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Annual Report 2017 English summary

A medical university A


(Dnr 1-323/2018) The 2017 annual report is an English summary of Karolinska Institutet’s Swedish language annual report for 2017 (Årsredovisningen 2017, dnr: 1-803/2017).

COVER PHOTO Laboratory work at the Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics. Photo: Erik Cronberg.

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KAROLINSKA INSTITUTET ANNUAL REPORT 2017 – ENGLISH SUMMARY


Karolinska Institutet is one of the world’s leading medical universities. Its vision is to significantly contribute to the improvement of human health. Karolinska Institutet accounts for the single largest share of all academic medical research conducted in Sweden and offers the country’s broadest range of education in medicine and health sciences. The Nobel Assembly at Karolinska Institutet selects the Nobel laureates in Physiology or Medicine.

KAROLINSKA INSTITUTET ANNUAL REPORT 2017 – ENGLISH SUMMARY

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The Vice-Chancellor’s statement Karolinska Institutet (KI) is facing a time of substantial challenges and fantastic opportunities. Given the energy that permeated 2017, I look forward to 2018 with great enthusiasm.

Internal control During the past year, we continued our efforts to implement numerous measures to remedy de-ficiencies in our internal control procedures. These measures are aligned with the recommendations of the external investigation and with Karolinska Institutet’s internal audit, as documented in KI’s action plan. In February 2017, a coordination group was appointed to analyse how the action plan is being monitored and executed. All of the recommendations have been addressed and most of the proposed measures have been, or are currently being implemented. For example, we have streamlined our recruitment procedures, instituted a more rigorous examination of application documents and improved both reference and CV verification processes. We have also introduced new routines with clearly defined responsibilities for managing cases of suspected scientific misconduct. The action plan also focuses on leadership; to that end, leadership training courses related to ethics and compliance are currently in development. If we are to retain and strengthen our status as one of the world’s leading medical universities, quality must be an integral component of everything we do; high-quality research and education require full compliance with rules and regulations.

A new public authority to oversee the ethics review Much is also happening around us. For example, the government has decided to create a new public authority to oversee the ethics review of research involving humans (Etikprövningsmyndigheten). Its primary role will be to review research proposals involving human subjects to ensure they comply with the requirements of the Ethical Review Act, and also to assure compliance regarding specific issues regulated by the Biobanks in Medical Care Act. An investigator will consult with the regional ethics review boards and the universities, including KI, that serve as host authorities for the regional boards. This will give us the opportunity to voice our opinions on how the new authority should operate.

New environments for education and research I am convinced that 2018 will be one of the most exciting years in KI’s history. Over the coming year, 60 per cent of our employees and approximately 80 per cent of our experimental research is relocating to new premises. Furthermore, several new environments for education and research on our two campuses will officially open their doors: the new Neo research block and the new premises on Alfred Nobels Allé 8 in Flemingsberg, along with the research laboratories Biomedicum and Bioclinicum in Solna. Karolinska Institutet has also made substantial investments in animal research, with the aim of giving our researchers access to the most modern animal research facilities and infrastructure in Europe.

An effective organisation Much of our work in 2018 will be devoted to creating a new organisation and strategy for KI. The 2017 staff survey revealed that many of our employees feel that the organisation lacks clarity and that it is difficult to relate to its overarching objectives. An effective organisation and a clearly formulated strategy are essential for creating the best possible conditions for education and research at our university.

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KAROLINSKA INSTITUTET ANNUAL REPORT 2017 – ENGLISH SUMMARY


Photo: Erik Cronberg.

I am convinced that 2018 will be one of the most exciting years in KI’s history. Over the coming year, 60 per cent of our employees and approximately 80 per cent of our experimental research is relocating to new premises.”

A new organisation is scheduled to be in place in 2019 and should, amongst other things, be characterised by clear lines of authority, quality in our core activities, effective support functions and collegial influence at the management level – including the establishment of a faculty council. The Karolinska Institutet Board (Konsistoriet) has also decided to appoint a scientific representative at the university who will serve as an ombudsman for ethics issues, support our ethical development work and chair Karolinska Institutet’s new ethics council.

Strategy 2030 The new strategy that we are beginning to develop has a time horizon stretching all the way to 2030. This long-term view will allow us to develop new and creative ideas for education, career development and competence assurance. It is no coincidence that the time plan for our strategy is the same as the UN’s plan for its Agenda for Sustainable Development. In its capacity as an international university, Karolinska Institutet has a global responsibility and must work explicitly towards the UN’s sustainability goals in both education and research. An example of this is the third global sustainability goal – to ensure healthy lives and promote well-being for all at every age. This is consistent with our own vision – to significantly contribute to the improvement of human health. We educate and train students at bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral levels; our new strategy will have a particular focus on further strengthening our educational programmes. We will also be targeting younger talent and creating career paths that make the university even more attractive in comparison to our global competitors. An equally important component is to adhere firmly to our recruitment goal so that we obtain a balance of women and men amongst our future professors.

Sustainability Success in our sustainability work requires a stable platform. Sustainability is about standing firm while looking ahead. We need to protect our strong academic tradition and have the courage to think creatively. Engagement and determination drive knowledge, and it is only through excellence in research and education, grounded in strong ethics, that we will be able to face and tackle the global challenges ahead.

Ole Petter Ottersen Vice-Chancellor Karolinska Institutet

KAROLINSKA INSTITUTET ANNUAL REPORT 2017 – ENGLISH SUMMARY

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A word from the students

Stephanie Ammerman Chair, Student Union of Odontology 2017

Max Kynning Chair, Medical Students’ Association 2017

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Together, we represent all of KI’s students at all levels. It is our belief that student influence is highly valued at KI today and seen as a natural part of the efforts being made to improve the university. In 2017 we were involved in the recruitment and welcoming of our new vice-chancellor, Ole Petter Ottersen, who, during the meeting with the consultative college received the unanimous confidence of the students. The vice-chancellor has expressed his wish to strengthen education at KI relative to research, which we welcome. We look forward to the coming years together. In order to sustain and enhance student influence, we strengthened our focus during the year on providing information to students who were interested in becoming involved. We also conducted more courses for new student representatives. Having two student unions at KI can sometimes be a challenge, but in 2017 we cooperated exceedingly well. Both unions work towards the same goals in the interests of all KI students. Together with the university, we worked on improving orientation activities for new students to make them feel even more welcome, as well as our respective reception activities, which are important aspects of our work. Stockholm has the largest student body in Sweden, which means it is especially important to ensure that there is a social life on our campuses that is open to all, as it enriches the student experience and boosts the sense of belonging. It is during these orientation activities that the recruitment of future student leaders and organisers takes place, so it is essential that the unions have a presence to forge early links with new students. As usual, the unions also contributed to student life by arranging evening activities, seminars and other events. In 2017 we increased the number of evening seminars and courses, exposing students to other themes and ideas than the subjects they study. This past year was also unique for MF as we marked our 140th anniversary with a celebratory

ball in the union building in April, which is due to be renovated following a generous donation from KI and newly launched fundraising campaign. During the year OF was involved in the reorganisation of the Department of Dental Medicine and the University Dental Clinic, which was a major project. We ensure that the students’ views are aired during the ongoing change work, particularly in the clinical component of the programmes. We focused heavily on improving our environmental efforts and introduced better waste sorting in our premises. We feel that KI takes our views on campus sustainability seriously, which is greatly appreciated. Together with the Department of Dental Medicine, we also drew up new guidelines for written exams. OF still enjoys a high level of union membership, which includes over 90 per cent of the students in our two programmes. In the wake of the #metoo phenomenon, the unions have worked with the university to analyse the best channels for students to report incidents of harassment. This is something we will continue to work with so that it is clearer and simpler to seek help and guidance when needed. Important organisational changes await KI in 2018. This is something that we as students are naturally involved in and will carefully monitor. We believe it is critical that the university capitalises on the existing competence in our current organisation and that education and research are given equal status. We would like to close by thanking all teachers, the KI management, and especially all the dedicated students who make the work of the unions possible. Looking back upon 2017, we realise just how much KI’s students do to improve their own university experiences and those of coming generations. We look forward to 2018 and to the great changes and challenges that lie ahead. On behalf of the Medical Students’ Association in Stockholm and the Student Union of Odontology

KAROLINSKA INSTITUTET ANNUAL REPORT 2017 – ENGLISH SUMMARY

Photos: Erik Cronberg.

As student unions at Karolinska Institutet (KI), the Medical Students’ Association in Stockholm (MF) and the Student Union of Odontology (OF) work primarily with promoting student influence, student assistance and student life.


Content Highlights at KI 2017.......................................................................................................................................................... 8 Key indicators.....................................................................................................................................................................10 Karolinska Institutet in brief........................................................................................................................................11 Organisation.......................................................................................................................................................................................................................11 Mission and governance................................................................................................................................................................................................12 Internal control..................................................................................................................................................................................................................12

Education at bachelor’s and master’s level...........................................................................................................15 Range of courses and study programmes.................................................................................................................................................................15 The students........................................................................................................................................................................................................................15 Education............................................................................................................................................................................................................................16 Internationalisation..........................................................................................................................................................................................................19 Quality..................................................................................................................................................................................................................................20 Equal opportunities..........................................................................................................................................................................................................20 Integration initiatives.......................................................................................................................................................................................................21

Doctoral education..........................................................................................................................................................23 Doctoral education..........................................................................................................................................................................................................23 Quality..................................................................................................................................................................................................................................24 Equal opportunities..........................................................................................................................................................................................................25 Internationalisation..........................................................................................................................................................................................................25

Research................................................................................................................................................................................27 From head to toe – a selection of the latest research findings...........................................................................................................................27 Quality..................................................................................................................................................................................................................................31 Equal opportunities..........................................................................................................................................................................................................33 Research financing...........................................................................................................................................................................................................33 Scientific infrastructure...................................................................................................................................................................................................34 Internationalisation..........................................................................................................................................................................................................34

Collaboration......................................................................................................................................................................37 Collaboration with Stockholm County Council.....................................................................................................................................................37 Collaboration and communication with the general public..............................................................................................................................38 Collaborating with industry...........................................................................................................................................................................................39 Innovation support..........................................................................................................................................................................................................39 Internationalisation..........................................................................................................................................................................................................40

A university environment in development..........................................................................................................43 An attractive workplace in which to develop...........................................................................................................................................................43 Recruitment........................................................................................................................................................................................................................43 Leadership and employeeship.....................................................................................................................................................................................46 Work environment and health.....................................................................................................................................................................................46 Equal opportunities..........................................................................................................................................................................................................47 Infrastructure – premises................................................................................................................................................................................................48 Sustainable development..............................................................................................................................................................................................50

Financial report.................................................................................................................................................................53 Sources of funding............................................................................................................................................................................................................53 Education at bachelor’s and master’s level................................................................................................................................................................54 Research and education at doctoral level.................................................................................................................................................................55 Asset management...........................................................................................................................................................................................................56 Funds.....................................................................................................................................................................................................................................56 KI Foundations...................................................................................................................................................................................................................57 Statement of financial performance...........................................................................................................................................................................58 Balance sheet.....................................................................................................................................................................................................................59 Appendix.............................................................................................................................................................................................................................61 The University Board........................................................................................................................................................................................................68

KAROLINSKA INSTITUTET ANNUAL REPORT 2017 – ENGLISH SUMMARY

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HIGHLIGHTS 2017

JANUARY

MARCH FEBRUARY

Photo: Erik Cronberg.

Honorary doctors. Francis L. Delmonico and Margaret A. Liu are made honorary doctors at Karolinska Institutet – Dr. Delmonico for his efforts to promote ethical organ donation around the world, and Dr. Liu for her groundbreaking contributions to research and education in the field of DNA-based vaccines. The honorary doctorates are conferred according to tradition in Stockholm City Hall on 12 May. Photo: MGH photo lab and private.

Pioneering. The worldrenowned photographer Lennart Nilsson passes away on 28 January. From the 1970s until into his 90s, he worked closely with researchers at Karolinska Institutet. Lennart Nilsson opened up a pictorial world of medical research and gave millions of people insight into the workings of the human body. With the aid of a microscope and pioneering keyhole photography he documented human physiology down to cell level, and throughout his career pushed the boundaries of medical photography.

Photo: Peter Hoelstad.

Photo: Lennart Nilsson.

Highlights at KI 2017

Repatriation. At a formal ceremony at the Hagströmer Library on 15 May, Karolinska Institutet returns the remains of three members of New Zealand’s indigenous population to a delegation from Te Papa Tongarewa museum. The remains were donated or sold to researchers at KI in the 19th century after having been plundered from graves by collectors. The Unit for Medical History and Heritage, which curates the university’s collection of human remains, is working on a database that will enable future repatriations.

MAY APRIL

JUNE

Photo: Jörgen Hildebrandt/TT.

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KR Graphics: iStock.

Passionate. Hans Rosling, Professor of Global Health at Karolinska Institutet and world-famous lecturer, dies on 7 February. Rosling was passionate about spreading new knowledge and puncturing old prejudices about the state of health and poverty in the world. In 2005 he founded the Gapminder Foundation with his son and daughter-in-law in order to promote sustainable global development through the greater use and understanding of statistics. Using computer programmes with a new type of animated visual statistic, he was able to display more variables and expose processes in a way that effectively debunked old truths.

KR

Graphics: iStock.

Starting donation. Karolinska Institutet donates SEK 4.5 million to the renovation of the student union´s (Medicinska Föreningen) building. The donation is presented in the form of a symbolic cheque by Acting Vice-Chancellor Karin Dahlman-Wright at the student union’s 140th anniversary banquet on 22 April.

Degrees. In early June, KI’s new graduates are celebrated at various ceremonies in Aula Medica. The students receive their diplomas from Acting Vice-Chancellor Karin Dahlman-Wright and ProVice-Chancellor Anders Ekbom. Amongst the new graduates are the first students to complete the English Bachelor’s Programme in Biomedicine.

KAROLINSKA INSTITUTET ANNUAL REPORT 2017 – ENGLISH SUMMARY


Collaboration. Tokyo University establishes a strategic partnership with three of Sweden’s leading universities: Stockholm University, Karolinska Institutet and the Royal Institute of Technology (KTH). The first official joint activity under the collaboration takes place at KI on 21 September under the heading “Active Ageing”. HM Queen Silvia opens the workshop by talking about the pressing nature of ageing issues in Sweden and Japan, and the importance of how our societies address it.

Photo: Anna-Karin Landin.

Mental ill-health. During the political week on Gotland, KI arranges a joint seminar on mental ill-health in children and young people with the organisation Children’s Rights in Society (Bris). Presenting current research in the field and participating in the panel are Acting Vice-Chancellor Karin Dahlman-Wright and professors Emily Holmes and Danuta Wasserman. KI researchers also take part in other debates and seminars during the week.

JULY

SEPTEMBER AUGUST

Graphics: Sofia Lindberg.

HIGHLIGHTS 2017

Doctoral graduates. 13 November marks the graduation of Karolinska Institutet’s 154 new doctors, who celebrate attaining the highest academic rank in Stockholm City Hall’s Blue Hall. The ceremony is punctuated by speeches, entertainment and a cannon salute from the waterfront. The year’s jubilee doctors, who graduated at KI 50 years ago, are also honoured at the ceremony.

NOVEMBER OCTOBER

New Vice-Chancellor. Ole Petter Ottersen becomes KI’s new vice-chancellor on 1 August. Ottersen is a professor of medicine and the former rector of the University of Oslo, where he served for eight years. The new vice-chancellor is installed at a ceremony in September. Karin Dahlman-Wright, who has been the acting vice-chancellor, returns to her former role as pro-vice-chancellor.

Photo: Erik Cronberg.

Photo: Erik Cronberg.

Nobel Prize. The Nobel Assembly at Karolinska Institutet decides to award the 2017 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine to Jeffrey C. Hall, Michael Rosbash and Michael W. Young for their discoveries of the molecular mechanisms that control circadian rhythms. It has long been known that living organisms have a biological clock able to predict and adapt their biology to the regular 24-hour cycle. Hall, Rosbash and Young succeeded in showing how such a clock operates by exposing the cell’s internal timekeeper. Their discoveries explain how plants, animals and humans optimise their physiology in preparation for the different phases of the day and night.

KAROLINSKA INSTITUTET ANNUAL REPORT 2017 – ENGLISH SUMMARY

DECEMBER

#metoo 10,400 female doctors join the #metoo movement (under the hashtag utantystnadsplikt) to protest sexual harassment, abuse and sexism in the healthcare sector, and to ask healthcare education leaders and others how do you intend to change things. The deans of Sweden’s medical faculties decide to work more actively to highlight the guidelines on sexual harassment and discrimination already in place at the country’s universities. Karolinska Institutet will also be working with representatives of Sweden’s regions and county councils to draft action plans for how these issues are to be handled during clinical placements.

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KEY INDICATORS

Key indicators Education and research FTE, full time equivalent, students 1 – women Cost per FTE student (SEK thousand) APE, annual performance equivalents 1 Cost per APE (SEK thousand) Number of fee-paying students 2 – women New doctoral student admissions – women Doctoral students, total >_ 1 % activity – women Doctoral students with employment (FTEs) – women Doctoral students with doctoral grants (FTEs) – women Average study time, licentiate students (net) Average study time, doctoral students (net) Doctoral degrees awarded Licentiate degrees awarded Peer-reviewed scientific publications 3 Cost per peer-reviewed scientific publication (SEK thousand)

2017

2016

2015

2014

2013

6,079 72% 159 5,618 172 111 58% 383 58% 2,136 58% 879 57% 0 0% 2.47 4.60 328 4 n/a n/a

5,973 72% 159 5,558 171 110 55% 363 58% 2,267 58% 932 59% 0 0% 3.22 4.32 331 7 5,086 1,089

6,062 72% 155 5,534 170 107 50% 398 60% 2,280 59% 770 58% 122 61% 3.10 4.44 359 8 5,302 1,012

5,978 72% 160 5,613 170 74 56% 407 59% 2,311 58% 650 59% 281 57% 2.53 4.37 340 9 5,060 998

6,014 73% 147 5,589 158 51 64% 374 55% 2,312 60% 595 64% 375 62% 2.40 4.24 306 12 4,971 975

4,749 61% 5,405 860 49% 797 47% 363 30%

4,820 61% 5,334 863 49% 795 47% 368 30%

4,694 61% 5,193 853 48% 776 45% 372 29%

4,473 62% 4,924 844 47% 739 43% 367 28%

4,283 63% 4,736 827 46% 717 42% 373 28%

6,890 1,084 85% 15% 5,806 34% 66% 6,794 52% 12% 3,020 11% 6,858 3,113 98 1,612

6,667 1,059 86% 14% 5,607 35% 65% 6,578 53% 11% 3,008 10% 6,249 3,107 78 1,514

6,475 1,050 86% 14% 5,424 35% 65% 6,394 53% 12% 2,996 11% 6,186 3,062 76 1,435

6,156 1,007 86% 14% 5,149 37% 63% 6,078 52% 13% 3,064 11% 5,577 2,621 63 1,359

5,796 991 88% 12% 4,805 37% 63% 5,797 52% 13% 3,046 12% 5,165 2,445 8 1,296

Staff FTE, full time equivalent, employees – women Average annual number of employees Teaching staff (FTEs) – women Teaching staff with doctoral degrees (FTEs) – women Professors (FTEs) – women

Finance Revenue, total (SEK million), of which Bachelor’s and Master’s education (SEK million) – direct government funding (%) – external revenue (%) Doctoral education and research (SEK million) – direct government funding (%) – external revenue (%) Cost, total (SEK million) – staff – premises Premises cost per sq. meter 4 (SEK) – percentage of adjusted total costs (%) Balance sheet total (SEK million), of which – unexpended grants – change in capital for the year – agency capital (incl. change in cap. for the year)

¹ Excluding contract education, contracted courses, complementary programmes and fee-financed education. ² Excluding contracted courses and complementary programmes. ³ Figure for 2017 not given owing to delay in registration. The figures for 2013–2016 have also been adjusted to account for the inclusion of MEDLINE-indexed journals and the general broadening of the bibliographic database. A new NLM indexing policy has been applied since 2017. The changes also affect cost-per-publication data. 4 Figure stated in accordance with the Association of Swedish Higher Education’s recommendations for premises costs in the section concerning the reporting of premises costs; see appendix 2 of the recommendations (REK 2014:1, 2015-10-26, ref 14/069). Source: Ladok, Primula, Unit4 Business World.

