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little girls,

big style

Sew a Boutique Wardrobe from 4 Easy Patterns

mary abreu

stash

an imprint of C&T Publishing


Text and style photography copyright © 2010 by Mary Abreu Artwork copyright © 2010 by C&T Publishing, Inc. Publisher: Amy Marson Creative Director: Gailen Runge Acquisitions Editor: Susanne Woods

Dedication

Editor: Cynthia Bix

For my late mother, Anna Abreu, who continues to inspire

Technical Editors: Carolyn Aune and Gailen Runge

my crafty adventures. She was the original craft addict; my

Copyeditor/Proofreader: Wordfirm Inc. Cover Designer: Kristy K. Zacharias

partner in all things stitched, painted, or made by hand;

Book Designer: Kristen Yenche

and my best friend.

Production Coordinator: Kirstie L. Pettersen Production Editor: Julia Cianci Illustrator: Zinnia Heinzmann Photography by Christina Carty-Francis and Diane Pedersen of C&T Publishing, Inc., unless otherwise noted Published by Stash Books an imprint of C&T Publishing, Inc., P.O. Box 1456, Lafayette, CA 94549 All rights reserved. No part of this work covered by the copyright hereon may be used in any form or reproduced by any means—graphic, electronic, or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, taping, or information storage and retrieval systems—without written permission from the publisher. The copyrights on individual artworks are retained by the artists as noted in Little Girls, Big Style. These designs may be used to make items only for personal use or donation to nonprofit groups for sale. Each piece of finished merchandise for sale must carry a conspicuous label with the following information: Designs copyright © 2010 by Mary Abreu from the book Little Girls, Big Style from C&T Publishing, Inc. Attention Copy Shops: Please note the following exception— publisher and author give permission to photocopy pattern pullout pages P1–P4 for personal use only. Attention Teachers: C&T Publishing, Inc., encourages you to use this book as a text for teaching. Contact us at 800-284-1114 or www.ctpub.com for lesson plans and information about the C&T Creative Troupe. We take great care to ensure that the information included in our products is accurate and presented in good faith, but no warranty is provided nor are results guaranteed. Having no control over the choices of materials or procedures used, neither the author nor C&T Publishing, Inc., shall have any liability to any person or entity with respect to any loss or damage caused directly or indirectly by the information contained in this book. For your convenience, we post an up-to-date listing of corrections on our website (www.ctpub.com). If a correction is not already noted, please contact our customer service department at ctinfo@ctpub.com or at P.O. Box 1456, Lafayette, CA 94549. Trademark (™) and registered trademark (®) names are used throughout this book. Rather than use the symbols with every occurrence of a trademark or registered trademark name, we are using the names only in the editorial fashion and to the benefit of the owner, with no intention of infringement. Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data Abreu, Mary. Little girls, big style : sew a boutique wardrobe from 4 easy patterns / by Mary Abreu. p. cm. ISBN 978-1-60705-188-6 (softcover) 1. Girls’ clothing. 2. Dressmaking--Patterns. I. Title. TT562.A27 2010 646.4’06--dc22 2010014304 Printed in China 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1

Acknowledgments The amazing Lisa Carroccio (aka The Diva) was with me every step of the way. Her guidance, input, and advice were invaluable, and I am blessed to have her as a mentor and friend. My friend Sarah Phillips of Intown Quilters in Decatur, Georgia, lets me teach at her store and pick her brain, and she never says no when I need a lunch buddy. Thank you to my awesome pattern testers: Jessica Chapman, MaryAnn Lopes, and Hayden Thornton. Y’all rock! My life is filled with such an awesome cast of supporters and cheerleaders. Special thanks to Amber Hartenbower, Sheree Schattenman, Jenn Cristy, Amber Turnbow, Tess Wiebe, Kristina Milling, Anna Garner, Tricia Estes, and Bari Ackerman. Angela Shimada and Katie Moore helped me get back into sewing after a lengthy break, and I owe them so much for it. The beautiful little girls wearing these clothes hold a special place in my heart. Thank you, Charlotte, Ella C., Ella J., Kayla, Sarah, Tatum, and especially Liesl. A big “thank you” to my C&T/Stash team for helping make my lifelong dream a reality. Thank you, Michael Miller Fabrics LLC, Timeless Treasures Fabrics Inc., Robert Kaufman Fabrics, and Intown Quilters for providing many of the fabrics used throughout this book. Dad and Jo, thanks for believing in me and being the loudest fans any girl could ever want. I could not have written this book without the support of my family: my husband, Matt; my sons, Joshua and Garrett; and my daughter, Liesl. Thank you for putting up with my obsessions, the deadlines, the constant hum of the sewing machine, and the incessant stream-of-consciousness chattering about this book. I love you.


Preface 4 The Boutique Look 5

The Peasant Top/Dress 64

What is “boutique”? 6

Classic Peasant Top/Dress 66

Choosing fabric 6

Ruffled Empire Peasant Top/Dress 72

Embellishments 9 Handmade vs. homemade 11 How to use this book 12 The Basics 14 Tools 15 Techniques A to Z 17 The Projects

The Basic Bodice 32 Barely Basic Top/Dress 34 Knotty Apron variation 39 Sunshine Halter 41 Side-Tied Smock 45 Perfect Party Dress 49 Pocket Pinafore 52 Ruffled Peek-a-Boo Jumper 58

Tiered Twirly Peasant Dress 77 Flutter-Sleeved Peasant Top 81 Ruffled-Neck Peasant Top 85

The Pants 89 Essential Pants/Capris 91 Ruffled Pants 94 Racing Stripe Pants 97 Lace-Edged Gauchos 100 Tiered Pants 104

The Skirts 107 No-Hem Skirt 109 Treasure Skirt 111 On-the-Border Skirt 114 Apron Skirt variation 117 Double-Layer Twirl Skirt 119

Resources 126

Twirly Girly Skirt 123

About the Author 127 Pattern Pullout Pages

Contents


Preface I spent much of my childhood watching my mother whip up anything and everything on her 1967 Singer Touch & Sew. Skirts, dresses, overalls, T-shirts, Halloween costumes—there was nothing she couldn’t make. I was always so proud to show up on the first day of school in clothing she made especially for me. When I was expecting my first child in early 1991, I dreamed of the day when I could sew clothes for my own daughter. After two boys and nearly 14 years later, I had a little girl of my own and could begin to make my sewing dreams a reality. Thankfully, sewing is cool again! The range of fabrics and notions available is mind-boggling. It’s not unusual for me to spend the first twenty minutes in the quilt shop just wandering around to get a feel for what’s new (and to see what fabrics start calling my name). I love it so much— I’ve even been known to help other customers pick out just the right fabrics for their projects. Push aside all the trends and popularity, though, and you’ll find that sewing fills a need to be creative, to make something useful, to experience the type of satisfaction that comes with knowing, “I made that!” I used to be embarrassed to admit to someone that I’d sewn my daughter’s outfit, unable to accept the compliment. Luckily, I’ve gotten over that and am now very proud to show off my work. I hope you find that kind of inspiration here and make the kind of memories for your daughter that my mother gave me. Happy sewing!

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Boutique clothing merges personality with a custom fit. The Flutter-Sleeved Peasant Top (page 81) paired with the Lace-Edged Gauchos (page 100) make a fun summer outfit.

The Boutique Look The Boutique Lookďťż

5


What is “boutique”? Children’s boutique clothing is something of a grassroots movement. Although the word “boutique” may bring to mind pricey European clothing brands, the children’s custom boutique market is actually more of a homegrown industry born out of creativity and necessity. Think thousands of at-home seamstresses designing, sewing, and selling their work in limited quantities to an eager audience searching for unique clothing that’s always a perfect fit. Hallmarks of this cottage industry are high-quality quilter’s cotton fabric, appliqué, coordinating accessories (hair, shoes, jewelry), themed apparel, made-to-match ready-to-wear garments, and often one-of-a-kind designs. The mother who buys or sews custom boutique clothing wants her child to not only be well dressed, but also to have her (or his) individuality shine. It’s less about following the pack and more about setting the trends. Perhaps one of the biggest benefits of boutique is always having clothes that fit perfectly. One thing that launched me on the path to sewing boutique clothing for my daughter was her hard-to-fit measurements. Any pants I bought that fit in length were always too wide in the waist (and looked ridiculous with the adjustable waistband cinched in). If pants fit her waist, they were inevitably too short. How could I resist the opportunity to make perfectly fitting apparel? Sewing your child’s boutique wardrobe gives you the chance to create unique, well-fitted clothing that is unlike anything you can find on a store’s clothing rack.

Choosing fabric Give any ten people the same pattern, and you’ll likely get ten very different interpretations of that garment, each with a very different “feel.” Much of that variety has to do with the fabrics they choose. It’s not just about color; it’s also about how the colors and prints work with (or against) each other. The outfits designed for this book and pictured throughout were sewn with a variety of cotton fabrics, primarily 100% cotton. I often use quilting cotton for dresses, tops, and skirts and occasionally for pants. For most pants, however, I prefer sewing with heavier-weight fabrics, such as twill, corduroy, or denim. These fabrics are sturdier and better suited for pants. I like to accent the pants with lighter-weight fabrics that coordinate with the tops I make, to add a punch of color and pattern.

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prewash!

Before cutting and sewing any of your fabric, wash it according to the manufacturer’s directions (check the end of the bolt when you buy it). You don’t want it to shrink after it’s been sewn. It’s also a good idea to prewash any trims you’ll be using. You can do this either in the washing machine or by hand.

I’m often asked how I choose fabrics for the clothes I sew. For me, it usually starts with a fabric print that catches my eye. As I try to visualize what I could sew with it, I note all the elements involved—straps, sleeves, ruffles. I then figure out how many different fabrics would work for what I have in mind. As I sort through, I sketch out my ideas and note my thoughts about complementary fabrics. Textile companies that cater to quilt shops create complete lines of fabrics made to work together. It’s a fast and easy way to choose a selection of fabrics made to coordinate. Of course, you don’t have to limit yourself to just one fabric line. I’m a huge fan of combining several different fabric lines.

Lines of fabric are designed to work together, making it easy to choose and sew coordinates.

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Tiered Twirly Peasant Dress (page 77) and Ruffled Pants (page 94) in two different fabric combinations The bright aqua, red, and white of this peasant dress give it a fun, bold feel. The same dress done in romantic floral prints, however, has a completely different look.

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When I pick fabrics for a project, I think about whom I’m sewing for, how many fabrics I want to use, and where I’ll use them. It’s not unusual to see me wandering around the quilt store with bolts of fabric in my arms, trying to find just the right coordinating fabrics. I’ll lay them on top of each other to see how the colors and patterns work together. But it’s not so much about matching colors exactly; instead, it’s about seeing if the fabrics are harmonious when placed beside each other. I love seeing how different accent fabrics can make the background colors in my main fabric pop. Different fabrics can completely change the feel of an outfit, making it seem like a new outfit when really, it’s just the fabric that’s different. When you’re scoping out fabric, think about the scale of the print. Most fabric lines made by quilting fabric manufacturers include a large print, a medium print, and a small print. Why? Because when you are combining fabrics, it’s pleasing to the eye to have prints of varying scale. A good rule of thumb for choosing a fabric based on scale is “fewer seams, bigger print.” Larger pieces of fabric will maintain the integrity and feel of the print, whereas smaller prints can more easily accommodate more seams and smaller cuts. I nearly always prefer to buy my fabric from my local quilt shop, because I like supporting small businesses. In addition, I can usually find what I’m looking for there. Use the Independent Fabric Shop tool on the Project 95 website to find a quilt shop near you (see Resources, page 126). Of course, there may not be a quilt shop near you. Or perhaps you want to improve your sewing skills before you start working with more expensive designer fabrics. If so, visit one of the variety of chain craft and fabric stores, which carry fabrics you can use for the projects in this book. Always check the end of the fabric bolt to make sure you are buying 100% cotton fabric. You also can find endless fabric sites on the Internet (see Resources, page 126).

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Embellishments

Embellishments like lace, rickrack, Ruffle Rac, yo-yos, and ribbon add oomph to an outfit.

