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AVAILABLE

A 01 R SEPT. 2017* C H

14.12.1988 from Tyumen, Russian Federation currently in Vaduz, Liechtenstein Russian - native language English - confident user French - beginner Dutch - beginner

Winner of the festival "Young masters of arts" 2010 | Tyumen, Russia Finalist of "Active House" competition 2012 | Moscow, Russia Finalist of "Rockwool" competition 2013 | Moscow, Russia Exhibitor on 14th Venice Architectural Biennale 2014 | Venice, Italy Contributor for an event New Schools of Thought, on 15th Venice Architectural Biennale 2016 | Venice, Italy

* OR EARLIER BY AGREEMENT

[plus] 32 485 80 24 99 ekaterinanagibina [at] gmail [dot] com

2003-2005 | Tyumen Center of Architectural Training 2005-2011 | Tyumen State University of Architecture and Civil Engineering Degree in Architecture 2013-2016 | UNIVERSITY OF LIECHTENSTEIN Master of Science in Architecture 2014-2015 | KU LEUVEN Campus Sint Lukas Brussels Architecture: Urban Projects, Urban Cultures

EKATERINA NAGIBINA


CV

NAME EKATERINA NAGIBINA DATE OF BIRTH 14 | 12 | 1988 PLACE OF BIRTH Western Siberia | Russian Federation TEMPORARY RESIDENCY Liechtenstein LANGUAGE SKILLS Russian English French Dutch

| native language | confident user | beginner | beginner

EDUCATION 2003-2005 | Tyumen Center of Architectural Training 2005-2011 | Tyumen State University of Architecture and Civil Engineering | Degree in Architecture 2013-2016 | UNIVERSITY OF LIECHTENSTEIN Master of Science in Architecture 2014-2015 | KU LEUVEN, Campus Sint Lukas Brussels Architecture: Urban Projects, Urban Cultures PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE 2009-2010 Architectural group "IST", Russia | intern 2010-2012 Architectural bureau "a_61", Russia | architect 02.2016 - 09.2017 University of Liechtenstein | research assistant PROFESSIONAL SKILLS ArchiCAD | confident user Sketch Up, 3d Max | basic knowledge Adobe Illustrator, Photoshop, InDesign, Premier, After Effects | confident user modelmaking | hand drawing | moviemaking COMPETITIONS AND Winner of the festival "Young masters of arts" EXHIBITIONS 2010 | Tyumen, Russia Finalist of "Active House" competition 2012 | Moscow, Russia Finalist of "Rockwool" competition 2013 | Moscow, Russia Exhibitor on 14th Venice Architectural Biennale 2014 | Venice, Italy Contributor for an event New Schools of Thought, on 15th Venice Architectural Biennale 2016 | Venice, Italy CONTACT +32 485 80 24 99 ekaterinanagibina@gmail.com


TABLE OF CONTENTS

ACADEMIC THE CASE OF MONCEAU SUR SAMBRE, 4-27 an Abandoned Power Plant in Charleroi, Belgium “I’LL BE YOUR MIRROR”,

a Story of Building Culture in Liechtenstein

KAESONG,

Investigating a Hypothetical Reunification of North and South Korea

TO AN ACTIVE URBAN SURFACE,

Rethinking Brussels North Quarter

WATER SPORTS CENTRE MULTI-APARTMENT BUILDING BUILDING INTERGRATION COURSE WORKSHOPS FORMS OF WEATHER 34-37 Alpine AA Visiting School, 2014 COMPETITIONS ACTIVE HOUSE 38-41 Moscow, 2012 MODEL MAKING 42-43 HAND DRAWING 44-47 3


MONCEAU SUR SAMBRE

UNIVERSITY OF LIECHTENSTEIN, 2015-16

individual work (master thesis dissertation) project was published on superarchitects.world