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KAROLINSKA INSTITUTET ANNUAL REPORT 2017 – ENGLISH SUMMARY


ABOUT KAROLINSKA INSTITUTET

Karolinska Institutet in brief Karolinska Institutet’s (KI’s) vision is to significantly contribute to the improvement of human health. KI is a medical university and government authority with a mission to provide education based on a strong scientific foundation and proven experience and to conduct research and development. The university also interacts with society, informs the public about its work and ensures that its research results are put to effective use. KI accounts for the single largest share of all academic medical research conducted in Sweden and has the largest range of medical courses and study programmes in the country.

Organisation Responsibility for KI’s overall activities ultimately rests with the university board (Konsistoriet). The board is supported by an internal audit office that examines, proposes improvements to and provides advice and support on the university’s internal control systems and procedures. In January 2017, the board established an audit committee for preparing matters relating to internal control, external and internal audits, risk, financial control and financial reporting. Immediately subordinate to the board is the vicechancellor, who is also the director general of the government authority. In addition to the vicechancellor, the executive management comprises the pro-vice-chancellor and university director. The management is further reinforced by a deputy vice-chancellor for international affairs and three internal boards. The boards are led by deans who report to the vice-chancellor and who are responsible for each of the university’s areas of operation: education at bachelor’s and master’s (1st and 2nd cycle) level, education at doctoral (3rd cycle) level, and research. The university director, who is also answerable to the vice-chancellor, has overall responsibility for KI’s administrative activities. Research and education are primarily carried out by KI’s 22 departments, each of which is led by a head of department, on KI’s two campuses – Solna and Flemingsberg – and at several of Stockholm County’s hospitals. Karolinska University Hospital, which is adjacent to the Solna campus, plays a vital role in KI’s clinical research and education. KI also collaborates with other hospitals and clinics in the vicinity, and has departments at Danderyd and Stockholm South General (Söder) hospitals. In ad-

UNIVERSITY BOARD DEPUTY VICE-CHANCELLOR

Internal audit

VICE-CHANCELLOR

Central Administration

Board of HIGHER EDUCATION

University Library Board of DOCTORAL EDUCATION

Comparative Medicine

Board of KI Holding AB

RESEARCH

Dep. of Biosciences and Nutrition Dep. of Cell and Molecular Biology Dep. of Clinical Neuroscience Dep. of Clinical Science and Education, Stockholm South General Hospital Dep. of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology Dep. of Clinical Sciences, Danderyd Hospital Dep. of Dental Medicine Dep. of Laboratory Medicine Dep. of Learning, Informatics, Management and Ethics Dep. of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics Dep. of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics

Dep. of Medicine, Huddinge Dep. of Medicine, Solna Dep. of Microbiology, Tumor and Cell Biology Dep. of Molecular Medicine and Surgery Dep. of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society Dep. of Neuroscience Dep. of Oncology-Pathology Dep. of Physiology and Pharmacology Dep. of Public Health Sciences Dep. of Women's and Children's Health Institute of Environmental Medicine Unit for Toxicological Sciences, Södertälje – Swetox

dition to the departments are the Unit for Toxicological Sciences in Södertälje, Comparative Medicine, the University Library and the University Administration. KI also has an overseas research branch, the Ming Wai Lau Centre for Reparative Medicine, which opened in Hong Kong in 2016. The allocation of responsibilities and authorisations at the university is regulated primarily in the organisational plan and the decision-making, administrative and delegation procedures decided by the university board, the vice-chancellor, the internal boards and heads of department on the basis of their mandates at each respective level.

KAROLINSKA INSTITUTET ANNUAL REPORT 2017 – ENGLISH SUMMARY

Solna

Flemingsberg Research and education are carried out on KI’s two campuses and at several of Stockholm County’s hospitals.

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ABOUT KAROLINSKA INSTITUTET

Vision Karolinska Institutet significantly contributes to the improvement of human health.

Mission and governance The Higher Education Act (1992:1434) specifies that KI’s mission is to provide education based on scientific evidence and proven experience and to conduct research and development. KI is also required to interact with society, inform the public about its activities and ensure that its research results are put to effective use. The government oversees KI’s operations based on this legislative framework along with the Higher Education Ordinance (1993:100) and annual appropriation documents. Strategy 2018 describes KI’s vision, goals and four strategic focus areas – Employees, Infrastructure, Collaboration and Funding – for the governance and development of its overall operations. Strategy 2018 also provides the foundation for the three-year organisational plans (2016-2018) of KI’s internal boards, departments and other units. The operational plans are broken down into activity plans that are reviewed annually, while the three-year operational plans are reviewed at the end of the period. Each year, the university board decides on planning assumptions and budgets. The vice-chancellor then sets the budgets for the internal boards, which then distribute the resources throughout the organisation. Every year, a risk analysis is conducted, resulting in a decision by the university board on the general risks to be prioritised. The analysis and management of priority risks at internal board and departmental levels are integrated into the threeyear plans and the annual review. The need for a far-sighted strategy for KI has been identified and the university board has initiated discussions on the matter. Work commenced with visits by the executive management to KI’s departments to ascertain their own assessments of strengths, opportunities and challenges. The results of 2017’s employee survey also provided key input into the process.

Coherent quality system In 2017, KI developed and began implementing an integrated quality system to guarantee quality throughout the organisation. The system is desig-

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ned to contribute to continual quality assurance, quality assessment and quality development. During the year, KI measured perceived quality through employee surveys, course and programme evaluations and exit polls at all degree levels. General quality indicators were developed along with methods for collegial review and learning at the bachelor’s and master’s levels. Furthermore, KI’s management information system was further developed during the year to better monitor qualityrelated statistics and indicators over time. For more information on quality work within KI’s core operations, see “Education at bachelor’s and master’s level”, “Doctoral education” and “Research”.

Internal control The university is required to conduct systematic internal control to ensure, with a reasonable degree of confidence, that it is performing its duties and operating effectively, that it is in compliance with all relevant laws and regulations, that its reporting is reliable and fair, and that it utilises its resources economically. An important part of this entails identifying, evaluating and managing circumstances and incidents that compromise KI’s ability to perform its mission, achieve its goals and live up to the general demands imposed on its operations. It is therefore incumbent upon the university to operate a systematic and structured risk management process that encompasses risk analysis, control, monitoring and documentation. These obligatory requirements and expectations for internal control in general and risk management specifically are provided in the Higher Education Ordinance, the Internal Audit Ordinance (2006:1228), the Internal Control Ordinance (2007:603), paragraph 3 of the Government Agencies Ordinance (2007:515) and the Annual Reports and Budget Documentation Ordinance (2000:605). While all staff members are expressly required to contribute to effective internal control, it is the university board that has overall responsibility in this area and that establishes the specific rules and instructions applicable at KI. Every year, the board takes decisions on the university’s overarching risk analysis and therefore which organisational-level risks to be prioritised and managed. The board also provides its opinion on the adequacy of KI’s internal control in the university’s annual report. The vice-chancellor has issued instructions for how the rules and regulations of the university bo-

KAROLINSKA INSTITUTET ANNUAL REPORT 2017 – ENGLISH SUMMARY

Graphics: Noun Project.

The university board has decided that the management organisation and collegial influence at KI are to be reviewed and a recommendation for a new organisational structure developed. The new organisation will be in place by 2019.


ABOUT KAROLINSKA INSTITUTET

ard are to be followed. Risk-owners are appointed for the prioritised areas, and control measures are documented in action plans that are subject to biannual review. Managers and internal boards are required with their respective mandates to ensure that good internal control is maintained, to analyse risks and to take the necessary control measures. More detailed risk analyses are to be conducted every three years, most recently at the end of 2015. Reviews and revisions are made on the basis of the risk documentation produced during the intervening years. The most important risks, control measures and responsible persons are described in the 2016–2018 operational plans and in the annual activity plans. A compilation report on the outcome of control measures taken during the three-year period is to be described in the 2016–2018 operational report submitted at the end of the period. A review of KI’s risk management process was initiated during the year with the goal of further development during 2018.

Measures for improved control In 2016, the KI management approved an action plan to remedy the shortcomings identified by the investigation into the university following the Macchiarini affair. Many of the measures were implemented in 2016 and the work continued in 2017. Most of the planned measures, including new recruitment procedures, new rules for extraoccupational activities, guidelines for handling suspected irregularities, new procedures for suspected scientific misconduct and guidelines for corporate alliances have been, or are about to be implemented. It was also decided to establish a scientific representative and an ethics council at a central level. Finally, as of January 2019, it will be compulsory for KI’s researchers to document their research electronically.

many years of action before their levels can be reduced, which is a criterion for risk to be considered sufficiently managed. At the end of 2017, the risk level was unchanged for five of the risks, higher for three of the risks and lower for four. All the risks require further management, and are those that the university board, following its risk analysis, decided to prioritise in 2018.

Concluding assessment In order to retain and bolster its status as one of the world’s leading medical universities, quality must be an integral component of everything Karolinska Institutet does. KI has in place a university-wide system for the allocation of responsibilities, authorisation and delegation; rules and procedures; processes for operational planning and resource allocation; and a systematic and structured risk management process. The mandatory requirements of the Internal Control Ordinance were carried out during the year, and numerous measures were taken to improve control processes in order to create the optimal conditions for the execution and development of operations. While much of the organisation functions smoothly, the overall assessment is that there are still shortcomings in KI’s internal control. The university needs to improve its monitoring of compliance with internal rules. The upcoming reorganisation, in combination with other ongoing and planned measures, will make it easier to successfully remedy this issue.

Mission Karolinska Institutet’s mission is to conduct research and education and to collaborate with society.

Priority risk management At the end of 2016, the university board prioritised twelve risk areas to manage at an overarching university level, three of which – non-compliance, scientific misconduct and undesirable external collaborations – were shortcomings highlighted through the Macchiarini affair. An example of another priorised risk is limited opportunities for clinical education and research. As a means of risk mitigation, the appointed risk-managers took measures during the year to address all prioritised risks in accordance with established action plans. Most of the risks require

KAROLINSKA INSTITUTET ANNUAL REPORT 2017 – ENGLISH SUMMARY

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Photo: Erik Cronberg.

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EDUCATION AT BACHELOR’S AND MASTER’S LEVEL

Photo: Stefan Zimmerman.

Education at bachelor’s and master’s level Karolinska Institutet (KI) has a wide range of study programmes in medicine and healthcare at bachelor’s and master’s level. In 2017, KI offered 13 beginners’ programmes, 28 continuation programmes and nearly 80 freestanding courses.

Range of courses and study programmes The beginners’ programmes form the basis of the university’s educational prospectus and account for over three quarters of the university’s fulltime equivalent students (FTEs). KI offers programmes leading to effectively every healthcare profession, a breadth of offering that is one of KI’s strengths and that enables the university to supply society with the competence in healthcare and medicine it needs. Continuing professional development is also an important part of KI’s academic prospectus. We offer freestanding courses and continuation programmes leading to second-cycle professional qualifications, as well as master’s (one and twoyear) programmes for international and national target groups.

The students Applicants The acceptance ratio remains high, and the number of qualified first-choice applicants increased. There is competition for most of KI’s programmes, and only four continuation programmes lacked applicants on waiting list after the second round of selections. The number of applicants to the beginners’ programmes, however, decreased, which is in line with the trend at other universities. This can be

attributed to a smaller demographic cohort and possibly the healthy status of the job market. The only exception is the study programme in dentistry, which saw a small rise in the number of applicants. As in previous years, the programmes leading to a degree in medicine, psychology, dentistry and dental hygiene had the highest acceptance ratio. The number of applicants to KI’s global master’s programmes continued to increase in 2017 (17 per cent more than in 2016), albeit not as sharply as the previous year.

Widening participation KI is required to actively promote and widen student recruitment in order to ensure that everyone has equal access to university studies regardless of background. KI also actively supports its students and helps to build a healthy study climate in order, amongst other things, to increase student completion. Part of these endeavours is the provision of language support. In 2017, KI increased its supervisory sessions, webinars, lectures and open workshops on academic writing.

Student influence KI believes that effective student influence is a prerequisite for academic quality. The students are represented on all of KI’s preparatory and decision-making bodies that handle issues related to education and/or the students’ situation. On most of the bodies, student representation is good.

KAROLINSKA INSTITUTET ANNUAL REPORT 2017 – ENGLISH SUMMARY

The Board of Education further developed the quality system for education during the year. Efforts were also made to enhance the pedagogical skills of our teachers and prepare for the implementation of modern learning environments and new IT tools. A proposal for further developing ethics instruction was produced with broad participation. The new healthcare landscape in the county poses considerable challenges for clinical placements, which led us to perform a consequence analysis. Measures have been initiated in consultation with Stockholm County Council and discussions continue. I’m glad to see that the board, teachers and students systematically and constructively lifted important issues throughout the year, which prompted a greater focus on education at KI.” Annika Östman Wernerson Dean of Education

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Photo: Erik Cronberg.

EDUCATION AT BACHELOR’S AND MASTER’S LEVEL

Master’s Programme in Toxicology students hold a presentation.

In 2017, KI conducted a student survey (the Studentbarometern) to obtain guidance on how the university can enhance student involvement. The results of the survey have yet to be presented. To support the student representatives in their duties, KI and the student unions jointly arrange courses every year for students who sit on decision-making and preparatory bodies.

Education The total number of full-time equivalent students (FTEs), including those on tuition-fee-financed education and supplementary training, was 6,255 and the number of annual performance equivalents (APEs) was 5,782. In 2017, KI had 10,611 registered students.

FTEs and APEs within the framework of the funding cap In 2017 there were 6,079 FTEs and 5,618 APE students at KI within the framework of the funding cap. This is an increase in both categories compared with 2016.

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Each programme’s share of the total number of FTEs is illustrated in the chart below. The number of FTEs and APEs in the various programmes is given in Table 4 of the tables appendix.

Commissions KI’s commissions include contract education, contracted courses from other higher education institutions and similar assignments. Revenues from commissions in 2017 amounted to SEK 96 million, an increase of approximately SEK 7 million compared to 2016, primarily resulting from a general rise in the number of contract education projects described below and an extended commission from the National Board of Health and Welfare on proficiency tests for health care professionals. See the chart on the right for information on revenues from different sources of funding. Contract education KI offers a wide range of courses in the fields of medicine and healthcare – areas in which KI’s competence contributes to societal development and enables lifelong learning for professionals.

KAROLINSKA INSTITUTET ANNUAL REPORT 2017 – ENGLISH SUMMARY


EDUCATION AT BACHELOR’S AND MASTER’S LEVEL

FTE students 2017 (6,079)

Revenue from commissions distributed by source of funding 2017, 95,9 SEK million

6%

6% 3%

11 %

27 %

8%

11 % 46 %

3%

3%

Qualified first-choice applicants per student admitted to:

6%

11 % 4% 7%

13 %

20 %

5%

9% Medicine 27 % Physiotherapy 6 %

County councils and municipalities 46 %

Nursing 13 %

Higher education institutions 9 %

Psychology 5 %

Other government agencies 20 %

Dentistry 7 %

Organisations and foundations 3 %

Occupational therapy 4 %

Swedish companies 11 %

7,3

Foreign financiers 11 %

Other beginner’s programmes 11 % Biomedical laboratory science 3 %

STUDY PROGRAMME IN MEDICINE

Source: Unit4 Business World.

Specialist nursing (continuation) 8 % Other continuation programmes 3 %

STUDY PROGRAMME IN PSYCHOLOGY

Master programmes 6 % Freestanding courses 6 % Source: Ladok.

Full-time equivalent students (FTEs) and annual performance equivalents (APEs) in contract education 2014–2017 2014

2015

2016

2017

Full-time equivalent students

304

279

287

271

Annual performance equivalents

274

249

237

251

5,0

STUDY PROGRAMME IN DENTISTRY

4,1

Källa: Ladok.

Graphics: Noun Project.

Approximately 200 courses and seminars were offered during the year, and over 1,600 students were registered for credit-bearing courses. Psychotherapy courses and specialist courses for nurses, doctors, dentists and other healthcare professionals once again made up a significant portion of KI’s contract education. KI has also seen a sharp increase in courses in neurodevelopmental disorders. A conference in the field (“NPF-skoldagarna”) for teachers, school executives and student welfare officers was attended by more than 800 professionals. KI also trained over 200 instructors during the year in Mental Health First Aid (MHFA), a course that helps to spread information on suicide prevention. Web-based courses continued to constitute a major share of KI’s contract education.

KAROLINSKA INSTITUTET ANNUAL REPORT 2017 – ENGLISH SUMMARY

STUDY PROGRAMME IN PHYSIOTHERAPY

3,5

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EDUCATION AT BACHELOR’S AND MASTER’S LEVEL

294

161

incoming students to Karolinska Institutet in 2017

outgoing students from Karolinska Institutet in 2017

Student exchange 2017 Incoming and outgoing students within exchange programmes

A SI A N O R T H AME R ICA E URO P E

191

61 40

24

25

29

8

13

A F RI C A S OU TH AME R ICA

Number of incoming students to Karolinska Institutet

4

11

27

22

OCEAN I A

Number of outgoing students from Karolinska Institutet

Source: Ladok.

Revenue and costs for operations funded by tuition fees 2014–2017, SEK million 2014

2014

2015

2016

2017

Full-time equivalent students

74

107

110

111

Annual performance equivalents

64

98

112

105

2015

2016

2017

Revenue

14,7

19,3

19,6

18,4

Costs

10,7

15,4

16,8

21,9

4,1

3,9

2,8

-3,5

Change in capital

Source: Unit4 Business World.

Source: Ladok.

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KAROLINSKA INSTITUTET ANNUAL REPORT 2017 – ENGLISH SUMMARY

Graphics: Noun Project.

Number of full-time equivalent students (FTEs) and annual performance equivalents (APEs) in tuition-fee financed activities 2014–2017


EDUCATION AT BACHELOR’S AND MASTER’S LEVEL

Internationalisation During the year, KI continued its efforts to integrate global health issues into its teaching and to implement obligatory courses in English in its study programmes. The majority of programmes now have courses with intended learning outcomes for global health, and a web-based global health course for teaching staff was developed and will be launched in 2018. In 2017, KI joined the international Consortium of Universities for Global Health, which gives the university access to further teaching resources and networks within global health. As of 2017, several study programmes offer a compulsory course in English. KI received a grant during the year from the Swedish Foundation for International Cooperation in Research and Higher Education (STINT) for a strategic internationalisation project. The aim of the project is to raise the quality of education at bachelor’s and master’s level via internationalisation within the university itself. Five of KI’s study programmes are taking part in the project, which will run until 2020. During 2017, KI did not reach its teacher mobility goals. The number of outgoing teachers declined slightly while the number of incoming teachers showed little change from 2016. As in previous years, teachers cite a lack of time as the major reason for not participating in an exchange. However, the Erasmus programme for staff exchange provides further opportunities for mobility, such as job shadowing, which can help to raise teacher competence without being as time-consuming as regular foreign exchange commitments; five KI instructors participated in such programmes during the year. A slight increase can be noted in the number of outgoing students, albeit from a relatively low level. Students have reported that requirements concerning the length of overseas stay are a deterrent. To stimulate exchange, KI has therefore reduced the length of the exchange period needed to qualify for a travel allowance – in the absence of financing from an external source – from five to four weeks, beginning in autumn 2018. Despite recurring information campaigns, it is difficult to increase the number of outgoing exchange students. KI has therefore concluded that other overseas opportunities must be offered in addition to traditional student exchanges, and appropriate measures will be investigated. A large number of students are already acquiring overseas experience during

their studies through data collection for their degree projects, Erasmus traineeships and elective courses held partly abroad. Some 350 students took part in such activities in 2017. The number of incoming students remains high.