I love incorporating lace, rickrack, ribbon, and other embellishments in my sewing projects. They add a little bit of oomph that takes an outfit from pretty to pretty fabulous. My preference is to use 100% cotton trims whenever possible. Michael Miller Fabrics makes a gorgeous line of trims called Ruffle Rac that come in a huge assortment of colors and prints—and also are made with 100 percent cotton fabric. Check the item’s label for fiber content before you make your purchase. I tend to gravitate to crocheted and Cluny laces, because they are typically made with cotton yarns. You can use polyester lace, but be warned— polyester can melt when pressed with an iron (and, yes, I know this from personal experience). Prewash trims just like you would your fabrics. There are many creative ways to add embellishments to your boutique clothing. Consider adding rickrack over a seam, securing it as you topstitch along the edge. Or use rickrack along the hem, sewing it with right sides together and then flipping it down so it makes “waves” below the hem. I’ve added rickrack near the bottom hem of the Essential Pants/ Capris (page 91) to coordinate with one of the main colors in the RuffledNeck Peasant Top (page 85).

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Consider using the Clover Quick Yo-Yo Maker (my friend Jenn Cooper of Take A Bow Creations is the yo-yo diva) to make yo-yo flowers. Try using buttons at the yo-yo centers and rickrack for stems to create adorable fabric “flowers.” (Note: Be cautious when using any small embellishments on clothing for children under three years of age to avoid a choking hazard.) Try your hand at embroidery (either by hand or by machine) on any of the patterns in this book to make a truly personalized garment. A variety of tutorials are available in books and online.


Handmade vs. homemade Home-sewn clothing gets a bad rap, because we often see poorly constructed garments that scream “homemade.” With practice, and by paying attention to details, however, you will elevate your sewing to new levels. You cannot make an outstanding outfit if you do not cut your pieces properly. Make sure you trace the pattern pieces precisely. Then exercise the same level of care in cutting out your fabric pieces. Remember to take your time while you sew. As you grow more comfortable with your sewing machine and skills, you’ll naturally get faster without sacrificing quality. If your seams are wonky, your gathers goofy, or your edges uneven, rip out the sewn stitches with a seam ripper and try it again. There is no shame in “unsewing” your work. My seam ripper gets a lot of use, so I make sure to keep it handy.

Pay attention to your seams and make the effort to finish them in some way. Most sewing machines have a zigzag and/or overlock stitch to finish fabric edges. If you find that you really enjoy sewing and are doing it often, consider investing in a serger or overlock machine. These machines enable you to sew together and finish the seam in one step. Topstitching is one of the quickest ways to add a professional, finished look to your garment sewing. It also adds durability and increases the comfort of a piece by securing seam allowances flat. I topstitch all seam allowances in which one piece is gathered to another. To do so, I finish the seam, press it toward the ungathered piece, and then topstitch. I’ve even done this on side seams of jumpers and pants. But the best advice I can give you is to just sew. The more you sew, the more comfortable you’ll become, and the better results you’ll have over time.

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How to use this book This book consists of four project chapters, each broken down by garment: ●⊑

Basic Bodice

●⊑

Peasant Top/Dress

●⊑

Pants

●⊑

Skirts

Each garment can be sewn with several variations on the basic design introduced at the beginning of each chapter. As you work through the projects, these variations increase in complexity. Different embellishments and elements are added throughout to show you how to mix up things, but don’t let that limit you! Take an element that you like from one—say, the hem band on the No-Hem Skirt (page 109)—and add it to another project, like the Knotty Apron variation (page 39). The whole point of this book is to help you see the potential in each pattern and to then build upon it, giving you a truly unique boutique wardrobe. For example, I might say to use a 3˝ ruffle in a pattern, but you might prefer a 2˝ ruffle. By all means, go ahead and change it up! After my friend Jessica tested the On-the-Border Skirt (page 114), she told me she thought she’d make a longer ruffle the next time she sewed it. I was so happy to read that, I did a little dance!

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Changing up elements makes for infinite customization options. The Classic Peasant Top/Dress (page 66) takes on new life when the neck ruffle (Ruffled-Neck Peasant, page 85) and hem band (No-Hem Skirt, page 109) are added. No-hem sleeve bands complete the look.


Layer one of the Basic Bodice pieces (page 32) over a T-shirt or, better yet, over one of the Peasant Tops (page 64). Stick a pair of Ruffled Pants (page 94) under a variation of the Peasant Dress (page 72) for a truly girly look. I like pairing the Basic Bodice with any of the skirts (and have even given them as gifts with the Treasure Skirt, page 111).

The right fit One of my favorite aspects of these pieces is how easy it is to adjust them to get the best possible fit for the wearer. Check out the size chart (below) and compare it to your child’s measurements. If you need to add length to any garment, use one of the horizontal lines (empire cutting line on the Peasant top, tiered pants line on the Pants, and so forth) to add an inch or two. Just keep in mind that any added ruffles or tiers also affect the garment’s overall length. The included pattern pieces—Basic Bodice, Peasant Top/Dress, and Pants—are graded from size 2 to 6. I’ve included measurements with each project for cutting the simple rectangles used to create elements like skirts and ruffles. The only limit to what you can do with these patterns is your own creativity!

A Peasant Dress variation makes a fun combination with Ruffled Pants in coordinating fabrics.

Size Chart € Chest Waist Hip

2

3

4

5

6

201/2˝

211/2˝

221/2˝

231/2˝

241/2˝

20˝

21˝

21˝

211/2˝

22˝

203/4˝

213/4˝

231/2˝

241/2˝

251/2˝

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This chapter lists the tools, terms, and techniques you’ll need to complete every project in this book—and beyond. This is a must-read before you start sewing, and it’s what you’ll refer to for in-depth instructions when completing more hands-on techniques, like gathering, hemming, and working with elastic waistbands.

Some indispensable tools of the trade:

Hand needle Cutting mat. Sewing machine needles

Acrylic ruler Pin cushion Rotary cutter

Measuring tape

Scissors

6. Pins Hem gauge Strap turner

Bodkin

Marking pen

Seam ripper Dressmaker’s chalk

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Chopstick


Tools Bodkin Guides elastic, cording, or ribbon through a casing (like a waistband). My favorite is about 3˝ long, with gripping teeth on one end. You can also use a safety pin (which I find a necessity with some of the narrower casings, like sleeves and cuffs). Dressmaker’s chalk/marking pen Marks lines and notches (matching points) on fabric. Chalk brushes away, and most marking pens are either air or water erasable. I tend to use the air-erasable pens most often. However, I will use the water-soluble pens when I’m working on a project for more than one day and do not want the marks to disappear before I complete my project. Take care not to iron over marking pen lines, because they may become permanent when heat set. Hand needle Even though I use a sewing machine, I still find plenty of uses for a hand needle: sewing on buttons, guiding top threads through to the back of a garment to tie off, attaching small embellishments, and so forth. Hem gauge Inexpensive, but indispensable for me! I use it for everything, from checking the seam allowance on my sewing machine to measuring strap placement. The plastic arrow slides into position and stays there, making it much easier to check the depth of the hem as you press a garment. Measuring tape Soft and flexible, the measuring tape is essential for taking key measurements of the child who’ll be wearing your creations. I keep a small notebook with my daughter’s measurements and always note the date they were taken so I can make sure they’re current before I start a project.

Pincushion The emery inside traditional pincushions is handy for keeping your pins sharpened and ready for use. I keep one on my cutting table (accessible for pinning) and one by my sewing machine (to relocate pins as I remove them while sewing). Some people prefer magnetic pincushions, which help keep pins from falling on the work surface. Pins Have you ever checked out the notions wall of your sewing shop? It’s like a buffet of sharp, pointy objects! As with sewing machine needles, there’s a proper pin for every fabric. I typically use dressmaker’s pins for my sewing projects. Discard bent and/or dull needles and pins. Rotary cutter, mat, and acrylic ruler I avoided these tools for years, thinking they were just for quilting. Boy, was I wrong! My 45mm rotary cutter, self-healing mat, and see-through acrylic ruler make cutting projects so much faster. I use them for everything, including cutting my pattern pieces. At the very least, they are indispensible for cutting the rectangles used throughout this book. (Note: Rotary cutter blades are razor sharp and should be used with extreme care.) Scissors Invest in a good pair of scissors just for cutting fabric. I have a slightly older pair I use for cutting patterns and interfacing, plus smaller scissors for clipping threads. I always mark my good sewing scissors “fabric only” with a permanent marker. And then I hide them from my family. Seam ripper Forget the tiny one that may have come with your sewing machine. Spend a couple of extra dollars to buy the larger, ergonomic seam ripper, because you’ll use it quite a bit. I use my seam ripper on nearly every project. The sharp tip is easy to maneuver under stitches or in between seams. The curve of the head is a sharp blade for slicing through stitches. I also use my seam ripper for cutting buttonholes after they’ve been machine sewn. Just poke the tip through the fabric and use the curved blade to slice open the buttonhole.

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Seam sealant This clear liquid dries hard and helps keep fabric from fraying. I find it particularly useful on buttonholes or on the cut ends of ribbon. Use sparingly, just enough to wet the fabric and keep it from fraying. Fray Check is a common brand of seam sealant. Serger A serger or overlock machine uses multiple top threads (four is relatively common) with no bobbin and wraps stitches around two sides of your fabric edge. It’s especially handy for finishing seams, but I also use mine for gathering ruffles and attaching elastic to waistbands. You do not need a serger for the projects in this book; however, I did use mine, so you’ll see a lot of serged seams throughout. Sewing machine You do not need a fancy-schmancy sewing machine to create the projects in this book. I sewed for years on an inexpensive machine purchased from a discount retailer. It got the job done. However, my current sewing machine (which cost about three times as much as its predecessor) does sew consistently better. If you’re having a lot of issues with thread breaking, tangling, or looping, it may be your machine and not user error. Sewing machine needles Check your sewing machine manual for the type of needle needed for your specific machine. Different fabrics require different size needles. For most apparel sewing, I use a Universal needle size 90/14, which works well on quilting cottons. For heavier fabrics like cotton twill, denim, or corduroy, I prefer a size 100/16 Jeans needle. Be sure to change your needle frequently (about every three or four projects). Strap turner There are a variety of commercial strap turners on the market, but my favorite continues to be a chopstick. If you choose a strap turner, consult the packaging for specifics on how to use it. Thread I grew up using a Coats & Clark Dual Duty All-Purpose thread and still do most of the time. I try to match my thread color to the main color of the fabric, going a little lighter rather than darker so the thread will blend in. For some projects, I’ll use a contrasting thread (especially if I’m ready to sew and don’t have any coordinating thread on hand). If you do, be aware that contrasting stitching stands out more, so you’ll want to make sure any visible stitches are nice and even. (Note: I used contrasting thread for the how-to photos in this book so the stitching can be seen easily.)

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Techniques A to Z The following is a basic dictionary of terms and techniques commonly used in sewing clothing. With each technique, a brief “tutorial” provides how-to specifics. Many of the projects refer to techniques in this section, so you may find it helpful to bookmark ones that are unfamiliar, so you can locate them easily while sewing.

Backstitching This machine stitch locks in the starting and ending stitches of a seam. At the beginning and end of each seam, sew forward three or four stitches. Then use your sewing machine’s reverse button or lever to sew back along that line three or four stitches. Release the button and continue sewing. End each seam by backstitching three or four stitches.

Basting Basting stitches are used to hold two or more pieces of fabric in place before you sew a seam. Basting allows you to test fit and placement before you do the final stitching. Set your sewing machine to the longest stitch length and move your needle position so you are sewing inside the seam allowance. (Note: If your machine doesn’t allow you to move the needle to the right, move the fabric to sew within the 1/2˝ seam allowance.) In this book, you’ll encounter basting when attaching straps to the bodice

of jumpers and when assembling double-layer skirts. Basting stitches

Run basting stitches inside the seam allowance.

Buttonholes A buttonhole consists of two parallel lines of tight zigzag stitches with end pieces (known as bartacks) of wider zigzag stitching. Check your sewing machine manual for the available buttonhole stitches and the steps needed for your specific machine. (Note: To stabilize the fabric where the buttonhole will go, it’s essential that you press fusible interfacing onto the fabric’s wrong side.)

Your sewing machine manual should include steps for sewing a buttonhole.

Curves When you sew a curved seam, such as an armhole, get in the habit of keeping your eye on the presser foot and not on the sewing needle.

Just take it slow and steady, guiding the fabric from in front of the presser foot without pushing it forward. It’s okay to raise the presser foot and adjust the fabric on tight curves, but make sure the needle is in the down position and through the fabric, so it doesn’t shift. After you stitch the curves, you will usually notch or clip them so the seam will lie properly after the garment is turned right side out. This technique will be used on the garments sewn in the Basic Bodice chapter. When you clip concave curves, such as armholes, carefully use the tip of your scissors to snip the fabric of the seam allowance perpendicular to your stitches. Take care not to snip through the stitches. Space your cuts about 1/3˝ apart throughout the curve.