Place of Memory 4


ACADEMIC

Place of History

Place of Imagination

Hinterlands of Production, topic of StudioStaub WS15-16 raised the question of the future destiny of former productive environments and spaces, currently abandoned or possibly abandoned in the close future. The changing trends in political, economic, and technological situations caused relocation or even closing of industries, flourishing during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, leaving behind industrial typologies to obsolescence and decay. History knows cases when some industries were able to continue using their buildings with the help of some transformations; more often the necessary upgrades were beyond the capabilities of the buildings. 5


MONCEAU SUR SAMBRE

UNIVERSITY OF LIECHTENSTEIN, 2015-16

PART 1. MEMORY The power lines infrastructure was not the first thing that I had in mind, when thinking of this place. In reality though, now, when I am on my way there, the power lines and its vertical supporting elements are like signs on the route, are guiding me towards my final destination. Their density increases, as I am getting closer and closer. The network of power lines, originating from here, spreads in different directions, covering the entire city and neighbouring communes. This fact fascinates me a lot. It means that there is a literal physical connection between this place and every, single apartment, and household in the city. Every time, when a person is making coffee in a coffee machine in the morning, when he is coming back home from work and turning on his TV, when he is doing his laundry, charging his phone, shaving his beard – all these actions connect (at least they used to) him to this particular space in the city, where I am in right now. I am wandering around the place, with these thoughts in my head. It is a warm autumn day. I found myself on a river bank. The water is calm, its surface is an almost perfect mirror. There are fishermen fishing on the bank. Several kids are pulling a shopping trolley up the hill, to ride in it down afterwards. It is amazing how different the place is in comparison to what I imagined it to be. The place has been left, but there is no sense of desolation or decline. It is calm. But no disturbing silence. Tranquillity. 6


ACADEMIC

PART 2. HISTORY

PART 3. IMAGINATION

The landscape of the place is complicated, broken, created out of the multiple layers, reflecting its history and production, used to happen here. The vast part of it is the former quarry. The hill, which used to be one of the highest points of the city, after the extraction, became one of the lowest, creating an enormous void, a sort of invisible, inverted architecture. Inside the building - the air is dry. With the help of dust particles, floating in the air, light becomes almost physical. It is very quiet. No random sounds, only the ones I produce. Again no definite idea of scale, at first. But, when I start looking for details, here and there, I start noticing pathways, and railways, corridors, buttons and switchers with signs in French. Materials, on the other hand, are normal, familiar- concrete, metal, glass, brick. The space itself is complicated. It is actually a continuity of spaces, difficult for me to navigate without a plan. Some of the spaces are vast and open, containing different types of machinery; the others, on the contrary, are small, maze-like, still preserving traces of people, who used to work in here. The open spaces, I think, are the former engine halls. They are not divided into different levels, occupying the entire height of the building. There are narrow pathways on different levels along the perimeter of the space. Made of metal grid they don’t give me the sense of floor or ceiling though, slight vertigo instead. Not being familiar with the machinery, it is difficult for me to say, where one part of it ends, and another starts. I’m wondering, where the button, or tumbler switch, that once has stopped everything. Now it reminds me a lot of an empty shell. The shell of an entity, which is gone. But which is still there, no matter what.

The only way to get inside is a narrow staircase, lifting you above the ground, leading you to a door-like opening. The single interior space with a huge central opening, which frames the sky and focuses my attention on it, brings the images of James Turrell’s skyspaces to my mind. Sky becomes the main point of interest, almost hypnotizing. Sounds seem distant, wandering around the roofless structure. The geometric patterns, repeating themselves endlessly up towards the opening, are bringing my focus back to the sky even at moments of distraction. Everything seems to add to the meditating atmosphere of the space - there is no wind, no noise, only the rare sounds of my own steps, echoes. The feeling of nostalgia. It takes efforts to shift my attention from the sky on the other details. When I finally do it, the first thought is how alien the space is. There is nothing normal - no signs, machines or windows - nothing to refer to, to hold on, and to help my mind to place itself. The space wasn’t designed for humans to be there - moving through the structure requires effort. The materials are barely distinguishable – every surface seems to be covered with a residue, which gives everything a grey tone. It takes me time to start noticing small details. There are different sorts of numerous artefacts inside of the drainage gutters – tiny seashells, and stones, birds’ single bones, and entire skeletons, traces of previous visitors. The space triggers my curiosity. What does look like at night? How would the snow look like in here? How would the rain sound? Desire to see more. More questions than answers. Feeling of being world away. 7


