Page 1

Capturing
Art
History
through
Collaboration
 By:
Kate
Stieren
 1.
Unit
Title:
Capturing
Art
History
through
Collaboration
 2.
Grade/Class:
 The
class
is
comprised
of
24
seventh
grade
students,
13
boys
and
11
girls.
In
the
 class,
two
of
the
boys
will
have
IEPs
for
learning
disabilities,
and
one
boy
who
is
part
 of
the
ELL
program.
 3.
Goals/Rationale:

 This
unit
is
designed
to
engage
students
in
deep
learning
and
understanding
of
 renowned
works
of
art
through
the
discussion,
research
and
recreation
of
the
 selected
works.
The
students
will
learn
how
to
use
perspective
and
lighting
to
shape
 meaning
in
the
artwork
they
have
chosen
to
recreate.
The
students
will
also
assist
in
 further
analyzing
and
recreating
the
artworks
selected
by
the
members
of
the
their
 team,
as
well
as
playing
important
creative
roles
in
the
production
of
their
fellow
 team
members’
final
projects.

 Each
individual
lesson
meets
several
standards
at
the
state
and
national
level,
as
 well
as
GREs.
How
the
lesson
applies
to
the
lesson
specifically
can
be
found
in
 section
12,
the
lesson
sequence.
 Lesson
1:

 National
Visual
Arts
Standards:
 *They
should
be
able
to
develop
and
present
basic
analyses
of
works
of
art
from
 structural,
historical,
and
cultural
perspectives,
and
from
combinations
of
those
 perspectives.
This
includes
the
ability
to
understand
and
evaluate
work
in
the
 various
arts
disciples.
 The
Show‐Me
Standards:
 Goal
1:
Students
in
Missouri
public
schools
will
acquire
the
knowledge
and
skills
to
 gather,
analyze
and
apply
information
and
ideas:
 Students
will
demonstrate
within
and
integrate
across
all
content
areas
the
ability
 to:
 5.
comprehend
and
evaluate
written,
visual
and
oral
presentations
and
works
 6.
discover
and
evaluate
patterns
and
relationships
in
information
ideas
and
 structures
 1.
develop
questions
and
ideas
to
initiate
and
refine
research



2.
conduct
research
to
answer
questions
and
evaluate
information
and
ideas
 Goal
3:
Students
in
Missouri
public
schools
will
acquire
the
knowledge
and
skills
to
 recognize
and
solve
problems.
 2.
develop
and
apply
strategies
based
on
ways
others
have
prevented
or
solved
 problems
 GLEs
 Strand
5:
Compare
and
contrast
two
artworks
on:
time,
place,
subject
matter,
theme,
 characteristics,
and
cultural
context.
 Lesson
2:
 National
Visual
Arts
Standards:
 *They
should
be
able
to
communicate
at
a
basic
level
in
the
four
arts
disciplines:
 dance,
music,
theatre,
and
the
visual
arts.
This
includes
knowledge
and
skills
in
the
 use
of
the
basic
vocabularies,
materials,
tools,
techniques,
and
intellectual
methods
 of
each
arts
discipline.
 *They
should
be
able
to
communicate
proficiently
in
at
least
one
art
form,
including
 the
ability
to
define
and
solve
artistic
problems
with
insight
reason,
and
technical
 proficiency.
 The
Show‐Me
Standards:
 Goal
2:
Students
in
Missouri
public
schools
will
acquire
the
knowledge
and
skills
to
 communicate
effectively
within
and
beyond
the
classroom.
 Students
will
demonstrate
within
and
integrate
across
all
content
areas
the
ability
 to:
 3.
exchange
information,
questions
and
ideas
while
recognizing
the
perspectives
of
 others
 Goal
3:
Students
in
Missouri
public
schools
will
acquire
the
knowledge
and
skills
to
 recognizes
and
solve
problems.
 Students
will
demonstrate
within
and
integrate
across
all
content
areas
the
ability
 to:
 2.
develop
and
apply
strategies
based
on
ways
others
have
prevented
or
solved
 problems.
 GLEs
 Strand
4:
Interdisciplinary
Connections
 Explain
how
art
is
used
in
designing
sets
in
film,
television,
or
live
theater.



Lesson
3:
 National
Visual
Arts
Standards
 *They
should
be
able
to
communicate
at
a
basic
level
in
the
four
arts
disciplines:
 dance,
music,
theatre
and
visual
arts.
This
includes
knowledge
and
skills
in
the
use
 of
the
basic
vocabularies,
materials,
tools,
techniques,
and
intellectual
methods
of
 each
arts
discipline.
 The
Show‐Me
Standards
 Goal
2:
Students
in
Missouri
public
schools
will
acquire
the
knowledge
and
skills
to
 communicate
effectively
within
and
beyond
the
classroom.
 Students
will
demonstrate
within
and
integrate
across
all
content
areas
the
ability
 to:
 1.
plan
and
make
written,
oral
and
visual
presentations
for
a
variety
of
purposes
and
 audiences
 5.
perform
or
produce
works
in
the
fine
and
practical
arts
 Goal
3:
develop
and
apply
strategies
based
on
one’s
own
experience
in
preventing
or
 solving
problems
 Goal
4:
Students
in
Missouri
public
schools
will
acquire
the
knowledge
and
skills
to
 make
decisions
and
act
as
responsible
members
of
society.
 6.
identify
tasks
that
require
a
coordinated
effort
and
work
with
others
to
complete
 those
tasks
 GLEs
 Create
original
artwork
using
the
following
subjects:
human
figure
and
still
life
from
 observation
 