For concave curves, clip through the seam allowance just to the stitches.

On convex curves, cut triangular notches out of the seam allowance. This technique can be used on the pockets sewn for the Pocket Pinafore (page 52).

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Elastic I love using elastic waistbands on kids’ clothing. They are easy to wear, particularly when a child hits that “I can do it” phase. Plus, they are really comfortable. Cut elastic 2˝ smaller than your child’s waist measurement for a secure yet stretchy fit. The skirts and pants in this book all use elastic waistbands.

Casing with inserted elastic 1. Fold the edge of the waistband (the top edge of the skirt or pants) 1/4˝ to the wrong side of the fabric; press.

3. With the garment wrong side out, stitch close to the bottom edge of the waistband all the way around, leaving a 1˝ opening at the side seam or the center of the back. Be sure to backstitch at the beginning and end of your stitching.

2. Fold the edge another 1˝, again to the wrong side of the fabric, and press again.

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tip

I recommend using another safety pin to secure the free end of the elastic to the garment to keep the elastic from accidentally being pulled into the casing. Take care to keep the elastic flat as you feed it through, so it doesn’t end up twisted inside the casing.

4. Attach a bodkin or safety pin to one end of the elastic and guide it through the waistband casing.

5. When you get back to the opening, push the bodkin end through it. Remove the bodkin or safety pin and sew the elastic ends together to make a loop, after checking one last time to make sure the elastic is not twisted. You can either overlap the elastic ends by about 1/2˝ and use a zigzag stitch to secure them, or abut the elastic ends and use a very wide zigzag stitch to connect the ends without overlapping them. Although this second choice can take a little practice, it will create a nice, flat waistband. For both methods, sew back and forth a couple of times to secure the elastic.

Overlapped elastic ends

Abutted elastic ends

6. After you connect the ends, slip the elastic through the gap in the casing and stitch the waistband gap closed. Take care not to stitch through the elastic. Turn your garment right side out. To prevent your waistband elastic from twisting, secure it to the side and back seams by stitching inthe-ditch of the seamline (see Stitching in-the-Ditch, page 28).

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Finishing seams With all the work you put into making a garment, you want it to hold up through wearing, washing, and drying. One of the best ways to do that is by finishing your seams. The fastest way to finish seams, in my opinion, is with a serger, but it’s far from the only or cheapest way. You can also use pinking shears to cut along the raw edges of the seam allowance and then press the seams open. Or you can sew a line of zigzag stitches along the edge of each piece of fabric before sewing the pieces together. After sewing the seams, press them open.

Serged seam (left), pinked seam (center), and zigzag stitched seam (right)

Gathering Nothing says “boutique” to me quite like lots of ruffles! I add them to nearly everything I sew—owning a serger has definitely made this easier. (Consult your serger’s manual for instructions on how to use it to gather ruffles.) There are a couple of ways to make ruffles with a sewing machine, and in no time you’ll be happily surrounded by “ruffly” goodness. You can also use these methods to gather larger rectangles to make a skirt, dress, or top. The Traditional method and the Zigzag method that follow describe making gathered tiers from rectangles of fabric and sewing them around the bottom of a skirt, dress, or pants legs. Before gathering, sew together the short ends of the ruffle strips to make a continuous circle.

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tip

A serger or overlock machine trims and overlocks the seam allowance in one pass. The serger knife moves ahead of the needles as it trims; needles and loopers form the stitches.


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Traditional method

tip

My friend Angela taught me to sew the gathering stitches on the front and back sections of the ruffle strip separately, with the two rows of stitches on each strip meeting at the ruffle’s side seams. It’s so much easier to do it this way than to have two long rows that go all the way around a ruffle (especially when it’s the bottom tier of a twirl skirt).

1. Set your sewing machine stitch length to the longest stitch and move the needle position all the way to the right. (Note: If your machine doesn’t allow you to move the needle to the right, move the fabric to sew within the 1/2˝ seam allowance.) Along the edge of the ruffle strip between 2 seams, sew 2 parallel rows of stitches—inside the seam allowance and about 1/4˝ apart—from one side seam to the other. Do not backstitch at the Sew 2 parallel rows of stitches. beginning and end of each row, and be careful that your rows of stitches do not cross each other. You also should leave about 4˝ to 6˝ of thread tail, which you’ll pull to gather the fabric in a later step.

2. On the bottom edge of the piece to which you are attaching the ruffle, mark the center point between the seams on each side. Do the same on the piece you are gathering. Match these 4 points and pin the pieces together, lining up the raw edges and with fabric right sides together. Match seams and center points between the seams on each side of ruffle.

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3. Pull the thread tail ends at one side seam to begin gathering the fabric. Use your fingers to slide the gathers toward the middle point of your ruffle, checking frequently to make sure the gathered section fits the flat section below it. Distribute the gathers evenly along the area and pin to hold them in place. Continue with the other three quadrants until the entire piece is gathered and pinned.

Pull threads and distribute gathers evenly.

4. Use a regular stitch length and seam allowance to sew the pieces together. I sew a little slowly and remove the pins before they slide under the presser foot. It helps to position the fabric gathers before they go under the foot so that the gathering is stitched neatly into the seam. Otherwise, you can end up with wonky-looking gathers. Pin ruffle.

Zigzag method 1. Set your sewing machine to its widest zigzag stitch. Cut a piece of yarn, embroidery floss, or narrow ribbon slightly longer than the ruffle. Place the ribbon on the fabric’s wrong side within the ruffle’s seam allowance. Center the presser foot over the ribbon and check the width of the zigzag to make sure it won’t catch the ribbon. Zigzag over the ribbon from one side seam to the other, being careful not to catch the ribbon in the stitches. Repeat on the other side of your piece.

Sew wide zigzag stitch over yarn, embroidery floss, or ribbon.

The Basics

23


2. Repeat Steps 2–4 of the Traditional Method (pages 22–23) to mark, pin, gather, and stitch the ruffle to the garment piece. Take extra care not to pull the free end of the ribbon out of the zigzag stitches when gathering. After sewing, remove the ribbon or yarn.

Pull yarn or floss to make gathers.

Hemming Most of the projects in this book call for a 1/4˝ machine-stitched hem. I use a serger to finish the edges of my garments, but a turned hem looks even better, in my opinion. Simply fold the hem 1/4˝ toward the wrong side of the garment and press. Turn it another 1/4˝ and press again. Now turn the garment wrong side out and stitch close to the inside hem edge. I line up the bottom edge with the right side of my presser foot and move the needle all the way over to the right. (Note: If you cannot change the needle position, move the fabric edge so the needle will be close to the inside folded edge.) Then I use a medium stitch length (3mm on my machine) to stitch it down.

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Line up hem’s bottom edge with presser foot to help keep stitches even.

tip

I’m always looking for easier ways to do things. My cheater way of turning a hem is to run a line of basting stitches 1/4˝ from the bottom edge, all the way around the hem. I then use that row of stitches as my guide for turning and pressing the hem. Because the stitching will be on the inside of the garment, it’s not necessary to remove it. Easy peasy!


Matching seams When sewing together pieces across seams, match the seams first and pin them in place; then insert pins between the seams. You’ll want to do this on nearly all of the Basic Bodice patterns, as well as some of the skirt patterns.

Match seams and pin.

Pattern and fabric layout Before laying out your pattern, match the fabric’s selvage edges and make sure there are no creases or wrinkles. Lay your fabric on a flat surface in preparation for cutting. (Refer to Tracing Patterns on page 29 for information on preparing the patterns in this book.) Check the pattern pieces for a long arrow, which indicates the direction of the grain. The arrow should run parallel to the fabric’s selvage. If the piece is to be placed on a fold, the fold should be parallel to the selvage, unless otherwise indicated.

Selvage

Fold

Selvage

Fold

Several patterns in this book require that you fold the fabric so that the selvages meet at the center, creating a folded edge along each side. Place a pattern piece on each fold of the fabric and then cut out the pieces. If you are using the same fabric for remaining garment pieces, refold the fabric and cut the pieces. Any larger pieces may need to be cut with the fabric opened into one layer.

tip

Always be sure to check the nap and/or the direction of your fabric print before cutting your pieces. I once cut an entire dress upside down because I laid out the pieces in the wrong direction on a one-way print!

Use pattern weights or a few pins to hold the pattern to the fabric while you cut it with scissors or a rotary cutter. The fabric and pattern should stay as flat as possible as you cut. Don’t lift up the fabric to cut around it. I try to cut near the corner of a table so I can move around the fabric and have access to nearly all sides.

Fold both selvages to the center and place pattern pieces on folds.

The Basics

25


Pinning Insert pins perpendicular to the seam’s edge so that as you stitch, you can easily remove them before they slide under the presser foot. Use fewer, rather than more, pins. They’re just there to keep pieces lined up as you maneuver the fabric through your sewing machine. Using too many pins can actually create puckered fabric in your seams.

Pressing I don’t enjoy ironing. Actually, I hate it. However, I’ve reconciled myself to the fact that a garment must be properly pressed throughout the sewing process for it to look right when it’s done.

tip

When doing multiple rows of shirring, I first use my airerasable pen to draw straight lines across the fabric. (I once used chalk, and for some reason, the chalk would not brush off after sewing. I ended up with blue lines permanently drawn across the front of a white peasant top.)

Always start a project by ironing your fabric so it is nice and smooth before you start cutting your pattern. If you pink or zigzag stitch your seams, press them open when you encounter instructions to press your seams. Use your fingers to separate the seam allowance and then iron down the middle, along the seam. I always flip the garment over and do a quick press on the right side, down the seam, to make sure I have not pressed in any puckers. Serged seams can’t be pressed open because the stitches are cast over the edge of the seam allowance. If you choose to serge your seams, press them to one side.

Rotary cutting My rotary cutter and I have a close personal relationship. I use it all the time, which is kind of ironic, because I used to be afraid of it! Use a clear acrylic ruler to cut rectangles and squares. Hold down the ruler with the fingertips of your noncutting hand (kind of like spider push-ups) to help keep it from slipping.

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Shirring This technique uses elastic thread to produce decorative rows of puckers or gathers in fabric.

1. Hand wind elastic thread onto an empty bobbin, keeping the elastic taut as you wind. Load the bobbin in your sewing machine and use regular thread on the top spool. Increase the stitch length as high as it will go and set the tension to the highest setting. As you sew, the elastic will contract, shirring the fabric.

Shirring gathers fabric as you sew.

tip

If the elastic thread does not contract right away, don’t stress. Just take the finished shirring to your ironing board and hit the stitches with some steam from your iron by hovering the iron over the stitches without touching them.

2. Near the end of the first row of stitching, stop at the edge, within the seam allowance; keep the needle in the down position before lifting the presser foot. Turn the fabric 90° toward the next line for shirring; then lower the presser foot and turn the wheel by hand to advance the fabric. When you get to the beginning point of the next row, leave the needle down and again raise the presser foot so you can turn the fabric to sew another line of shirring stitches. You may have to stretch the fabric flat as you continue sewing rows, because it will likely shrink up with the first line of shirring. 3. To secure the stitches before joining seams, replace the elastic thread bobbin with regular thread, and restore the tension and stitch length to your machine’s normal settings. Stitch a line over the shirring, perpendicular to the rows and within the seam allowance.

The Basics

27


Stitching in-the-ditch

Topstitching

This is a line of stitches that “hides” in a seam. Set the seam under the presser foot so the needle will stitch where the two pieces of fabric meet— this is known as the ditch formed by the seam. Carefully sew right on top of the seam (ditch), taking care to make sure the stitches do not drift to one side or the other of the seam. This stitch is recommended for use on waistbands to help secure the elastic in the casing.

Topstitching is both functional and decorative. It helps maintain the integrity of your garment’s shape and keeps seams flat on the inside. You can use a longer straight stitch (I set mine to 3.0mm) or a decorative stitch (zigzag or fancier). Stitches will be close to the seam or edge of a garment. In this book, topstitching is used around the bottom of the Basic Bodice, where gathered panels attach, or above tiers on skirts.

Stitch in-the-“ditch” of the seam.

Stitching in-the-ditch

Straight stitching The straight stitch is the most common stitch in your sewing arsenal, the one you’ll use to construct probably every garment you ever make. Keep your stitch length to a short to medium length (I use 2.2mm) and sew pieces with the edge of your garment running along the appropriate seam allowance mark on your sewing machine (most of the projects in this book use a 1/2˝ seam allowance).

Topstitch closely above seam after you’ve pressed seam allowance.

tip

When topstitching, I switch out my regular presser foot for a clear appliqué foot, which makes it easier to see the seams.