Tuition fees for non-EU/EEA students As in previous years, the acceptance ratio for the international master’s programmes was high in 2017, evidence that Karolinska Institutet remains an attractive university for non-EU/EEA students. Eight master’s programmes, three of which are run in association with other national and international universities, and a bachelor’s programme are included in KI’s English prospectus. KI also offers freestanding courses in English. In the autumn semester of 2017, 80 new feepaying students (46 per cent female, 25 per cent on full scholarship) were registered for KI’s programmes. The number of self-financed students was higher than in 2016, continuing the upward trend. The total number of FTE and APE students in 2017 was 111 and 105, respectively (see table to the left for a year-on-year comparison). In 2017, KI conducted an analysis of its tuitionfee financed activities and concluded that the university has the latitude to add new programmes. Initiatives in tuition-fee financed activities aim to raise the quality of KI’s internationalisation efforts and education. In addition to reception services and social activities, KI offers fee-paying students extended support in academic writing and more comprehensive career services. KI also developed a course for teachers during the year to raise the quality of teaching in “the multicultural classroom”. KI made extra quality investments in 2017. As the financing for these initiatives was drawn from the accumulated agency capital, there was a negative change in capital for the year. The Swedish Migration Agency’s lengthy processing times for decisions on residence permit extensions created serious problems for numerous students. Since the delay has prevented such students from going on planned exchanges or completing their degrees abroad, some have requested a postponement of their tuition-fee payments. Some of the third-country students entering the final semester of their studies have been issued a deportation order. KI has written to the agency and the government arguing that these decisions have not been made on reasonable grounds and proposing that fee-paying students in two-year master’s programmes be given two-year residence permits.

KAROLINSKA INSTITUTET ANNUAL REPORT 2017 – ENGLISH SUMMARY

The majority of programmes now have courses with intended learning outcomes for global health.

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EDUCATION AT BACHELOR’S AND MASTER’S LEVEL

70 % of the students were satisfied with their study experience at KI. This according to the exit polls of students who graduated in the spring of 2017.

Quality KI is actively developing its systematic quality programme, and in 2017 work began on implementing a coherent quality system. A component of this quality system is that the departments are required to account for the education they provide by answering questions about strategically selected areas. In 2017 they reported, for example, on teaching resources, student influence and the research basis of their education. The responses provide valuable data for the purposes of quality development in education and make KI’s educational activities more visible. These reports are supplemented with quality plans at departmental and programme levels. In order to develop the quality work, structured meetings for collegial review and learning have been introduced for the development of quality plans and related activities. During the spring, departmental and programme representatives met to review and discuss the quality plans; a similar meeting focusing on the review of course syllabi was arranged in the autumn. KI conducted an exit poll for all bachelor’s and master’s programmes in 2017 to gather students’ feedback on the quality of their education and student experience. These exit polls complement the course evaluations submitted at the end of every course. According to the exit polls of students who graduated in the spring of 2017, 70 per cent were satisfied with their overall study experience at KI. Approximately an equal share would recommend KI to prospective students.

Evaluation of sustainable development in education In 2017, the Swedish Higher Education Authority conducted a thematic evaluation of sustainable development in tertiary education. KI was judged to have well-developed processes in two out of three fields, but the area “environment, resources and premises” was judged to be in need of improvement. Work also began to bring KI’s education programmes more in line with the sustainability goals of the UN’s Agenda 2030 programme. For more details, see the section entitled “A university environment in development”.

Professional development for teachers In order to enhance the teachers’ pedagogical competence, KI arranged ten courses on teaching and learning in higher education and six shorter continuing professional development courses for

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supervisors and teachers engaged in clinical training in 2017. KI also continued its efforts to meet the Association of Swedish Higher Education’s (SUHF) requirement that teaching staff have appropriate training in teaching and learning in higher education corresponding to at least ten weeks of full-time study. To further strengthen the pedagogical competence of its teaching staff, KI developed four new courses during the year and arranged a teachers’ day on the theme of interprofessional education.

Pedagogical leadership training The second round of the course “Tomorrow’s pedagogical leaders” concluded in 2017, bringing the total number of participating KI teachers to over 50. The overall goal of the programme is to ensure the future supply of scientifically qualified and pedagogically proactive leaders within KI’s educational activities. The course evaluation shows that the participants considered the content to be relevant and felt that they had been given effective leadership and development tools for their work.

Review of ethics teaching A 2017 review of ethics instruction within KI’s bachelor’s and master’s programmes shows that, while many programmes have well-conceived ideas for content and progression, there is still room for improvement. KI therefore established and started to implement a common base level for all programmes to ensure that all KI students adopt an ethical approach and that the university’s ethics teaching maintains a high national standard.

Equal opportunities Gender distribution The gender distribution within KI’s bachelor’s and master’s programmes has seen little change over the past few years. A majority of the students are women. While there are some variations across the programmes, only the study programme in medicine and three master’s programmes have a relatively even gender distribution amongst beginners. On one programme, male students are in the majority. It should be noted, however, that the master’s programmes in question are small, and a minor change in the number of male students in a particular programme greatly affects its corresponding gender distribution. For year-on-year trends, see Table 2 of the tables appendix.

KAROLINSKA INSTITUTET ANNUAL REPORT 2017 – ENGLISH SUMMARY


EDUCATION AT BACHELOR’S AND MASTER’S LEVEL

Equal opportunities for students To reduce the risk of discrimination and harassment and to promote equal opportunities, KI held lectures and seminars on the theme for students, teachers and other staff during the year. This included, for example, two open seminars organised in the wake of the #metoo campaign for HR officers, equal opportunity and safety representatives and supervisors; students and other employees also attended. Programmes at bachelor’s and master’s level and courses for clinical placement supervisors also contain content regarding equal opportunities. In 2017 KI decided to review the content of its education programmes from a gender and equal opportunities perspective. The project was piloted with the study programme in medicine, and other programmes have shown an interest in strengthening their equal opportunities perspective. A workshop was also held for teachers responsible for KI’s professional education and training programmes on incorporating issues related to men’s violence against women and violence in intimate relationships into their curriculums. More information about equal opportunities integration at KI can be found under “A university environment in development”.

The supplementary programme for nurses was evaluated during the year. The results reveal a very high degree of labour market establishment amongst former course participants. The clinical aspects of the programme were identified as being most useful, along with the components related to statutes, laws and ordinances. A majority of the students are women. Only the study programme in medicine and three master’s programmes have a relatively even gender distribution amongst beginners.

Assessment of non-formal qualifications KI conducted a project during the year designed to inform students and teaching staff about the assessment of non-formal qualifications. The project began by examining and analysing the methods used at other universities and the information provided to their students. Using this analysis, KI produced information materials for students and assessment support material for the decisionmakers who process applications for the accreditation of non-formal qualifications.

Integration initiatives Supplementary training for midwives, physiotherapists, doctors, nurses and dentists with degrees from outside the EU/EEA and Switzerland KI arranged supplementary training for doctors, nurses and dentists with degrees from countries outside the EU/EES and Switzerland. All three training programmes comprise one year of campusbased full-time study worth 60 credit points made up of both theory and clinical placements.

KAROLINSKA INSTITUTET ANNUAL REPORT 2017 – ENGLISH SUMMARY

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Photo: Erik Cronberg.

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DOCTORAL EDUCATION

Karolinska Institutet (KI) places a heavy focus on doctoral education with the aim of ensuring that the doctoral degrees it awards are recognised nationally and internationally for their high quality.

Doctoral education Doctoral education is mainly pursued by students conducting individual research projects with the assistance of supervisors and other researchers. To help the students in this endeavour and to ensure the quality of their studies, KI has established a framework of support mechanisms, rules and regulations that places heavy demands on supervisors and the study environment in general. In 2017, KI offered 215 courses for doctoral students, the aims of which are now stated in their respective syllabi (as of the autumn semester of 2017). Topic-specific courses are mainly offered in KI’s twelve doctoral programmes, which coordinate course selection within their respective research fields. Characteristically for KI and other medical faculties, a large proportion of doctoral students

(about one third) do their research training part-time while working in the healthcare sector. This puts particular demands on both the students and the university. To facilitate their studies, KI and Stockholm County Council have created a number of research schools with the aim of providing a course package suited to the target group while giving students access to research networks and time for in-depth study.

Doctoral students There is a weak downward trend in the number of doctoral students at KI, which nonetheless has a large doctoral student body compared with other medical faculties in Sweden. The proportion of newly admitted female doctoral students has historically been over 60 per cent. Since 2012, however, this figure has dropped to between 55 and 60 per cent.

Number of newly admitted students 2008–2017 500 450

420

420

450

438 410

374

400

407

398 363

383

350

I’m pleased with the results of the exit poll for 2013–2016, which shows that graduates are increasingly satisfied with doctoral education at KI. We’re also seeing that their published articles are of the same high standards as KI’s publications in general. We continue our efforts to strengthen doctoral education in clinical practice, including primary care, which is facing huge challenges in the new healthcare landscape. Clinical research schools are an important part of doctoral education and have now been expanded. The digital system for study plans developed over the year will be an effective monitoring tool.” Marianne Schultzberg Dean of Doctoral Education

300 250 200 150

Total

100

Female

50 0

Photo: Erik Cronberg.

Doctoral education

Male 2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

KAROLINSKA INSTITUTET ANNUAL REPORT 2017 – ENGLISH SUMMARY

2017

Source: Ladok.

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DOCTORAL EDUCATION

Quality

Education at doctoral level 2014–2017: Number of doctoral students, exams and studytime Degree

2014

2015

2016

2017

Number of doctoral students (individuals)

2,311

2,280

2,267

2,136

Number of doctoral students (full-time equivalent)2

1,741

1,724

1,738

1,685

9

8

7

4

1

Number of exams (licentiate) Number of exams (doctoral)

340

359

331

328

Total study time3

6.05

6.02

5.84

6.35

Net study time

4.37

4.44

4.32

4.60

For education at a doctoral level to be considered high quality, the theses produced must maintain a high scientific standard and the students who graduate must have developed into competent and independent researchers. Achieving these criteria requires not only excellent research but also learning environments characterised by good leadership and a focus on each student’s learning and development. Several quality-raising measures were taken during the year: the introduction package for new students was improved and the internal doctoral financing programme (KID) was further developed. A “green light” process was also introduced for supervisors, ethics courses were revised and a comprehensive review of doctoral education was launched (see below).

Source: Ladok.

”Overall, I am satisfied with my doctoral education at KI” 100 % 90 %

86

90

88

85

87

89

93

92

92

80 %

”Green light”

70 %

In the interests of enhancing supervision at KI, the university introduced a requirement during the year that all principal supervisors apply for a “green light” before recruiting a doctoral student. The aim of this initiative is to help ensure that all students have the opportunities and resources needed for a high-quality education. The head of department and at least two others from the department where the doctoral project will be conducted assess the prospective supervisor according to the following criteria: financial resources, time available for supervision, and quality of previous supervisory activities. Without a “green light” a new doctoral project may not commence. As of 2018, this will form a complement to the compulsory supervisor training programme introduced at the university in 2008.

60 % 50 % 40 % 30 % 20 %

14

15

12

10

13

11

10 % 0%

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

7

8

9

2014

2015

2016

Agree + Somewhat agree Somewhat disagree + Disagree Source: Survey data from KI’s exit polls of newly graduated doctoral students, 2008–2016. Response frequency has varied from 67–85 per cent.

Photo: Stefan Zimmerman.

Research ethics

Doctoral student Mansoureh Shahsavani and Associate professor Anna Falk at Karolinska Institutet's Department of Neuroscience.

Ethics courses were a focus area throughout 2017. Since 2009, it is mandatory for doctoral students at KI to attend a course in research ethics. During the year, KI reviewed these courses to check the objectives and quality requirements for content and intended learning outcomes, and made several adjustments and clarifications accordingly. The general syllabus for doctoral education was also revised so that it is now compulsory for all doctoral students conducting clinical research to take a course on the quality assurance of clinical research.

1 All doctoral students who have registered activity of 1 per cent or over during the autumn term. 2 Information for 2017 has been retrieved from the new Ladok’s monitoring module and is therefore not fully comparable with data for 2014–2016. 3 Total study time was previously defined at KI as the time up until the term of thesis defence. From 2017 onwards, the monitoring module in new Ladok is used, in which time is calculated up until the

issuing of a degree. Data for 2014–2016 has been recalculated to make the figures comparable.

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KAROLINSKA INSTITUTET ANNUAL REPORT 2017 – ENGLISH SUMMARY


DOCTORAL EDUCATION

Follow-up The exit poll4 For the tenth year in a row, all doctoral students were invited in connection with their thesis defence to participate in an anonymous survey about their completed studies. The response rate of this “exit poll” over the past few years has been approximately 80 per cent. Even though it is difficult to gauge quality, an exit poll provides KI unique feedback on its various initiatives and vital data for assessment and decision-making. In 2017, KI conducted a more thorough analysis of its exit polls. The accumulated results from the past few years provided sufficiently large groups to be able to report trends at a departmental level, which gave the departments feedback on their performance. The exit poll results were also the theme of the annual discussion between the dean and the departments’ directors of doctoral studies.

Equal opportunities In 2017 KI decided to finance an online course on gender, power and bias in assessment processes. This in order to, amongst its other aims, address the uneven distribution of men and women in regards to funding applications and approval rates for the doctoral programmes and clinical graduate schools. During the previous allocation period (2016), more men than women applied for and were granted funding. Four supervisor training courses, each including a module on equal opportunities, were held in 2017; each was attended by approximately 35 supervisors. KI also finances a doctoral ombudsman, based at the Medical Students’ Association in Stockholm, who is able to assist students and represent them on personal matters.

Internationalisation

Graphics: iStock.

KI’s Strategy 2018 stresses the importance of giving doctoral students opportunities to participate in international exchanges during their studies. Of the KI students who graduated in 20165, 38 per cent (40 per cent, 2015) had participated in some kind of international exchange, most commonly by spending time with a research group at an overseas university. In 2017, the proportion of newly admitted doctoral students with a qualifying education from

another country was 41 per cent. The most common countries were China (11 per cent of all new admissions), Germany (4 per cent) and Italy (4 per cent). It is important to note that country of qualifying education is not always the same as nationality or citizenship.

38 % Doctoral students that participated in some kind of international exchange.

National Institutes of Health (NIH, USA) Since 2001, KI has had a doctoral student collaboration in place with NIH in the field of neuroscience. This is the largest international institutionalised collaboration involving doctoral education at the university. The students in this programme share their time between laboratories at KI and at NIH and have supervisors from both organisations. A new collaboration agreement was signed by KI and NIH in 2017. The new agreement will remain in effect until June 2022. A joint symposium was arranged at KI in March 2017 in order to establish contacts between researchers and to give the programme’s students the opportunity to present their research.

41 % Newly admitted doctoral students with a qualifying education from another country.

Keio University (Japan) During the year, KI renewed its declaration of intent on collaborating with Keio University in Japan. The collaboration mainly concerns doctoral education, for which KI, Keio University, Peking University Health Science Centre and University College London operate a joint summer school on different themes each year. In 2018 the partnership will also include a student exchange agreement for the medical programme.

University of Newcastle (Australia) In 2017, KI signed a collaboration agreement with the University of Newcastle (U of N) in Australia with the aim of increasing research and doctoral collaborations and the number of student exchanges at bachelor’s and master’s level.

Muhimbili University of Health and Allied Sciences (MUHAS, Tanzania) Two individuals from Muhimbili University of Health and Allied Sciences were admitted as Sidafinanced doctoral students in 2017. The supervisor training was completed successfully at MUHAS in accordance with the “train-the-trainer” concept and Karolinska University Library participated in a course on information competence.

4 The 2017 survey is open until February 2018 and can therefore not be reported here. 5 Source: Exit poll.

KAROLINSKA INSTITUTET ANNUAL REPORT 2017 – ENGLISH SUMMARY

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Photo: Erik Cronberg.

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RESEARCH

The research covers a broad field, from basic molecular biological research to clinical epidemiology and nursing science

Cancer and haematology Neuroscience and psychiatry

Cell, molecular and structural biology

Healthcare sciences and aging

Developmental biology, reproduction and reparative medicine Epidemiology and public health

Infection and inflammation

Endocrinology and metabolism

Research KI is currently in the middle of a comprehensive infrastructure transition, which, while challenging, places KI in good stead to maximize its research potential. To this end, KI must strengthen its collaboration with Stockholm County Council and the Swedish private sector, along with other universities and international actors.

Graphics: iStock.

From head to toe – a selection of the latest research findings Every year, approximately 5,000 original articles are published by KI’s researchers in scientific journals. About 90 per cent of these articles are written in collaboration with other research institutions in and outside Sweden. A significant

Photo: Erik Cronberg.

Circulation and respiration

proportion of them have some connection to healthcare. Many of the scientific articles are also republished as constituent papers in the doctoral theses presented at KI. On the following pages is a list representing a limited selection of scientific discoveries presented in 2017 on KI’s websites.

KAROLINSKA INSTITUTET ANNUAL REPORT 2017 – ENGLISH SUMMARY

Karolinska Institutet (KI) had a wonderfully successful year in terms of grants, which I see as proof that KI’s researchers are outstanding and that our research makes a real difference. Over the past year we have put tremendous focus on the development of shared infrastructure, particularly the animal facilities, and the planning of a new electron microscopy centre and an imaging centre. New vital infrastructure will be so costly and complex that it will require more collaboration both amongst departments and within the entire sector. This applies not only to heavy equipment but also to things like data processing and biobanks.” Anders Gustafsson Dean of Research

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RESEARCH

THE EYES EAR -NOSE-THROAT Tinnitus in both ears is largely caused by genetic factors, especially in men.

Our genes affect how we use our eyes to receive information.

THE CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM The number of patients who suffer a heart attack or die after being sent home with a “nonspecific chest pain” diagnosis has declined.

BREAST Women with hormone-sensitive breast cancer run a significant risk of relapse.

STOMACH & INTESTINES Patients over the age of 60 with inflammatory bowel disease are treated more often with older drugs, rather than more modern medicines that target the immune system.

LIVER & KIDNEYS Researchers could be well on the way to preventing the deterioration of kidney function in diabetes.

THE BLOOD

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Graphics: iStock and Noun Project.

THE SKIN Researchers have studied certain immune cells to learn more about the inflammatory skin diseases psoriasis and vitiligo.

The research is paving the way for more tailored treatments for infections, allergies, autoimmune diseases, cancer and other conditions.

KAROLINSKA INSTITUTET ANNUAL REPORT 2017 – ENGLISH SUMMARY


RESEARCH

THE EYES. A study involving 233 twins showed that our genes affect how we use our eyes to receive information. The study was conducted in collaboration with Uppsala University and Indiana University in the USA (Current Biology, November). EAR-NOSE-THROAT. Tinnitus in both ears is largely caused by genetic factors, especially in men, according to one study (Genetics in Medicine, March). KI researchers and their British colleagues confirmed that vitamin D protects against respiratory infections, something had long been debated (BMJ, February). Another study showed that healthy young men who undergo surgery for acid reflux and heartburn rarely relapse (JAMA, September). Even before disease onset, our senses of smell and vision can help us identify an infected person in our vicinity (PNAS, May).

Photos: iStock.

THE BRAIN AND NERVE SYSTEM. By manipulating the genetic activity of glial cells in the brain, researchers have created new dopamine-producing neurons in mice and cultivated human cells, results that give hope of a future treatment for Parkinson’s disease (Nature Biotechnology, April). In a joint project with Danish colleagues, researchers at KI also produced short synthetic DNA-components that bind direct to the gene that is mutated in Huntington’s disease. The discovery opens the way for new approaches to treating the currently untreatable and deadly neurodegenerative disease (Nucleid Acids Research, February).