MONCEAU SUR SAMBRE

UNIVERSITY OF LIECHTENSTEIN, 2015-16

Series of study photographs 8


ACADEMIC

Within the present thesis I investigated the currently abandoned power plant Monceau sur Sambre in Charleroi, Belgium and the territory around it. After discovering the very peculiar characteristics the power plant possesses I proved it to be a monument for the 20th century by highlighting that it fully represents the unifying consciousness of consumption and unifying culture of technology, strongly associated with the century. In working with the monument I followed the conclusions of the research, concerning the treatment of the monument: - processes of restoration and preservation, demanded by deliberate monuments, imprison unintended monuments, for which aging is a part of the natural life cycle; - new function, oriented on salvation of abandoned site, in most of the cases replaces it by the required adaptations; - the key elements of a monumental site require the least invasive treatment. The conclusions of the theoretical research I named prove that the present tendency in working with the unintended monument erases the identity of the places accumulated over the years. Aiming for putting places back into the circle of production and profit, the tendency tries to adapt abandoned structures for new uses (sometimes more successful than the others), using place as a mere shelter, disregarding everything that is connected to it. In my project I tried to offer a new approach in the treating of the unintended monument. The monument I was working on is neither being imprisoned by restoration nor replaced by a new function, but it rather seeks for its own role in the life and structure of the city of Charleroi. I put away the preconception of necessary salvation, and attempts to achieve it by giving the place a new use. I started evolving my design strategy from the appreciation of

Mapping of the site: - built environment, - power lines infrastructure, - infrastructure and former industrial sites, - natural environment. 9


MONCEAU SUR SAMBRE

UNIVERSITY OF LIECHTENSTEIN, 2015-16

Series of study sketches 10


ACADEMIC

what is already there. In the case of Monceau sur Sambre, apart from the physical structures and infrastructure, there is the inextricable literal and metaphorical connection between the power plant and the city of Charleroi, as well as its amazing ability to oppose the capitalist system, while being the former representation of the very same system at the same time. I defined the key elements of my site, selected tools which can help to highlight the characteristics of each of the elements while leaving them intact, and I created a path which threads all of the elements of the monument together. I want to state at this point that I do not think that this is a universal solution, and that every single abandoned power plant around the world is there to become a monument. I see this project very much related to the particular case of Charleroi, its postindustrial condition and the Belgian context. The process of the decision making and its justification had the same importance to me as the outcome of the project itself. Also with this project I hoped to open a discussion on the term of the monument and its role in the 21st century. I think that now it is a crucial point to reevaluate and redefine it, due to the fact that with every year passing by our cities contain more and more monuments (the issue was already referred to by Rem Koolhaas in the exhibition Cronocaos for Venice Architectural Biennale 2010). I opened my thesis book with a quote by Walter Benjamin, who says that he is unquestionably deformed by the relationships with everything that surrounds him (n.d., as cited in Rossi, 1976), and now I want to try to explain why. This one line, for me, brings so many things together, it is history, it is memory, it is every single person, and every single building. For Charleroi it was the industry that deformed it, and keeps influencing it even now, when it is not there anymore. I do not see it as bad thing, but rather as a fact.