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Tracing patterns The patterns from this book are printed on the pullouts. However, I recommend tracing them onto a more flexible, durable material. My choice is Pellon Easy Pattern, but you can use Swedish tracing paper (see Resources, page 126), clear soil liner from the garden center, or even lightweight nonwoven interfacing. Whichever option you choose, you’ll end up with a reusable pattern piece that’s easy to use. Doing so also lets you make the outfits from this book in multiple sizes without cutting into the nested patterns. Just trace each pattern piece along the line designated for the size you want to make. The original pattern remains intact, so when you want to make the garment again in a different size, you can trace the size you need. I trace every pattern I sew and keep the traced pattern with the pattern envelope or book. Make sure you copy all the markings from the original pattern, including grainline, notches, number of pieces to cut, pattern name/number, and size.

Tracing keeps your nested patterns intact.

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29


Turning straps Turning straps are the bane of my existence. I’ve even been known to increase the cutting width of a strap just to avoid having to turn it! But sometimes there is no way to avoid turning straps. In those instances, follow these steps:

1. To sew and turn a strap, fold the strap in half with right sides together so the long edges meet. Sew along the long edge, using a 1/2Ë? seam allowance. Be sure to backstitch at the beginning and end of your stitching.

2. Take the strap to your ironing board and press open the seam so the seam is in the middle of the strap.

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3. Sew across a short end of the strap, taking care to backstitch at the beginning and end. Clip the sewn corners diagonally toward the center of the strap (it’ll look sort of like an arrow). Be careful not to clip into the stitching, or you’ll be left with a hole in the end of your strap.

4. Hold the open end of the fabric strap in one hand and your turning tool, such as a chopstick, in your other hand. Fold the top edge of the strap over the tool (like a little cuff). Gently push the tool upward against the fabric as you work the fabric tube right side out. Be careful while you are pushing and pulling! It’s very easy to accidentally poke the turning tool through the fabric end and ruin your strap. Once the strap is right side out, use the turning tool to poke out the corners. If you are using a commercial strap turner, refer to the directions that come on the package.

5. Press the strap, and then topstitch along the long, pressed edges and the short, sewn edge (the raw edge will be inserted between seams). I usually hand crank the sewing machine’s wheel as I approach the finished short end of the strap. To do so, leave the needle down through the strap and raise the presser foot. Turn the strap, lower the presser foot, and then hand crank the wheel of the sewing machine for the first few stitches.

The Basics

31


The Basic Bodice O

ne of the most versatile pattern pieces I know is the Basic Bodice. It’s the foundation of a garment that

runs from shoulder to waist and that can be a top, a dress, or something in between, depending on how

long you cut the lower gathered panel. Layer the bodice over a Peasant Top (page 66), a Peasant Dress, or a tee—or wear it on its own. A simple change of fabric can take this from casual to formal, just like that. The photograph shows the Pocket Pinafore (page 52) worn with a T-shirt and Lace-Edged Gauchos (page 100) and the Knotty Apron variation (page 39) worn over a Peasant Top (page 66).

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In addition to the Barely Basic Top/Dress, you’ll find six very different styles based on the versatile Basic Bodice design. Barely Basic Top/Dress (page 34)

Knotty Apron variation (page 39)

Sunshine Halter (page 41)

Side-Tied Smock (page 45)

Pocket Pinafore (page 52)

Ruffled Peek-a-Boo Jumper (page 58)

Perfect Party Dress (page 49)

The Basic Bodice

33


Barely Basic Top/Dress 34

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T

here’s nothing boring about this Barely Basic Top/Dress. Depending on the length of your lower panels, you can make either a top (shorter panel) or a dress (longer panel).

Simplify the dress by making it out of one fabric. Or go a little crazy by choosing different fabrics for each element—bodice, gathered panel, straps, and ruffle. You can even make the gathered panel itself from two fabrics, and then place the side seams in the centers of the bodice so both fabrics show. Simple straps button on the front of the bodice, and a ruffle dresses up the bottom hem. Pair this versatile Barely Basic Top or Dress with everything from Ruffled Pants (page 94) to the Twirly Girly Skirt (page 123).

Cutting Instructions

1/3 yard fabric for the Basic Bodice

Note: Lay out and cut the Bodice pattern pieces first and then cut rectangles for the remaining pieces. Refer to Pattern and Fabric Layout (page 25) for instructions on preparing the folded fabric.

1/3 yard fabric for the Basic Bodice lining 5/8 yard fabric for the Lower Panel (top) OR 1 yard fabric for the Lower Panel (dress)

2 pieces 1˝ × 1˝ fusible interfacing for the buttonholes 2 buttons (7/8˝)

Fold

Bodice back

Bodice front

Fold

1 fat quarter or 1/3 yard fabric for the Straps

Selvage edge

1/4 yard fabric for the Ruffle

Selvage edge

Materials

Cutting layout

Seam sealant

Basic Bodice Trace the appropriate size of the Front and Back Basic Bodice patterns from the pattern pullout (page P1). Cut one front and back from the bodice fabric and one front and back from the lining fabric.

Lower Panel and Ruffles Size

2

3

4

5

6

Lower Panel for top (Cut 2.)

71/4˝ × 21˝

73/8˝ × 217/8˝

71/2˝ × 221/2˝

73/4˝ × 23˝

8˝ × 235/8˝

Lower Panel for dress (Cut 2.)

141/2˝ × 21˝

143/4˝ × 217/8˝

15˝ × 221/2˝

151/2˝ × 23˝

16˝ × 235/8˝

Ruffle (Cut 2.)

21/2˝ × 363/4˝

21/2˝ × 381/4˝

3˝ × 39˝

3˝ × 391/2˝

3˝ × 40˝

Note: All dimensions are listed length × width.

Barely Basic Top/Dress

35


Straps Size

2

3

4

5

6

Straps (Cut 2.)

4˝ × 71/2˝

4˝ × 8˝

4˝ × 81/4˝

4˝ × 83/4˝

6˝ × 9˝

Construction Refer to Techniques A to Z (pages 17–31) or specific information on the techniques used in this project. ½˝

½˝

BASIC BODICE 1. Make turned straps from the 2 strap pieces. 2. Pin a strap 1/2˝ in from each side of the top edge of the back bodice piece, right sides together. Match the strap’s unfinished edge with the top edge of the bodice. Baste the straps to the bodice.

3. Pin the bodice front to the back with right sides together. Pin and sew the side seams, using a 1/2˝ seam allowance. Press the seams open and set aside. Repeat this step with the lining pieces.

4. Turn the bodice lining right side out. Insert the bodice lining inside

Pin straps 1/2˝ from sides of bodice top.

the bodice, with right sides together and side seams and corners matching. (The straps will be sandwiched between the top and the lining.) Pin the bodice to the lining along the top and at the sides. Stitch a 1/4˝ seam all the way around the armholes and the top of the bodice. Do not stitch the bottom of the bodice.

5. With the bodice still wrong side out, place the bodice/lining unit on the ironing board and iron a 1˝ × 1˝ piece of fusible interfacing to the bodice front where the buttonholes will be sewn. Place the interfacing approximately 3/8˝ down from the top edge and 1/2˝ from each side.

6. Clip the armhole curves and trim the corners so they’ll be nice and

Match and pin bodice side seams.

crisp when you turn the bodice right side out. Turn the bodice right side out. Gently push out all your seams so they lie flat; then press the stitched edges.

tip

To help push out the corners, you can use a point turner, a hem gauge, or even a small pair of scissors with the blades closed (just be careful not to poke through the fabric).

Insert bodice into lining; pin.

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7. Starting at one of the side seams, topstitch all the

3. Sew gathering stitches along the ruffle’s top edge.

way around the bodice’s sewn edge. Baste the bottom raw edges of the bodice and lining together. Set aside.

Match the gathered edge of the ruffle to the bottom edge of the lower panel, right sides together. Gather it to fit; then pin and sew with a 1/2˝ seam allowance.

Lower Panels 1. Place the 2 lower panels right sides together, matching and pinning the side seams. Sew, finish the seams, and press. Set aside.

Attach ruffle to bottom edge of lower panel.

4. Finish the seam allowance, press it up toward the Match and pin short edges of lower panels.

2. Match the short edges of the ruffles, right sides together, and pin. Sew, finish, and press the seams. Finish the bottom edge of the ruffle strip by turning and pressing it 1/4˝ to the wrong side. Fold again 1/4˝ and stitch close to the inside folded edge.

lower panel, and topstitch right above the seam along the bottom edge of the lower panel to hold the seam allowance in place.

Pin and sew short edges of ruffle strips.

Barely Basic Top/Dress

37


Finishing 1. Sew gathering stitches along the top edge of the lower panel. Match the gathered edge with the bottom edge of the bodice, right sides together. Gather the lower panel to fit the bottom edge of the bodice; pin. Sew with a 1/2˝ seam allowance to attach the bodice to the lower panel.

Attach lower panel to bodice.

2. Finish the seam allowance and press it up toward the bodice. Topstitch right above the seam along the bottom edge of the bodice to hold the seam allowance in place. 3. Use a fabric marker or dressmaker’s chalk to mark two 1˝ buttonhole lines on the front bodice. They should be parallel to the top bodice edge, 1/2˝ down and 1/2˝ from each side seam. (The fusible interfacing you ironed on should be directly beneath the marks.)

Mark stitching lines for buttonholes.

4. Follow your sewing machine’s directions to sew two 1˝ buttonholes on the front of the bodice. Apply a thin line of seam sealant to the entire buttonhole and let it dry. Place a pin just inside the bartack at each end of the buttonhole; then cut the buttonhole open between the lines of stitches, from one pin to the other. Hand sew buttons to the ends of your straps.

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Knotty Apron Variation Knotty Apron Variation

39


T

he Knotty Apron is a variation of the Barely Basic Top/Dress. An apron sewn into the waist seam and straps that are knotted,

instead of buttoned, give this version its own special charm.

MATERIALS

CUTTING INSTRUCTIONS

Refer to Materials for the Barely Basic Top/Dress (page 35) for the Bodice and Lower Panel/Ruffles yardages.

Refer to Cutting Instructions for the Barely Basic Top/ Dress (pages 35–36) for the Bodice and the Lower Panel and Ruffles.

1 fat quarter for the Straps 1 fat quarter or 1/2 yard fabric for the Apron

Apron Size

2

3

4

5

6

Apron (top)

51/4˝ × 12˝

53/8˝ × 121/2˝

51/2˝ × 13˝

53/4˝ × 131/8˝

6˝ × 131/2˝

Apron (dress)

101/2˝ × 12˝

11˝ × 121/2˝

12˝ × 13˝

13˝ × 131/8˝

14˝ × 131/2˝

Straps Size

2

3

4

5

6

Straps (Cut 2.)

4˝ × 131/2˝

4˝ × 14˝

4˝ × 141/4˝

4˝ × 143/4˝

4˝ × 15˝

Construction Follow Steps 1–7 for the Basic Bodice construction of the Barely Basic Top/Dress (pages 36–37). Then continue as follows for the Knotty Apron variation.

1. Finish both side edges and the bottom edge of the apron by pressing the fabric 1/4˝ to the wrong side. Fold again 1/4˝ and stitch close to the inside folded edge all the way around the 3 sides.

2. Sew gathering stitches along the apron panel’s top edge. 3. Measure 2˝ in from each side seam on the sewn bodice front. Pin the sides of the apron to the bodice at those points, right sides together and matching the raw edges of the bodice and apron. Gather to fit; then pin and baste 1/4˝ from the raw edge to secure.

4. Construct the lower panels and ruffles (Lower Panels, Steps 1–4, page 37). Finish as for the Barely Basic Top/Dress (Finishing, Steps 1–4, page 38). (Note: You may need to make smaller buttonholes so the knots do not slip through. Make a test 3/4˝ buttonhole on a scrap of fabric and try fitting the knot through it. Enlarge or decrease the size as needed for your particular strap.) 40

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Attach apron to bodice.


Sunshine Halter Sunshine Halter

41


M Y

ermaids frolic across a fun, summery Sunshine Halter. A quick change—replac-

ing the back bodice piece with a basic rectangle that’s elasticized across the

top—makes a big difference in the look of this top. The straps simply tie together at the back of the wearer’s neck. Lengthen the bottom two tiers, or add another tier or two as shown in the photo to make a halter dress instead. Wear it over another top with sleeves (like the Peasant Top, page 66) to make it more of a year-round option.

