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features Hank Azaria’s Bel Aire Home: From The Outside In

4 We get to take you on a tour of the voice of The Simpsons California home. more on pg.4

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On The Market: August 2011

Check out some of our favorite homes that have recently become available in the market. more on pg.29

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Charles Gwathmey A Modern Architect

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This magazine takes a look at every aspect of Art and Architecture both inside and out of homes, businesses, and buildings from all over the world. As we encounter the rise of architecture in the world today, we need a push forward, and an answer to all the questions that come about modern architecture. We want to show everyone that there are many different ways to improve their lifestyle, while being able to keep your own ‘personal mark on your home.’

The Top 8 Most Influential Buildings

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Nanjing Museum Nanjing, China

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A look into profound Architect Charles Gwathmey’s St. Bart’s home. more on pg.12

James Pawson’s Minimalism In L.A.

James Pawson puts a more personal feel into this Los Angeles home. more on pg.20

Join us on the exploration of the Nanjing Architectural Museum and see for yourself what all the fuss is about. more on pg.24


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Hank Azaria’s Bel Aire Home

From the outside in


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Photography by John Ales

A Zimmer + Rohde velvet covers custommade sofas in the living room. The Danish cocktail tables are vintage, the side table is by Holly Hunt, and the floor lamp is by Waldo’s Designs; the Kilim ottomans are by Horchow.

The 1932 house was built in the Monterey Colonial style, distinguished by gracious proportions and a second-story veranda. The landscaping was done by GDS Designs.

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Honeysuckle climbs the trellis of the outdoor living room, which is furnished with Haenischdesigned seating upholstered in Perennials outdoor fabrics; the cocktail table is by Holly Hunt.

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Photography by John Ales

A Jean de Merry chair meets a French bookcase from Mecox in the living room.


Photography by John Ales

In the kitchen, barstools by Hollywood at Home face an island Haenisch designed of reclaimed wood with a Carrara-marble top; the pot rack is by Ann-Morris Antiques. The stainless-steel range and hood by Viking and the Sub-Zero refrigerators

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complement the counters and backsplash of dark-gray Basaltina stone and the French-oak floors.

Chairs by Hollywood at Home with cushions in fabric by Jasper are paired with a Paul Ferrante metal dining table in the breakfast area.


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A custom-made bed upholstered in a Holly Hunt leather is flanked by sconces from Bourgeois Bohème in the master bedroom. The 18th-century Belgian commode at right and the zinc-top oak desk are both from Lucca Antiques.

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Bourgeois Bohème Atelier, and the curtains are made of a plaid alpaca fabric by Sandra Jordan.

Photography by John Ales

Azaria keeps his Emmys and memorabilia in his home office, where Eames chairs by Herman Miller surround the custom-designed poker table and pendant lamps. The bespoke metal cabinet at left is by Bourgeois Bohème Atelier, and the

Article Continued on pg.79


n a c i r e Amces: Plaangered End

The Chicago building that formerly housed Prentice Women’s Hospital is proudly unorthodox. Above a steel-and-glass base, in a sea of more-conventional rectilinear neighbors, the building’s quatrefoil concrete tower rises banded with oval-shaped windows. Designed by Bauhaus-trained Chicago architect Bertrand Goldberg — best known for the twin cylindrical towers of the nearby Marina City development (1964) he designed — the Prentice tower’s cloverleaf design was far from being simply contrarian. Goldberg sought to create a modernist architecture more organic than the International style’s straight lines and boxes, which he came to consider dehumanizing. In hospital design, he intended to improve patient experience, which at Prentice translated into a bed tower with seven small patient floors, each divided into four lobes. Designed for maximum flexibility, the 1974 hospital building was also structurally innovative. The tower is cantilevered from a central core, allowing for column-free, open-plan floor plates. The load-bearing concrete shell transfers loads diagonally back to the core via four large arches.

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Despite its significance, this building is at risk of demolition. To bring attention to its plight, the National Trust for Historic Preservation has named the former Prentice Women’s Hospital building to the 2011 list of America’s Most Endangered Historic Places. The annual list of America’s Most Endangered Historic Places highlights historic places across the United States that are threatened by neglect, insufficient funds, inappropriate development, or insensitive public policy. This year, two of the listed sites are Midwestern medical care facilities. Nine more endangered places range from an eighth-generation Pennsylvania farm to ancient roads in New Mexico.