Diagram of the site, depicting; - terrain, - existing elements, - curated route and elements of the route 11


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The final outcome of the project was presented in a form of double-sided foldable ATLAS (click the link to see the ATLAS). That allowed to reveal the development of the project step-by-step to the audience. Both pages. Foldable Atlas, side A, fragments 13


I’LL BE YOUR MIRROR

UNIVERSITY OF LIECHTENSTEIN, 2014 individual work project was exhibited at Venice Architectural Biennale, 2014

Still image from CINEMAGRAPH 1 (click the link to watch the cinemagraph)

What are the fundamentals of a Liechtenstein building culture? As the country’s rapid spatial development in the last 100 years was largely influenced by modernity and globalisation we are not looking for traditional building elements of the distant past, but architectural fundamentals of the present. They will help to find out, how the copying and pasting of the foreign needed adapting to suit the local condition. The experimental results will not lead to a celebration of Liechtenstein architecture, but provide a critical and visionary contribution to the Biennale debate about national or regional architectural identities. 14

The final output for each student, to be displayed at the Architecture Biennale 2014 is: - two cinemagraphs portraying detailed exterior and interior visual narrations of the designed building; - one detailed and crafted model of the designed building, a viewing machine from which the interior visualisation originates. - documentation of the research- and design process in form of text and drawings, which will be published in the exhibition’s catalogue. source: https://studiostaubblog.wordpress.com/


ACADEMIC

Still image from CINEMAGRAPH 2 (click the link to watch the cinemagraph)

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I’LL BE YOUR MIRROR

UNIVERSITY OF LIECHTENSTEIN, 2014

Buildings documentation

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ACADEMIC

Prototypical building, created by overlaying photographs of existing buildings

LIECHTENSTEIN is a country of unique success in the modern history of Europe. Several times it was in danger of disappearing from the map; it is too small, and it has no natural resources. Nevertheless since the 1940s low taxes, liberal regulation and a “small government” have helped to transform it from an agrarian backwater into one of the most advanced high-technology industrial countries in Europe. In opposite to the 1920s and 1930s now its manufacturing companies are important providers of employment to people from the surrounding regions. With a population of 36 838 (24 501 citizens and 12 337 foreigners), Liechtenstein gives employment to 35 829 people. The country accommodates not only native residents but also people working here. In attempt to respond to the social and economical needs, people start building multi apartment houses for the tenants as well as their families. The statistics shows that between the years of 2000 and 2010 the amount of apartment blocks increased from 1 576 to 6 161 (37,1%);

for comparison the amount of the single family houses changed insignificantly – from 5 961 to 6 161 (4%). A closer look at this building typology rises a number of questions to argue about. The first consequence of this tendency and maybe the one that has the most powerful visual impact is contradiction between the building and the context. The block of apartment, the representation of an urban architecture code, is placed into the rural landscape, predominately occupied by single-family houses and pastures. The second aspect is that the appearing architectural language continues to reflect the language people are used to – a single-family house with a pitched roof, but blown up in scale, and reaching the desirable amount of square meters by mirroring and multiplying the same building. Pretending to be 2 or 3 independent buildings on their own rights, but standing on one basement or united by common central element, or sometimes placed side-by-side, these buildings are perceived as one architectural object. 17


Photo from the model (click to see more of the model) 18


ACADEMIC

Photo from the model

Furthermore, being a 3-4 storeys block of apartment, a building of such kind should still bring people the advantages of rural life – such as a green lawn. As a replacement of an individual plot of land these buildings offer their residents huge sunny terraces. It becomes even more reasonable when you realize that the building doesn’t have a ground level – the physical connection to the natural surrounding. Of course, there is a ground floor but it is not for people – it is occupied by cars. It would be hard to overestimate the role of the car in everyday life of people in Liechtenstein. The level of motorization is very high in the country - there are around 750 passenger cars per each 1 000 of inhabitants, which represents the peak value in Europe. In the neighboring countries, Austria and Switzerland, this number is around 550. The following consequences do not have such a strong visual effect, but they are definitely of the same importance. The typology of common living is comparably new for the Liechtenstein citizens (for people who used