Cutting Instructions

1 yard fabric for the Halter Front Bodice, Front Bodice lining, Back Panel, and Front Tier 1 Panel

Note: Lay out and cut the Bodice pattern pieces first and then cut rectangles for the remaining pieces. Refer to Pattern and Fabric Layout (page 25) for instructions on preparing the folded fabric.

1/2 yard fabric for Tier 2 7/8 yard fabric for Tier 3

Fold

Bodice front

Fold

3/8 yard 1/2˝-wide elastic for the Halter Back

Selvage edge

1 fat quarter or 1/2 yard fabric for the Straps

Selvage edge

Materials

Bodice front lining

Cutting layout

Front Bodice Trace the appropriate size of the Front Basic Bodice pattern from the pattern pullout (page P1). Place it on the fold of the fabric and cut 1 for the bodice front and flip the pattern over and cut 1 for the lining.

Halter Back and Tiers Size

2

3

4

5

6

Halter Back Panel (Cut 1.)

71/2˝ × 21˝

81/8˝ × 217/8˝

9˝ × 221/2˝

95/8˝ × 23˝

101/4˝ × 235/8˝

Front Tier 1 (Cut 1.)

41/4˝ × 21˝

41/2˝ × 217/8˝

5˝ × 221/2˝

51/4˝ × 23˝

51/2˝ × 235/8˝

Tier 2 (Cut 2.)

41/4˝ × 363/4˝

41/2˝ × 381/4˝

5˝ × 39˝

51/4˝ × 391/2˝

51/2˝ × 40˝

Tier 3 (Cut 4.)

41/4˝ × 32˝

41/2˝ × 331/2˝

5˝ × 34˝

51/4˝ × 351/4˝

51/2˝ × 36˝

Note: All dimensions are listed length x width.

Straps

42

Size

2

3

4

5

6

Straps (Cut 2.)

4˝ × 14˝

4˝ × 15˝

4˝ × 151/2˝

4˝ × 161/2˝

4˝ × 17˝

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Construction

4. Clip the corners and armhole curves, turn right side

Refer to Techniques A to Z (pages 17–31) for specific information on the techniques used in this project.

1. Make turned straps from the 2 strap pieces. 2. Pin a strap 1/2˝ in from each side of the top edge of the front bodice piece, right sides together. Match the strap’s unfinished edge with the top edge of the bodice. Baste the straps to the bodice. ½˝

out, and press. Then topstitch along the edge of the arm and the top seam.

5. Sew gathering stitches along the top edge of the Front Tier 1 piece. Pin the gathered edge to the bottom edge of the front bodice piece, right sides together. Gather it to fit; then pin and sew with a 1/2˝ seam allowance.

½˝

Pin straps to front of bodice.

Gather and attach Front Tier 1 piece to front bodice.

3. Place the front lining piece on top of the bodice, right sides together. Pin and sew the arm and top edges with a 1/4˝ seam allowance. Sew.

6. Finish the seams and press them up toward the bodice. Topstitch right above the seam along the bottom edge of the bodice to hold the seam allowance in place. Set aside.

7. Turn and press the raw top edge of the halter back panel 1/4˝ to the wrong side. Turn another 11/4˝ and press well. Stitch close to the lower folded edge to secure it to the back panel.

8. To make a casing for the elastic, measure down 1/2˝ from the folded top edge of the halter back panel. Use a fabric marker to draw a line from side edge to side edge. Stitch along this line from edge to edge. Match front bodice lining to front bodice piece and sew.

S unshine Halter

43


9. Measure the finished front bodice piece above the gathered tier, from

13. Match the short edges of

side seam to side seam. Cut a piece of 1/2˝-wide elastic 1˝ shorter than that measurement, and attach it to a safety pin or bodkin. Thread the elastic through the casing in the halter back.

the Tier 2 rectangles, right sides together, and sew them together with a 1/2˝ seam. Finish and press. Set aside.

10. When the opposite end of the elastic reaches the side seam, stop pulling it through, and secure this end by stitching through both the casing and the elastic close to the edge. Make sure you catch the elastic in the stitches. Doing this will keep the elastic from accidentally going too far into the casing, which would require you to start threading it through all over again.

14. Repeat Step 13 with the Tier 3 rectangles. Turn the lower edge 1/4˝ to the wrong side; then turn another 1/4˝ to create the hem. Press and stitch down.

11. Continue pulling the elastic through the casing, gathering the halter

15. Sew gathering stitches along

back panel as you pull through the elastic. Secure it on the other side of the halter by again stitching through both the casing and the elastic, close to the edge.

the top edge of Tier 3.

12. Place the front bodice unit and back halter piece right sides together, matching the side seams. Pin and sew with a 1/2˝ seam. Finish the seam and press it toward the halter back. I like to topstitch along the side seam to secure the seam flat against the halter back. Set aside.

16. Pin Tier 3 to the bottom edge of Tier 2, with right sides together and raw edges matching. Gather it to fit; then pin and sew with a 1/2˝ seam. Finish the seam allowance and press it up toward Tier 2. Topstitch right above the seam along the bottom edge of Tier 2 to hold the seam allowance in place.

17. Repeat Steps 15 and 16 with Tier 2, pinning and gathering the Tier 2/Tier 3 unit to the bottom edge of the upper bodice/Tier 1 unit. Finish the seam allowance and press it up toward the bodice. Topstitch right above the seam along the bottom edge of Tier 1 to hold the seam allowance in place.

One side of front bodice and back halter pieces sewn together

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Side-Tied Smock Side-Tied Smock

45


Y

ou’ll never confuse this layering piece with those preschool artist smocks! Follow the instructions here for a fast, basic top, or embellish it with

ruffles at the hem or even inserted between the bodice top and bottom pieces. You also can swap out the fabric side ties for ribbons—just be sure to seal the ribbon ends to prevent fraying. Want to really mix things up? Use four different fabrics for each of the main pieces.

MATERIALS

CUTTING INSTRUCTIONS

1/3 yard fabric for the Basic Bodice

Note: Lay out and cut the Bodice pattern pieces first and then cut rectangles for the remaining pieces. Also use the Bodice pattern to lay out and cut the Bodice lining. Refer to Pattern and Fabric Layout (page 25) for instructions on preparing the folded fabric.

1/3 yard fabric for the Basic Bodice lining 2/3 yard fabric for the Lower Panel 1/4 yard fabric for the Side Ties

Selvage edge

Fold

Bodice front

Selvage edge

Fold

1 fat quarter or 1/3 yard fabric for the Straps Bodice back

Cutting layout for both the Bodice and the Bodice lining

Basic Bodice Trace the appropriate size of the Front and Back Basic Bodice patterns from the pattern pullout (page P1).

Lower Panel Size

2

3

4

5

6

Lower Panel (Cut 2.)

81/2˝ × 21˝

9˝ × 217/8˝

91/2˝ × 221/2˝

10˝ × 23˝

101/2˝ × 235/8˝

Note: All dimensions are listed length x width.

Straps Size

2

3

4

5

6

Straps (Cut 2.)

4˝ × 71/2˝

4˝ × 8˝

4˝ × 81/4˝

4˝ × 83/4˝

4˝ × 9˝

Side Ties Cut 4 rectangles 11/2˝ × 4˝.

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LIT TLE GIRL S, BIG ST YLE


Construction

6. Make 2 turned straps from the strap rectangles except leave both short ends unsewn. Press. Topstitch along the long folded edges.

Refer to Techniques A to Z (pages 17–31) for specific information on the techniques used in this project.

1. Finish both side edges and the bottom edge of the lower panel by pressing the fabric 1/4˝ to the wrong side. Fold again 1/4˝ and stitch close to the inside folded edge all the way around the 3 sides.

7. Measure 1/2˝ from each side on the top edge of the front bodice. Pin each strap on the marks, matching the raw edges, and baste them in place. ½˝

2. Sew gathering stitches to the top edge of each lower panel. 3. Measure and mark 5/8˝ in from each side on the bottom edge of the front bodice. Pin the top edge of a lower panel between those markings, right sides together, and gather it to fit. Pin and sew with a 1/2˝ seam; then press the seam up toward the bodice. Repeat this step using the back bodice piece and the second lower panel.

4. Make 4 ties from the tie strips, using a 1/4˝ seam allowance and the same technique as for turned straps.

5. On each side of the front bodice, measure down 5/8˝ from the top edge. Pin the side ties at this marking, with right sides together and raw edges matching. Baste the ties to the side seam. Repeat this step with the back bodice.

8. Turn up the lower edge of the front bodice lining by 1/2˝ and press. Repeat with the back bodice lining.

5⁄8˝

Press up bottom of lining.

9. To help keep the straps and ties out of the way as Measure and pin ties.

you attach the lining, anchor them with pins to the center of the bodice.

Side-Tied Smock

47


10. Place the front bodice lining on top of the bodice front, with right sides together and with sides and top edges matching. Starting at a side edge, stitch a 1/4˝ seam across the armhole, the top of the pinned bodice, and around the remaining armhole to the other side edge. Stitch a 1/2˝ seam along each side of the bodice. The bottom edges of the bodice (where your lower panel is located) and lining should remain free and unstitched.

11. Clip the curves of the armholes and trim the corners. Turn the bodice right side out through the bottom edge and gently push out all your corners. Press.

12. Check the folded edge of the bodice lining to make sure it is even with the seam at the bottom edge of the bodice front. Pin in place.

13. Topstitch about 1/8˝–1/4˝ away from all the edges of the bodice,

tip

If you want to add a ruffle to the bottom edge, finish the side seams of the ruffle and the lower panel before you attach the ruffle. You can also add lace to the bottom edge. If you do, attach the lace before you finish the side seams so that the outer edge of the lace will be folded and finished neatly with your bodice bottom.

backstitching at the beginning and end. Make sure to catch the folded lining edge in your stitches as you topstitch along the bottom edge of the bodice.

14. Pin the back ties to the center of the back bodice to keep them out of your way. Lay the back bodice on your table, right side up. Place the unattached ends of the straps on the back bodice, right sides together. (The other ends of the straps are already attached to the front bodice.) Pin the back bodice lining to the back bodice, right sides together covering the straps. Starting at a side edge, stitch a 1/4˝ seam across the armhole, the top of the pinned bodice, and around the remaining armhole to the other side edge. Stitch a 1/2˝ seam along each side of the bodice. The bottom edge of the bodice (where your lower panel is located) and lining should remain free and unstitched.

Sew ¼˝ seam.

Sew ½˝ seam.

Sew ½˝ seam.

Straps with attached front bodice are placed between back bodice and its lining.

15. Repeat Steps 12–13 to finish the back bodice.

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Lit tle Girls, Big St yle


Perfect Party Dress Perfect Party Dress

49


M Y

y friend Lisa Carroccio made me promise to include a fancy dress. This

dress is just the thing when your little girl needs something to wear for a

special occasion. Dress it up even more by making the optional overskirt.

Cutting Instructions

1/3 yard fabric for the Basic Bodice

Note: Lay out and cut the Bodice pattern pieces first and then cut rectangles for the remaining pieces. Refer to Pattern and Fabric Layout (page 25) for instructions on preparing the folded fabric.

1/3 yard fabric for the Basic Bodice lining 11/2 yards fabric for the Skirt (Lower Panel)

2 pieces 1˝ × 1˝ fusible interfacing for the buttonholes

Fold

11/2 yards 2˝-wide grosgrain or satin ribbon (for the optional Overskirt)

Bodice front

Bodice back

Fold

3/4 yard fabric for the Overskirt (optional)

Selvage edges

1 fat quarter or 1/3 yard fabric for the Straps

Selvage edges

Materials

Cutting layout

2 buttons (7/8˝)

tip

Seam sealant

Head to the discount home store and buy a premium full-size flat sheet to get a really posh fabric for much less than buying yardage.

Basic Bodice Trace the appropriate size of the Front and Back Basic Bodice patterns from the pattern pullout (page P1). Place the pattern pieces on the fold of the fabric. Cut 1 of each from the bodice fabric and 1 from the bodice lining fabric.

Skirt (Lower Panel) Size

2

3

4

5

6

Skirt (Lower Panel) (Cut 2.)

20˝ × 21˝

201/2˝ × 217/8˝

211/2˝ × 221/2˝

23˝ × 23˝

24˝ × 235/8˝

Overskirt Size

2

3

4

5

6

Overskirt (Cut 1.)

18˝ × 231/4˝

181/2˝ × 241/8˝

191/2˝ × 243/4˝

21˝ × 251/4˝

22˝ × 257/8˝

Note: All dimensions are listed length x width.

Straps Note: These straps are wider than ones used on other projects.