 4.
Rationale
for
Artists
and
Artworks
used
meet
the
unit
goals:

 Because
this
unit
allows
each
student
to
select
their
own
artist
and
artwork
to
 research
and
understand,
the
students
as
a
class
will
have
the
opportunity
to
learn
a
 bit
about
a
multitude
of
artists
and
work
by
watching
and
participating
in
the
 development
of
each
student’s
final
project.
The
students
will
be
able
to
select
 artworks
from
an
assortment
of
renowned
works
of
art
from
a
variety
of
time
 periods
that
I
have
pre‐selected,
unless
the
student
has
proposed
an
appropriate
 artwork
to
study
and
recreate.
Examples
of
specific
artists
relating
to
each
lesson
 can
be
found
in
the
materials
section
of
the
lesson
sequences.



5.
Enduring
Ideas:
Throughout
time
and
across
cultures
artists
have
created
works
 that
survive
centuries
and
educate
students
about
not
only
the
development
of
art,
 but
also
the
social
and
cultural
context
of
the
time.
Through
studying
and
evaluating
 these
works,
then
recreating
them,
the
students
will
engage
in
an
authentic
 experience
that
creates
meaning
through
meaningful
making.
Students
will
learn
 both
life
and
art
skills
through
various
artistic
roles
while
working
collaboratively
to
 develop
a
final
project.
 6.
Investigative
Essential
Questions:

 Below
are
some
of
the
most
important
investigative
essential
questions
that
the
 students
will
answer
throughout
this
unit:
 What
does
it
mean
to
recreate
a
work
of
art?
 What
can
we
learn
by
recreating
an
artwork?
 How
did
the
artist
use
light
and
perspective
to
successfully
recreate
this
artwork?
 What
other
elements
of
art
can
we
use
to
create
meaning
and
evoke
feelings?
 How
will
you
reflect
on
your
final
project
during
the
process
and
continuously
 improve
your
final
recreation?
 At
the
end
of
this
sequence
of
lessons
students
will
discover
the
power
of
learning
 through
recreation
of
an
artwork,
how
the
artistic
process
is
equally
as
important
as
 the
final
product,
and
how
each
individual
can
add
a
unique
strength
to
a
 collaborative
project.
 7.
Key
Instructional
Concepts:

 Below
are
some
of
the
most
important
key
instructional
concepts
that
the
students
 will
learn
throughout
this
unit:
 Through
research
and
recreation
of
an
artwork
we
can
learn
more
about
the
artist’s
 perspective,
history,
technique
and
society
in
which
they
lived.
 Perspective
can
change
how
the
story
is
being
told
and
who
is
telling
it

 Lighting
can
be
used
in
a
variety
of
ways
to
create
artistic
effects,
including,
but
not
 limited
to:
shadows,
filters,
and
depth
 Each
individual
has
artistic
strengths
that
must
be
recognized
in
order
to
work
to
 your
fullest
potential
as
a
team
 The
artistic
process
should
include
continuous
evaluation
and
adjustments
your
 artwork
to
create
the
best
final
product
 



8.
Constraints
 o Time:
short
classes,
a
lot
of
work
going
into
the
final
project
 o Materials:
a
lot
of
recyclable,
free
materials
will
be
required
for
the
project
 and
will
need
to
be
gathered
in
advance
 o Cameras:
would
like
to
have
at
least
4
cameras
for
lessons
two
and
three
 o Scenery:
availability
of
outdoor
scenery?
 9.
Integrative
Options/Cross
Curricular
Correlations
 o History:
Student
could
absolutely
relate
the
artwork
or
time
period
they
have
 chosen
to
research
to
a
history
class.
The
student
could
research
and
do
a
 presentation
on
a
topic
related
to
the
artist
or
artwork.
 o Literature:
This
could
be
a
great
opportunity
for
the
students
to
read
an
 artist
bio
about
the
artist
to
learn
more
about
their
life,
thoughts,
opinions,
 etc.
 o English:
The
students
could
write
their
voiceover
for
the
stop
motion
video
 they
will
be
creating
in
the
English
class.
The
voiceover
should
explain
why
 they
chose
to
recreate
that
work
of
art
and
their
artistic
process
leading
up
to
 the
final
product.
 10.
Relationship
to
the
Developmental
Needs
of
Children
 I
will
strategically
place
students
with
special
needs
and
learning
requirements
into
 groups
where
they
will
best
succeed.
I
will
provide
the
ELL
student
with
a
bi‐lingual
 critical
vocabulary
list
if
appropriate,
so
that
he
will
be
able
to
understand
some
of
 the
most
important
concepts
of
this
unit.
Many
of
the
lessons
are
designed
to
 involve
hands
on
learning
that
can
be
explored
at
any
level,
and
encourages
the
 students
to
think
outside
of
the
box.
Students
with
learning
disabilities
will
be
 working
in
a
team
environment
with
successful
students
where
everyone
has
a
 unique
role.
By
emphasizing
the
team
must
use
each
member
of
the
team’s
 strengths
to
create
the
best
final
product,
I
hope
to
create
a
positive
community
 environment
in
the
studio.