to live in the individual houses), and in local interpretation it doesn’t provide a community of people living together spaces for communication. And previously discussed individual terraces even add into the process of disintegration between the residents, as well as highlight it on the façade, creating strong shadows and a clear division between different floors. In my work I was trying to find an approach which would meet both social and economical needs, and at the same time will be appropriate for the context it is placed in. It should intent to contribute to the relationship between nature, public and private spaces. I see the possibility for development of such an approach through the sequence of the alley spaces and public terraces, combining individual apartments. Rethinking of the existing terraces could make out of them both “the common ground” for residents encounters, and the space in transition between building and surrounding landscape. 19


PLATTENBATOR

SINT LUKAS, BRUSSELS, 2014 work in group with Vincent François, Tomáš Kučera project was published on koozarch.com

The project has been initially started as a proposal for Junglim Award competition, although after a closer look at the context and competition requirements the project has been developed on its own, without following the guidelines of the competition. 20

View of the buildings occupied and reprogrammed by people


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ACADEMIC

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10 15 x 0,180 = 2,700

5 4 3 2

15 x 0,180 = 2,700

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Image 02

YEAR 2032 // Reunification of South and North Korea took place at 2022 after 6-years of negotiations

10TH ANNIVERSARY OF THE REUNIFICATION

In order to avoid an influx of foreigners bringing their own cultures to the fragile, unstable environment of our society, the closed character of the country was preserved for a transitional period of time. This was supposed to give us time to improve the social and economical conditions of the country. In fact we were left on our own, to take care of ourselves.

On behalf of the editorial office we would like to congratulate every citizen of the Reunified Korea, young and old, with the 10th anniversary of this memorable event! On this joyous day we celebrate life itself, but also we would like to refresh the memory of the hard journey our nation went through. All the struggles that now seem so far away, we, as the people, managed to overcome through hard work and determination.

After the first shock had gone we had to take responsibility for our own lives. To stay afloat we had to start working together as a community. We, the North Korean people, were lucky enough to set up the system of the goods' and services' production and sharing. Recycling was something that people started doing naturally, without expensive schemes, we were forced to adapt and reuse.

article from a local newspaper

21


PLATTENBATOR

SINT LUKAS, BRUSSELS, 2014

"PEOPLE TRANSFORMED A PREVIOUSLY PASSIVE BUILDING INTO AN ECONOMICALLY SELF-SUFFICIENT STRUCTURE BY EXPLOITING THE POTENTIAL OF EACH SPACES IT CONTAINS"

"SPATIAL OWNERSHIP WAS NOT LIMITED TO THE LIVING UNIT ONLY ANYMORE, BUT ALSO INCLUDED PRODUCTION/WORKING SPACE"

Section 22


ACADEMIC

"BY OCCUPYING AND REPROGRAMMING THE BUILDINGS PEOPLE ORGANIZED A NEW SYSTEM OF CO-EXISTENCE"

The changes in political environment caused unavoidable changes in our society. Those who once had been in favor of the regime had to escape, leaving their apartments. The former residential towers for the so-called elite didn't stay abundant for a long time. They became a “Utopian” solution for a new social layer of people, emerging after the reunification – young professionals, looking for a common ground for a start-up. By occupying and reprogramming the buildings people organized a new system of coexistence. Some of the apartments were taken by bigger families, while the others were converted into communal flats for people living alone. The upper floors stayed purely residential, while the lower part was converted to fit individual offices and co-working spaces for people who were ready to settle their small businesses. Spatial ownership was not limited to the living unit only anymore, but also included production/working space. At a certain point, when the people were feeling that they were lacking the space to work, they started expanding the existing boundaries of the building. By adding a framework structure which was supposed to contain individual working units, people re-appropriated the space around and started actually using it. It was meant as a temporary solution to tackle current problems and supposed to be disassembled after a while. The resilient character of the structure was just what the changing society of North Korea needed during the transition period. As a result the towers were converted into alive urban and economic structures. People transformed a previously passive building into an economically self-sufficient structure by exploiting the potential of each spaces it contains (rooftops, cellars, if there are, space around the building, etc.). This has been in stark contrast with the way buildings are usually treated, where the fact that the building requires financial support for maintenance during its lifespan is taken for granted. We congratulate everybody for showing such good spirit when we needed it the most, and would like to motivate the entire population of Korea to collectively keep on going in the right direction, and maintain our straight course for an even better future, together.