50

Size

2

3

4

5

6

Straps (Cut 2.)

41/2˝ × 71/2˝

41/2˝ × 8˝

41/2˝ × 81/4˝

41/2˝ × 83/4˝

41/2˝ × 9˝

Lit tle Girls, Big St yle


Construction Refer to Techniques A to Z (pages 17–31) for specific information on the techniques used in this project.

Dress 1. Make 2 turned straps from the strap rectangles. 2. Follow Basic Bodice Construction, Steps 1–7, for the Barely Basic Top/Dress (pages 36–37) to assemble the bodice, but with one exception: In Step 2, attach the straps to the front bodice piece instead of to the back bodice.

3. Place the skirt panels with right sides together, matching and pinning the side seams. Sew with a 1/2˝ seam allowance. Finish the seams and press.

4. Sew gathering stitches along the skirt’s top edge. Match the gathered edge of the skirt with the bodice’s raw bottom edge, right sides together. Gather to fit; then pin and sew with a 1/2˝ seam allowance to attach the bodice to the lower panel.

5. Finish the seam allowance and press it up toward the bodice. Topstitch right above the seam along the bottom edge of the bodice to hold the seam allowance in place.

6. With a fabric marker, make two 1˝ lines parallel to

Overskirt 1. Cut a piece of 2˝-wide satin or grosgrain ribbon to your child’s waist measurement plus 24˝. Heat seal or use seam sealant on the cut ends.

2. Finish the side and bottom edges of the overskirt by turning 1/4˝ to the wrong side. Turn under another 1/4˝, press, and sew all the way around the 3 sides.

3. Fold over the top edge of the overskirt 1/4˝ to the wrong side and then fold another 2˝ to make a casing. Stitch close to the bottom folded edge to secure.

the top edge of the back bodice for the buttonholes. These lines should be 1/2˝ down from the top edge and 1/2˝ in from each side seam.

7. Follow your sewing machine’s directions to sew two 1˝ buttonholes on the back of the bodice. Apply a thin line of seam sealant to the entire buttonhole and let it dry. Place a pin just inside the bartack at each end of the buttonhole; then cut the buttonhole open between the lines of stitches, from one pin to the other. Hand sew buttons to the ends of your straps.

8. Finish the skirt hem by pressing the fabric 1/4˝ to the wrong side. Fold again 1/4˝ and stitch close to the inside folded edge.

Fold top edge to make casing.

4. Use a bodkin or safety pin to thread the ribbon through the 2˝ casing. Tie the overskirt over the top of the party dress waistline. Perfect Party Dress

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Pocket Pinafore 52

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YI

t’s hard to believe this top starts with the same Basic Bodice pattern pieces, but it does.

Follow the cutting instructions closely, and your daughter will be sporting this funky two-pocket pinafore in no time. It’s particularly fun to mix in corduroy with quilting cottons to add textural as well as visual interest. For a fun touch, the straps are fastened using suspender/ mitten clips. Here, the pinafore is worn with a coordinating pair of Lace-Edged Gaucho Pants (page 100). Instead of hemming the pinafore, you could add lace or rickrack to the bottom edge of the top to coordinate with the pants. Refer to Steps 7 and 8 (page 103) for instructions on adding lace.

Cutting Instructions

Materials

11/4 yards fabric for the Lower Panel

1˝ Draw line.

1 fat quarter or 1/4 yard fabric for the Pockets

1˝ Draw line.

Folded or cut Bodice Back Fold

Fold

Folded or cut Bodice Front

Selvage edge

1/4 yard fabric for the Bodice lining

Selvage edge

1/4 yard fabric for the Bodice

Draw line.

1 fat quarter or 1/3 yard fabric for the Straps

Lower portion of folded or cut Bodice Front

Fold

2 suspender/mitten clips (Look in the notions section of your local quilt or fabric shop.)

Draw line.

Selvage edges

2 pieces 1˝ × 1˝ fusible interfacing

Draw line.

Cutting layout

See the special cutting instructions (pages 54–55) to ensure success.

Straps Size

2

3

4

5

6

Straps (Cut 2.)

31/2˝ × 71/2˝

31/2˝ × 8˝

31/2˝ × 81/4˝

31/2˝ × 83/4˝

31/2˝ × 9˝

Pocket Pinafore

53


Pockets

Lower Panels

Trace the Pinafore Pocket from the pattern pullout (page P4) and cut 4 from the pocket fabric.

Instead of cutting rectangles for the lower panels (as you did for the Basic Bodice Top/Dress), you will extend the length of the folded or cut Bodice Front and Back patterns.

Bodice For the top of this garment, you will alter the Basic Bodice by cutting it shorter than the original.

1. To expand the width of the lower portion of the

1. Trace the appropriate size of the Front and Back Basic Bodice pieces from the pattern pullout (page P1). Be sure to include the line indicated for the Pocket Pinafore.

2. Cut or fold the front and back pattern pieces at the line indicated for the Pocket Pinafore.

front basic bodice piece, place the bottom portion of the folded or cut front bodice piece on the fold of the fabric. Use a ruler to measure over the appropriate amount (see chart). Move the piece over that much, keeping the edge parallel to the fold.

tip

You can either cut on the line or just fold the pattern up and out of the way along the line when you cut. If you fold the pattern, you can later use it for another basic bodice top or dress.

3. Place the folded or cut top part of the bodice pattern on the fold of the bodice fabric. Add 1˝ below the folded or cut edge, mark the new edge on the fabric, and cut out the piece. Repeat with the back bodice piece, again adding 1˝ to the bottom edge. Then cut out the same pieces from the lining fabric.

54

Measure over from fold to place pattern piece.

Size

2

3

4

5

6

Distance from fold

41/2˝

43/4˝

47/8˝

51/8˝

Length from bottom edge

10˝

101/2˝

11˝

111/2˝

12˝

Lit tle Girls, Big St yle


2. Add a seam allowance to the top by measuring 1/2˝ up from the cut or folded top edge of the pattern. Draw a line across to the fabric’s folded edge.

3. Add length to the piece by measuring down from the bottom side corner of the lower bodice piece the amount shown in the chart. Mark the new length and draw a line along the side of the pattern down to the marked length. This line forms the lower panel’s new side seam.

4. Use the ruler to draw a line connecting the folded edge of the fabric with the lengthened side seam to form the pinafore’s hem. Cut out the front lower panel.

Front lower panel

Extend pattern piece with ruler and marking pen.

5. Repeat Steps 1–4 to cut out the back lower panel.

Pocket Pinafore

55


Construction Refer to Techniques A to Z (pages 17–31) for specific information on the techniques used in this project.

1. Make 2 turned straps from the strap rectangles. 2. Fold a short strap end 1/4˝ to the wrong side and press. Fold it up another 11/4˝ and press again. To attach the suspender clips, slide the pressed strap end through one of the clips from front to back, with the strap right side up. The folded edge should be in the back.

7. Repeat Step 5 for the front bodice piece and lining. With the bodice still wrong side out, iron 2 pieces of 1˝ × 1˝ fusible interfacing on the bodice front where the suspender clips will grip. Place them so they are approximately 3/8˝ down from the top edge and 1/2˝ in from each side. These will reinforce the area and help keep the teeth of the clips from damaging the fabric.

8. Repeat Step 6 to complete the front bodice. 9. Match the 2 pocket pieces, right sides together. Pin and sew them together with a 1/4˝ seam allowance. Leave a 1˝ opening along one of the sides for turning, at least 1/2˝ from the corner. Be sure to backstitch before and after the opening to secure it. Repeat with the remaining pocket pieces.

Leave 1˝ opening.

Attach suspender clips.

3. Stitch close to the folded edge, making sure to backstitch at the beginning and end so the strap is secure. Repeat with the other strap and set both aside.

4. Pin a strap 1/2˝ in from each side of the top edge of the back bodice piece, right sides together. Match the strap’s unfinished edge with the top edge of the bodice. Baste the straps to the bodice.

5. Place the back bodice lining piece on top of the piece with the straps, right sides together. Pin and sew around the sides and the top edge, using a 1/4˝ seam allowance. Do not sew across the bottom edge.

6. Clip the corners, turn right side out, and press. Topstitch along the 3 edges. Then baste the lower edge closed. Set aside.

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Lit tle Girls, Big St yle

Match pocket pieces, right sides together.

10. Clip the top corners of the pockets, notch around the curve, and turn them right side out through the opening. Press.

11. Topstitch 1/4˝ from each pocket’s top edge. 12. Use your ruler to measure 3˝ from each side of the lower bodice piece. Mark the fabric with your fabric marker.


13. Shift your ruler so it is perpendicular to the hem

18. Sew gathering stitches along the top edges of the

of the bodice piece and the edge of the ruler is alongside the mark you made. Measure and mark 2˝ up from the bottom.

front and back panels. Match the gathered top edge of the front lower panel with the raw edge of the bottom front bodice to the bottom raw edge of the lower panel, right sides together. Gather and sew using a 1/2˝ seam allowance.

14. On each side of the skirt, place the outside edge of the pocket adjacent to the mark 3˝ from the edge and the bottom edge of the pocket on the mark 2˝ from the bodice bottom edge. Pin at the pocket’s top corners, in the middle of each side, and on the bottom.

Gather lower panels to bodice.

19. Clip the corners diagonally. Press the seam up Measure and mark for pocket placement.

toward the bodice and topstitch above the seam. Repeat with the back bodice and panel.

15. Sew the pocket to the skirt close to the pocket edge, starting at the top right corner of the pocket and finishing at the top left corner of the pocket. The top of the pocket will remain open and unsewn. Backstitch at the beginning and end of the stitching to secure the pocket.

16. Pin the side seams of the front and back panels with right sides together. Sew with a 1/2˝ seam allowance. Finish the seams and press.

17. Turn the edge of the armhole seam 1/8˝ toward the wrong side of the fabric and press; then turn the edge another 1/8˝, press, and stitch close to the folded edge. Work as slowly as you need to and use steam (careful not to burn your fingertips!) to get the folded edge to lie flat.

Press seam up toward bodice.

20. Finish the hem of the pinafore by pressing the fabric 1/4˝ to the wrong side. Fold again another 1/4˝ and stitch close to the inside folded edge.

Pocket Pinafore

57


Ruffled Peek-a-Boo Jumper 58

Lit tle Girls, Big St yle


T

his is one of my all-time favorite tops. The ruffles are plentiful, from the top of the bodice to the hem to the cascading ruffles on the underskirt. I

used five different fabrics on this one for maximum impact. Even the straps have a gathered effect, created with elastic. If you want to make this a dress instead of a top, simply lengthen the underskirt and overskirt panels.

Cutting Instructions

1/3 yard fabric for the Basic Bodice

Note: Lay out and cut the Basic Bodice pattern pieces first and then cut rectangles for the remaining pieces. Refer to Pattern and Fabric Layout (page 25) for instructions on preparing the folded fabric.

1/3 yard fabric for the Basic Bodice lining 1/2 yard fabric for the Overskirt 5/8 yard fabric for the Underskirt

Fold

1/3 yard fabric for the Underskirt Ruffles 1/2 yard fabric for the Straps

Bodice front

Bodice back

Fold

1/3 yard fabric for the Overskirt Ruffle

Selvage edge

1/8 yard fabric for the Bodice Ruffle

Selvage edge

Materials

Cutting layout

2 pieces 1˝ × 1˝ fusible interfacing 3/8 yard 3/4˝-wide nonroll elastic for the Straps 2 suspender/mitten clips (Look in the notions section of your local quilt or fabric shop.) French curve (You can use a 12˝ plate or pizza pan if you don’t have a French curve available.)

Basic Bodice Trace the appropriate size of the Front and Back Basic Bodice pattern from the pattern pullout (page P1). Place them on the fold of the fabric and cut one of each from the bodice fabric and the lining fabric.

Overskirt and Underskirt Size

2

3

4

5

6

Overskirt Back Panel (Cut 1.)

51/4˝ × 21˝

53/8˝ × 217/8˝

51/2˝ × 221/2˝

53/4˝ × 23˝

6˝ × 235/8˝

Overskirt Front Panel (Cut 2.)

51/4˝ × 101/2˝

53/8˝ × 11˝

51/2˝ × 111/2˝

53/4˝ × 12˝

6˝ × 121/2˝

Underskirt (Cut 2.)

71/4˝ × 21˝

73/8˝ × 217/8˝

71/2˝ × 221/2˝

73/4˝ × 23˝

8˝ × 235/8˝

Ruffled Peek-a-Boo Jumper

59


Place the 2 front overskirt panels right sides together. Use the French curve (or plate) to draw a curved line down the right edge, from the top to the bottom of the panel. Cut along that line to shape the front overskirt opening.