 11.
Opportunities
for
student
responses
to
art
from
historical,
critical
and
 aesthetic
perspectives
 The
students
will
respond
to
the
artworks
presented
in
the
presentation
in
analysis
 and
discussion;
record
what
elements
or
aesthetics
they
have
found
 successful/unsuccessful;
research
background
knowledge
on
the
artist
and
artwork
 that
they
have
selected;
and
recreate
through
their
own
interpretation
an
original
 artwork.
 12.
Lesson
Sequence
 
 



Lesson
1
of
3
 Art
History
Recreated
 7th
Grade
 National
Visual
Arts
Standards:
 *They
should
be
able
to
develop
and
present
basic
analyses
of
works
of
art
from
 structural,
historical,
and
cultural
perspectives,
and
from
combinations
of
those
 perspectives.
This
includes
the
ability
to
understand
and
evaluate
work
in
the
 various
arts
disciples.
 The
fourth
National
Visual
Arts
Standard
will
be
met
in
lesson
one
of
the
unit
 through
the
viewing
and
analysis
of
recreations
of
prominent
works
of
art
spanning
 several
centuries.
The
students
will
interpret
the
images
below,
as
well
as
many
 other
examples
of
recreations
of
famous
artworks,
and
evaluate
how
successful
the
 recreations
of
the
work
are
in
comparison
to
the
originals.
 The
Show­Me
Standards:
 Goal
1:
Students
in
Missouri
public
schools
will
acquire
the
knowledge
and
skills
to
 gather,
analyze
and
apply
information
and
ideas:
 Students
will
demonstrate
within
and
integrate
across
all
content
areas
the
ability
 to:
 5.
comprehend
and
evaluate
written,
visual
and
oral
presentations
and
works
 6.
discover
and
evaluate
patterns
and
relationships
in
information
ideas
and
 structures
 In
lesson
one,
students
will
work
towards
point
5
and
6
of
Goal
1
by
engaging
in
the
 presentation
about
recreated
works
of
art
and
beginning
to
evaluate
how
to
make
a
 successful
recreation
or
reproduction
of
a
famous
work
of
art.
The
students
will
also
 compare
the
original
works
of
art
to
their
reproductions
and
discuss
relationships
 and
successful
strategy.
 For
homework
in
lesson
one,
students
will
be
asked
to
do
further
research
on
the
 work
they
have
selected
to
recreate,
meeting
point
one
and
two
of
Goal
1:
 1.
develop
questions
and
ideas
to
initiate
and
refine
research
 2.
conduct
research
to
answer
questions
and
evaluate
information
and
ideas
 Goal
3:
Students
in
Missouri
public
schools
will
acquire
the
knowledge
and
skills
to
 recognize
and
solve
problems.



2.
develop
and
apply
strategies
based
on
ways
other
shave
prevented
or
solved
 problems
 Students
will
not
only
discover
ways
that
other
artists
have
solved
problems
 through
viewing
the
other
exemplars
of
recreation,
but
also
through
interacting
 with
classmates
and
working
within
their
production
teams.
 GLEs
 Strand
5:
Compare
and
contrast
two
artworks
on:
time,
place,
subject
matter,
theme,
 characteristics,
and
cultural
context.
 In
this
lesson,
student
will
be
viewing
original
artworks
and
reproductions
of
the
 work
and
then
analyzing
what
is
and
is
not
successful
about
the
reproduction.
The
 students
will
be
answering
questions
such
as,
“how
do
the
two
works
of
art
differ?”
 leading
to
discussions
about
the
varying
characteristics
and
cultural
contexts
of
the
 work.
 Rationale
and
Goals
for
this
lesson:
 This
lesson
will
introduce
to
students
the
concept
of
recreating
works
of
art
to
 develop
a
deeper
understanding
of
the
work
and
to
engage
in
problem
solving
to
 discover
how
to
produce
their
best
version
of
the
recreation.