Chronic nerve pain is not necessarily caused by hypersensitivity in the specialised neurons that transmit pain. New research showed that the kind of neuron that normally allows us to feel pleasant tactile sensations can start to signal pain after nerve damage (Science, June). Pneumococcus is the most common cause of bacterial infection of the airways. In a study on mice, researchers showed that the bacteria can be prevented from entering the brain by blocking certain receptors in the brain’s vasculature (The Journal of Experimental Medicine, May). By reprogramming skin cells into nerve cells, researchers have

been able to study how the cells of patients with the severe developmental disease lissencephaly differ from healthy cells. The method of producing a cell model of the brain can be used to improve understanding of other severe congenital diseases (Molecular Psychiatry, September). THE BLOOD. Cytarabin is the most common drug used to treat the aggressive form of blood cancer known as acute myeloid leukaemia (AML), but over time, some patients develop a resistance to it. Researchers identified the protein that inhibits and reduces the effect of cytarabin, giving hope of better treatments in the future (Nature Medicine, January). Every individual has a unique configuration of white blood cells; this in turn can predict the immune system’s reaction to different types of stimulation, a new study showed, paving the way for more tailored treatments for infections, allergies, autoimmune diseases, cancer and other conditions (PNAS, July). THE SKIN. With the aid of thousands of skin biopsies and over a hundred kilograms of skin, researchers have studied certain immune cells to learn more about the inflammatory skin diseases psoriasis and vitiligo. The study opens the way for more targeted local treatments for patchy skin disorders (Immunity, February). THE CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM. Oxygen has long been routinely used in the treatment of patients with suspected myocardial infarction. Researchers have now shown that the treatment is ineffective for heart patients with normal blood oxygenation (New England Journal of Medicine, August). A large-scale registry study shows that a new more sensitive analytical method has improved the evaluation of patients admitted to hospital for chest pain and suspected myocardial infarction. The number of patients who suffer a heart attack or die after being sent home with a “nonspecific chest pain” diagnosis has declined (Journal of the American College of Cardiology, May). A specially constructed drone equipped with a defibrillator can be dispatched and delivered automatically to the site of a cardiac arrest long before an ambulance arrives, one study has shown (JAMA, June). BREAST. Women with hormone-sensitive breast cancer run a significant risk of relapse as many as 20 years after diagnosis, according to one study. The international team of researchers therefore propose that

KAROLINSKA INSTITUTET ANNUAL REPORT 2017 – ENGLISH SUMMARY

patients could need hormone therapy for longer than five years, which is the current standard (New England Journal of Medicine, November). Another study showed that genetic testing could identify breast cancer patients with a very low risk of death within 20 years and thus reduce overtreatment (JAMA Oncology, June).

STOMACH & INTESTINES. Patients over the age of 60 with inflammatory bowel disease are treated more often with older drugs, rather than more modern medicines that target the immune system, research has shown (Gastroenterology, November). Children who develop inflammatory bowel disease, such as ulcerative colitis or Crohn’s disease, run a higher risk of cancer, both in childhood and later in life, according to one study (BMJ, September). According to recent studies, short-course preoperative radiotherapy combined with delayed surgery reduces the adverse side-effects of colon surgery for cancer without compromising its efficacy (The Lancet Oncology, February). LIVER & KIDNEYS. Researchers could be well on the way to preventing the deterioration of kidney function in diabetes, something that currently forces many patients to undergo dialysis or kidney transplantation. A new drug candidate tested on mice reduces the accumulation of fat in the kidneys, which is thought to be the cause of diabetic kidney disease (Cell Metabolism, February). Liver disease in children born with Alagille Syndrome can be caused by malformations of the bile ducts, research on mice shows (Gastroenterology, November). Drugs containing omeprazol (e.g. Losec), which inhibits the production of stomach acid, are some of the most widely sold in the world. However, according to an observation study, apart from alleviating heartburn and preventing stomach ulcers, they can also increase the risk of kidney failure, which is something the researchers believe should be factored into treatment (Gastroenterology, August). WOMEN’S HEALTH. A study of nearly 89,000 women has shown that postmeno-

29


RESEARCH

AT THE START OF LIFE. Researchers at Karolinska Institutet have produced 3D molecular images showing how sperm bonds with the egg at the start of fertilisation (Cell, June). Babies born to women who were treated with influenza medicine while pregnant do not run a higher risk of deformity or ill-health, according to the largest study to date in this field (BMJ, February). The use of antidepressants during pregnancy has also been shown to be safer for the baby than previously believed (JAMA, April). Babies born prematurely run a higher risk of heart failure during childhood and adolescence, a new registry-based study reports (Journal of the American College of Cardiology, May). A large study by researchers at Karolinska Institutet and colleagues at Makerere University in Kampala has shown that cerebral palsy (CP) is a much more common and deadly disorder in Uganda than in the West, probably as a result of malaria (The Lancet Global Health, October).

CELLS & MOLECULES. Researchers at Karolinska Institutet have developed a tool for identifying the very earliest stem cells in the human embryo, something that was previously difficult to do. These cells are thought to possess great potential for replacing damaged tissue (Cell Stem Cell, March). Antabus, which is used to treat alcohol abuse, can also kill cancer cells, according

30

to a study in which researchers combined registry data and laboratory experiments (Nature, December). Researchers at Karolinska Institutet have managed to synthesise lung surfactant, a drug given to preterm babies to expand their lungs and help them breathe, by mimicking the production of spider silk (Nature Communications, May). A light in the darkness for children with neuroblastoma is that this form of childhood cancer has the highest frequency of spontaneous regression among all cancers. Research found that high levels of KIF1B-β protein can play an important role in tumour suppression, something that can provide clues to the development of new therapies (Genes and Development, June). In a large-scale study, researchers have shown that certain proteins in human cells are able to activate regions in the genome that are normally inactive due to epigenetic changes. The findings contribute to a better understanding of gene regulation, embryonic development and different pathological processes (Science, May). MENTAL ILLNESS. The opportunity to play the computer game Tetris in hospital can prevent intrusive memories (flashbacks) after a traumatic event, one study reported (Molecular Psychiatry, March). Young people with lower school grades than their peers run a higher risk of mental ill-health and attempted suicide, one that persists into middle age (Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica, August). There is a link between treatment for self-harming behaviour and the risk of conviction for violent criminality, according to a Swedish registry study (JAMA Psychiatry, April). The prescription of lithium to people with bipolar disease has declined in Sweden in recent years. However, a registry study shows that lithium therapy reduces the risk of suicide in this patient group (The American Journal of Psychiatry, June).

AGEING. Anticoagulants not only reduce the risk of stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation, they can also be linked to a reduced risk of dementia in this patient group, according to a recent registry study (European

Heart Journal, October). A European research team has shown that a medical nutrient drink comprising essential fatty acids and vitamins can help to slow the pathological process of patients in the earliest stage of Alzheimer’s disease (Lancet Neurology, November).

WEIGHT. Too little weight gain in a woman during pregnancy can increase the risk that the baby will go on to develop schizophrenia and other types of psychoses later in life, according to a registry study (JAMA Psychiatry, February). However, overweight in the mother during pregnancy can be linked to a higher risk of cerebral palsy (CP) in the newborn infant. According to the researchers, the risk increases in proportion to the woman’s BMI (JAMA, March). A KI study conducted together with researchers in Gothenburg and Lund has shown that bariatric surgery on teenagers produces equally positive long-term results as shown in adults. However, many of the teenagers developed complications and need support addressing their vitamin and mineral deficiency (The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology, January). DIABETES. A study conducted together with Finnish researchers has shown that a vaccine against a common cold virus protects mice from developing type 1 diabetes. The company is now building on this discovery and hopes to test a similar vaccine on humans (Diabetologia, November). Working with their American colleagues, KI researchers have identified a possible new target for the treatment of obesity-related metabolic diseases, such as type 2 diabetes. The activity of a protein called carboxylesterase 2 in liver biopsies of obese individuals was half that observed in liver biopsies of their lean counterparts (Cell Reports, January). Consuming one or more pots of “snus” (Swedish snuff or dipping tobacco) per day dramatically increases the risk of developing type 2 diabetes, one study reported. This is the same risk increase as previously seen for smokers who smoke one packet of cigarettes a day (Journal of Internal Medicine, February).

KAROLINSKA INSTITUTET ANNUAL REPORT 2017 – ENGLISH SUMMARY

Photos: iStock.

pausal hormone therapy does not increase the risk of stroke, provided that it is started early. The results refine the knowledge gained from previous research (PLOS Medicine, November). Women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) have high levels of male sex hormone and can have difficulty conceiving. A study by an international team of researchers has shown, however, that acupuncture is not an effective infertility treatment for these women (JAMA, June). The most common combined contraceptive pill in Sweden can negatively impact life quality, affecting things like mood, wellbeing and energy levels, a large randomised placebo-controlled study reported (Fertility and Sterility, April).


RESEARCH

Quality In 2015 the former vice-chancellor decided to launch a project designed to create a coherent quality system for KI. The project delivered its final report in 2017, after which the implementation of the quality system began. The primary focus of the initiative is assuring the quality of the research process, rather than the results generated. KI is also studying various models for resource allocation. During the year, KI and Karolinska University Hospital drafted new joint procedures related to the division of responsibilities for clinical research studies that require ethical review. This will further clarify the responsibilities of each hospital unit’s clinical manager, research leader and head of department involved in specific research projects. KI also further clarified its processes and procedures for cases of scientific misconduct. There is now an established system at KI that includes the functions proposed in the report produced by the inquiry for investigations on research misconduct (“Oredlighetsutredningen”, SOU 2017:10). Recruitment procedures for academic positions were strengthened during the year with the aim of attracting desired competence through clear career paths, while minimising the risk of recruitment errors. KI also worked with Karolinska University Hospital to further develop rules and processes for clinical combined positions. A pilot study conducted during the year on the handling of research data at KI revealed a need for improved internal coordination. Individual research groups and departments require better support, and more solutions are needed for ensuring the secure digital storage of research data. To this end, KI decided to establish a Research Data Office (RDO). Furthermore, the vice-chancellor decided that, in order to improve searchability, transparency and information security, and to make it easier for researchers to comply with KI’s research documentation rules, all research for which KI is the lead research institution must be documented electronically as of 1 January 2019.

Measures of academic output – bibliometrics Bibliometrics involves the application of mathematical and statistical methods to articles, books and other communications media. Like many other

Number of published articles 2007–2016 8 000 7 000 6 000 5 000 4 000 3 000 2 000 1 000 0 2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

Review

Other

2014

2015

2016

Article

Source: Web of Science and Medline.8 ”Other” consists of the previous sub-items Meeting abstracts, Editorial material and Letters.9

Field-normalised citation score 2007–201610 2,0 1,8 1,6 1,4 1,2 1,0 0,8 0,6 0,4 0,2 0,0 2007

2008

2009

2010 KI

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

Cf EU28

Source: Web of Science.

universities, KI uses bibliometrics to monitor the dissemination and impact of its research results. The number of published articles is a relatively rough measure of academic output and depends on a variety of factors, such as the publication patterns within different disciplines. Because of this, field-normalised citation scores are used as a complement to describing scientific impact. Both indicators are shown below. The data reported6 are clearer when seen from a longterm perspective. The bars in the figure represent the number of published articles with addresses that can be connected to KI7 in either Web of Science or Medline.

6 Certain data included herein are derived from the Web of Science ® prepared by THOMSON REUTERS ®, Inc. (Thomson®), Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA: © Copyright THOMSON REUTERS ® 2018.

All rights reserved. 7 The main address strings included in the analysis are Karolinska, Huddinge Hospital/Sjukhus, Danderyd Hospital/Sjukhus, Sodersjukhuset/Soder hospital, St Goran Hospital/Sjukhus, St Erik Hospital/ Sjukhus, Astrid Lindgren Hospital/Sjukhus. 8 Data is partially derived from MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine. 9 Types of publications in ”Other”: Meeting Abstract, Editorial Material, Letter, Correction Addition, Biographical Item, Book Review, Reprint, News Item, Database Review, Fiction Creative Prose, Software Review. Coverage for these types of publication is very uneven. 10 KAROLINSKA INSTITUTET REPORT 2017 – ENGLISH SUMMARY Data is based only on publicationsANNUAL covered by Web of Science. Publications from 2017 have been excluded due to a certain lag in reporting. 31


RESEARCH

The research revenue 2014–2017, SEK million 2014

2015

2016

2017

Change 2016–2017

Research councils

844

969

988

1,013

2,5%

Other government agencies

288

307

300

304

1,3%

Municipalities and county councils

376

400

390

341

-12,6%

Swedish foundations and organisations

904

974

991

1,050

6,0%

Foreign foundations and organisations

409

405

431

489

13,5%

Swedish companies

198

252

296

319

7,8%

Foreign companies

94

89

147

170

15,6%

Dividends from KI funds

70

76

69

102

47,8%

Funding source

18

6

12

5

-58,3%

Total external funding

3,202

3,478

3,623

3,793

4,7%

Direct government funding

1,920

1,897

1,959

1,997

1,9%

Total

5,121

5,375

5,582

5,790

3,7%

63%

65%

65%

66%

Financial income

Proportion of external funding Source: Unit4 Business World.

Research funding 2008–2017

Revenue from the EU (including scholarships and other transfers) 2008–2017

SEK million 4 000

SEK million

3 500

300

3 000 250

2 500 200

2 000

150

1 500 1 000

100

500

50

0 2008 2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

Government

2016

2017

External

0

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

Income

Source: Unit4 Business World.

2013

2014

2015

2016 2017

Scholarships and other transfers

Source: Unit4 Business World.

Total ERC grants to KI researchers

Number of EU projects 2014–201712

Total number of projects with KI as coordinator

13

2014

2015

2016

2017

202

214

198

200

15

12

11

12

Source: EU database KI, Participant portal, Cordis, VINNOVA.

Starting 2017

Total amount

Advanced Grants

3

11

Consolidator Grant

1

10

Starting Grant

3

13

Proof of Concept Grant

2

3

Source: Participant portal, Cordis.

32

KAROLINSKA INSTITUTET ANNUAL REPORT 2017 – ENGLISH SUMMARY


RESEARCH

Recruitment The previously launched initiative to establish a clear and attractive career path for junior researchers continued in 2017. Assistant professors (formerly research associates) recruited externally via advertised appointments receive a relocation grant in addition to the basic financial contribution to their salaries. The aim of this is to enable new employees at KI to become immediately engaged in active research.

Equal opportunities The training programme for research group leaders includes a regular and compulsory half-day seminar on equal opportunities and an online module on equal opportunities in education. This past year, approximately 30 research group leaders participated in the programme. In 2017, KI decided to finance a web-based course on gender, power and bias in decisionmaking processes, primarily for people who assess internal funding applications. A course on the integration of equal opportunity principles into

Total revenues for research at KI increased 3.7 per cent compared to 2016. Reasons for this include an increase in income from corporate partners, with whom KI has spent many years establishing collaborative systems and relationships. Additional increases resulted from funding from Swedish and overseas foundations and organisations. As in recent years, external funding increased more than the government appropriation, leading to a gradual increase in the proportion of externally financed research at KI. Revenues from local governments, particularly from the Stockholm County Council, declined during the year, owing in part to the conclusion of numerous collaboration projects.

pages 43–47

For more information about the work on equal terms, see the chapter A university environment in development.

pages 47–48

For more information about the largest sources of funding, see the chapter Financial report and table 6 in the table appendix. Created by Niklas Bäversten from the Noun Project

The field-normalised citation score reflects the number of citations of the article compared to other articles of the same type – the same type of document from the same year and in the same subject. The graph shows the average annual value of the field-normalised citation score for all articles11 from KI and the field-normalised citation score for all 28 member states of the EU (EU28). As can be seen on page 31, KI’s score is higher than the corresponding score for EU28.

Research financing

For more information about the KI’s recruitment strategy, see the chapter A university environment in development.

Created by Niklas Bäversten from the Noun Project

Field-normalised citation score

decision-making was also held for the members of KI’s three internal boards. Furthermore, a committee at KI has been tasked with reviewing the government’s recruitment targets for new professors/visiting professors. Created by Niklas Bäversten from the Noun Project

Review articles and original articles are the two document types that are normally included in bibliometric analyses at KI as well as internationally. A review is an article describing the current status of a particular field of research; unlike an original article (“Article” in the chart on page 31), it usually contains a summary of previous publications in a certain area rather than the author’s own research. Because there is a slight delay in database updates, complete statistics for the past year were not available at the time of this annual report’s publication. Consequently, to provide an accurate summary of developments, details for 2017 are not reported.

pages 53 and 66

The European Union Karolinska Institutet is the second largest recipient of EU grants in Sweden. In 2017, KI had a total of 200 EU-financed projects, twelve of which were coordinated by KI researchers. As a coordinator, KI is in a stronger position to enhance its international profile and influence European research policy. KI has 70 active projects in the EU programmes for health and is a successful recipient of grants from Horizon 2020’s Societal Challenge 1: Health, demographic change and wellbeing. In 2017, KI was the sixth largest recipient of these EU grants. Nine new projects commenced during the year, including one in multiple sclerosis, which KI coordinates. KI participates in 14 projects under the Innovative Medicines Initiative (IMI), a joint undertaking between the European Union and the pharmaceutical industry. Two new projects commenced during the year, one of which is coordinated by KI. The university also takes part in projects on issues such as infrastructure, information and communication technology, nanoscience and environment. The revenue from KI’s EU-financed projects was SEK 262 million.

11 Articles and reviews in Web of Science. 12 Number of current projects within the seventh framework programmes, Horizon 2020 and the Health Programme. Decided, but not yet started projects are not included. 13 The figures referring to KI as coordinator do not include projects supported by the European Research Council.

KAROLINSKA INSTITUTET ANNUAL REPORT 2017 – ENGLISH SUMMARY

33


RESEARCH

For more information about research collaborations with other universities, see the chapter Collaboration. Created by Niklas Bäversten from the Noun Project

pages 40–41

European support for individual researchers European grants for individual researchers are primarily received from the European Research Council (ERC) and the Research Executive Agency (REA). Nine new projects supported by the ERC were started in 2017; by the end of the year, KI had 37 ongoing ERC projects, 33 of which are led by its own researchers. The university received, amongst other awards, three Advanced Grants for established outstanding researchers and three Starting Grants for young, particularly promising researchers. The Marie Skłodowska-Curie Programme (MSCA), which is administrated by the REA, aims to reinforce Europe’s intellectual capital and competitiveness. In 2017 five new individual and five network-based MSCA grants were awarded to KI researchers. KI now has a total of 40 active MSCA projects.

Scientific infrastructure With the growing importance of research infrastructure both nationally and for KI, advanced scientific infrastructures must be much more effectively coordinated and shared. This will not only ensure the efficient use of resources but will also allow KI to offer as many researchers as possible access to structures that cannot be operated by individual groups. Research infrastructure exists within KI’s departments, and infrastructure issues are managed by different parts of the organisation. There is a considerable and growing need for coordination, not only within KI but also with Stockholm County Council. Initiatives at a national level are also necessary. In light of this and related issues, KI established an Infrastructure Committee at the start of the year tasked with drawing up proposals for a university-wide infrastructure strategy as well as prioritising and initiating infrastructure investments. As part of the strategy development process, the committee inventoried the university’s existing and potential future infrastructure in order to create a resource catalogue and a foundation for its upcoming strategy work. The committee identified, amongst other things, the importance of coordination and identifying synergies among different infrastructure resources and the rese-

34

arch being conducted, and the need to be able to connect the right competencies to the right infrastructures. KI takes considerable responsibility for infrastructure in the medical field and offers a large number of infrastructural solutions in areas such as biobanking, proteomics and genomics. KI’s two campuses in Solna and in Flemingsberg are undergoing considerable expansion and several new premises and facilities are being built for laboratories, animal facilities and more. Initiatives are underway with external actors, such as the healthcare sector, to further integrate research and clinical activities.

Internationalisation Collaborations with internationally leading research environments are necessary for the exchange of ideas, methods and results that drive research forward. KI’s international standing and influence is very much based on the extent to which its researchers establish collaborations and co-author articles within these environments.

KAROLINSKA INSTITUTET ANNUAL REPORT 2017 – ENGLISH SUMMARY


RESEARCH

International co-publications 2015–2017 The number of academic articles published by Karolinska Institutet’s researchers in collaboration with one or more researchers from different countries or territories. Certain data included herein are derived from the Web of Science ® prepared by THOMSON REUTERS ®, Inc. (Thomson®), Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA: © Copyright THOMSON REUTERS ® 2018. All rights reserved.

EUROPE NORTH AMERICA

5,458

39,919

ASIA

4,636

0 1–10 11–50 51-200 201-1000 1000+

AFRICA

OCEANIA

1,455

1,357

INTERNATIONELL SAMPUBLICERING ÅR 2015–2017 Antal vetenskapliga artiklar publicerade av Karolinska Institutets forskare i samverkan med en eller flera forskare från respektive land eller territorium.

SOUTH AMERICA

765

Certain data included herein are derived from the Web of Science ® prepared by THOMSON REUTERS ®, Inc. (Thomson®), Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA: © Copyright THOMSON REUTERS ® 2018. All rights reserved.