Use French curve (left) or plate (right) to make curved line for overskirt front panels.

Ruffles Size

2

3

4

5

6

Top Bodice Edge Ruffle (Cut 1.)

13/4˝ × 15˝

13/4˝ × 151/4˝

13/4˝ × 151/2˝

13/4˝ × 16˝

13/4˝ × 161/2˝

Overskirt Ruffle (Cut 2.)

21/2˝ × 363/4˝

21/2˝ × 381/4˝

3˝ × 39˝

3˝ × 391/2˝

3˝ × 40˝

Underskirt Ruffles (Cut 3.)

2˝ × 363/4˝

2˝ × 381/4˝

2˝ × 39˝

2˝ × 391/2˝

2˝ × 40˝

Note: All dimensions are listed length x width.

Straps Size

2

3

4

5

6

Straps (Cut 2.)

31/2˝ × 13˝

31/2˝ × 14˝

31/2˝ × 141/4˝

31/2˝ × 151/4˝

31/2˝ × 153/4˝

Size

2

3

4

5

6

3/4˝-wide elastic (Cut 2.)

71/2˝

73/4˝

81/4˝

81/2˝

Elastic

60

Lit tle Girls, Big St yle


Construction

Refer to Techniques A to Z (pages 17–31) for specific information on the techniques used in this project.

Straps 1. Make 2 turned straps from the strap rectangles, leaving both short ends unsewn.

2. Use a bodkin or safety pin to feed an elastic piece through a strap. When the raw edge of the elastic is flush with an open edge of the strap, sew across the short edge and secure the elastic in the strap.

3. Continue pulling the elastic through the strap (the fabric of the strap will start to gather) until the remaining raw edge is even with the opposite end of the strap. Pin in place and sew across the short edge to secure the elastic in the strap. Remove the pin. Repeat with the second strap.

Pin and stitch across strap to secure elastic.

4. Follow the instructions in Step 2 (page 56) to attach the suspender clips to each strap. Push the gathers up so the first 1˝ of each strap is not gathered and will go through the clip easier.

Basic Bodice 1. Pin a strap 1/2˝ in from each side of the top edge of the back bodice piece, right sides together. Match the strap’s unfinished edge with the top edge of the bodice. Baste the straps to the bodice.

2. Press the top bodice edge ruffle in half, with wrong sides together and long edges matching. Sew gathering stitches along the long, raw edge.

Press bodice ruffle, wrong sides together.

3. On the bodice front, measure and mark 3/8˝ from each side on the top edge. Line up the gathered edge of the bodice-edge ruffle with the top edge of the bodice front and pin the centers. Pin the ends next, fanning up the short, open edges of the ruffle so they are flush with the top edge of the bodice. The folded edges of the ruffle should be at the 3/8˝ marks to allow the ruffle to disappear into the top edge of the bodice after it’s sewn.

4. Gather the ruffle to fit the top edge of the bodice. Baste with a 1/8˝ seam allowance.

5. Match the bodice front and back pieces, right sides together. Pin and sew the side seams, using a 1/2˝ seam allowance. Finish and press the seams. Repeat with the lining pieces.

Gather ruffle and fan edges.

Ruffled Peek-a-Boo Jumper

61


6. Turn the bodice lining right side out and insert it

3. Sew gathering stitches along the top edge of the

inside the bodice, right sides together, matching the side seams and then the corners. Stitch a 1/4˝ seam all the way around the sides and top of the pinned bodice. The bottom edge will remain unstitched.

overskirt ruffle. Pin, gather to fit, and sew it to the bottom edge of the overskirt, right sides together.

7. With the bodice still wrong side out, place the sewn pieces on the ironing board and iron 2 pieces of 1˝ × 1˝ fusible interfacing on the bodice front where the suspender clips will grip. Place the interfacing approximately 3/8˝ down from the top edge and 1/2˝ from each side. These pieces will reinforce the area and help keep the teeth of the clips from damaging the fabric.

4. Finish the seam allowance, press it up toward the overskirt, and topstitch right above the seam along the overskirt’s bottom edge. Set aside.

Underskirt 1. To mark the ruffle locations, draw a straight line from side seam to side seam 1 /2˝ from the bottom edge of the underskirt. Draw 2 more lines above the first, each parallel to the first line and 2˝ apart.

8. Clip the curves of the armholes and trim the corner edges so they’ll be nice and crisp. Turn the bodice right side out, gently pushing out all seams and corners so they lie flat. Press the stitched edges. Starting at one of the side seams, topstitch all the way around the sewn edge of the bodice. Set aside.

2˝ 2˝

Overskirt 1. Match the straight edges of the 2 front overskirt panels to the side edges of the back overskirt panel, right sides together, and pin. Sew with a 1/2˝ seam allowance, finish the seams, and press.

1½˝

Mark ruffle locations on underskirt.

2. Finish the bottom edges of each underskirt ruffle by pressing the fabric 1/4˝ to the wrong side. Fold again 1/4˝ and stitch close to the inside folded edge. 3. Sew gathering stitches along the top edge of the Attach overskirt front panels to back panel.

2. Match the short edges of the overskirt ruffle strips, right sides together, and sew. Finish and press. Finish the lower edge of the ruffle strip by folding it 1/4˝ to the wrong side, then another 1/4˝, and then stitching close to the inner folded edge.

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Lit tle Girls, Big St yle

ruffles.


4. Place the first ruffle on the front underskirt panel,

6. Pin the back underskirt panel and the ruffled front

right sides together, and pin the raw edge of the ruffle along the bottom drawn line. The raw edge will be facing the underskirt’s bottom edge. Pin, gather to fit, and sew using a 3/8˝ seam allowance. Repeat with the remaining ruffles.

underskirt panel, with right sides together and side seams matching. Sew together, using a 1/2˝ seam allowance. Finish the seams and press.

7. Pin the bottom ruffle up out of the way and finish the underskirt’s hem by folding it 1/4˝ to the wrong side; then fold another 1/4˝ and stitch close to the folded edge.

Finishing 1. Sew gathering stitches along the top edges of both the underskirt and the overskirt.

2. Pin the overskirt to the bodice by matching the side seams and then pinning the front edges to the center of the bodice front. Gather to fit, pin, and sew the overskirt to the bodice, using a 1/2˝ seam allowance. Attach ruffles to underskirt.

5. Press the ruffles over so the right sides are up and the ruffle covers the seam allowance. Remove any gathering stitches that show along the tops of the ruffles. Topstitch along the top edge of each ruffle to tack it down.

Gather and pin overskirt to bodice.

3. Pin and gather the underskirt to fit the bodice, making sure the ruffled panel is on the bodice front. Sew with a 1/2˝ seam allowance.

4. Finish the seam allowance, then press it up toward Topstitch ruffles to underskirt.

the bodice. Topstitch right above the seam along the bottom edge of the bodice to hold the seam allowance in place.

Ruffled Peek-a-Boo Jumper

63


The Peasant Top/Dress

S

leeves can be intimidating for the novice sewer, which is what makes this top or dress so pleasant to sew. The sleeves are raglan style, which means no ease stitching and no set-in frustrations. You’ll wish

you could make one for yourself.

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Lit tle Girls, Big St yle


In addition to the Classic Peasant Top/Dress, you’ll find four fun styles based on the peasant design. Classic Peasant Top/Dress (page 66)

Ruffled Empire Peasant Top/Dress (page 72)

Tiered Twirly Peasant Dress (page 77)

Flutter-Sleeved Peasant Top (page 81)

Ruffled-Neck Peasant Top (page 85)

the peasant top/dress

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Classic Peasant Top/Dress 66

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sew one of these tops in white every spring and fall, because it goes with pretty

much everything: jeans, shorts, skirts, jumpers. If you want to use a combination of

fabrics, but you’re intimidated about combining them, start with a coordinating print on the sleeves and ruffle of this piece. Like the Basic Bodice, this pattern can be made as a dress or a top. Either way, a ruffle perks up the hemline. The neckline, bodice, and sleeves are shirred. If your machine is resistant to shirring, follow the directions for the Ruffled Empire Peasant Top/Dress (page 72) to create an elastic casing for the neckline and sleeves.

Materials

Cutting Instructions

1/2 yard fabric for the Peasant Bodice Front and Back

Note: Lay out and cut the Peasant Bodice Front and Back pieces on the folds before cutting out the sleeves and ruffle. Refer to Pattern and Fabric Layout (page 25) for instructions on preparing the folded fabric.

1/3 yard fabric for Short Sleeves OR 5/8 yard fabric for Long Sleeves

Fold

Bodice back

Fold

Bodice front

Selvage edge

Elastic thread for shirring

Selvage edge

1/4 yard fabric for the Ruffle

Fold

Selvage edges

Short sleeve

Fold

Selvage edges

Note: Refold the fabric, so you have one fold to cut the sleeves.

Long sleeve

Cutting layout

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Peasant Bodice Trace the appropriate size of the Front and Back Peasant Bodice patterns from the pattern pullout (page P2). Place each on the fold of the fabric and cut 1 of each. Note: Use a fabric marker or chalk to trace the empire cutting/shirring line on both pieces. Draw 3 more lines above the first one, each 1/4˝ away from the previous line.

Dress If you make a dress instead of a top, extend the length of the Front and Back Peasant Bodice pattern pieces. To do this, measure your child from under the arm to the knee. Compare the measurement to the underarmto-hem length on your Front and Back Peasant Bodice pattern pieces. Add the difference in length to the bottoms of the patterns. (Your dress will end up slightly longer than that because of the ruffle that you will add to the bottom.) Place your ruler along the side seam of the pattern piece and draw a line out to the new bottom edge. The side seam tapers out toward the bottom edge, so the skirt on the dress will be a bit wider. Repeat with the back piece. Match the 2 pieces at the underarm and the bottom hem to make sure they are the same length.

Sleeves Trace the corresponding size sleeve from the pattern pullout (page P1). Use the cutting line to make a short-sleeved version, if you prefer. Cut 2 from your fabric. Mark the sleeve front and back.

Ruffles

68

Size

2

3

4

5

6

Ruffle (Cut 2.)

3˝ × 281/2˝

3˝ × 29˝

3˝ × 293/4˝

3˝ × 303/8˝

3˝ × 311/8˝

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Construction Refer to Techniques A to Z (pages 17–31) for specific information on the techniques used in this project.

1. Fold over the hem of one sleeve 1/4˝ to the wrong side of the fabric; then fold again 1/4˝ and press well. Repeat with the second sleeve. Do not stitch the folds down yet.

2. Place the sleeves right side up on your work surface. Using your fabric marking pen and a ruler, follow the appropriate instructions below. For short sleeves: Measure up 3/4˝ from the folded edge of the sleeve and draw a line across the sleeve from one side to the other. Draw 2 more lines above it, each 1/4˝ from the previous line. Repeat on the second sleeve.

Make shirring marks on short sleeve.

For long sleeves: Draw a line across the sleeve, from one side to the other, on the short-sleeve cutting line. Draw 2 lines above it, each 1/4˝ from the previous line. Repeat on the second sleeve.

Make shirring marks on long sleeve.

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3. Match the front upper sleeve edge of one sleeve to

5. Fold the neckline edge of the bodice/sleeve unit 1/4˝

the upper arm edge of the bodice front, right sides together. Pin and sew with a 1/2˝ seam allowance. Repeat to add the second sleeve to the other side of the front. Finish the seams and press them toward the bodice.

to the wrong side of the bodice and press. Fold another 1/4˝ and press again. Do not stitch the fold down yet.

6. With your fabric marking pen and ruler, measure down 1/2˝ from the folded neckline edge and mark a line all the way around the neckline. This will serve as your guide for shirring the neckline.

Edge is folded but not stitched down. Stitch. Mark for shirring.

Match sleeves to bodice front.

4. Match the back upper edge of one sleeve to the upper arm edge of the bodice back, right sides together. Pin and sew. Do not repeat with the second sleeve at this time. The unit can still lie flat for shirring.

Mark all around neckline.

7. Mark 3 more shirring lines, each 1/4˝ from the previous line. Follow the directions for Shirring (page 27) to shirr the neckline. Working from the right side of the fabric, start at the open edge between the bodice back and the sleeve, with the top of the neckline to the right of the presser foot. Stitch all the way around the neckline along the top marked line. Continue sewing shirring stitches on the other marked rows. You will have 4 parallel rows of shirring.