 Enduring
Big
Idea:

 The
big
idea
in
this
lesson
is
recreation.
The
big
idea
will
be
connected
to
art
making
 when
the
students
began
researching
their
selected
artist
and
artwork
to
gather
 background
information
for
inspiration
as
they
begin
the
process
recreating
the
 piece
they
have
chosen.
 Essential
Questions:

 What
does
it
mean
to
recreate
a
work
of
art?
 What
can
we
learn
by
recreating
an
artwork?
 How
have
other
artists
successfully
recreated
works
of
art?
 What
techniques
or
strategies
have
other
artists
used
in
the
process
of
recreating?
 Knowledge
Base
and
Key
Concepts:
 o Through
research
and
recreation
of
an
artwork
we
can
learn
more
about
the
 artist’s
perspective,
history,
technique
and
society
in
which
they
lived
 o By
viewing
and
analyzing
works
of
art
we
can
learn
what
makes
art
 successful
and
strategies
that
we
can
use
in
our
own
artwork
 o We
can
how
the
artist’s
perspective
changes
the
work
of
art
by
viewing
 originals
and
recreations
of
famous
artworks



Objectives:
 o The
students
will
view
and
discuss
a
series
of
recreated
artworks
 o The
students
will
compare
the
original
artwork
to
the
recreation
and
record
 what
is
successful
and
what
could
be
improved
 o The
students
will
participate
in
a
gallery
walk
learning
a
bit
about
each
image
 before
selecting
the
work
they
will
recreate
 o The
students
will
create
sketches
of
a
minimum
of
five
ways
the
artwork
they
 selected
could
be
recreated
 o The
students
will
begin
gathering
background
knowledge
through
research
 on
their
selected
artist
and
artwork
 Vocabulary
 o o o o o o

Recreation
 Scene
 Set
Design
 Space
 Production
 Costume


Lesson
Vignette
 Time:
8:00
a.m.
–
8:10
a.m.
 Class
begins
with
two
large
images
hanging
on
the
board,
one
an
original
artwork,
 and
one
the
recreation
of
the
artwork.

 Ask
class:
 o What’s
going
on
in
these
two
images?
 o How
would
you
compare
the
image
on
the
right
(recreation)
to
the
image
on
 the
left
(original)?
 o Why
do
you
think
the
group
on
the
right
recreated
the
artwork?
 o Do
you
think
the
recreation
of
the
artwork
was
successful?
 Watch
70
Million
by
Hold
Your
Horses.
 Time:
8:10
a.m.‐8:30
a.m.
 Class
discussion
and
presentation
about
recreation.
 Questions
to
be
asked:
 o What
is
successful
about
this
recreation
and
what
is
unsuccessful?
 o What
mood
or
feeling
do
you
think
the
artists
creating
the
image
were
trying
 to
achieve?
 o What
techniques
or
strategies
did
the
artists
use
in
recreating
the
work?
 Time:
8:30
a.m.
–
8:40
a.m.



Gallery
walk
to
view
and
read
about
well‐known
artworks.
Students
then
select
an
 artwork
to
recreate.
Students
may
choose
to
recreate
the
same
artwork.
 Time:
8:40
a.m.
–
8:50
a.m
 Students
begin
background
research
on
image
and
artist.
Explain
homework
of
 continuing
background
research
and
beginning
sketches
of
ways
they
will
recreate
 the
artwork.
 Assessments:

 During
the
first
lesson,
student
assessment
is
based
on
active
participation
in
the
 discussion
and
engagement
during
the
gallery
walk.
The
students
will
also
be
 creating
a
list
of
successful
aspects
of
the
recreated
works
as
well
as
areas
to
be
 improved
upon.
This
will
be
a
good
way
for
me
to
gauge
the
students’
level
of
 engagement.
The
student
should
return
to
class
with
background
research
and
 beginning
sketches.
The
student
will
be
evaluated
on
continued
revisions
to
 sketches
and
concept
seen
through
the
sketchbook.
 Student
Engagement
and
Adaptations
for
Special
Needs:
 I
will
strategically
place
students
with
special
needs
and
learning
requirements
into
 groups
where
they
will
best
succeed.
Prior
to
the
unit
beginning
I
would
like
to
take
 time
to
get
to
know
my
students
with
special
needs
to
better
understand
how
to
 meet
their
needs.

If
my
ELL
student
is
struggling
with
vocabulary,
I
could
create
a
 bilingual
vocabulary
list
to
provide
scaffolding
for
that
student
in
order
to
build
a
 strong
foundation
for
terms
that
will
be
commonly
used
in
this
unit.
For
the
 students
with
learning
disabilities
I
would
like
to
place
them
in
groups
of
students
 that
succeed
in
art
but
also
understand
patience
so
that
the
student
only
sees
and
 learns
success
within
his
or
her
team.

 Materials,
Teaching
Resources/References:
 Video:
http://player.vimeo.com/video/9752986
 Presentation
with
images
like
the
following
recreation
examples
and
the
originals:



My
exemplar:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 Materials:
 ‐~30
printed
images
of
famous
artworks
for
students
to
select
form
for
their
final
 project
(with
brief
descriptions
on
back)
 Teacher
Reflection:
 The
largest
indicator
that
this
lesson
is
successful
and
meaningful
will
be
in
the
 students’
excitement
and
interaction
of
the
lesson.
I
hope
to
see
a
high
level
of
 student
engagement
and
participation
in
the
discussion.
The
success/areas
for
 improvement
worksheets
will
be
a
good
tool
to
gauge
whether
or
not
the
students
 are
understanding
the
factors
in
developing
a
successful
reproduction
of
the
work
of
 art.
 