KAROLINSKA INSTITUTET ANNUAL REPORT 2017 – ENGLISH SUMMARY

35


Photo: Erik Cronberg.

36


COLLABORATION

Collaboration

Graphics: iStock.

More than half of the research and education at Karolinska Institutet (KI) is conducted in the clinical environment, at the region’s hospitals and within the primary care. Some of KI’s research is also conducted in cooperation with Swedish and overseas companies and organisations. Through this close collaboration with the healthcare and corporate sectors, KI’s research results are put to good use.

KI is located in close proximity to Karolinska University Hospital, the Public Health Agency of Sweden, the Science for Life Laboratory (SciLifeLab) and the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC), amongst other institutions. KI also provides limited financial support to both the Flemingsberg Science and Stockholm Science City foundations with the purpose of developing innovative and collaborative environments in the region. KI has many long-term partners around the world and is extensively involved in collaborations established, for example, through EUfunded research projects. Recently undertaken collaborations are described below (see also under “Internationalisation” and “Research”). In 2017, KI joined Cancer Core Europe (CCE), a network of six leading research universities and institutes set up primarily to identify methods for early diagnosis and more effective prevention. Since 2015, KI has been a partner of EIT Health, a European consortium established that same year by the European Institute for Innovation and Technology (EIT) to focus on research, education and collaboration for healthy living and active ageing. EIT Health is one of the EU’s biggest initiatives in the translation and application of research, education and innovation within the field, and has a budget of EUR 700 million through 2020. KI actively participates within both innovation projects and educational activities. The Prostate-cancer-test-Stockholm3, for which KI is the academic leader, won EIT’s major innovation competition in 2017. MultiMode (dementia screening), another KI innovation project, won the second place in competition with all other EIT projects.

Collaboration with Stockholm County Council Stockholm County Council is KI’s most important partner. KI’s collaboration with the county council is based on the national and regional ALF agreement, an agreement signed between the government and selected county councils whereby the government remunerates the councils involved for their participation in medical education, clinical research and healthcare sector development. At a regional level, agreements are signed between county councils and universities. The regional ALF agreement between KI and Stockholm County Council also covers collaboration on clinical placements for students in programmes other than medicine.

489 SEK million

in financing from the corporate sector 2017

The collaboration organisation The ALF collaboration between KI and Stockholm County Council is organised on three levels: Management, Hospital (or the equivalent) and Operational. The top level comprises the KI– Stockholm County Council management group, which is supported in its strategic work by two advisory committees, one for research and one for education. At the second level are research, development and education (RD&E) committees, while the third level comprises several RD&E groups.

Allocation and outcome of ALF and RD&E resources Every year, the KI-Stockholm County Council management group announces joint prioritisation RD&E funding, administered by the county council. The resources available comprise ALF

KAROLINSKA INSTITUTET ANNUAL REPORT 2017 – ENGLISH SUMMARY

37


COLLABORATION

The KI–Stockholm County Council collaboration organisation: synoptic diagram

KI–Stockholm County Council Management Group

Senior Management level

Research Advisory Committee

Forskningsrådet Forskningsrådet Hospital

Hospital level

Representatives

Education Advisory Committee

Representatives

Forskningsrådet Forskningsrådet Department

Forskningsrådet

Forskningsrådet RD&E Committee

Operational level

Forskningsrådet

Forskningsrådet Operational unit

Representatives

Representatives

Forskningsrådet Forskningsrådet Section/Unit

Forskningsrådet Forskningsrådet RD&E Group

funding from the government and the funding contributed by the council itself. Funds are allocated directly to the RD&E operations for distribution, and also designated for special investments. Every year, funds are announced for research and development projects, clinical graduate schools, adjunct clinical lecturers and clinical researchers at various levels. At the end of 2017, a new call for applications was also approved for a three-year core facility funding package. During the year, the KI-Stockholm County Council collaboration had a total of SEK 1,010 million at its disposal, which the management group jointly prioritised.

Academic Specialist Centre established Healthcare in the Stockholm region is currently in the middle of a period of radical structural change. The County Council’s decision on a new business model for Karolinska University Hospital and the restructuring of healthcare levels in Stockholm pose new challenges for KI’s education programmes and clinical research. Consequently, Stockholm County Council and KI have developed a joint concept called the Academic Specialist Centre to protect the knowledge that has been amassed over the decades through the combined efforts of the healthcare services and KI’s research and education. The centre’s remit is to conduct somatic specialist care, research, education and development for the specialised care that does not require the university hospital’s combined resources. After piloting the concept in rheumatology in 2016, the areas of diabetes and neurology were added the

38

following year. Another centre activity is the development of pedagogical methods for interprofessional learning during students’ clinical placements. The first intake of students will take place in early 2018. The centre is run by the administration of the Stockholm Healthcare Services (i.e. counciloperated healthcare outside the emergency hospitals).

Fruitful collaboration in Programme 4D A multi-year development programme between the county council and KI called Programme 4D (D as in Diagnosis) was concluded during the year. The diagnoses involved were four of the most common diseases: arthritic diseases, breast cancer, type two diabetes and heart failure. The aim of the programme was to improve conditions for healthcare and research by enabling the rapid translation of new knowledge into personalised prevention, early diagnostics and treatment. The programme also included an informatics project that made it possible to link information from medical records, patient e-health accounts, quality registers and biobanks. The programme resulted in a number of generalisable solutions, all of which help to improve patient-healthcare-research interaction. The solutions include e-services, processes or new work methods that can be spread geographically to other organisations and healthcare areas.

Collaboration and communication with the general public KI works actively to disseminate information about its activities and interact with society. KI’s popular science magazine, Medical Science, is distributed to the press, politicians, financiers, hospitals, schools and paying subscribers, and is also available for individual purchase. In 2017, the magazine increased its print run to 27,400 copies (compared to 26,700 in 2016) and is also available on several digital magazine sites. A special compilation issue in English is distributed annually to foreign journalists, embassies and other target groups. The magazine’s articles are also posted on KI’s website, in Swedish and English, and on social media. The news media is an important channel for KI’s information outreach, which is normally dominated by reports on the latest research findings. The vice-chancellor also writes a personal blog. KI was active during the year on several social

KAROLINSKA INSTITUTET ANNUAL REPORT 2017 – ENGLISH SUMMARY


COLLABORATION

media channels and noticed an increase in the number of followers. The university also started a student podcast about KI’s education programmes and student life. Several KI researchers published popular science books during the year, many of whom gave presentations at Sweden’s annual book fair in Gothenburg. In December, the university arranged its own medicine and health book fair in association with several external publishing houses. KI maintains relations with former graduates and employees via its KI Alumni & Friends network, which currently has a membership of 15,800.

Collaborating with industry KI collaborates with companies, both Swedish and foreign, to realise the potential of the research results and knowledge generated by the university. Industrial collaborations are important for creating fresh development potential through the exchange of knowledge and experience, financing and resource sharing. In 2017, KI received SEK 489 million (443 million in 2016) in financing from the corporate sector, of which SEK 170 million came from companies based abroad. KI’s most important industrial partner is AstraZeneca. The latest in a series of collaboration initiatives is the KI-AZ Integrated Cardiovascular Metabolic Centre (ICMC), which accommodates over 70 researchers as well as modern technology for cell analysis. KI developed its partnership with Novo Nordisk in 2017 with, amongst other initiatives, a programme for the financing of postdoctoral researchers. The focus of the new research project is diabetes and associated metabolic diseases, such as cardiovascular diseases and liver diseases. Takeda Pharmaceuticals, Japan, established a three-year collaboration project with Karolinska Institutet during the year on the validation of mechanisms of inflammatory bowel diseases. The collaboration also includes open innovation. A number of projects in the fields of cancer and autoimmune diseases were started during the year with Merck KGaA, Germany. These collaborations form the basis of a long-term research and education partnership. In 2017, KI, SciLifeLab and pharmaceutical company Ferring established the Centre for Translational Microbiome Research (CTMR). An example of a newly started study is an investigation into how the microbiome during pregnancy is related to medical problems.

Innovation support KI’s innovation support system is a service for researchers, students and employees in need of advice and practical support on how to develop their ideas and convert them into innovations. Many of KI’s operational units in the innovation field take part in EIT Health, one of the EU’s largest research consortiums focused on healthy living and active ageing.

Education and research on entrepreneurship

4D

The aim of the Programme 4D is to improve conditions for healthcare and research by enabling the rapid translation of new knowledge into personalised prevention, early diagnostics and treatment.

KI conducts research and education on innovation, entrepreneurship and knowledge transfer by means of the Unit for BioEntrepreneurship (UBE). This includes a two-year international master’s programme. Interdisciplinary studies are facilitated through the Stockholm School of Entrepreneurship, which is a joint venture between four higher education institutions in Stockholm. In 2017, two doctoral theses were presented that charted innovations and patents related to KI.

Innovation – advice and commercialisation The KI Innovation Office provides support to researchers and students in developing their ideas and identifying tentative innovation partners. Ideas are passed on for commercial verification by KI Innovations AB (KIIAB). During the year, the Innovation Office helped to produce new guidelines on intellectual property and commercial outreach at KI. The Innovation Office was financed in 2017 through a special government grant of SEK 8.6 million. The role of KIIAB is to verify research results ahead of commercialisation and to facilitate the conversion of scientific discoveries and research results into socially beneficial products and services. In 2017, nine companies were launched with support from KIIAB, and KIIAB qualified for the Vinnova Innovation Agency Excellence Programme for incubators. Examples of companies within this incubator programme are: • Prognostix AB, an e-health programme that has developed the validated prognosis tool PATHFx. • Heartrunner Sweden AB, a mobile device application for heart and lung resuscitation, which won the 2017 Athena Prize, the Swedish healthcare sector’s most prestigious prize for clinical research.

KAROLINSKA INSTITUTET ANNUAL REPORT 2017 – ENGLISH SUMMARY

39


COLLABORATION

681 Employed by companies within KI Science Park

• Lexplore AB (owned by Optolexia AB), which has developed techniques for the early discovery of dyslexia in children. Lexplore attracted a private investment during the year of SEK 50 million and is now investing in a US launch.

Other operations within KI Holding AB (KIHAB)

72

KI Innovations AB active projects at turn of year

KI Housing AB is tasked by KI with managing and leasing new accommodation to international students and visiting researchers (see “A university environment in development”). The question of social innovations is becoming increasingly topical as focus is placed on research benefiting society rather than shareholders. The board of KIHAB has therefore taken a decision to launch a limited dividend company. Extensive restructuring work is underway at KI Science Park. Activities will focus on three areas: 1. Co-office Space and Open Source Labs in a dynamic environment 2. Facility Management Services (IT, office services and seminars) 3. KI Science Park Business Academy for practical courses in entrepreneurship Several companies originating from, or with the support of, one of KI Holding’s operations acquired listed status in 2017, including Oncopeptides AB, BioArctic, XSpray Microparticles AB, Inhalation Sciences Sweden AB and NextCellPharma AB. KIHAB is a part-owner (6.8 per cent of the capital) of the independent investment company Karolinska Development AB (Nasdaq Stockholm: KDEV, KD).

Organisational changes to KI’s innovation activities A full analysis of KI’s innovation system was performed during the year. In accordance with a decision by the university board, KI and KIIAB approved an agreement on collecting all innovation activities under one roof. During 2018, this will entail the relocation of KI Innovation Office services related to inspiration, advice and guidance to KIIAB. The role of the parent company, KI Holding AB, has been refined, reorganised and concentrated onto three areas: share and portfolio management; economic and financial advice; and group administration. Corporate outreach support, primarily the collaboration between researchers and well-established companies, is not covered by the change and will remain with the central university administration.

40

Internationalisation KI developed procedures during the year for prioritising international activities and partnerships, with guidance from the export and investment agency Business Sweden. The university also engaged the services of a consultant to analyse potential collaborations in southern China. As in previous years, KI hosted a large number of international visitors.

Health innovators’ school (Norway) KI began a joint project with two universities in Norway during the year to establish a Nordic health innovators’ school in order to equip doctoral students and postdocs in the healthcare field with the knowledge they need to convert their research ideas into products and, ultimately, companies.

TRAC (Vietnam) Training and Research Academic Collaboration (TRAC) is a three-year collaborative project among five Swedish universities: KI (coordinator), Uppsala, Umeå, Gothenburg and Linköping. These institutions have received funding from the Foundation for the Internationalisation of Education and Research (STINT) for the establishment of a common platform for research and education collaboration. During the year, courses were held for Vietnamese and Swedish students on both master’s and doctoral level.

University of Tokyo (Japan) In 2017 KI signed a strategic collaboration agreement with the University of Tokyo in association with the Royal Institute of Technology and Stockholm University. One of the aims of the agreement is to promote multidisciplinary collaborations in research and education between the Stockholm region and the University of Tokyo within selected subject fields, including active ageing.

Mayo Clinic (USA) In September 2017, the 23rd joint conference with Mayo Clinic was held in Stockholm. This year, in addition to collaboration on research, education, administration and innovation, the conference also included healthcare management, with participation from Karolinska University Hospital. The collaboration announces joint funding for research and development projects, travel and other activities.

KAROLINSKA INSTITUTET ANNUAL REPORT 2017 – ENGLISH SUMMARY


COLLABORATION

The Ming Wai Lau Centre for Reparative Medicine (MWLC) was established in Hong Kong in October 2016. In 2017, activities increased in several areas, including research, recruitment, doctoral courses and conferences, including the Reparative Medicine and Beyond symposium, with participants from the University of Hong Kong. Collaborations with local universities and organisations were further expanded, and efforts to develop and implement joint procedures with KI in Sweden continue. There is considerable interest in the MWLC, and many delegations from several countries have visited the centre. The year concluded with a visit by HRH Prince Carl Philip and subsequently by KI’s vice-chancellor and chairman.

Photo: Molly Yang .

Ming Wai Lau Centre for Reparative Medicine, MWLC (Hong Kong)

There is a great deal of interest in the Ming Wai Lau Centre for Reparative Medicine, with delegations from several countries visiting the centre in Hong Kong. The year concluded with the visit of HRH Prince Carl Philip, as well as the vice-chancellor and chairman of the Board of Karolinska Institutet.

Key indicators for collaboration 2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

3,040 268 85

3,260 289 97

3,478 341 89

3,623 443 147

3,793 489 170

56 8

70 11

74 8

83 12

90 12

241

304

279

287

271

84 64

85 67

91 71

85 68

81 64

E. Doctoral students employed in the private sector and public organisations (annual working units)

479

500

511

528

533

F. EU projects (FP7, H2020 and EU health programme) – as coordinator

229 19

202 15

214 12

198 11

200 12

G. Ideas/advice/cases treated at KI Innovations AB and the Innovation Office

123

139

150

168

178

H. KI Innovations AB active projects at turn of year

30

50

55

66

72

A. Externally funded research, total (SEK million) – from companies, total (SEK million) – from overseas companies (SEK million) B. Contract education, total revenue (SEK million) – from companies, total (SEK million) C. Contract education (FTE students) D. Adjunct Professors (headcount) – of which are financed by the Stockholm County Council

I. Companies within KI Science Park

70

82

86

87

84

575

651

672

690

681

K. Scientific articles, percentage co-published with parties outside of KI (%)

85

84

88

88

L. Scientific articles, percentage co-published with international parties (%)

63

63

67

70

J. Employed by companies within KI Science Park

Source: A, B: The financial system Unit4 Business world. C: The student database Ladok. E: The student database Ladok. K, L: Web of Science/Medline. K-L: Data for 2017 were incomplete at time of publication. Certain data included herein are derived from the Web of Science® prepared by THOMSON REUTERS®, Inc. (Thomson®), Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA: © Copyright THOMSON REUTERS® 2018. All rights reserved.

KAROLINSKA INSTITUTET ANNUAL REPORT 2017 – ENGLISH SUMMARY

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42

Photo: Erik Cronberg.

November saw the ground breaking ceremony at Campus Solna for the construction of new housing for 400 researchers and students.


A UNIVERSITY ENVIRONMENT IN DEVELOPMENT

A university environment in development Measures were taken during the year to ensure and promote a healthy working environment and a well-functioning organisation. Two of the four largest building projects described in Strategy 2018 were also completed: the Neo research building in Flemingsberg and the Comparative Medicine – Biomedicum animal facilities in Solna.

An attractive workplace in which to develop KI has decided on an action plan to ensure that equal opportunity perspectives and policies are integrated into all levels and stages of decisionmaking processes. In 2017, an employee survey was conducted with a high response rate. Work began in the autumn on drafting action plans to remedy areas identified as in need of improvement. As leadership is essential to a successful organisation and a healthy work environment, KI launched several new leadership programmes during the year, along with a clear, transparent recruitment process for heads of department and heads of administration. The guidelines on secondary occupations were tightened and the first set of secondary-occupation reports required from all employees were compiled. New rules were introduced for the association of people to the university in lieu of formal employment. KI also took a decision on new, clearer rules for employment after the age of 67. During the autumn, the university decided to implement a new appointments procedure effective as of 1 April 2018. This change was made both in response to amendments to the Higher Education Ordinance and due to the newly created career position of Assistant Professor. The annual salary survey showed no undue pay gap between women and men. Further, in order to create more room for salary adjustments, the 2017 and 2018 salary reviews have been combined and a new review scheduled for 1 April 2018.

Recruitment Work continued on the academic career system, with a new appointment procedure established at the end of the year and effective as of 1 April 2018. The greatest change is the introduction of the new career development position of Assistant Professor, as defined in the Higher Education Ordinance, and the abolition of the previous career development position (Forskarassistent). KI’s recruitment guide was revised during the year to clarify the rules regarding academic positions and employment by the state (general labour law, government sector employment regulations and the Higher Education Ordinance.) Improvements were made during the year to the digital recruitment system for job vacancies and applications to ensure that employment procedures run smoothly and in full compliance with the rules. Several steps were digitalised to improve the administration of recruitments, resulting in greater efficiency, less paperwork and easier traceability. During the year, KI procured a psychological candidate assessment test together with an external assessor to supplement the recruitment process for its most senior managerial positions (heads of department and heads and administration). For the fourth consecutive year, KI announced positions for the recruitment of prominent junior researchers within medical science. This is a strategic investment in junior researchers with particularly excellent academic qualifications and future potential. It is a broad investment focusing on both basic and clinical research. The investment covers

KAROLINSKA INSTITUTET ANNUAL REPORT 2017 – ENGLISH SUMMARY

5,405 employees

3,250 are women

43


A UNIVERSITY ENVIRONMENT IN DEVELOPMENT

Newly appointed professors and lecturers 2014–2017 2014

2015

2016

Number

Women (%)

Number Women (%)

19

37

24

46

18

Visting professors

7

29

16

44

Adjunct professors

13

46

10

30

Total

39

38

50

17

64

6 23

2017

Number Women (%)

Number

Women (%)

56

12

25

12

50

6

17

8

50

9

22

42

38

53

27

22

13

62

6

50

17

53

0

5

20

10

70

16

50

47

18

50

16

63

33

52

Professors Professors

Senior lecturers Senior lecturers Adjunct senior lecturers Total

The figures for professors and visiting professors for 2014 have been adjusted from the 2014 annual report. Source: Internal KI database for recruitment.

Change 2016–2017 (%)

FTE employees, various categories of staff 2014–2017 2014

2015

2016

2017

Number

Women (%)

Number

Women (%)

Number

Women (%)

Professors, pre-clinical

221

28

230

29

234

31

233

31

-1

Professors, clinical

146

27

143

28

134

29

130

29

-3

Senior lecturers, pre-clinical

110

62

110

63

100

64

94

68

-5

48

51

45

46

46

46

48

51

6

Lecturers

159

75

157

75

162

76

159

78

-2

Senior researchers

360

46

379

48

361

46

353

46

-2

Assistant professors

161

52

170

53

188

54

196

52

5

Postdoctors with employment

526

56

539

57

521

56

530

56

2

Doctoral student with employment

650

59

770

58

932

59

879

57

-6

Technical and admin. staff

2,093

72

2,153

70

2,143

70

2,126

70

-1

Total

4,473

62

4,694

61

4,820

61

4,749

61

-1

Senior lecturers, clinical

Number

Women (%)

Here, “FTE employees” refers to the number of employees translated into full-time equivalents. The figures above include all employees who were not on a full leave of absence during the month measured, regardless of the extent or length of their employment, but exclude adjunct teachers. The figures refer to October 2017. Source: Primula.