Chicago Modern at Risk The Prentice Women’s Hospital organizational entity, which is part of Northwestern Memorial Hospital (NMH), moved out of the 1974 Goldberg-designed building and into a new facility in 2007, and the building’s remaining tenant, NMH’s Stone Institute of Psychiatry, is currently in the process of moving out, as of July 2011. Northwestern University, which will own the building once it is vacant, has announced plans to demolish the structure to make way for the possible future development of a larger facility, for medical research.

In April 2011, a study exploring possibilities for reuse of the building was released by the nonprofit Landmarks Illinois, which is a member of the “Save Prentice” coalition, along with Preservation Chicago, DoCoMoMo Midwest, and the Midwest office of the National Trust. The Commission on Chicago Landmarks is expected to consider the building for landmark status at an upcoming meeting, and Northwestern University has agreed to defer seeking a demolition permit for the time being.


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Charles Gwathmey

A Modern Architect


Photography by William Abranowicz

A cluster of discrete villas, roughly divided into a lower guest level and an upper master level, make up the compound; chaise longues by Gloster line the pool deck off the guest-level living quarters.

No one who knew Charles Gwathmey, either as an architect or as a friend, had any doubts about his dedication, his passion, or his loyalty. Case in point: In May 2009, while battling advanced esophageal cancer, he traveled to St. Barts to check on the progress of a family compound he was designing there. He took along Kang Chang, an associate at his firm, Gwathmey Siegel & Associates Architects.

Korean-born architecture student came to visit a friend who was working in the Gwathmey Siegel office; while there, he ran square into the physically imposing Gwathmey, though Chang had no idea who the man was.

“St. Barts is an amazing project on every level,” he wrote to Chang from his home office soon after their return. “I hope to see its final realization, but totally trust your commitment and guidance. My life has obviously changed and I am compromised, but I never stop thinking about creativity and pay attention to my own self-criticism.”

The young student quickly learned that beneath Gwathmey’s tough-guy exterior lay a very generous soul. He interned at the firm every summer during college, and went to work there in 1996 after graduation. And on his first major assignment—the Manhattan apartment of David Geffen—Chang duly impressed his boss with his diplomacy as well as his deft handling of design details. “I was sort of the mediator between Charlie and David,” says Chang, who has powerful memories of the colorful expletives the two strong-willed men lobbed at each other—through him. “From that point on Charlie gave me great independence.” Chang went on to serve as lead architect on residences built for many of the firm’s top clients, including Jerry Seinfeld, Steven Spielberg, and Terry Semel.

Although Gwathmey died shortly thereafter, on August 3, 2009, at the age of 71, the residence stands as one of the most compelling works of an architect who was among the preeminent modernists of his generation. Its completion by Chang, in late 2010, was seamless and proved to be a testament to their long and close relationship, which had begun after Chang’s freshman year at Syracuse University. The two met when the

“Who the f—k are you?” Chang remembers the architect barking at him. Then came the kicker: “You have a portfolio?”

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Photography by William Abranowicz

In the master living/dining room, the sectional sofa and club chair by Jonas are upholstered in a Perennials fabric, and the armchair is a Pollaro reproduction of Kem Weber’s Airline chair; a Jeff Koons sculpture and binoculars from Nicholas Brawer are at the window, while a wood bowl by Pedro Petry is displayed on a Chang-designed cocktail table of Ataija Azul limestone.

In 2007 Gwathmey received a call from another major client. The gentleman had purchased two choice parcels of land on St. Barts to create a precipitously high one-acre site on the island’s north end. Gwathmey and Chang, along with their spouses, boarded a plane and spent a happy week there, during which the architects, who had never worked in the Caribbean, studied local materials and building types. For Gwathmey, known for his bold sculptural forms, designing a home on St. Barts presented something of a challenge: Strict local ordinances require that all dwellings have a symmetrical four-sided roof. Any temptation to bend the rules was quickly dismissed when he found out that Bruno Magras, president of the St. Barts Territorial Council, lived on the property that directly neighbored his own.

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Inspired by the steepness of the site, Gwathmey conceived of a collection of separate pavilions—a private, pristine hill town, as it were. The plan consisted loosely of two levels: On the lower would be six guest villas, one of which would hold a living room, kitchen, dining area, and gym. On the more private upper level would be a master bedroom villa, plus another containing a living room, dining room, and kitchen. Each level would have its own pool and terrace. To maintain an air of simplicity, Gwathmey kept the number of building materials to a minimum, relying on white-stuccoed concrete for exterior walls and polished concrete for accents. A dark-gray volcanic stone excavated from the site was used for retaining walls and some doorways, and a light-gray Ataija Azul limestone from Portugal paves the outdoor terraces as well as living areas and bathrooms (several tables were also carved from the same substance).