 
 Lesson
2
of
3
 Tools
of
Production
 7th
Grade
 National
Visual
Arts
Standards:
 *They
should
be
able
to
communicate
at
a
basic
level
in
the
four
arts
disciplines:
 dance,
music,
theatre,
and
the
visual
arts.
This
includes
knowledge
and
skills
in
the
 use
of
the
basic
vocabularies,
materials,
tools,
techniques,
and
intellectual
methods
 of
each
arts
discipline.
 *They
should
be
able
to
communicate
proficiently
in
at
least
one
art
form,
including
 the
ability
to
define
and
solve
artistic
problems
with
insight
reason,
and
technical
 proficiency.
 The
students
will
work
on
the
first
visual
arts
standard
by
learning
some
of
the
tools
 and
techniques
used
in
producing
their
final
image
of
the
recreation.
In
this
lesson,



the
students
will
learn
tools
and
techniques
of
lighting,
camera
angle,
perspective,
 creating
shadows,
and
the
use
of
filters
to
be
used
in
their
final
recreation
of
the
 artwork
they
have
chosen.
This
will
give
students
insight
into
how
to
solve
some
of
 the
artistic
problems
that
arise
in
recreating
the
artwork.
Students
can
use
the
 information
and
practice
from
the
lesson
to
achieve
an
accurate
depiction
of
the
 original
image.
 The
Show­Me
Standards:
 Goal
2:
Students
in
Missouri
public
schools
will
acquire
the
knowledge
and
skills
to
 communicate
effectively
within
and
beyond
the
classroom.
 Students
will
demonstrate
within
and
integrate
across
all
content
areas
the
ability
 to:
 3.
exchange
information,
questions
and
ideas
while
recognizing
the
perspectives
of
 others
 Students
will
not
only
be
able
to
gain
insight
into
how
the
perspective
can
change
 the
meaning
of
an
artwork,
but
also
how
the
person
recreating
the
artwork
can
 interpret
the
artwork
in
different
ways.
 Goal
3:
Students
in
Missouri
public
schools
will
acquire
the
knowledge
and
skills
to
 recognizes
and
solve
problems.
 Students
will
demonstrate
within
and
integrate
across
all
content
areas
the
ability
 to:
 2.
develop
and
apply
strategies
based
on
ways
others
have
prevented
or
solved
 problems.
 By
viewing
the
ways
in
which
other
artists
have
successfully
recreated
artworks,
the
 students
can
use
the
strategies
they
have
learned
in
creating
and
developing
their
 own
reproductions.
 GLEs
 Strand
4:
Interdisciplinary
Connections
 Explain
how
art
is
used
in
designing
sets
in
film,
television,
or
live
theater.
 This
strand
of
the
GLE
standards
will
be
introduced
first
during
lesson
one,
and
then
 further
explored
in
lesson
two.
Students
will
learn
tools
and
techniques
of
designing
 sets
to
be
used
in
creating
their
final
reproduction
of
the
work
of
art.
In
this
lesson,
 the
students
will
also
learn
about
the
roles
they
will
play
as
members
of
their
 production
team.
 Rationale
and
Goals
for
this
Lesson



These
tools
and
techniques
are
imperative
to
be
taught
before
the
students
begin
 crafting
their
final
project.
It
is
important
that
the
students
not
only
take
into
 consideration
the
lighting
and
perspective
that
is
used
in
the
work,
but
also
how
to
 create
these
effects
in
their
own
recreations.
The
students
will
have
the
opportunity
 to
experiment
hands‐on
with
lighting,
shadows,
perspective,
filters,
angle,
and
other
 artistic
elements
in
this
lesson.
 Enduring
Big
Idea:
 The
enduring
big
idea
in
this
lesson
is
light
and
perspective.
These
two
artistic
 elements
are
powerful
tools
that
can
change
the
meaning
and
the
story
of
a
work
of
 art.
This
lesson
will
be
connected
to
art
making
by
giving
students
inspiration
for
 their
final
art
project.
After
the
students
have
completed
the
lesson,
they
will
create
 detailed
sketches
in
their
sketchbook
of
how
they
would
like
to
use
lighting
and
 perspective
in
their
final
project.
 Essential
Questions:
 Referencing
the
images
in
the
slideshow,
how
did
these
artists
use
lighting
to
affect
 the
mood
and
feeling
of
the
work?
 What
kinds
of
strategies
do
you
think
the
artist
used
to
create
this
effect?
 Referencing
the
images
in
the
slideshow,
why
do
you
think
the
artist
chose
to
create
 the
work
from
this
perspective?
Who
do
you
think
is
the
viewer?
 Had
the
artist
changed
the
perspective,
what
would
be
the
effect?
 How
will
you
use
lighting
and
perspective
to
create
the
feeling
you
wish
to
evoke
in
 your
final
project?
 Knowledge
Base
and
Key
Concepts:
 o Perspective
can
be
used
as
a
tool
to
change
the
feeling
and
meaning
of
a
work
 of
art
 o Lighting,
or
the
lack
thereof,
can
be
used
to
change
the
mood
or
feeling
of
a
 work
 o Lighting
can
be
used
in
a
variety
of
ways
to
create
artistic
effects,
including,
 but
not
limited
to:
shadows,
filters,
and
depth
 o Taking
risks
in
experimenting
with
light
and
perspective
will
be
rewarded
 with
bonus
points
 Objectives:
 o Students
will
experiment
with
lighting
and
the
artistic
effects
it
can
be
used
 to
create
 o Students
will
experiment
with
various
perspectives
and
camera
angles
to
 evoke
different
feelings
and
meaning
in
their
work