Number of teachers and proportion of doctorates of all teachers 2014–2017, FTE employees Year

Number of teachers

Proportion of doctorates (%)

2014

844

88

2015

853

91

2016

863

92

2017

860

93

“Teachers” includes professors, senior lecturers (formerly research associates), assistant professors and lecturers (formerly junior lecturers). Source: Primula.

44

KAROLINSKA INSTITUTET ANNUAL REPORT 2017 – ENGLISH SUMMARY


A UNIVERSITY ENVIRONMENT IN DEVELOPMENT

FTE employees, various categories of staff 2017

110 89

Senior lecturers

54

123

35

163

Lecturers 190

102

Senior researchers

94

299

Assisant professors 231

Employed postdocs 375

504 818

800

600

Administrative staff Technical staff

389 400

200

0

Women (total 2,883)

Photos: Stefan Zimmerman and Erik Cronberg. Graphics: iStock.

Employed doctoral students

245 675

1 000

Professors

253

61% women

KAROLINSKA INSTITUTET ANNUAL REPORT 2017 – ENGLISH SUMMARY

200

400

600

800

Source: Primula.

Men (total 1,866)

363 professors

45


A UNIVERSITY ENVIRONMENT IN DEVELOPMENT

Work environment and health Shared workplaces

KI introduced a new employee career support model during the year and now offers opportunities for career planning and personal development.

Work environment training for managers

Leadership and employeeship Leadership development KI decided to institute a compulsory leadership programme during the year for its most senior managers and leaders. The courses, which will begin in the spring of 2018, focus on leadership and control, equal opportunities, and greater inter-campus collaboration. A pilot training course for potential managers and leaders, “Future Academic Leaders”, was concluded and evaluated during the year. A similar course is planned over the coming years for potential managers and leaders on the Flemingsberg campus. In 2017, KI and the Royal Institute of Technology developed and implemented a group development tool for research groups. As a means to take best advantage of talent, KI also relaunched a project leadership course for junior researchers that was first held in 2008. The course has been further developed and extended from five to six days. Twenty-four nominated researchers from eleven departments participated. KI also developed a two-day management course on finance. The course is interactive and adapted to KI’s financial model.

Career development To create long-term adjustment measures, KI introduced a new employee career support model during the year. KI now offers, in association with a procured external supplier, opportunities for career planning, switching and coaching for employees and managers in need of support in connection with reorganisation, personal development, possible redundancy or requested mobility. The programme is financed by local career-adjustment funds. Thirty-six people took part in the career programme during the year.

46

KI, the Royal Institute of Technology and Stockholm University signed an agreement during the year on a work environment collaboration (including responsibility for the coordination of work environment issues in accordance with the Work Environment Act) on shared workspaces for the Science for Life Laboratory. The hub of this work environment collaboration is a newly created forum for joint consultation with employer and employee representatives from the three universities.

KI announced positions for the recruitment of prominent junior researchers within medical science. The 2017 announcement drew a total of over 270 applicants.

KI has decided that three work environment courses (systematic work environment management, organisational and social work environment, and laboratory safety) will be compulsory for managers with delegated work environment tasks. The number of course sessions was increased, and 340 individuals (compared with 184 in 2016) participated during the year. Seven courses were also arranged for managers wanting to learn more about alcohol-related issues at work, cooperative workplace cultures and conflict management.

The 2017 employee survey In the autumn of 2017, KI conducted an employee survey with participation by nearly 4,300 coworkers, corresponding to an 80 per cent response rate. Generally speaking, KI compares well to other universities and to other areas of the labour market. The aggregate results show that many co-workers are satisfied with their immediate manager’s leadership and that the work-group climate is good. The percentage of co-workers who would recommend their workplace was higher than in the previous survey (2014) and higher than the average for other higher education institutions conducting similar surveys. The Staff Index, which is a measure of engagement in the workplace, has a high score. Other strengths revealed by the survey included equal treatment and performance management dialogs. One area in need of improvement at KI is management and organisation. According to the survey, many co-workers feel that the organisation is unclear and that its goals and strategies do not fully inform its operations. Workloads have also increased since 2014. Fewer people replied that they have a satisfactory workload, a good balance of work and leisure time, and time for recuperation at work. The self-rated workload is heaviest

KAROLINSKA INSTITUTET ANNUAL REPORT 2017 – ENGLISH SUMMARY

Graphics: iStock and Noun Project.

three levels of the academic career ladder: assistant professor, assistant professor on extended contract, and senior researcher. KI partially finances the successful applicants’ salaries for four, two and five years, respectively. The 2017 announcement drew a total of over 270 applicants. Following a rigorous selection process involving an internal panel, external expert assessment and interviews, KI recruited eight assistant professors and eight senior researchers. Eight additional assistant professors had their contracts extended. To assist externally recruited assistant professors, KI provided them with a relocation grant.


A UNIVERSITY ENVIRONMENT IN DEVELOPMENT

for lecturers, followed by senior lecturers, senior researchers and assistant professors. Managers also rated their workload to be heavier than nonmanagement staff. The proportion of co-workers who feel that their department is free from discrimination was higher than in 2014. However, despite the positive trend, five per cent say that they were subjected to some form of discrimination in the past year. The most common ground for perceived discrimination is gender, followed by ethnicity and age. Work on action plans at different organisational levels began in November, and is expected to conclude in the spring of 2018.

Equality integration

KI

In the 2017 employee survey, the Staff Index has a high score. It is a measure of engagement in the workplace.

Health promotion The Solna campus fitness centre obtained an active space in 2017 for reduced sedentariness in office environments, in accordance with WHO guidelines. This is a learning space designed according to biophilic principles using environmentally friendly materials and natural elements that inspire active recuperation. The space is used, for example, in connection with ergonomics training and Physical Activity on Prescription instruction for easier training in the home. As part of ongoing efforts to tie research, education and administration closer together, parts of a research project in the field of Alzheimer’s disease and dementia (MIND-AD) were relocated to KI’s new BASE gym in Flemingsberg.

KI approved an equality integration action plan during the year for 2017–2019 in accordance with the government’s special directive. A status analysis was carried out at the start of the year in order to obtain an overview of inequality at the university and to formulate key problem areas. Priority areas in the action plan are leadership development, career paths, internal evaluations, resource allocation and the content and execution of education. Since the plan was decided, KI has continued to prepare and implement activities in the various areas. This has been done through support, education, information campaigns and the external analysis of equality issues as well as networking and collaboration, both internal and with the general higher education sector. All of KI’s internal boards were allocated funds for equality activities in 2018, with a particular focus on gender and power relations in different assessment and resource allocation processes.

Recruitment targets for professors KI approved an equality integration action plan during the year for 2017– 2019 in accordance with the government’s special directive.

Equal opportunities Strategy 2018 states that KI should be a workplace characterised by participation, transparency, equality and diversity as well as care for the environment, both internal and external. To this end, KI works comprehensively and actively with equality issues. The university promotes equal rights and opportunities for all students and employees and works to prevent discrimination on grounds of sex, gender identity or gender expression, ethnicity, religion or other belief, sexual orientation, disability or age. The pro-vice-chancellor has overall responsibility for the university’s equal treatment work, which focused in 2017 on, amongst other issues, the government’s equality integration directive and on the tightened regulations in the Discrimination Act regarding active anti-discrimination measures, discrimination prevention and equal rights.

KAROLINSKA INSTITUTET ANNUAL REPORT 2017 – ENGLISH SUMMARY

In KI’s appropriation directions for the fiscal year 2017, the Ministry of Education and Research established a recruitment goal for the university, stating that at least 60 per cent of the new professors that are employed between 2017–2019 must be women. The recruitment goal does not include adjunct professors. The proportion of women among newly appointed professors and visiting professors in 2017 was 22 per cent, compared with 53 per cent in 2016. In December 2017, the Boards of Research and Education appointed a committee to produce in early 2018 activities and initiatives to increase the proportion of women amongst newly employed professors and visiting professors. This includes conducting a more detailed analysis of the underlying causes of the low outcome for 2017.

Courses, workshops, lectures and networks The topic of equal opportunities is an integral part of management and supervisor training and student education. In addition, some 250 employees and students took part in courses, workshops and lectures during the year with a focus on how KI as an employer and educational institution can prevent discrimination and harassment (including sexual) and actively promote equal rights. On International Day Against Homophobia, Transphobia and Biphobia (IDAHOT), two seminars were held for students, employees and affilia-

47


A UNIVERSITY ENVIRONMENT IN DEVELOPMENT

KI’s total area:

245,500 square metres Of this, almost 25.000 m² is sublet, including to SciLifeLab.

tes on the vulnerability of transpeople in the health care sector. In connection with the #metoo campaign, two seminars were arranged on the prevention of sexual harassment. Some 130 people also attended a dramatic performance highlighting the situation of female academics from a historical perspective. During the year, KI initiated a network for equal treatment within Stockholm higher education institutions in order to strengthen regional cooperation and facilitate shared learning. The network’s first meeting focused primarily on the intensive work taking place related to the requirements of the Discrimination Act. KI is also represented in the steering group for the national network for equal treatment and equality in higher education, which is run by the Equality Ombudsman (DO).

The Pride parade Under the banner of “A university for diversity”, KI and the Medical Students’ Association HBTQ society Queerolinska took part in Stockholm Pride for the fourth year in succession. A total of 130 employees, affiliates and students gathered for the 2017 parade, along with KI’s newly appointed vice-chancellor, the deans of education, research and doctoral education and the pro-vice-chancellor.

Infrastructure – premises In June 2017 the KI board decided on the university’s second and updated premises provision plan. By that time, some of the projects described in the 2016 report had successfully progressed from investigation to execution. Two of the four largest premises projects in Strategy 2018 were also completed by 1 of December 2017: the Neo research building in Flemingsberg, hired from Hemsö Fastighets AB, a new landlord for KI; and the Comparative Medicine – Biomedicum (KM-B) animal facility in Solna, built under the supervision of Akademiska hus. As a result, the total area occupied by KI increased by 10 per cent to 245,500 square metres. A long-term campus plan for the Solna campus was also completed in May as a joint undertaking by KI and Akademiska Hus. The plan has a time horizon extending to 2030 and describes the physical and social development of the university campus as well as issues relating to urban development and sustainability. One of the plan’s aims is to improve the external environment and make the campus more attractive to KI’s employees and stu-

48

dents as well as to prospective tenants of the premises that KI vacates.

Strategic premises projects Karolinska Institutet now leases approximately 15,200 square metres (about 80 per cent) of the Neo research building, which includes laboratories, lecture halls, conference rooms, as well as a multifunctional room for written examinations, among other activities. The building shares an entrance lobby with the adjacent Royal College of Technology building, which was completed and occupied in 2016. In KM-B – adjacent and physically connected to Biomedicum – with over 12,500 square metres of space that bring together a large portion of comparative medicine’s activities. The building replaces several older animal facilities, which will be vacated in 2018; thereafter, the total animal facility area will be somewhat less than before. The total leasing costs of Neo and KM-B will be higher than for the older premises, but the effect on the result for 2017 is only marginal as the buildings were not utilised until 1 December. The costs are in line with the forecast and are covered according to plan by the increase in internal leasing. The Biomedicum research building, by far the largest project in KI’s major infrastructure programme, was structurally completed at the end of 2017, but is undergoing an adjustment and installation phase during the first quarter of 2018. Occupancy will commence, per the contractual agreement, on 1 April 2018. Biomedicum’s 44,000-plus square metres accommodate five KI departments on the Solna campus. Apart from research laboratories, the building contains offices and meeting spaces, primarily for conferences and other large gatherings. The rent for Biomedicum will be based on the final cost. Over three years, well-executed tenders and cost controls have reduced the forecast for the annual rent by approximately SEK 20 million, or about 10 per cent. The Laboratory of the Future project at Alfred Nobels allé 8 in Flemingsberg – an extensive conversion covering some 10,000 square metres within a total building area of 30,000 square metres – has been the most challenging to complete given that adjacent premises are fully active. Measures have been taken to minimise disruption. The project is due for completion in the autumn of 2018. On the clinical side, Bioclinicum, the new research building at Karolinska University Hospital

KAROLINSKA INSTITUTET ANNUAL REPORT 2017 – ENGLISH SUMMARY


A UNIVERSITY ENVIRONMENT IN DEVELOPMENT

in Solna, was completed at the end of 2017. The building brings together clinical laboratory researchers from several departments and will be linked in 2018 to Biomedicum by a raised walkway over Solnavägen.

The examination hall project involving the conversion and extension of the Berzelius Laboratory continued in 2017 and is due for completion in the first quarter of 2018. In September, the conversion and extension of the Wargentin building began with the goal of preparing for an electron microscopy corefacility, which will be linked to Biomedicum, and expanding available office space. The estimated completion time is summer/autumn 2018. In March, conversion began of the Department of Microbiology, Tumour and Cell Biology’s (MTC’s) former animal facility. The space will become the new Comparative Medicine Annex and will replace the current animal facility in the Scheele Laboratory by summer 2018.

Under investigation on the Solna campus During 2017, KI began planning for improved and extended fitness premises next to the Berzelius Laboratory. The plans will be effected in 2018. A new learning laboratory for physiology and pharmacology is planned for the Scheele Laboratory to replace the one vacated when the department moves to Biomedicum. Next to it will be teaching rooms and student spaces. For Comparative Medicine, a conversion and extension of the Astrid Fagræus Laboratory is being investigated to meet a variety of needs.

Photo: Sofia Lindberg.

Other projects on the Solna campus

Area and cost of premises 2010–2017 Year

Area (sq.m.)

Cost (SEK million)

Proportion of total cost (%)

2010

204,494

565

11

2011

200,859

586

11

2012

213,881

667

12

2013

218,870

741

13

2014

220,628

763

13

2015

220,759

754

12

2016

221,925

755

11

2017

245,500

822

12

Costs for premises include rent, electricity, media, cleaning etc. Source: KI real estate system and Agresso.

Accomodation In the autumn of 2017, following a lengthy zoning process, building work began on the planned residential blocks in the northern part of KI’s Solna campus. KI signed a block rental agreement for 322 apartments for up to 400 tenants, primarily visiting researchers and exchange students. Occupancy will commence in 2019–2020. In Flemingsberg, 84 apartments of varying sizes in newly constructed buildings have been rented by KI to cater to similar needs.

KAROLINSKA INSTITUTET ANNUAL REPORT 2017 – ENGLISH SUMMARY

49


A UNIVERSITY ENVIRONMENT IN DEVELOPMENT

Sustainable development

50

Strategy 2018 states that all activities at KI are to be characterised by strong social commitment and that KI shall contribute to sustainable development within and beyond Sweden’s borders.

Sustainable campus

The university’s aim is to have efficient and eventually climate neutral energy use, and to effect a 25 % reduction in its per-square-metre energy usage from 2010 to 2025.

Energy use Energy use is one of KI’s most significant environmental aspects and is thus a priority area in its environment and sustainability work. The university’s aim is to have efficient and eventually climate neutral energy use, and to effect a 25 per cent reduction in its per-square-metre energy usage from 2010 to 2025. KI collaborates with landlord Akademiska Hus on improving the energy efficiency of its premises, and took measures during the year to improve heat recovery and fans. The university also signed an agreement on a new electric boiler room to create a more energy-efficient campus steam-supply network that is planned to be operational by the end of 2018. During the autumn, KI installed 440 square metres of solar cells on the roof of Biomedicum. The panels will produce an estimated 38,000 kWh per year, corresponding to the annual energy consumption of 15 to 20 electric cars. The solar panels are placed vertically on the building and can be seen from the campus. Biomedicum has also been awarded a Miljöbyggnad Silver certificate in accordance with Sweden Green Building Council standards. During the year, KI also approved a plan for the Solna campus relating to the UN’s global sustainable development goals. The plan, which runs through 2030, includes fitting solar panels on roofs around campus – part of a long-term sustainability goal to promote local energy generation. The plan also includes reducing the number of parking spaces on campus and redirecting cars to the outer areas, which began in 2017. Laboratory safety and waste management To analyse laboratory safety, unannounced inspections were carried out in 2017 of 35 different

KAROLINSKA INSTITUTET ANNUAL REPORT 2017 – ENGLISH SUMMARY

Graphics: iStock and Noun Project.

“As an international university, KI has a global responsibility and must be seen to embed the sustainability development goals in both education and research,” writes Karolinska Institutet’s (KI’s) vice-chancellor. KI’s core activities of research and education make a significant contribution to several of the Agenda 2030 goals, particularly Goal 2 (End hunger, achieve food security and improved nutrition and promote sustainable agriculture), Goal 3 (Ensure healthy lives and promote well-being for all at all ages) and Goal 4 (Ensure inclusive and equitable quality education and promote lifelong learning opportunities for all). KI also contributes to sustainable development by acting upon its environmental and social responsibilities in its day-to-day operations. Much of its sustainability work takes place under the university’s management system for environment and sustainable development, which is beeing developed to meet the requirements of the international standard for environmental management systems, ISO 14001. Strategy 2018 states that all activities at KI are to be characterised by strong social commitment and that the university shall contribute to sustainable development within and beyond Sweden’s borders through education and research. To highlight the sustainability-related research conducted at KI, a special environment and sustainable development theme issue is planned for Medical Science magazine in 2018. KI also plans to compile previously published articles on the environment and sustainable development on its website. KI’s chemical safety coordinator held a seminar for research group leaders on the laws and regulations governing the handling of chemicals, related to the environment and sustainable development. Efforts to integrate sustainable development more clearly into KI’s educational programmes continued during the year. An interprofessional elective course on sustainable development in healthcare was offered to students at bachelor’s and master’s level. A lecture on sustainable development was included in the compulsory introductory course for doctoral supervisors, held four times during the year. During the spring an analysis was carried out on how sustainable development has been implemented in the doctoral education programmes. At the request of the Swedish Higher Education Authority, KI submitted a self-evaluation in 2017 of its sustainable development work in education. According to the authority’s appraisal of this

evaluation, KI has a well-developed process in the areas of “Management and organisation” and “Design, implementation and results”. However, KI’s processes in the field of “Environment, resources and premises” were in need of improvement. More specifically, the authority’s view was that competence-raising measures were needed for teachers and that interaction with students and the commercial sector required augmenting. This appraisal will serve to guide future measures and activities designed to promote the integration of sustainable development in education during and after 2018.


A UNIVERSITY ENVIRONMENT IN DEVELOPMENT

laboratory environments on both campuses. The results show that while there is generally good legal compliance on laboratory and chemical safety, there are also shortcomings. The managers concerned have been tasked with taking steps to remedy these problems and a follow-up will be conducted in 2018. More inspections will be made in the coming year. A half-day training on laboratory safety is now offered during the obligatory work environment course for managers in laboratory environments. There were also targeted, local training initiatives on risk assessments in the use of chemicals. To tighten control measures, the KLARA chemical database was augmented with the bar-code labelling of chemicals, a system that will be mandatory in Biomedicum. Work on KI’s chemicals goal for 2017–2019 began at the departments. The goal is the substitution, phase-out and reduction of hazardous chemicals used in laboratories. The departments are required to report volumes of selected chemicals in order to be able to measure goal fulfilment in 2019. The waste-sorting rules were updated and adapted to both campuses in order to increase uniformity and facilitate proper sorting. A new recyclable waste category (paper packaging) was introduced during the year. Furthermore, new rules for laboratory waste were drawn up that prohibit the emission of antibiotic waste and chemical products of potential harm to the environment or water-purification processes. The new research environments that KI will be utilising from 2018 are expected to facilitate KI’s environment and sustainability work. In 2017, the departments prepared for relocation by introducing safer handling of hazardous substances, safer routines for handling hazardous waste, and improved cooperation and coordination in purchasing, logistics and technical equipment. An online buying-and-selling site for laboratory equipment at KI was launched to promote recycling and reuse. KI signed a declaration of intent during the year on promoting cooperation between authorities and researchers to reduce the risks related to PFAS (highly fluorinated substances).

The university implemented new travel rules and instructions during the year in order to improve its cost-effectiveness and reduce its environmental impact.

The new research environments that KI will be utilising from 2018 are expected to facilitate KI’s environment and sustainability work.