The master bath features a custom-made sink and vanity, sink and shower fittings by Boffi, towels and a rotating mirror by Waterworks, and a RainSky ceiling-mounted shower by Dorbracht.

Photography by William Abranowicz


Photography by William Abranowicz

An island and cabinetry of sucupira wood complement the Gaggenau stainless-steel cooktop and oven in the kitchen; the stools were custom made by Jonas.

In the master bedroom, Pratesi linens and a cashmere throw by Christian Liaigre dress the bed, which is flanked by Artemide’s Tolomeo lamps.


Photography by William Abranowicz The front corner of the bedroom has a beautiful view towards the sea.

Sucupira, a Brazilian hardwood, was used for bedroom flooring and for most millwork and cabinetry. The structures are sparely furnished with custom-made seating upholstered in white canvas and feature almost no art on the walls; they are designed to capitalize on the sweeping views afforded by large picture windows with astonishing views. The architects and their client agreed to build the compound in two phases, beginning with the lower-level villas. “That turned out to be a good idea because we learned from all our mistakes there, before we built the upper level,” Chang says. The lower level was completed just before Thanksgiving of 2009 (sadly Gwathmey had died a few months before); the upper level was finished a year later, nearly to the day. “Charlie was looking at everything almost until his last moments,” Chang recalls.

An infinity pool offers views of the surrounding French West Indies.

In the spring of 2010 the young architect opened his own firm, KangModern, where he oversaw the St. Barts project to its end with the blessings of the client and Gwathmey Siegel’s cofounder, Robert Siegel. KangModern has come out of the gate fast: The five-person office has already finished a renovation of Geffen’s Fifth Avenue apartment, and in East Hampton it is building a new house for Semel and an addition to a Gwathmey Siegel dwelling commissioned in the ’80s by Howard Schultz, the CEO of Starbucks. “I miss Charlie greatly,” Chang says. “He was like a father to me, and an incredible mentor. I always wonder what he would do in a particular situation.” And what was the master’s greatest lesson? “Charlie taught me that you design and refine up until the last minute,” the architect answers. “He was relentless. Until the client moves in, you can always make things better.”

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John Pawson’s Minimalism In L.A.


Photography by Todd Eberle

Architect John Pawson designed this Los Angeles house for Ellen and Andrew Hauptman; Jonathan Bell handled the landscape design, and Alexandra and Michael Misczynski of Atelier AM assisted Pawson with the decor. The dwelling consists of two slim and stately boxes, one cantilevered over the other; an additional level is partly hidden below ground.

Among the handful of architects working today who could be called purists, few names are more venerated than that of John Pawson. The minimalist spaces he designs, whether a boutique for Calvin Klein on Madison Avenue or a monastery for Cistercian monks in the Czech Republic, offer a singular interpretation of austerity that still manages to feel utterly luxurious. So there was much anticipation when the London-based Pawson began making sketches for a house in Los Angeles on a spectacular three-acre hillside site; it would be his second freestanding building in North America (a 2001 residence near Telluride, Colorado, was his first). Considering the architect’s rigorous standards, it shouldn’t come as a surprise that the design phase took four years, and construction another four. Now that the house is complete, it is most striking for its understated calm. “It’s a family house, which is what the clients wanted,” Pawson says. “And yet it’s still a piece of architecture.” Ellen and Andrew Hauptman, a low-key couple with two children, are entrepreneurs and philanthropists; he is a film producer (State of Play, Millions) and owner of the Chicago Fire Soccer Club, while together they actively support causes such as City Year, an educational mentoring program for inner-city

The terrace off the kitchen is paved with honed Halila stone, inset with flush deck lighting; Pawson designed the teak table


Photography by Todd Eberle A Poul Kjæholm PK24 chaise longue and a Serge Mouille standing lamp in an alcove

students. The pair also have highly evolved aesthetic sensibilities. Ellen’s grandfather Samuel Bronfman commissioned New York’s iconic Seagram Building, which her aunt Phyllis Lambert had a hand in along with Ludwig Mies van der Rohe. “I was interested in hearing their anecdotes about Mies and Phyllis,” Pawson says. “But Andrew and Ellen are very much their own people. They are going their own way.” The couple met Pawson when they were living in London in the 1990s and hired him to design the interiors of a townhouse they’d bought; they subsequently developed a friendship with him and his wife, Catherine, and became steeped in the Pawson philosophy. “It has affected the way we live,” Andrew says. “We don’t really collect art or have many things. John talks about how a lack of noise—by which he means clutter and other distractions—leads to more intimacy. That’s something we have really experienced.”