o Students
will
use
their
experiences
with
lighting
and
perspective
to
create
 sketches
of
how
lighting
and
perspective
will
play
a
role
in
their
final
 recreations
of
the
artwork
they
have
selected
 Vocabulary
 o o o o o o o

Perspective
 Camera
angle
 Viewpoint
 Lighting
 Shadow
 Filter
 Depth


Lesson
Vignette
 Time:
8:00
a.m.
to
8:10
a.m.
 Presentation
of
concepts:
perspective
and
lighting
 Slideshow
of
images
showing
extremes
of
lighting
and
perspective
juxtaposed
next
 to
each
other,
ask
students
questions
about
images
such
as:
 o How
does
the
artist
use
lighting
to
evoke
a
feeling?
 o How
does
the
artist
use
perspective
to
evoke
a
feeling?
 o How
can
you
use
these
tools
in
your
own
artwork
deliver
your
message?
 Time:
8:10
a.m.
to
8:50
a.m.
 As
production
company
teams
(by
table),
students
will
rotate
to
four
different
 stations
for
ten
minutes
each
where
there
will
be
a
camera
and
tools
at
each
station.
 At
each
station,
each
student
will
take
turns
snapping
a
few
pictures,
altering
the
 tool
that
station
is
experimenting
with.
For
example,
at
the
perspective
station,
Ellie
 will
snap
a
few
pictures
from
different
perspectives
using
the
other
students
on
her
 team
as
her
actors.
 Station
1:
Perspective
(varying
the
angle
and
height
of
the
camera)
 Station
2:
Lighting:
absence
or
presence
(varying
the
amount
of
light
in
the
scene)
 Station
3:
Lighting:
using
color
and
screen
filters
to
evoke
different
moods
 Station
4:
Lighting:
using
shadows
to
create
images
within
the
scene
 The
students
will
be
assigned
homework
that
involves
sketching
exactly
how
they
 plan
to
use
lighting
and
perspective
in
their
final
artwork
based
on
their
 experimentation
in
class.
The
students
will
receive
printed
copies
of
the
images
they
 took
to
include
in
their
sketchbook.
The
students
should
take
into
consideration
the
 research
they
have
done
on
their
artwork
and
how
lighting
and
perspective
will
play
 a
role
in
creating
meaning.



Assessments:

 Success
in
this
lesson
is
based
on
the
students
taking
risks
as
artists
and
thinking
 outside
of
the
box
to
experiment
with
lighting
and
perspective
in
a
variety
of
ways.
 The
evidence
for
this
can
be
seen
through
the
photos
that
the
students
capture
and
 the
way
they
use
their
fellow
team
members
as
actors.
The
evidence
will
also
be
 seen
in
the
thought
the
students
have
put
into
their
sketches
of
how
lighting
and
 perspective
will
be
used
in
their
final
projects.
 Student
Engagement
and
Adaptations
for
Special
Needs:
 As
I
said
earlier,
I
will
strategically
place
students
with
special
needs
and
learning
 requirements
into
groups
where
they
will
best
succeed.
Because
this
activity
 involves
such
hands‐on
learning,
I
think
that
most
students
can
learn
by
watching
 other
students
model
the
activity.
This
activity
calls
for
creativity
and
out‐of‐the‐box
 thinking
which
I
believe
crosses
language
barriers
and
allows
students
to
think
 freely
in
their
own
way.

 Materials,
Teaching
Resources
/Reference:
 Resources:
presentation
with
examples
of
artworks
with
varying
lighting
and
 perspectives
such
as
these:
 



 Materials:
 ‐four
digital
cameras
 ‐filters
for
lenses,
colored
lenses,
textured
filters
 ‐chairs
and
blocks
of
varying
heights
for
students
to
stand
on
 ‐small
closet
type
room
to
create
varying
light
sources



‐cut
outs
to
create
shadows
 ‐light
sources:
lamps,
overhead
lights,
spotlights
 Teacher
Reflection:
 I
will
know
that
this
lesson
is
successful
and
meaningful
by
investigating
the
 students
thought
process
about
light
and
perspective
as
a
part
of
their
final
project.
 It
should
be
evident
in
the
students’
sketchbook
that
they
have
thoroughly
 considered
various
options
on
how
they
will
capture
their
recreation
of
the
artwork.
 