Sustainable IT KI produced guidelines for sustainable IT during the year with an aim to maximise the virtualisation of servers and minimise the use of hardware and energy. Retired equipment is to be taken care of and, if not suitable for reuse, sent for materials recycling and recovery.

KAROLINSKA INSTITUTET ANNUAL REPORT 2017 – ENGLISH SUMMARY

Business travel and virtual meetings Business travel is one of KI’s most significant environmental aspects and is thus a priority area in the environment and sustainability work. KI’s goal is to reduce its climate footprint from business travel by three per cent from 2017 to 2018. The university implemented new travel rules and instructions during the year in order to improve its cost-effectiveness and reduce its environmental impact. The changes include the preferred use of video- or teleconferences for meetings that otherwise would have entailed official travel. Rail is to be given priority over air for domestic journeys and personal car use for business travel is normally to be avoided. All KI employees are also directed to the university’s tendered travel agency, which ensures that KI obtains the most advantageous prices and documents where its employees are in the event of a major incident, natural disaster, etc. It also assures the quality of the university’s travel statistics. In light of the worsening security situation around the world, travellers may choose more expensive flights if circumstances dictate and travel by taxi instead of public transport (in countries where the security situation is unstable). KI procured travel agency services in 2017 through a renewed process of competitive tendering under the Legal, Financial and Administrative Services Agency’s framework agreement in which environmental requirements were placed on the bids. The contract-awarding decision has been appealed and until the matter is resolved, KI has an extended agreement with its current agency. A bicycle day was held during the year on the Solna and Flemingsberg campuses to promote climate-smart travel and active local transportation. The Solna event was held in association with Akademiska Hus, Stockholm City and KI’s climate association, and the Flemingsberg event with Akademiska Hus, Södertörn University, the Royal Institute of Technology, the Red Cross University College of Nursing, student organisations, Stockholm City and Huddinge Municipality. KI replaced diesel cars with electric cars for postal collection and delivery, a small contribution to the reduction of KI’s transport-related climate footprint and to the level of noise and emissions on campus. KI installed Skype for Business to promote virtual meetings, which, along with the web conferencing tool Adobe Connect, allows meetings to be held without the need for travel.

51


52

Photo: Erik Cronberg.

Leadership training for KI staff makes use of Ekonomispelet [the Finance Game] to explain the complexities of the university’s finances.


FINANCIAL REPORT

Karolinska Institutet’s revenue for 2017, total SEK 6,890 million 2% 5% 1% 8%

Financial report

16 %

42 %

6%

Karolinska Institutet’s (KI’s) turnover continues to increase according to earlier forecasts and in 2017 amounted to SEK 6,890 million.

5% 15 %

Direct government funding 42 % (43 %) Research councils 15 % (15 %) Other government agencies 5 % (5 %)

Government appropriations and grants accounted for the increase, while fees and financial revenues decreased. Measured in revenue, turnover increased by SEK 223 million, or 3.3 per cent, compared with 2016. The largest growth in revenues was in the category of external grants, which increased by SEK 197 million, or 6.5 per cent, compared with 2016. Research activity dominates KI’s operations and amounted, as in 2016, to approximately 84 per cent of the total turnover. The positive change in capital for the year amounted to a total of SEK 94 million (78 million in 2016), of which KI activities accounted for SEK 95.6 million (88.3 million in 2016) and KI’s subsidiary Karolinska Institutet Holding AB for SEK -1.6 million (-10.3 million in 2016).

Sources of funding The university’s funding sources are shown in the chart below. The distribution remains effectively unchanged from 2016. Total government funding of KI’s activities amounted to 62 per cent of KI’s total revenue, which is one percentage point lower than in 2016. External funding has been increasing over the past few years, but only marginally in relation to government funding. The largest individual sources of external funding are listed in Table 6 of the tables appendix.

Loans with the National Debt Office Every year new loans are taken with the National Debt Office for the fixed assets that are funded by the government. The loans are taken twice a year, in June and December, on investments made up to and including May and November, respectively. At the time of the loan, a repayment is simultaneously made that corresponds to the year’s depreciations and settlements. New investments were made in 2017 equivalent to SEK 414 million, and depreciation amounted to SEK 142 million. KI’s total loan debt in the National Debt Office was SEK 875 million. KI’s loan limit is SEK 1,240 million. The annual average interest rate in 2017 was -0.50 per cent (-0.49 per cent). The negative interest rate means that KI receives interest income on its loans from the National Debt Office.

Municipalities and county councils 6 % (6 %) Swedish foundations and organisations16 % (16 %) Foreign foundations and organisations 8 % (7 %) Swedish companies 5 % (5 %) Foreign companies 2 % (2 %) Financial income 1 % (1 %)

Accumulated agency capital, excluding subsidiaries, total SEK 1,574 million 12 %

1%

7%

Agency capital Accumulated agency capital, including the change in capital for the year, amounted to SEK 1,608.5 million (1,513.8 million), which breaks down into subsidiaries SEK 34.2 million (34.8 million), asset management SEK 126.6 million (119 million) and core activities SEK 1,447.7 million (1,360 million).

22 % 58 %

Research appropriations 58 % Research grants 22 % Research contracts 7 % Education appropriations 12 % Education contracts 1 %

The source of information in this section is the Unit4 Business World financial system, unless otherwise specified. Last year’s figures in brackets.

KAROLINSKA INSTITUTET ANNUAL REPORT 2017 – ENGLISH SUMMARY

53


FINANCIAL REPORT

Education at bachelor’s and master’s level

Education at bachelor’s and master’s level total, SEK million 2014

2015

2016

2017

Direct government funding

870.6

906.4

907.2

920.5

Fees and other remuneration

118.0

123.9

129.4

138.1

18.5

19.8

22.7

24.9

Revenue

Grants Financial income

Revenue

0,0

0,0

0,0

0,0

1,007.1

1,050.1

1,059.3

1,083.5

Staff costs

559.9

551.2

579.9

573.7

Premises costs

121.9

90.8

88.2

96.3

Other operating expenses

340.1

373.6

359.6

368.1

Financial costs

0.1

0.2

0.1

0.1

Depreciation

7.8

14.0

14.2

13.8

1,029.9

1,029.8

1,042.1

1,051.9

Government funding

4.5

4.5

4.6

4.7

Funding from other government agencies

0.0

0.1

0.0

0.0

Other funding

0.4

0.0

0.5

0.0

-4.9

-4.6

-5.1

-4.7

Total revenue Expenses

Total expenses Transfers

Grants distributed

The outcome for full-time equivalent (FTE) and annual performance equivalent (APE) students was in line with the forecast KI submitted in October, which means that KI did not reach the funding cap. Including the performances from December 2016, KI fell short of the funding cap by SEK 8.4 million. The outcome means that all previous surplus has been used up and that the outgoing appropriation saving amounts to SEK 3.8 million (see note 1). The government appropriation was adjusted for prices and salaries by 1.52 per cent (1.61 per cent). Activities within the framework of the ALF agreement are reported under the Collaboration section. Revenues under Fees and other remuneration item increased compared with 2016 due to a growth in contract education and an increase in revenues from tuition fees. Revenues from grants consist mostly of grants from other government agencies transferred to KI for activities in the field of education in accordance with the appropriation document of each agency.

Expenses Change in capital

54

For the year

-22.8

20.4

17.2

31.6

Balance brought forward

168.9

146.1

166.4

183.6

Total (balance carried forward)

146.1

166.4

183.6

215.2

Expenses for education for the year showed a slight increase compared to 2016. Education activities account for approximately 16 per cent of KI’s total expenses. Staff costs decreased slightly and premises costs increased compared with 2016. Depreciation was at the same level as in 2016. The figures for 2014 contain a reallocation of staff costs from research to education, which disturbs year-on-year comparisons.

KAROLINSKA INSTITUTET ANNUAL REPORT 2017 – ENGLISH SUMMARY


FINANCIAL REPORT

Research and education at doctoral level Revenue Research revenue for the year amounted to SEK 5,806.3 million (5,607.3 million). Direct government funding increased by SEK 37 million, or 1.9 per cent, compared with 2016, and is in accordance with the government appropriation document. The government appropriations have been adjusted for prices and salaries by 1.52 per cent (1.61 per cent). Activities within the framework of the ALF agreement are reported under the Collaboration section. Fees and other remuneration decreased by SEK 28 million owing to lower activity in contract research compared with 2016. As in previous years, the largest increase in revenues is in the category Revenues from grants, which increased by SEK 195 million, or 6.5 per cent. This increase is slightly greater than in 2016. Grant-funded activities showed a positive change in capital. The Swedish Research Council accounted for an increase in revenues of SEK 20.3 million compared with 2016. In the Organisations and foundations category, the Wallenberg Foundations remained the largest donor, representing an 11 per cent increase in revenue compared with 2016. Funding from county and municipal councils decreased in 2017. This includes a decrease in revenue of SEK 48.1 million from Stockholm County Council due to the conclusion of several collaborative projects and changes in partnership financing. In the Companies category, AstraZeneca was the largest financier, while Johnson & Johnson accounted for the largest actual and relative increases. The European Union remained the largest financier in the Foreign organisations category, increasing by SEK 26.6 million, or 11 per cent, compared with 2016 (see Table 6 of the tables appendix). Financial revenues decreased, mainly due to a sharp drop in exchange rate gains. The annual average interest rate on the interest account with the National Debt Office was -0.50 per cent (-0.49) in 2017. Interest income from the Swedish National Debt Office was approximately SEK 3.5 million and is due to negative interest rates on KI’s loans for fixed assets. Other financial revenues consist mainly of dividends and capital gains from the sale of financial fixed assets.

Expenses Total expenses for the year increased by SEK 202 million, or 3.7 per cent, compared with 2016. Staff costs increased in total by SEK 68.6 mil-

Research and education at doctoral level (including asset management), SEK million 2014

2015

2016

2017

1,919.5

1,896.7

1,959.4

1,997.2

Revenue Direct government funding Fees and other remuneration Grants Financial income Total revenue

601.1

593.8

608.3

580.1

2,594.5

2,862.5

3,002.4

3,198.1

33.8

71.4

37.3

30.9

5,148.9

5,424.4

5,607.3

5,806.3

2,568.5

2,808.2

2,881.9

2,950.5

640.7

663.1

667.1

725.9

1,604.5

1,643.6

1,728.8

1,797.7

11.7

19.3

28.1

33.8

Expenses Staff costs Premises costs Other operating expenses Financial costs Depreciation

222.3

230.1

230.2

234.5

5,047.8

5,364.4

5 ,536.2

5,742.4

Government funding

12.5

13.2

13.4

13.0

Funding from other government agencies

40.5

68.8

56.2

50.1

Total expenses Transfers

Other funding

90.9

136.1

130.1

117.8

-143.9

-218.1

-199.7

-180.9

101.1

60.0

71.1

63.9

Balance brought forward

1,063.2

1,164.3

1,224.3

1,295.2

Total (balance carried forward)

1,164.3

1,224.3

1,295.4

1,359.1

Grants distributed Change in capital For the year

lion, or 2.4 per cent, compared with 2016. The salary review which was initiated in 2016 was concluded. The figures for 2014 contain a reallocation of staff costs from research to education, which affects year-on-year comparisons. Premises costs increased compared with 2016 owing to an expansion of premises and retroactive rent surcharges, non-recurring costs and higher costs for electricity and media. A correction of SEK 22 million for premises costs was made in 2014 between research and education, which affects year-on-year comparisons. Operating expenses increased in step with turnover. The purchase of services and the IT category accounted for the highest costs.

KAROLINSKA INSTITUTET ANNUAL REPORT 2017 – ENGLISH SUMMARY

55


FINANCIAL REPORT

Distribution of investment fund portfolio 2017-12-31* 31 % 29 %

1% 8% 31 %

Interest-bearing securities 29 % Cash 1 % Global equity funds 31 % Swedish equity funds 8 % Alternative investments 31 % * Excluding the MWLC portfolio, which is placed in two separate portfolios with interest-bearing securities.

Financial costs consist primarily of interest expenses of SEK 18.4 million (17.6 million) on the balance with the Swedish National Debt Office, exchange rate losses of SEK 5.2 million (4.5 million) and a SEK 7.7 million deprecation of financial instruments. The annual average interest rate on the deposit account for 2017 was -0.50 per cent (-0.49 per cent). Depreciation was slightly higher than 2016 but is expected to rise further in 2018 owing to an increase in ongoing investments in 2017 that have not yet become operational.

Asset management Karolinska Institutet manages individual donations intended for medical science at KI. Donations are divided into: 1. funds, which are included in KI’s accounts 2. independent foundations, which are their own legal entities with an administrative relationship to KI. For funds that are managed and reported within KI, both yield and capital may be utilised. The independent foundations are individual legal entities and issue their own separate annual reports. Any yield the foundations contribute to KI is included in KI’s accounts as external grants. Summaries of KI’s foundations’ accounts are shown in order to provide a complete picture of KI’s donated assets, regardless of their legal format.

Yield in per cent compared with the reference index KI’s funds Reference index

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

9.8

15.4

5.2

5.8

5.9

12.6

15.0

4.8

7.9

6.6

Yield is stated net, i.e. including dividends and deductions for administrative costs. Share indicies are stated inclusive of reinvested dividends.

Indices used for comparison in 2017

56

Swedish fixed interest

OMRX Bond

30 %

Shares

MS CI World Net Div (SEK)

40 %

Alternative investments

OMRX T-Bill + 3 %

30 %

Funds The market value of the fund portfolio (excluding the donation for the Ming Wai Lau centre, MWLC), as reported in KI asset management, amounted at year end to SEK 193.7 million (239.7 million). In 2017, the net outflow (the difference between purchased and sold funds) was SEK -55.9 million (-21.8 million) and the total change in value was SEK 9.9 million (12.9 million). Holdings in the fund portfolio are distributed as shown below. The donation for MWLC has been placed in two separate portfolios, denominated in SEK and USD respectively, with only interest-bearing securities. At the end of the year, the market value of the MWLC portfolios amounted to SEK 366.7 The decrease in value is due to withdrawals of SEK 13 million and a weakened dollar.

Yield The total yield of the fund portfolio excluding MWLC was 5.9 per cent in 2017. The relative yield compared to the market index was -0.7 percentage points. The real rate of return during the year – as in previous years – was very good, owing primarily to the continuing rise of the world’s stock markets. The main reason for this is the surprisingly healthy general economy, manifested in the companies’ positive quarterly reports, which has benefited higher risk investments. The yield requirement, which is to be evaluated over the long term and which comprises risk-free interest (measured as six-month treasury bills) plus two percentage points, was met in 2017 and will continue to be met over the longer term. Over the past five-year period the average annual yield has exceeded the yield requirement by approximately six percentage points. However, the relative yield compared to the benchmark index was less satisfactory, with the portfolio’s yield underperforming by 0.7 percentage points. This was due to the fact that the yield on the foreign share mandates greatly underperformed relative to the market yield. Other placement mandates surpassed their reference index. The yield on the interest-bearing placements in the MWLC portfolio was positive, despite very low interest levels. The Swedish portfolio had a yield of 0.4 per cent, which is 0.1 percentage points higher than the benchmark index.

KAROLINSKA INSTITUTET ANNUAL REPORT 2017 – ENGLISH SUMMARY


FINANCIAL REPORT

KI Foundations

Dividend from KI’s funds, SEK million 2014 2015 2016 Research grants

2017

69.5

75.0

62.2

87.2

Travel grants

0.6

0.6

0.5

0.7

Education at bachelor’s and master’s level

0.1

0.7

0.3

0.3

Other

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

Total

70.2

76.3

63.0

88.2

MWLC donationen, SEK million 2014

2015

2016

2017

Yield

0.0

0.0

80.6

13.4

Total

0.0

0.0

80.6

13.4

The American dollar portfolio had a yield of 1.5 per cent, exceeding the benchmark index by 0.8 percentage points.

Dividend from KI’s funds In 2017, SEK 101.7 million was allocated to the core KI activities shown in the table below. The increase is attributable to two large withdrawals, one from an endowment professorship and one from the Swedish MWLC donation.

External resources to asset management In 2017, KI’s asset management received a total of SEK 62.4 million (74.2 million) from external donations. The table below shows individual donations of SEK 2.0 million or more.

There are 171 (173) foundations for which the authority has associated management. The aim of the foundations is to promote medical research and education. During the year, 2 (6) foundations were closed following a decision by either the Swedish Legal, Financial and Administrative Services Agency or KI’s Board of Research that all of the assets may be released with the aim of fulfilling each foundation’s purpose. No (1) new foundation was established during the year. New gifts and donations were made to a total of SEK 7.3 million (13.4 million) and invested in existing foundations. The end-of-year result was SEK 69.2 million (44.2 million), of which SEK 23.5 (0.6 million) is attributable to capital gain on securities reinvestments, SEK 0 thousand (0) to the value adjustment of securities, and SEK 45.7 million (43.6 million) to operating profit. The operating cost includes remuneration to KI of SEK 1.6 million (1.6 million). The amount awarded is lower because the KI Research grant is advertised every other year, and no call was announced in 2017.

88 SEK million

Dividend from KI’s funds

171 Associated foundations

Foundations, SEK million Asset value Grants awarded

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

1,398

1,605

1,683

1,794

1,923

29.6

32.7

28.8

56.8

16.4

Donation purpose

Donor

Medical research and doctoral education

The Gustav and Tyra Svensson Memorial Foundation

18.2

Heart research

Fredrik Lundberg

11.0

Research in chronic pain

The Lundblad family

10.0

Cognitive neuroscience focusing on the ageing of the healthy brain

The Stichting af Jochnick Foundation

5.0

Scientific research, primarily cancers

The Sune and Charlotta Hay Foundation

4.2

Research on gastroenterology and hepatology

The Ruth and Richard Julin Foundation

2.2

Investor’s Professorship in Innovative Care

Investor AB

2.0

Per Nilsson’s research at the Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society

The Bertil Hållsten Research Foundation

1.0

Research in vascular biology

The Bertil Hållsten Research Foundation

1.0

KAROLINSKA INSTITUTET ANNUAL REPORT 2017 – ENGLISH SUMMARY

Amount (SEK m.)

57


FINANCIAL REPORT

Statement of financial performance (SEK in thousands) Outcome

Outcome

01/01/2017

01/01/2016

31/12/2017

31/12/2016

2,917,690

2,866,622

718,180

737,684

3,222,985

3,025,029

30,946

37,290

6,889,800

6,666,625

-3,524,128

-3,461,875

-822,200

-755,257

-2,165,800

-2,088,467

-33,813

-28,294

Operating revenue Direct government funding Fees and other remuneration Grants Financial income Total revenue Operating expenses Staff costs Premises costs Other operating expenses Financial costs Depreciation

-248,291

-244,452

-6,794,232

-6,578,346

Operating profit/loss

95,569

88,279

Profit/loss from holdings in associated companies and subsidiaries

-1,598

-10,315

Total expenses

Collection of general revenue Revenue from fees etc. and other revenue not at the authority’s disposal

0

1,849

General revenue transferred to the Government budget

0

-1,818

0

31

Funding received from the Government budget for the financing of grants

17,665

17,974

Funding received from Government agencies for the financing of grants

50,081

56,245

117,811

130,588

-185,557

-204,807

0

0

93,971

77,995

Balance Transfers

Other funding received for the financing of grants Grants distributed Balance

CHANGE IN CAPITAL FOR THE YEAR

58

KAROLINSKA INSTITUTET ANNUAL REPORT 2017 – ENGLISH SUMMARY


FINANCIAL REPORT

Balance sheet (SEK in thousands) ASSETS

31/12/2017

31/12/2016

Capitalised expenditure for development

5,197

3,054

Rights and other intangible fixed assets

2,033

5,565

7,230

8,619

Expenditure for improvements to leased property

113,263

46,542

Machinery, equipment, installations etc.

