn how to properly cook basic Mexican dishes like enchiladas, fajitas or rice.” The Jon Brion fan has relied on the basics of food to develop some of his more intricate dishes. “Just get creative,” Benavides said. “If you can make a dish with just three main ingredients, then you mastered something

that you can always fall back on when times get rough.” Guacamole was one of the first items Benavides learned to prepare. He says the dish is “very simple to make, and can really add to a taco of brisket or barbacoa.” The 30-year-old recalls his mom making guacamole and feels “it is special because it is part of my childhood.” When he has the chance to visit, Benavides goes home to Crystal City, Texas and visits his family. While home, he and his wife get together and make guacamole for his family to enjoy on Sunday morning with barbacoa tacos. While they eat at the table, Benavides says he gets to hear about his sisters’ experiences at the college they attend. “The fact that St. Mary’s University is a smaller campus than most universities is nice,” Benavides said. “As you get older, you look back at your college days and realize that you don’t remember half the people you encountered. When I talk to my sisters, there’s a sense that they know most of the people on campus by their first names.” photos and story by katherine benavides

chef’s tip If you did not eat all the guacamole, save it in the fridge for later. Squeeze a bit of lemon to prevent the dish from turning black.

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\ spring 2013 \ taste of stmu


guacamole

3

Empty with a spoon about half of each ingredient (tomatoes, cilantro, etc.) from the bowl into the other bowl with the avocado. Once that has been completed, add two pinches of salt.

4

Next cut the lime in half. Squeeze one of the halves onto the avocado mixture. Then, with a masher, or spoon, mash and mix the avocado mixture.

5

Continue to mix until you get a lime green, semi-thick mixture. Once completed, it is ready to serve.

directions

ingredients s

garlic

Then, cut a stick of cilantro into bits.

s

green peppers

Then, slice the tomato into four.

s

1/2 an onion

Slice and dice only a one-fourth

s

cilantro

of the tomato. Next, remove two

s

lime

cloves of garlic. Dice the vegetable.

s

salt

serving size s

6 people

preparation s

10 minutes

s

s

tomato

1 avocado

1

2

First, slice and dice the onion.

Then, add them to a bowl, but keep each ingredient separate from each other. Next, cut the avocado in half. Remove the seed and empty both halves of the avocado into a bowl.

5 taste of stmu \ spring 2013 \ 11


buñuelos

decoding a recipe St. Mary’s student turns to making buñuelos as a fun hobby

D

photos and story by katherine benavides

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uring the day, senior computer information systems major Kathleen Benavides cracks software programs and translates codes in her classes and at her internship. But at night, the St. Mary’s University student is a fun personality who loves to create tasty dishes for her family and friends. “I have always had an interest in cooking or creating dishes for my family and friends,” Benavides said. “Cooking is more of a hobby to me but I definitely enjoy it. I want to be able to cook the variety of dishes my mom would cook for us when my siblings and I were kids.” Benavides enjoys all types of foods including chalupas, pizza and brisket. Benavides admits she does “not like all these foods together, but I like that each are different and come from different areas of the world.” Once she got to college, Benavides knew there was going to be a setback in cooking a variety of meals, but she did not let that stop her. She recalls bringing specific meats, vegetables and fruits from the cafeteria to concoct a few of her favorite dishes in her room. “My favorite food to cook is lemon fajitas. I’ll pick up some fajita meat in the café and a couple of lemons. Then, I’ll warm it up in my dorm and squeeze lemons for the juice on top. It gives it that great tangy taste.” The twin enjoys finding quick and simple meals to make, “since that is what college life allows you to make at times.” “I chose to make buñuelos (for the magazine) because they can serve as a tasty snack or dessert,” Benavides said. “They are also very simple and quick to make, especially in a college setting.” Her fun personality does not stop at making meals. Benavides likes to work out at the gym, read novels, visit the Marianist

Kathleen Benavides

brothers on campus, tour downtown San Antonio and serve on iStar, an on-campus student consulting organization. She admires the community spirit offered at the university. “I like St. Mary’s because of the close-nit atmosphere,” Benavides said. “There are so many professors here that really want to help the students and that is what keeps me motivated to do great.”

chef’s tip It might be better to put the scoop of ice cream in a bowl so it will not melt all over the buñuelos. If separate, you can mix the contents better.