 
 Lesson
3
of
3
 Making
Meaning
Through
Collaboration
(this
lesson
will
take
place
over
multiple
 class
periods,
each
student
on
the
team
will
take
turns
acting
as
the
production
 manager
to
create
their
final
product
and
the
roles
will
rotate)
 7th
Grade
 National
Visual
Arts
Standards
 *They
should
be
able
to
communicate
at
a
basic
level
in
the
four
arts
disciplines:
 dance,
music,
theatre
and
visual
arts.
This
includes
knowledge
and
skills
in
the
use
 of
the
basic
vocabularies,
materials,
tools,
techniques,
and
intellectual
methods
of
 each
arts
discipline.
 In
the
third
lesson,
students
will
apply
what
they
have
learned
in
lessons
one
and
 two
to
create
a
meaningful
final
recreation
of
the
artwork
that
they
chose
in
lesson
 one.
They
will
apply
what
they
have
learned
about
successful
reproductions
of
 artworks,
lighting,
perspective,
and
artistic
effects
to
their
final
project
and
work
as
 the
director
of
their
team
to
make
their
vision
come
to
life.

 The
Show­Me
Standards
 Goal
2:
Students
in
Missouri
public
schools
will
acquire
the
knowledge
and
skills
to
 communicate
effectively
within
and
beyond
the
classroom.
 Students
will
demonstrate
within
and
integrate
across
all
content
areas
the
ability
 to:
 1.
plan
and
make
written,
oral
and
visual
presentations
for
a
variety
of
purposes
and
 audiences
 The
students
will
be
working
on
this
standard
during
planning
and
making
process
 of
their
final
project.
The
final
product
will
be
both
an
oral
and
visual
presentation
 showing
the
development
of
the
project
from
start
to
finish
using
stop
motion



photography
and
video
as
well
as
a
voiceover
from
the
student
explaining
the
 evolvement
of
the
image
and
its
significance.
 5.
perform
or
produce
works
in
the
fine
and
practical
arts
 This
standard
will
be
met
by
capturing
the
students’
process
through
stop
motion
 photography
and
later
creating
a
video
of
their
process.
The
final
project
can
be
seen
 in
a
still
photograph
and
also
through
the
short
video
capturing
the
process.
 Goal
3:
develop
and
apply
strategies
based
on
one’s
own
experience
in
preventing
or
 solving
problems
 Because
the
students
have
had
a
variety
of
experiences
with
artistic
elements
in
 their
set
design
at
this
point,
they
will
be
able
to
use
this
information
to
problem
 solve
in
creating
their
set
design,
props,
etc.
 Goal
4:
Students
in
Missouri
public
schols
will
acquire
the
knowledge
and
skills
to
 make
decisions
and
act
as
responsible
members
of
society.
 6.
identify
tasks
that
require
a
coordinated
effort
and
work
with
others
to
complete
 those
tasks
 The
third
lesson
is
based
largely
on
working
in
a
team
environment
because
it
 requires
the
team
to
work
collectively
to
create
the
final
product.
On
each
team
the
 students
will
take
turns
playing
the
roles
of
production
manager,
set
designers,
 photographers,
and
costumers.
 GLEs
 o Create
original
artwork
using
the
following
subjects:
human
figure
and
still
 life
from
observation
 In
lesson
three,
the
students
will
create
original
artwork
using
their
own
bodies
to
 recreate
the
work
of
another
artist.
They
may
also
create
work
representative
of
a
 still
life
in
recreating
the
work
that
they
selected.
 Rationale
and
Goals:

 This
lesson
is
the
culminating
lesson
of
the
unit
as
students
are
in
the
process
of
 creating
their
reproduction
of
an
original
renowned
artwork.
This
lesson
will
give
 students
hands
on
experience
collaborating
with
team
members
to
a
finished
 artwork
and
playing
the
role
of
manager
in
creating
their
final
product.
I
hope
that
 the
students
not
only
learn
about
leadership
and
team
roles,
but
also
how
the
 process
in
which
art
is
created
is
so
important
to
the
meaning
of
the
final
piece.
 Enduring
Big
Idea:
 o The
big
idea
in
this
lesson
is
applying
the
planning
the
students
have
done
 and
the
experiences
from
past
lessons
to
a
team
collaborative
environment
 in
order
to
bring
their
recreation
to
life.




Essential
Questions:
 o How
will
you
as
the
production
manager
see
that
your
vision
is
carried
 throughout
the
process?
 o How
will
you
use
the
talents
of
your
team
members
to
their
fullest
potential?
 o How
will
you
help
your
production
manager
create
the
most
effective
final
 project
possible?
 o How
will
you
reflect
on
your
final
project
during
the
process
and
 continuously
improve
your
final
recreation?
 Knowledge
Base
and
Key
Concepts:
 o It
is
important
to
recognize
each
individual’s
artistic
strengths
in
order
to
 work
to
your
fullest
potential
as
a
team
 o The
artistic
process
should
include
continuous
evaluation
and
adjustments
to
 the
final
project
to
create
the
best
final
product
 Objectives:
 o Students
will
work
in
a
collaborative
team
environment
to
create
a
dynamic
 final
product
in
the
versions
of
a
single
still
photograph
and
a
stop
motion
 movie
 o Students
will
continuously
analyze
the
artistic
process
and
the
work
they
are
 creating
to
make
improvements
when
appropriate
 o Students
will
apply
their
knowledge
gained
in
the
past
two
lessons
to
create
 an
interesting
final
project
paying
attention
to
lighting,
angle,
perspective
 and
other
artistic
elements
 Vocabulary:
 o o o o o o