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TO AN ACTIVE URBAN SURFACE

SINT LUKAS, BRUSSELS, 2015

individual work

Current situation

Mono-functionality of the office towers of North Quarter in Brussesls creates extreme conditions of day/night cycle, leaving area abundant (which means unused and unsafe) during off pick hours (18pm – 8 am). Meanwhile poor design of public spaces surrounding the towers, their closed character and exclusive access do not allow daily routines of the commuters and the local residents to overlap (no interaction -> no opportunity to get to know each other -> no trust and cooperation). The strategies I developed in order to create the capacity to support a variety of activities and users in the existing office-towers of the Manhattan district of Brussels are: - to provide a continuity of the cityscape; - to create a variety of services. 24


ACADEMIC

Design proposal situation

Diagram of gradual opening of the office tower

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Axonometric section of the proposed scenario 26


ACADEMIC

Ground floor plan of the proposed scenario

The first strategy is connected to the transformation of the ground level of the officetowers into an accessible dynamic tissue, who's role is to connect currently disrupted fragments of urban surface and its users. While the second strategy is aiming to fill in the opened ground floor, creating together with the surrounding spaces the active urban surface. The designed space is supposed to embrace fixed and adaptive programs and have spatial qualities for spontaneous events to happen. It is important to find the fine line between programmed space and space waiting to be appropriated and transformed by public. The method of bringing to life the strategies, named earlier, would consist of a number of steps. The opening of the office-towers should be hold gradually in order to encourage people to start using it. The very first step would be opening for public access and use already

existing functions, as an example I will take a cafeteria. As a step forward residents of the neighborhood would not only be able to eat in the cafeteria, but also establish a small business in the form of snack and coffee corners. Next step would be the introduction of new functions, interesting for public (such as libraries, cultural venues, market space, etc.). The office-tower of the Manhattan district, being the product of Modernist period, contain enormous amount of spaces used for car parking. By introducing new functions instead, the ground level would be given back to the people – which is crucial in creating a continuous urban surface. The final step, as I see it, would be the physical reorientation of the building; by which I mean creating a new visual language for the new urban structure, instead of used blind concrete panels, and glass with mirroring cover. 27


WATER SPORTS CENTRE

TYUMEN, RUSSIA, 2011

individual work

The project was developed as a degree project for Tuymen State of Architecture and Civil Engineering. The aim of the thesis project was to present a personal vision and understanding of problems at a chosen site of the city (Tyumen) and providing idea of its solutions. 28

Night view of the Water Sports Centre


ACADEMIC

Ground floor plan of the Water Sports Centre

Section across the Water Sports Centre 29


WATER SPORTS CENTRE MULTI-APARTMENT BUILDING

TYUMEN, 2009 TUYMEN, RUSSIA, 2011

individual work

The project was developed during the 4th year of architecture studies. The aim of the project was to achieve knowledge in the process of designing a multistorey apartment houses, to learn more about inner space of an apartment. 30

View of the design proposal


ACADEMIC

+62,700

+60,200

+62,700

+60,200

+60,200

+59,700

+56,700

+56,400

+51,900 +50,700

+41,550

+23,550

+20,400

+20,400

+18,900

+18,900

+17,700

+17,700

+17,850

+5,400

+5,550

+20,400

+17,700

+9,700

+5,400

±0,000

+5,550

±0,000 -0.200 Ур.