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\ taste of stmu


buñuelos

ingredients s

6 tortillas

s

sugar

s

cinnamon

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oil

s

vanilla ice cream

serving size s

3 people

preparation

directions

s

20 minutes

directions 1

First, stack two tortillas on a plate.

sprinkle the oil in the pan. If the oil

Then, with a knife, cut the tortilla

reacts to the water, it is ready.

into fours (there should be eight

2

1

tortilla to the pan. Remember to

Proceed with cutting the other four

keep a close watch as the tortillas

tortillas in the same way.

tend to cook quickly. Flip the

Next, pour sugar onto a plate.

tortillas frequently with tongs to

Cover about 2/3 of the plate with

get a brown look on both sides.

sugar in order to use for coating

Once the sections are brown,

the buñuelos once they are

remove them from the pan.

5

Continue to add the rest of the

the sugar. Add the amount you are

tortillas until they are all cooked.

comfortable with for coating. With a

Place one part of the tortilla in

spoon, mix the sugar and cinnamon.

the sugar mixture. With the tongs,

Pour oil into a skillet pan. The oil

move the buñuelo in the mixture

should be enough to cover the

and flip to add the mixture to both

bottom of the pan. Next, turn on the

sides. Proceed with doing the same

heat of the stovetop to medium-

to the rest of the buñuelos.

high. Allow the pan to warm up. To check if the pan is ready to cook the

4

Next, add the four sections of one

sections from the two tortillas).

cooked. Then, add cinnamon to

3

4

6

Once sugar has been added to all of the buñuelos, place them on a

tortillas, rinse your hands. With the

plate. Add a scoop of ice cream to

water remaining on your hands,

the top and it is ready to serve.

taste of stmu \ spring 2013 \ 13


elite

Be among the at St. Mary’s University

got bite? For more information on the ROTC program, go to stmarytx.edu/rotc.

Become a Rattler today by applying at stmarytx.edu/applications.

need a study buddy? FOR PAWS

The Program

SM friends

Join SMFriends, a weekly volunteer program in which students visit a Marianist brother. Get to know a brother by playing checkers, taking a stroll around campus or sitting down for a chat. Minimum meeting time is one hour per week. Contact Joanne Sanchez at 210.436.3333 for more information.

St. Mary’s is home to the friendliest cats on the block! In the For Paws program, we strive to feed, take care and neuter community cats. Make a donation today. Contact Caroline Byrd at 210.431.3430. Like us on facebook.com/ ForPaws Follow us on twitter.com/ ForPaws


A reading with

Richard Blanco Poet Richard Blanco read his “One Day” at President Obama’s recent inauguration. He’s the first immigrant, Latino, and openly gay poet chosen to read at an inauguration and the youngest. His most recent publication is the collection Looking for the Gulf Motel, which explores themes of sexuality and home. Richard Blanco was born in Cuba, assembled in Spain, and imported to the United States—meaning his mother, seven months pregnant, and the rest of the family arrived as exiles from Cuba to Madrid where he was born. Only forty-five days later, the family emigrated once more and settled in New York City, then eventually in Miami where he was raised and educated. Sponsored by English and Communication Studies Department, Philosophy Department, and the School of Humanities and Social Sciences. For more information, contact Dr. Ito Romo at iromo@stmarytx.edu or Dr. Camille Langston at clangston@stmarytx.edu.

Join us for a poetry reading and a question/answer session. When: 10 a.m., Wednesday, April 3 Where: UC, Conference Room D


beautiful

even behind your shades.

Sunglasses Palace • 102 Spinach Blvd • San Antonio, TX 78249 • Open weekdays 8 a.m. to 9 p.m. • 210.555.4747 • sunglassespalace.com


Taste of StMU - Spring 2013