Collaboration
 Photographer
 Set
designer
 Costume
designer
 Production
manager
 Reflection


Lesson
Vignette:
 Students
will
have
the
opportunity
to
have
one
to
two
class
periods
dedicated
to
 creating
their
final
product
where
he
or
she
and
his/her
team
members
work
on
the
 creation
of
props,
costume,
set
design,
lighting,
camera
angles,
script,
etc.
 The
students
will
take
turns
playing
the
various
roles
by
drawing
them
from
a
hat
 and
then
rotating
so
that
everyone
plays
all
of
the
roles
evenly
and
has
experienced
 each
role
at
the
end
of
the
unit.



During
this
time
the
production
manager
and
should
be
directing
the
various
 components
of
his
or
her
final
product
and
the
photographer
should
be
capturing
 this
process
to
create
the
stop
motion
movie
after
the
project
has
been
completed.
 This
lesson/unit
will
be
summarized
with
a
premiere
of
all
of
the
stop
motion
videos
 being
played
for
the
class
so
that
the
class
can
see
how
each
final
project
developed
 from
beginning
to
end.
This
will
be
a
great
opportunity
for
the
students
to
see
the
 magic
that
occurs
during
making
meaning
through
meaningful
making.
 Assessments:
 If
the
students
receive
a
letter
grade
for
art
at
this
grade
level,
I
would
create
a
 rubric
that
would
be
given
to
the
students
after
lesson
one
so
that
they
know
what
 an
“A”
project
would
look
like.
I
think
that
the
best
way
to
see
the
student’s
growth
 in
this
unit
would
be
to
look
at
their
sketchbook
and
she
how
their
thinking
has
 developed
from
their
first
sketch
of
how
to
execute
their
recreation
to
their
final
 project.
This
way
I
could
see
the
ways
in
which
their
thinking
has
evolved
and
their
 process
as
well
as
decisions
they
have
made
along
the
way.
This
could
also
be
seen
 through
the
stop‐motion
video,
which
is
a
great
way
for
students
to
reflect
on
their
 artistic
process
as
well.
 Student
Engagement
and
Adaptations
for
Special
Needs:

 I
will
also
encourage
the
students
to
find
strengths
within
each
of
their
team
 members
to
create
the
best
team
environment
for
all
students.
I
will
strategically
 place
students
with
special
needs
and
learning
requirements
into
groups
where
 they
will
best
succeed.
Prior
to
the
unit
beginning
I
would
like
to
take
time
to
get
to
 know
my
students
with
special
needs
to
better
understand
how
to
meet
their
needs.

 If
my
ELL
student
is
struggling
with
vocabulary,
I
could
create
a
bilingual
vocabulary
 list
to
provide
scaffolding
for
that
student
in
order
to
build
a
strong
foundation
for
 terms
that
will
be
commonly
used
in
this
unit.
For
the
students
with
learning
 disabilities
I
would
like
to
place
them
in
groups
of
students
that
succeed
in
art
but
 also
understand
patience
so
that
the
student
only
sees
and
learns
success
within
his
 or
her
team.

 
 
 13.
Assessment
Strategies
and
Evaluation
Criteria
 Lesson
1:
 Journal:
Successful/unsuccessful
components
recreations
in
the
presentation
 Participation
in
class
analysis
and
discussion
of
artworks
 Background
research
completed
on
artist
and
work



Lesson
2:
 Evidence
of
taking
risks
and
experimenting
seen
through
photographs
from
Light
&
 Perspective
activity
 Sketches
showing
light
and
perspective
applied
to
final
project
 Lesson
3:
 Peer
evaluations
 Active
participation
in
group
effort

 The
culminating
activity
for
this
unit
will
be
a
premiere
of
all
of
the
students
stop
 motion
videos.
The
students
will
have
the
opportunity
to
not
only
learn
a
bit
about
 more
than
20
important
paintings
in
art
history
through
the
eyes
of
their
peers,
but
 also
to
see
how
artistic
processes
differ
and
what
makes
an
artistic
process
 successful.
 14.
Unit
Evaluation
and
Assessment
 1.
Photograph
of
recreation
 2.
Stop‐motion
video
of
artistic
process
 o Did
the
student’s
work
evolve?
 o Did
the
student
apply
his
experiences
with
perspective
and
light
to
his
final
 product?
 o Did
the
student
(as
production
manager)
try
to
engage
all
members
of
the
 team
in
the
project
with
important
roles?
 o Does
the
student’s
voice‐over
successfully
explain
his/her
artistic
process
 and
how
meaning
was
made?
 15.
Unit
student
art
exemplar



Capturing Art HIstory Through Collaboration Unit Plan  

Unit Plan

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