Main elevations of the proposed design 31


BUILDING INTEGRATION COURSE

SINT LUKAS, BRUSSELS, 2015

individual work

6 000

00 90

00 90

6 000

90 00

90 00

00 90

6 000

90 00

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90 00

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5 200

6 800

30 00

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Analysis and comparison of different floor systems (the Slimline Floor system, ribbed floor, waffle floor). The Simline Floor system was chosen for further development. 32

00 90 30 00


01/03 ARCHITECTURAL DETAILS

ACADEMIC Removable floor system

70 mm

Acoustic layer

15 mm

Slimline floor system (steel)

600 mm

Slimline floor system (concrete)

70 mm

TOTAL

718 mm

Waterproof filling

Eternit cladding panels

85 mm

Ventilated cavity

30 mm

Thermal insulation

150 mm

Fair-face concrete internally

220 mm

TOTAL

485 mm

Facade fastener Eternit cladding panels

30 mm

Thermal insulation

150 mm

Fair-face concrete internally

220 mm

TOTAL

485 mm

Removable floor system

Facade fastener

85 mm

Ventilated cavity

70 mm

Acoustic layer

15 mm

Slimline floor system (steel)

300 mm

Slimline floor system (concrete)

70 mm

TOTAL

418 mm

Waterproof filling

Damp-proof course

Fastener (chromium steel)

The Slimline Floor System is an integral combination of ceiling, horizontal service shaft and subfloor. The composite floor solution is based on structural steel beams together with a concrete ceiling, manufactured in prefabricated elements, with a subfloor of choice. Among the system's advantages are: - integrated solution (speeds up the integration of construction and installations); - lighter weight (reduced weight allows lower foundation costs or more m2 on existing foundation large span); - reduced floor zone height (reduced building cost and options for more floors in the same building height); - no shuttering strut, dry build (reduction in build programme); - finished ceiling (smooth soffit offering esthetical value); - installations in the floor zone (easy and fast installation, reachable from above); - open horizontal service shaft (future-proof and easily modifiable layout choices)

Asphalt, 2cm Bituminous base, 5cm

Pit-run gravel, 20-25 cm

Geotextile mat, fleece

Plinth element (precast concrete) Peripheral insulation Waterproofing (bitumen paint) Fastener (chromium steel)

Soil

100 mm 80 mm 2 mm

In situ concrete wall

350 mm

TOTAL

532 mm

Ready-to-lay flooring system

15 mm

Screed

80 mm

Drainage, perforated/porous pipe

Separating layer (e.g. 1mm plastic sheet) Insulation (cellular glass)

80 mm

Damp-proof membrane (Robit) Concrete ground slab

430 mm

Lean concrete

50 mm

TOTAL

655 mm

Details of the wall X_Team25_SportClub+Hotel | Manon Deneef Ekaterina Nagibina


FORMS OF WEATHER

ALPINE AA VISITING SCHOOL, 2014

work in group with Reto Egli, Rebecca Fitz, Philip Schatzmann and Vladimir Sergeev

Images from the construction site

The participants learned from traditional ways of living in Alpine conditions and investigated spatial, architectural and cultural mechanisms affected by weather change to develop future solutions for a safe and responsible inhabitation of productive Alpine environments. 34