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The master bathroom’s sink vanity spans a windowed alcove.

Intimacy was exactly what the family wanted of their new home in L.A., even though it would amount to 20,000 square feet. Pawson achieved this goal through a number of clever moves. To keep the house in proportion to the landscape, he planned a subterranean floor that would accommodate mechanical equipment and storage as well as staff quarters, a children’s playroom, and a screening room. Aboveground, Pawson conceived of the dwelling as two elegant, horizontally oriented boxes: a smaller one for the main level, clad in pale Halila limestone, and cantilevered atop that, a larger one of stucco and red-cedar siding. Within the house, the ground-floor public rooms—kitchen, living room, dining room, study—are configured around a dramatic central staircase, flowing into one another without doors. There are four bedrooms upstairs, three of which have terraces, the master bathroom’s boasting a hot tub and a fire


Photography by Todd Eberle

An understated study, featuring a sofa by Pawson covered in a Rubelli linen from Donghia, Christian Liaigre table lamps, and RenĂŠ Gabriel chairs.

Oak cabinetry in the kitchen complements the La Cornue range and Caesarstone sink; the sink fittings are by Dornbracht.


pit. Throughout the house not a single hinge, light switch, or baseboard is visible. Achieving such seamless simplicity was, needless to say, a challenge. “Everything in John’s work is so precise that we went through a million iterations,” Andrew says. “Contractors were pulling their hair out.” To supplement the furnishings Pawson designed for the project, the couple tapped the smart L.A. team of Alexandra and Michael Misczynski, or Atelier AM, who helped them source pieces by such 20th-century masters as René Gabriel, Eugene Printz, Børge Mogensen, and Diego Giacometti. The designers also worked with them on textiles, which Pawson tends to use very sparingly. For the bedroom, Atelier AM commissioned a handwoven mohair rug by Sam Kasten, a bespoke weaver based in Massachusetts and Paris. Kasten also created a sublime gold silk fabric for the bedroom walls; it was made in one 15-foot width so there would be no seams.

“I loved working with John,” Michael says. “He was open to everybody’s ideas and incredibly collaborative.” That view might come almost as a disappointment to some design devotees who relish the architect’s standing as the high priest of severity. “I know I have a reputation,” Pawson acknowledges. “Truth be told, sometimes my clients are more extreme than I am.” Yet he cannot deny the perfectionism that drives him to devise houses like this one. “That’s what they come to me for,” he says. But let the ultimate judges of Pawson and his latest creation be the littlest Hauptmans. Budding minimalists at ages eight and ten, they gamely stow their toys in the finely crafted cabinetry in their rooms. “They know if they leave their stuff lying around, it’s impactful,” Ellen says. And so the children have added a new word to their vocabulary: As they are fond of saying, “This is Pawsonesque.”

Photography by Todd Eberle

Chaise longues and side tables by Christian Liaigre populate a deck overlooking the infinity-edge pool.

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Architects to remember Bjarke INGLES

Suzanne TICK

Paul COCKSEDGE

Jennifer STEINKAMP

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Nanjing Sifang Art Museum

Nanjing, China


Building area: 30,000 square feet (2,787 square meters) Completed: 2011 Architects: Steven Holl Architects Client: Nanjing Foshou Lake Architecture and Art Developments Ltd Architects: Steven Holl Architects Design architects: Steven Holl, Li Hu Associate-in-charge: Hideki Hirahara Project architects: Clark Manning, Daijiro Nakayama Project team: Joseph Kan, JongSeo Lee, Pei Shyun Lee Tz-Li Lin, Richard Liu, Sarah Nichols Associate architects: Architectural Design Institute, Nanjing University Structural consultant: Guy Nordenson and Associates Lighting design: L’Observatoire International


Photography by Li Hu and Shu He

The new Nanjing Sifang Art Museum is sited at the gateway to the Contemporary International Practical Exhibition of Architecture in the lush green landscape of the Pearl Spring near Nanjing, China. The museum explores the shifting viewpoints, layers of space, and expanses of mist and water, which characterize the deep alternating spatial mysteries of early Chinese painting. The museum is formed by a “field” of parallel perspective spaces and garden walls over which a light “figure” hovers.