632,263

704,733

Intangible fixed assets

Total intangible fixed assets Tangible fixed assets

Fixed assets under construction

613,329

225,944

1,358,855

977,219

34,215

34,813

499,457

581,503

533,672

616,316

Accounts receivable

185,108

183,844

Receivables from other Government agencies

161,320

138,447

403

348

346,831

322,639

Prepaid expenses

195,478

169,584

Accrued grant revenue

529,729

407,723

Other accrued revenue

9,152

17,740

734,358

595,047

-3,820

-287

-3,820

-287

3,692,879

3,583,342

Total tangible fixed assets Financial fixed assets Holdings in associated companies and subsidiaries Other long-term securities holdings Total financial fixed assets Receivables

Other receivables Total receivables Cut-off items

Total cut-off items Settlement with the Government Settlement with the Government Total settlement with the Government Cash and bank balances Balance of the interest-bearing account at the Swedish National Debt Office

184,586

146,261

Total cash and bank balances

Cash and bank

3,877,465

3,729,603

TOTAL ASSETS

6,854,591

6,249,156

KAROLINSKA INSTITUTET ANNUAL REPORT 2017 – ENGLISH SUMMARY

59


FINANCIAL REPORT

Balance sheet (SEK in thousands) CAPITAL AND LIABILITIES

31/12/2017

31/12/2016

7,000

6,238

28,813

39,127

1,478,701

1,390,391

93,971

77,995

1,608 485

1,513,752

Agency capital Government capital Shares of earnings in associated companies and subsidiaries Capital brought forward Change in capital according to the statement of financial performance Total agency capital Provisions Provisions for pensions and similar obligations

5,508

2,995

90,354

34,259

95,862

37,254

Loans at the Swedish National Debt Office

875,364

602,730

Liabilities to other Government agencies

151,186

140,077

Accounts payable

431,591

277,459

Other liabilities

122,312

135,415

1,580,452

1,155,681

156,271

138,796

3,112,549

3,107,279

300,972

296,393

Total cut-off items

3,569,792

3,542,468

TOTAL CAPITAL AND LIABILITIES

6,854,591

6,249,156

5,095

76,087

5,095

76,087

Other provisions Total provisions Liabilities etc.

Total liabilities etc. Cut-off items Accrued expenses Unexpended grants Other prepaid revenue

Contingent liabilities Other contingent liabilities Total contingent liabilities

60

KAROLINSKA INSTITUTET ANNUAL REPORT 2017 – ENGLISH SUMMARY


APPENDIX

Table 1 Number of first-choice applicants per admitted student 2014

2015

per % admitted women

2017

2016

per % admitted women

per % admitted women

per % admitted women

Beginner’s programmes Occupational therapy Audiology Biomedical laboratory science Physiotherapy

1.6 3.1 1.3 4.0

83 80 83 63

1.7 3.1 1.4 4.2

87 68 73 63

1.4 2.3 1.3 4.0

83 78 77 63

1.3 1.3 1.1 3.5

86 59 80 63

Biomedicine

0.9

67

1.2

60

2.0

59

2.9

67

Speech and language pathology

2.5

90

3.1

87

2.9

89

2.2

91

Medicine

7.8

58

8.0

59

7.8

60

7.3

62

Optometry

1.8

83

1.8

85

2.0

82

1.8

75

Psychology

6.1

68

5.6

75

5.6

73

5.0

72

Radiography

2.2

80

1.9

73

2.2

75

1.7

73

Nursing

3.1

86

3.2

84

2.6

85

2.2

85

Dental hygiene

4.1

90

5.0

93

4.6

91

4.3

91

Dentistry

4.4

70

4.5

68

4.1

72

4.1

71

Midwifery

3.6

100

2.8

100

2.4

99

2.4

99

Psychotherapy

1.6

81

1.3

88

2.0

78

2.1

79

Specialist nursing

1.7

86

2.0

86

1.5

86

1.8

84

Odontological prophylactics

1.2

95

1.1

100

1.2

93

0.8

93

1.5

87

-

1.7

90

Continuation programmes

MSc (1 year) – Work and health MSc (1 year) – Diagnostic cytology

-

2.5

80

2.0

77

MSc (1 year) – Global health

5.0

78

3.5

78

3.6

73

3.8

73

MSc (1/2 year) – Clin. medical science

1.7

82

1.2

84

-

MSc (1 year) – Clinical optometry

1.5

86

1.3

86

1.2

1.1

64

-

81

1.5

76

MSc (1/2 year) – Medical education

-

MSc (2 year) – Bioentrepreneurship

1.2

49

1.3

58

2.2

56

2.4

60

MSc (2 year) – Biomedicine

2.3

62

2.0

67

2.9

61

3.1

63

MSc (2 year) – Public health sciences MSc (2 year) – Health Economics, Policy and Management

1.9

63

1.4

65

3.1

53

3.1

62

-

-

-

-

3.3

57

MSc (2 year) – Health informatics

1.5

40

1.4

57

0.8

46

1.4

62

MSc (2 year) – Toxicology

1.1

64

1.0

62,0

2.0

61

1.6

65

Total

3.2

72

3.0

73

3.1

72

2.9

74

-

KAROLINSKA INSTITUTET ANNUAL REPORT 2017 – ENGLISH SUMMARY

-

61


APPENDIX

Table 2 First-year students registered for term 1 2014

Beginner’s programmes Occupational therapy Audiology Biomedical laboratory science Physiotherapy Biomedicine

2015

2017

2016

total

% women

total

% women

91 18 83 151 77

86 89 83 58 70

90 21 76 144 73

87 67 71 62 71

% total women

99 20 74 140 62

88 85 80 67 66

total

% women

96 32 84 145 61

78 69 82 65 75

46

87

34

88

50

80

37

97

327

50

329

55

325

51

316

47

Optometry

54

81

58

86

56

77

60

78

Psychology

76

71

87

64

82

72

84

65

Radiography

46

78

55

69

41

68

49

71

Speech and language pathology Medicine

324

85

333

83

341

86

397

85

Dental hygiene

49

88

47

91

47

85

48

85

Dentistry

97

63

95

63

96

71

116

70

Midwifery

66

100

79

100

81

99

78

100

Psychotherapy

15

80

19

95

17

76

20

80

540

87

555

88

585

87

634

89

11

100

26

100

17

82

16

88

-

-

81

90

-

-

85

94

Nursing

Continuation programmes

Specialist nursing Odontological prophylactics MSc (1 year) – Work and health

-

-

-

-

20

75

17

59

MSc (1 year) – Global health MSc (1 year) – Public health in disasters

31

65

35

77

32

75

40

68

7

86

2

100

16

56

8

25

MSc (1/2 year) – Clin. medical science

85

79

79

86

2

100

-

-

MSc (1 year) – Clinical optometry

27

85

25

92

24

75

29

79

MSc (1 year) – Diagnostic cytology

MSc (1/2 year) – Medical education

-

-

37

59

-

-

-

-

MSc (2 year) – Bioentrepreneurship

32

59

38

66

30

53

31

55

MSc (2 year) – Biomedicine

38

61

37

78

40

70

40

65

MSc (2 year) – Public health sciences MSc (2 year) – Health Economics, Policy and Management

63

57

58

79

48

63

21

81

33

36

23

74

31

52

26 50

69 68

-

-

6

50

20

50

24

58

30

57

26

69

22

64

25

84

2,417

75

2,568

77

2,418

76

2,669

77

MSc (2 year) – Health informatics MSc (2 year) – Molecular tech. in life sc. MSc (2 year) – Toxicology Total

62

KAROLINSKA INSTITUTET ANNUAL REPORT 2017 – ENGLISH SUMMARY


APPENDIX

Table 3 Full-time equivalent students (FTEs) 2014

2015

2017

2016

total

% women

total

% women

Beginner’s programmes Occupational therapy Audiology Biomedical laboratory science Public health sciences Physiotherapy

224 55 205 14 370

88 70 84 90 67

231 58 204 0 365

88 72 82 64

236 51 196 361

88 78 81

Biomedicine

157

69

172

71

164

Speech and language pathology

% total women

total

% women

64

243 49 185 353

86 79 82 66

71

164

68

108

90

116

88

116

86

117

88

1,667

53

1,651

53

1,635

52

1,623

52

127

82

130

81

141

83

142

87

Medical informatics

0

-

0

-

-

-

-

-

Podiatry

0

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Psychology

300

68

320

69

320

70

328

70

Radiography

112

80

110

76

101

71

98

70

Nursing

792

87

806

88

768

86

819

86

Medicine Optometry

Dental hygiene Dentistry Dental technology

85

95

89

92

84

91

89

88

433

65

443

66

425

69

432

70

5

89

-

-

-

-

-

-

101

100

111

100

117

100

115

99

20

82

17

82

23

84

26

84

Continuation programmes Midwifery Psychotherapy Specialist nursing

456

89

447

89

455

88

508

89

Odontological prophylactics

15

88

16

100

22

94

17

88

MSc (1 year) – Work and health

31

97

36

95

33

90

34

93

MSc (1 year) – Diagnostic cytology

0

-

-

-

9

74

16

70

MSc (1 year) – Global health MSc (1 year) – Public health in disasters

24

75

22

77

23

79

23

77

2

81

3

100

3

83

5

60

MSc (1/2 year) – Clin. medical science

74

82

71

83

47

83

15

86

MSc (1 year) – Clinical optometry

22

87

27

88

23

84

25

77

MSc (1/2 year) – Medical education

15

74

15

73

13

58

8

48

MSc (2 year) – Bioentrepreneurship

41

63

46

61

52

62

48

60

MSc (2 year) – Biomedicine

69

65

70

66

67

71

64

72

MSc (2 year) – Public health sciences MSc (2 year) – Health Economics, Policy and Management

65

85

75

78

76

77

57

77

-

-

-

-

-

-

9

85

MSc (2 year) – Health informatics MSc (2 year) – Molecular tech. in life sc.

27

49

22

56

22

71

35

63

-

-

2

60

5

47

11

64

MSc (2 year) – Toxicology

19

53

26

66

35

72

37

76

341

78

362

78

351

80

385

79

5,978

72

6,062

72

5,973

72

6,079

72

Single subject courses Total

KAROLINSKA INSTITUTET ANNUAL REPORT 2017 – ENGLISH SUMMARY

63


APPENDIX

Table 4 Full-time equivalent students (FTEs) and annual performance equivalents (APEs) 2014

2015

2017

2016

FTE

APE

%*

FTE

APE

%*

FTE

APE

%*

FTE

Beginner’s programmes Occupational therapy Audiology Biomedical laboratory science Public health sciences Physiotherapy

224 55 205 14 370

217 55 186 17 355

97 100 90 122 96

231 58 204 0 365

216 54 184 2 338

94 94 90 93

236 51 196 361

222 47 185 348

94 92 94 96

243 49 185 353

222 46 163 0 351

Biomedicine

157

141

90

172

142

82

164

151

92

164

151 92

108

101

93

116

109

94

116

104

90

117

110 94

1,667 1,660

100

1,651 1,583

96

1,635 1,552

95

Speech and language pathology Medicine Optometry

APE

%*

91 94 88 100

1,623 1,563 96

127

114

89

130

121

93

141

137

98

142

Medical informatics

0

1

-

0

2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Podiatry

0

0

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Psychology

300

276

92

320

290

91

320

304

95

328

309 94

Radiography

112

114

102

109

91

83

101

97

96

98

92 93

Nursing

792

745

94

806

733

91

768

709

92

819

724 88

85

70

82

89

75

84

84

97 116

89

76 86

433

396

91

443

416

94

425

394

93

432

411 95

5

7

139

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

101

94

93

111

102

92

117

108

93

115

112 97

20

18

88

17

16

93

23

21

90

26

27 106

Dental hygiene Dentistry Dental technology

137 96

-

-

Continuation programmes Midwifery Psychotherapy Specialist nursing

456

423

93

447

409

91

455

404

89

508

447 88

Odontological prophylactics

15

13

88

16

9

54

22

21

96

17

15 84

MSc (1 year) – Work and health

31

36

117

36

28

79

33

32

99

34

22 66

4

45

16

18 115

24 105

23

22 92

MSc (1 year) – Diagnostic cytology

0

0

-

-

-

-

9

MSc (1 year) – Global health MSc (1 year) – Public health in disasters

24

22

-

22

19

87

23

2

2

94

3

3 104

3

92

5

5 104

MSc (1/2 year) – Clin. medical science MSc (1 year) – Clinical optometry

74 22

69 21

93 96

71 27

65 91 28 104

47 23

58 123 22 94

15 25

25 161 22 88

MSc (1/2 year) – Medical education

15

14

97

15

14

94

13

13 102

8

10 128

MSc (2 year) – Bioentrepreneurship

41

41

100

46

39

84

52

55 105

48

49 101

MSc (2 year) – Biomedicine

69

65

95

70

67

96

67

68 101

64

62 97

MSc (2 year) – Public health sciences MSc (2 year) – Health Economics, Policy and Management

65

60

92

75

70

94

76

76 100

57

62 110

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

9

6 66

MSc (2 year) – Health informatics MSc (2 year) – Molecular tech. in life sc.

27

29

106

22

22

98

22

20

91

35

29 82

-

-

-

2

1

43

5

4

86

11

9 87

19

20

107

26

20

79

35

32

341

233

68

362

268

74

351

247

70

5,978 5,613

94

6,062 5,534

91

5,973 5,558

93

MSc (2 year) – Toxicology Single subject courses Total

2

91

37

38 102

385

283 74

6,079 5,618 92

*Performance indicator

64

KAROLINSKA INSTITUTET ANNUAL REPORT 2017 – ENGLISH SUMMARY


APPENDIX

Table 5 Degrees

2014

2015

total

total

66 15 65 53 108 30 240 26 36 12 38 226 397 33 76 11 1,432

83 67 100 89 68 100 56 88 67 83 84 81 91 94 70 91 80

71 17 64 65 101 21 292 38 47 13 33 237 439 46 94 1,578

89 70 100 85 77 95 56 87 72 77 88 89 90 100 61 80

64 21 73 61 112 23 262 34 54 9 50 229 375 42 70 1,479

1 1

100 100

3 3

67 67

-

Bachelor’s degrees Biomedicine Odontological prophylactics Other main subjects Total bachelor’s degrees

35 14 439 488

63 86 84

29 5 388 422

69 100 86 85

31 13 426 470

MSc (1 year) Work and health Diagnostic cytology Global health Clinical medical science Medical education Optometry Other main subjects Total MSc (1 year)

19 2 30 70 2 21 287 431

95 100 70 84 100 90 89 87

43 1 30 68 13 23 495 673

95 100 70 81 77 83 88 88

Master’s qualifications (2 years) Bioentrepreneurship Biomedicine Public health sciences Health informatics Molecular techniques in life science Toxicology Other main subjects Total master’s qualifications (2 years)

19 34 43 19 21 50 186

58 50 86 42

18 33 41 18 2 36 148

78 73 76 56

Total general qualifications

1,106

81

Total qualifications awarded

2,538

81

Total graduates

1,964

Professional qualifications Occupational therapy Audiology Midwifery Biomedical lab science Physiotherapy Speech and language pathology Medicine Optometry Psychology Psychotherapy Radiography Nursing Specialist nursing Dental hygiene Dentistry Dental technology Total professional qualifications General qualifications University diplomas BSc

57 76

KAROLINSKA INSTITUTET ANNUAL REPORT 2017 – ENGLISH SUMMARY

% total women

2017 total

% women

68 15 70 56 123 21 272 43 48 14 27 215 437 39 83 1 1,532

88 87 100 86 57 90 52 86 69 71 70 88 90 95 75 100 78

-

-

61 100 86 85

33 12 504 549

70 92 84 83

13 34 68 4 25 414 558

100 76 76 50 92 91 88

31 14 28 63 16 23 484 659

90 86 86 89 44 78 90 88

0 83 74

29 30 59 23 19 29 189

52 60 59 35 58 58 76 58

34 40 46 9 4 24 44 201

71 78 85 78 50 71 73 76

1,246

85

1,217

82

1,409

84

2,824

82

2,696

81

2,941

81

2,105

% women

2016

% women

1,946

92 67 100 89 64 87 55 74 76 78 82 90 91 90 59 80

2,069

65


APPENDIX

Table 6 Revenue 2017, largest sources of funding, SEK million Research councils The Swedish Research Council Forte Formas

848,9 132,7 31,8

County & municipal councils Stockholm County Council Västra Götaland County Council Uppsala County Council

355,0 4,3 4,3

Government agencies Royal Institute of Technology Sweden’s Innovation Agency Kammarkollegiet The National Board of Health and Welfare

144,2 35,7 30,4 27,4

Companies AstraZeneca Johnson & Johnson AFA Insurance Novo Nordisk

172,4 32,9 30,9 20,8

Stockholm University The Public Health Agency of Sweden The Swedish Armed Forces The Swedish Social Insurance Agency Uppsala University Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency Organisations and foundations The Wallenberg Foundations The Swedish Cancer Society The Swedish Foundation for Strategic Research The Swedish Childhood Cancer Foundation Torsten and Ragnar Söderberg Foundations The Swedish Heart-Lung Foundation The Erling-Persson Family Foundation Karolinska Institutet Foundations The Swedish Brain Foundation The Swedish Society of Medicine

66

12,7 11,6 10,9 8,6 8,6

Ferring Pharmaceuticals Pfizer Roche Biogen Idec Sorrento Therapeutics Evox Therapeutics

15,9 15,1 12,7 9,4 9,3 8,0

8,3

208,0 148,8 111,0 89,4 72,4 63,6 60,9 32,1 29,0 21,0

Foreign organisations and foundations European Union (EU) Ming Wai Lau The Novo Nordisk Foundation National Institutes of Health (NIH) CHDI Foundation OECD Aarhus University Hospital Kingdom of Saudi Arabia NordForsk Stichting af Jochnick Foundation

264,7 35,0 34,6 28,3 13,6 9,1 9,0 8,5 8,4 7,5

KAROLINSKA INSTITUTET ANNUAL REPORT 2017 – ENGLISH SUMMARY


KAROLINSKA INSTITUTET ANNUAL REPORT 2017 – ENGLISH SUMMARY

67


THE UNIVERSITY BOARD

The University Board

Mikael Odenberg Chair, member

Lisa Sennerby Forsse Deputy Chair, member

Stephanie Ammerman Member

Elias Arnér Member

Sofia Heidenberg Member

Liselotte Højgaard Member

Anna Karlsson Member

Leif Karlsson Member

Lena von Koch Member

Photos: Erik Cronberg.

Ole Petter Ottersen Vice-Chancellor, member

68

KAROLINSKA INSTITUTET ANNUAL REPORT 2017 – ENGLISH SUMMARY


THE UNIVERSITY BOARD

Max Kynning Member

Marianne Lundius Member

Jonas Milton Member

Björn Stensaker Member

Göran Stiernstedt Member

Karin Dahlman-Wright Pro-Vice-Chancellor, co-opted member

Per Bengtsson Chief rapporteur

Torkel Falkenberg Union representative

Magnus Anå Union representative

KAROLINSKA INSTITUTET ANNUAL REPORT 2017 – ENGLISH SUMMARY

69


THE UNIVERSITY BOARD

Resolution on the annual report and assessment of internal control The University Board hereby resolves to submit the annual report for 2017. We confirm that the annual report provides a true and fair impression of the authority’s results, costs, revenue and of the agency’s financial position. We judge that deficiencies exist in the authority’s internal control with respect to the following14; •

The monitoring of compliance with internal regulations.

Stockholm, 19 February 2018

Mikael Odenberg, Chair

Ole Petter Ottersen, Vice-Chancellor

Lisa Sennerby Forsse, Deputy Chair

Stephanie Ammerman

Elias Arnér

Sofia Heidenberg

Liselotte Højgaard

Anna Karlsson

Leif Karlsson

Lena von Koch

Max Kynning

Marianne Lundius

Jonas Milton

Björn Stensaker

Göran Stiernstedt 14 See also the concluding assessment in the chapter Karolinska Institutet in brief, Internal control.

70

KAROLINSKA INSTITUTET ANNUAL REPORT 2017 – ENGLISH SUMMARY


KAROLINSKA INSTITUTET ANNUAL REPORT 2017 – ENGLISH SUMMARY Design: Sofia Lindberg | Print: TMG Tabergs AB 2018 | ISBN: 978-91-85681-97-6

A


Karolinska Institutet Annual Report 2017 – English summary Compiled by: The Central Administration, Karolinska Institutet Published by: The Communication and Public Relations Office, Karolinska Institutet SE-171 77 Stockholm ki.se

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Annual Report 2017, English summary - Karolinska Institutet  
Annual Report 2017, English summary - Karolinska Institutet