WORKSHOP

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FORMS OF WEATHER

ALPINE AA VISITING SCHOOL, 2014

PROJECT DESCRIPTION The warm dry wind called Föhn is a common weather phenomenon in the Alps’ valleys during winter time. It has a huge impact both on weather and human: snow starts melting because of the high temperature of the air and wind itself in combination with sunlight, and the residents in areas of frequent Föhn winds report illnesses such as migraines. These kind of Föhn effects we wanted to reflect in our structure made of snow. As a starting point of the project we had an dome-like structure (big enough for 4 people to stand inside). And rather than to create artificial weather phenomena inside of our space we decided to go the other way and let them influence our existing structure and actually enter it. That is the origin of the hole in the southern part of the ceiling. And here is also the point where the snow structure is being transformed into something more. Now it is a trap for different kind of weather phenomena (both wind and sun) on the one side and a space for people to face the weather and explore it by themselves. Entering the structure and spending time there people are becoming not just visitors but investigators. The investigators start their way for “weather exploration” from the northern part of the structure which is actually a solid wall with the only way to enter. After going inside people find themselves just in front of a huge opening towards the sun and wind. The hemi-sphere inner space provides them with a number of options to sit, lay down or stay standing; at the same time it creates a visual and sound border from the environment around to let people focus on their personal feelings. They are also free to choose the way they prefer to spend time inside: on their own or share the experience with other investigators. As the next step of the project development the structure might be multiplied in different scales (depending on the amount of people we would like to enter them) and spread along the slope offering people different kinds of experiences. 36


WORKSHOP

Sketches 37


ACTIVE HOUSE

MOSCOW, 2012

individual work

Image 1

Master plan

The competition task was laconic: to design a compact modern private residence with 4 bedrooms, with a total area of 150-180 sq.m. The technical tasks require not only obeying certain parameters of natural lighting, air quality and temperature mode, but also such considered nontechnical nuances as guaranteeing the best view of the landscape and the sky, which according to the competition developers, is no less important for comfortable living. 38


COMPETITION

Ground floor

South elevation 39


ACTIVE HOUSE

MOSCOW, 2012

Interior

My personal goal (except the requirements of the competition) was to develop a design, where all of the family members would have an equal access to the advantages of living in an individual house - having an oportunity to exit your personal room directly on a green lawn. That was the reason behind the decision to locate all of the spaces, both private and public, on the ground level. These spaces are devided in two blocks, according to the level of their privacy - the living space, including dining area and kitchen, and a private block of bedrooms and bathrooms. 40


COMPETITION

Images 2 and 3

East elevation

Section 1-1 41


MODEL MAKING

individual work

MODEL 01 The map is an attempt to bring together different ways of perceiving the city. One is by professionals, namely architects, and urban planners, who perceive the city as a man-build structure. The other one is by people living in the city, for whom city is a collection of their memories, connected to the actual places in the city. By adding stripes with their thoughts about Brussels, in particular case, people are participating in the creation of an alternitive map of the city. They transform the physical space by filling it with their personal memories. 42


MODEL 02 The present map depicts the most popular jogging routes in Brussels, among people using tracking devices and mobile applications. Formerly known as one the most democratic sports, now jogging is very much associated with expensive clothes, smartphones, and applications, representing a person's class status. On the scale of the city tracking the jogging routes, without concious intention of doing this, reveals city's poorer and richer neighbourhoods. 43


HAND DRAWING

individual work

SPACE OF LOST FUNCTION Wall. Door. Window. Stairs. Balcony. Roof. The fundamental elements, which are being used everywhere, anytime, by every single architect. Each of the elements has its own very clear function. What if a building does not have function? Does it mean that the elements lose their function as well? Walls and roof do not enclose the space anymore, doors and stairs are not there to allow communication within the building, and neither cannot you observe with outer world though windows or balconies. 44


STUDY SKETCHES FOR MASTER THESIS DISSERTATION I always consider writing and drawing to be an essential part of my work. In my opinion, through making notes and sketches, by describing space not only in forms of photographs, but also by putting it on paper, a deeper level of attention towards the site of investigation could be developed. The details that might escape, while taking a picture with a camera, will become present when one tries to redraw it or describe it in words. 45


HAND DRAWING

individual work

TRAVELLING SKETCHES 46


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THANK YOU FOR YOUR ATTENTION architectural portfolio EKATERINA NAGIBINA

EkaterinaNagibinaPortfolio  

Architecture Portfolio

EkaterinaNagibinaPortfolio  

Architecture Portfolio

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