The straight passages on the ground level gradually turn into the winding passage of the figure above. The upper gallery, suspended high in the air, unwraps in a clockwise turning sequence and culminates at “in-position” viewing of the city of Nanjing in the distance. The meaning of this rural site becomes urban through this visual axis to the great Ming Dynasty capital city, Nanjing.


Photography by Li Hu and Shu He

The courtyard is paved in recycled Old Hutong bricks from the destroyed courtyards in the center of Nanjing. Bamboo, previously growing on the site, has been used in bamboo-formed concrete, with a black penetrating stain added for contrast. The museum has geothermal cooling and heating, and is equpped with recycled storm water, which is green and low-maintenance.

Perspective is the fundamental historic difference between Western and Chinese painting. After the 13th Century, Western painting developed vanishing points in fixed perspective. Chinese painters, although aware of perspective, rejected the single-vanishing point method, instead producing landscapes with “parallel perspectives� in which the viewer travels within the painting.

Limiting the colors of the museum to black and white connects it to the ancient paintings, but also gives a background to feature the colors and textures of the artwork and architecture to be exhibited within. INT:EXT.2011.SUMMER.27


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On The Market: August 2011

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Photograph Courtesy of Christie’s International Real Estate

1 1. Sabaudia, Italy STATS: 7 bedrooms 5 baths 11,370 sq. ft $28.1 million Pedigree: In 1960 Milanese architect Tomaso Buzzi designed a Palladian villa (AD, January 1987) for Countess Nathalie Volpi and her husband, Giuseppe, founder of the Venice Film Festival. Located an hour south of Rome, the house exudes classical grandeur with its soaring Ionic columns and decorative brickwork. Property Values: The 26 acres stretch from the Tyrrhenian Sea to Lake Paola and include a guesthouse, cottage, personal caretaker’s quarters, and stable. Talking Point: Legend has it even Odysseus was seduced onto local shores. Contact: Christie’s International Real Estate, 011-39-02-303-28340; christiesrealestate.com

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August 2011 2. Montauk, New York STATS: 4 bedrooms 6 baths 7,400 sq. ft. $25 million Pedigree: Architect James Biber created this award-winning oceanfront compound when he was a partner at Pentagram Design; it consists of a low-slung main house and, just across the courtyard, a glass-walled guest lodge dramatically raised on steel beams. This home was completed in 1999. The residence was inspired by icons of midcentury modernism, from California’s Case Study homes to ’50s motels. Property Values: Set on a bluff 75 feet above the shoreline, the buildings occupy four acres, with an infinity pool and a private path to the beach. Thanks to favorable currents, erosion is not a concern. Talking Point: Red and blue fireplaces as well as a yellow spiral staircase add splashes of primary color. Contact: The Corcoran Group, 917-882-8338; corcoran.com

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Photography by Peter Mauss/Esto


August 2011

3. Healdsburg, California STATS: 4 bedrooms 2.5 baths 2,240 sq. ft. $3.2 million Pedigree: Perched on a hilltop overlooking the Russian River Valley, this LEED Platinum dwelling was built by San Francisco architect Julie Dowling for her own family. Clad in quarter-sawn Western red cedar, with expansive floor-to-ceiling windows, the 2009 structure blends nicely into its sylvan surroundings. Property Values: Twenty-two acres with a 76-foot-long lap pool. Talking Point: Solar panels power the home, while cross breezes and a south-facing overhang alleviate the need for air-conditioning. Contact: Sotheby’s International Realty, 707-431-0777; sothebysrealty.com

Photograph Courtesy of Sotheby’s International

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Photograph Courtesy of Savills

4 4. Ayrshire, Scotland STATS: 18 bedrooms 16 baths 25,000 sq. ft $13 million Pedigree: For some 900 years, descendants of William the Lion, the long-ruling king of the Scots, have presided over medieval Blair Castle and its sprawling country estate in the southwest. The interiors have been faithfully restored and feature original masonry constructed, in the case of one Norman tower, on exposed bedrock. Property Values: The 1,265 acres welcome outdoor activities such as driven pheasant shoots and roe deer stalking. Spread across the grounds are four farms, seven cottages, and a carriage house with stables and a tennis court. Talking Point: The historic collection of furniture, china, and Gaelic artifacts is also for sale. Contact: Savills, 011-44-131-247-3720; savills.co.uk

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The Top 8 Most Influential Buildings

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USS Arizona Memorial Honolulu, Hawaii The USS Arizona is the final resting place for many of the ship’s 1,177 crewmen who lost their lives in the attack on Pearl Harbor 70 years ago. The 184-foot-long memorial, accessible only by boat, sits on the surface above the sunken vessel’s midsection, rising at either end to signify the United States’ ultimate victory. Its designer, Austrian-born Alfred Preis, fled the Nazi takeover of his homeland only to be imprisoned as an “enemy alien” in Hawaii, not far from where his monument now stands.

Photo by Ray Sandla

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Mémorial des Martyrs de la Déportation Paris, France It is the quintessential postcard image of Paris—Notre Dame Cathedral emerging from the Seine on the Île de la Cité. Behind the Gothic masterpiece, on the eastern tip of the island, is a small but moving memorial by French modernist architect GeorgesHenri Pingusson to the 200,000 French who died in concentration camps between 1940 and 1945. Rather than rising heroically, the memorial is meant to evoke the unspeakable, anonymous drama of deportation—its entrance a descending stairway.

Photo © Monsoon/Photolibrary/Corbis

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Oklahoma City National Memorial & Museum Oklahoma City, Oklahoma On April 19, 2000, the fifth anniversary of the bombing at the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building, the Outdoor Symbolic Memorial was dedicated to the 168 lives lost. The centerpiece of the 3.3-acre site, designed by Hans and Torrey Butzer with Sven Berg, are 168 bronze and stone chairs with translucent glass bases that honor each victim individually.

Photo by the Oklahoma City National Memorial Foundation

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Photo by Toru Yamanaka

Hiroshima Peace Memorial Park Hiroshima, Japan The Hiroshima Peace Memorial Park marks the epicenter of the first nuclear bomb attack. The site, which continues to evolve, includes a museum designed by Kenzo Tange following a competition win in 1949. Tange, known for fusing traditional Japanese architecture with contemporary Western ideas, designed an International Style building with a framework of exposed concrete raised up on pillars. The building overlooks a monument whose parabolic form is associated with the tombs of the rulers of old Japan.


Pentagon Memorial Washington, D.C. In a two-acre park near the point of impact of American Airlines Flight 77 on 9/11, the Pentagon Memorial features 184 cantilevered, benchlike “units,” each engraved with the name of a victim, hovering above a pool of water. Somewhat convoluted in its details, Keith Kaseman and Julie Beckman’s design was chosen from more than 1,200 submissions in an international competition.

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Photo by Bill O’Leary at The Washington Post

Vietnam Veterans Memorial Washington, D.C. Just 21 years old and a student at Yale University, Maya Lin was plucked from obscurity and immediately plunged into controversy when her design—a visual scar on the National Mall—won the 1981 competition. The memorial invites the viewer below ground level to read the names of the war’s more than 58,000 dead and missing inscribed on the face of two 247-foot black-granite walls. Decried as an insult to veterans, the simple structure elicited such powerful emotions upon opening to the public that its critics were almost immediately silenced.

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Photo by VVMF and JC Cummings

Jewish Museum Berlin, Ger many No museum dedicated to the history of the Jews in Germany can be just a museum. Opened in 2001, Daniel Libeskind’s first major work is arguably his best. Built around the concept of erasure and void, its architecture integrates the meaning of the Holocaust into the consciousness of the city, physically and spiritually. The zigzagging form of its main building, the unusual gradient of the Garden of Exile, and the Holocaust Tower’s claustrophobic container are disorienting, but the architect calls the project an “emblem of hope.”

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Photo by Jens Ziehe/Courtesy of the Jewish Museum Berlin

Steilneset Memorial to Victims of Witch Trials, Vardø, Norway Visiting this curious collaboration between Pritzker Prize–winning architect Peter Zumthor and the late artist Louise Bourgeois requires a trek above the Arctic Circle to Norway’s northeasternmost town. Remembering the 91 so-called witches burned at the stake in the area more than 300 years ago, Zumthor’s memorial consists of two structures—a long, wood-framed enclosure punctuated by 91 windows, and a steel-and-glass one to house Bourgeois’s featured artwork, a burning chair.

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Photo by Bjarne Riesto

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INT:EXT Magazine