8. Sew shirring stitches along the lines on both sleeves. 9. Once you’ve finished shirring, replace the elastic bobbin thread with your regular thread. Readjust the stitch length and the thread tension to their normal positions. Leave 1 seam for 1 sleeve unattached.

10. Unfold the pressed neckline edge and pin the back upper sleeve edge to the back bodice, right sides together. Sew with a 1/2˝ seam allowance, finish the seam, and press it toward the bodice.

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11. Refold the top edge of the neckline. Press.

14. Unfold the hem of the second sleeve. Match the

Topstitch all the way around the top of the neckline, just above the lower folded edge.

underarm sleeve edges and the bodice front and back side edges, right sides together. Pin and sew. Finish the seam and press.

15. Refold the sleeve hem and press well. Topstitch close to the inside folded edge, all the way around. Repeat with the second sleeve. Set aside. 16. Match the short edges of the ruffle strips, right sides together. Sew and finish the seams. Press.

17. Turn the bottom edge of the ruffle strip 1/4˝ to the wrong side; then turn it another 1/4˝ and press. Stitch close to the inner folded edge. Topstitch around neckline.

12. Unfold the hem of 1 sleeve. Match the underarm sleeve edges and the bodice front and back side edges, right sides together. Pin and sew to complete one side seam. Finish the seam and press. Do not repeat with the second side.

13. Reload your sewing machine with elastic bobbin thread, readjust the stitch length and tension, and use the previously marked empire lines on the bodice to shirr 4 rows of elastic around the chest, again with the fabric right side up. Change the bobbin back to regular thread. Readjust the stitch length and the thread tension to their normal positions.

18. Sew gathering stitches to the ruffle’s top edge. Match the gathered edge of the ruffle to the bottom edge of the peasant bodice, right sides together. Gather to fit; then pin and sew the ruffle with a 1/2˝ seam allowance.

19. Finish the seam and press the seam allowance up toward the bodice. Topstitch right above the seam along the bottom edge of the bodice to hold the seam allowance in place.

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Ruffled Empire Peasant Top/Dress 72

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he word “sweet” doesn’t begin to describe the oh-so-girly Ruffled Empire

Peasant. There’s something almost lyrical about this top (which can also be

transformed into a dress simply by adding length to the gathered panel). It’s got a little extra swing, courtesy of the gathered panel that attaches to the empire bodice. I especially love using floral fabrics when I make this top for my daughter. Here, I made a pair of Ruffled Pants (page 94) with matching ruffles. In this pattern, the gathered effect is produced using narrow elastic instead of shirring.

Materials

Cutting Instructions

1/3 yard fabric for Peasant Bodice Front and Back

Note: Lay out and cut the Front and Back Peasant Bodice pattern on the folds before cutting the sleeves and rectangles for the Lower Panel and Ruffles. Refer to Pattern and Fabric Layout (page 25) for instructions on preparing the folded fabric.

1/3 yard fabric for Short Sleeves OR 5/8 yard fabric for Long Sleeves

Selvage edge

Long sleeve

Fold

Selvage edges

Short sleeve

Bodice back

Fold

Selvage edges

Bodice front

Fold

1 yard 1/4˝-wide elastic for the neckline and sleeves

Selvage edge

5/8 yard fabric for Ruffle

Fold

1/2 yard fabric for Lower Panel

Cutting layout

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Peasant Bodice Trace the appropriate size of the Front and Back Peasant Bodice patterns from the pattern pullout (page P2) to the empire cutting line. Place each on the fold of the fabric and cut 1 of each.

Dress If you make a dress instead of a top, extend the length of the Front and Back Lower Panel pattern pieces. To do this, measure your child from under the arm to the knee. Compare the measurement to the length of the Lower Panel pattern pieces. Add the difference to the length of the panels. (Your dress will end up slightly longer than that because of the ruffle that you will add to the bottom.)

Sleeves Trace the corresponding size Sleeve from the pattern pullout (page P1). Use the cutting line marked “Short Sleeve” to make a short-sleeved version. Cut 2 from your fabric. Mark the sleeve front and back.

Lower Panel and Ruffle Size

2

3

4

5

6

Lower Panel (Cut 2.)

6˝ × 281/2˝

61/4˝ × 29˝

61/2˝ × 293/4˝

63/4˝ × 303/8˝

63/4˝ × 311/8˝

4˝ × 26˝

4˝ × 265/8˝

4˝ × 273/8˝

Ruffle (Cut 4.) 4˝ × 25˝ 4˝ × 251/2˝ Note: All dimensions are listed length x width.

Elastic Cut an 18˝-long by 1/4˝-wide piece of elastic to feed through the neckline casing. Cut 2 lengths of elastic 1/2˝ smaller than your child’s upper arm or wrist measurement for the sleeves.

Construction Refer to Techniques A to Z (pages 17–31) for specific information on the techniques used in this project.

1. Match the front upper sleeve edge of 1 sleeve to the upper arm edge of the bodice front, right sides together. Pin and sew with a 1/2˝ seam allowance. Repeat to add the second sleeve to the other side of the front. Finish the seams and press them toward the bodice. 2. Match the back upper edge of 1 sleeve to the upper arm edge of the bodice back, right sides together. Pin and sew. Repeat with the second sleeve.

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3. Fold the neckline edge 1/4˝ to the wrong side of the top and press. Fold an additional 1/2˝ and press again.

4. Starting in the middle of the bodice back, stitch close to the lower folded edge all the way around the neckline, leaving a 2˝ gap through which you’ll later feed the elastic. Make sure you backstitch 2 or 3 stitches at the beginning and end to keep the neckline casing from pulling open.

5. Match the underarm sleeve edges with the front and back bodice side edges, right sides together. Pin and sew. Finish the seam and press it toward the garment back. Repeat with the second sleeve.

Match underside of sleeve and bodice sides.

6. Fold over the hem of 1 sleeve 1/4˝ to the wrong side of the fabric; then fold an additional 1˝ and press well. Repeat with the second sleeve.

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7. Topstitch close to the lower folded sleeve edge, all the way around, leaving a 1˝ gap near the seam through which you can feed the elastic. Sew another row of stitches 1/2˝ from the first, closer to the sleeve hem—but do not leave a gap. Repeat with the second sleeve. Set aside.

8. Place the 2 lower panels right sides together and match the side seams. Sew, finish the seams, and press. Set aside.

9. Place 2 of the 4 ruffle strips right sides together and match a short side seam. Repeat with the other 2 ruffle strips until you have a continuous circle. Sew and finish the seams, and press toward the ruffle back. Sew 2 rows of stitches to form a channel for the elastic.

10. Fold 1/4˝ of the lower edge of the ruffle toward the wrong side of the fabric and press; then fold another 1/4˝. Stitch all the way around the bottom of the ruffle, close to the inner folded edge.

11. Sew gathering stitches to the ruffle’s top edge. Pin the ruffle’s gathered edge to the bottom edge of the lower panels, right sides together. Gather to fit; then pin and sew, using a 1/2˝ seam allowance.

12. Finish the seam and press it up toward the bodice. Topstitch right above the seam along the bottom edge of the bodice to hold the seam allowances in place. 13. Sew gathering stitches to the top edge of the lower panels. Pin the gathered edge to the lower edge of the bodice top, right sides together. Gather to fit; then pin and sew, using a 1/2˝ seam allowance.

Gather and attach ruffle to bottom of lower panel.

14. Finish the seam and press toward the bodice top. Topstitch right above the seam along the bottom edge of the bodice top to hold the seam allowances in place.

15. Use a bodkin or safety pin to feed the 1/4˝ elastic through the neckline. Refer to the instructions on page 19 to overlap the ends and secure with a zigzag stitch; then stitch closed the gap in the neckline casing. Repeat with each sleeve.

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Tiered Twirly Peasant Dress Tiered Twirly Peasant Dress

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atisfy her urge to twirl with the Tiered Twirly Peasant Dress. This dress—with

its three tiers—is not for the faint of heart! It involves lots and lots of gathering.

but it’s definitely worth the effort. She’ll spin her heart out just to see the hem of the dress flare and float.

Materials

Cutting Instructions

1/3 yard fabric for Front and Back Peasant Bodice

Note: Lay out and cut the Front and Back Peasant Bodice on the folds before cutting the Sleeves and Tier rectangles. Refer to Pattern and Fabric Layout (page 25) for instructions on preparing the folded fabric.

1/3 yard fabric for Short Sleeves OR 5/8 yard fabric for Long Sleeves

Lit tle Girls, Big St yle

Selvage edge

Short sleeve

Long sleeve

Fold

Cutting layout

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Empire cutting line

Note: Refold the fabric, so you have 1 fold to cut the sleeves.

Selvage edges

Before you start this dress, buy extra thread and load up three bobbins to save time while sewing.

Peasant bodice back

Fold

tip

Empire cutting line

Selvage edges

1 yard 1/4˝-wide elastic for the neckline and sleeves

Peasant bodice front

Fold

11/8 yards fabric for Tier 3

Selvage edge

2/3 yard fabric for Tier 2

Fold

1/2 yard fabric for Tier 1


Peasant Bodice Trace the appropriate size of the Front and Back Peasant Bodice patterns from the pattern pullout (page P2). Be sure to mark the empire cutting line. Place each on the fold of the fabric and cut 1 of each, cutting the bottom at the empire cutting line.

Sleeves Trace the corresponding size Sleeve from the pattern pullout (page P1). Use the cutting line marked “Short Sleeve” to make a short-sleeved version. Cut 2 from your fabric. Mark the sleeve’s front and back.

Tiers Size

2

3

4

5

6

Tier 1 (Cut 2.)

51/4˝ × 281/2˝

51/4˝ × 29˝

51/2˝ × 293/4˝

6˝ × 303/8˝

61/2˝ × 311/8˝

Tier 2 (Cut 3.)

51/4˝ × 331/4˝

51/4˝ × 337/8˝

51/2˝ × 343/4˝

6˝ × 351/2˝

61/2˝ × 361/4˝

Tier 3 (Cut 5.)

51/4˝ × 35˝

51/4˝ × 351/2˝

51/2˝ × 361/2˝

6˝ × 37˝

61/2˝ × 38˝

Elastic Cut a piece of 1/4˝-wide elastic to 18˝ to feed through neckline casing. Cut 2 lengths of elastic 1/2˝ smaller than your child’s upper arm or wrist measurement for the sleeves.

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Construction Refer to Techniques A to Z (pages 17–31) for specific information on the techniques used in this project.

1. Follow Steps 1–5 for the Ruffled Empire Peasant Top/Dress (page 72) to sew the top of the dress.

2. Place the Tier 1 rectangles right sides together and match the short ends. Sew, finish the seams, and press. Set aside. Repeat with Tiers 2 and 3.

3. Turn under 1/4˝ on the lower edge of Tier 3 and press it toward the wrong side of the fabric. Fold another 1/4˝ and press again. Stitch all the way around the bottom of the tier, close to the inner folded edge.

4. Sew gathering stitches to Tier 3’s top edge. Match the gathered edge to Tier 2’s bottom edge, right sides together. Gather to fit; then pin and sew, using a 1/2˝ seam allowance.

5. Finish the seam and press it up toward Tier 2. Topstitch right above the seam along the bottom edge of Tier 2 to hold the seam allowance in place.

6. Repeat Steps 4 and 5 with Tier 2 and Tier 1, making sure you always attach the top of the lower section to the bottom edge of the tier above it.

7. Repeat Steps 4 and 5 to attach Tier 1 to the bottom edge of the bodice. 8. Use a bodkin or safety pin

Gather and attach bottom tier to second tier, right sides together.

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to feed the 1/4˝ elastic through the neckline casing. Refer to the instructions on page 19 to overlap the ends and secure with a zigzag stitch; then stitch closed the gap in the casing. Repeat with each sleeve.


Flutter-Sleeved Peasant Top Flutter-Sleeved Peasant Top

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his top is so light and airy, it almost floats away. The “sleeves” are cut very short,

and their hems are finished before the sleeves are attached to the bodice. They

get their “flutter” from the neckline shirring. Here, it’s worn with the Treasure Skirt (page 111).

Cutting Instructions

tip

1/2 yard fabric for the Front and Back Peasant Bodice

Are you using dark fabric? Elastic thread is also available in black, which will keep the little white stitches from showing through when you shirr.

1/4 yard fabric for the Sleeves 1/2 yard fabric for the Ruffle

Peasant bodice back

Fold

Peasant bodice front

Selvage edge

Fold

Elastic thread for shirring

Note: Lay out and cut the Front and Back Peasant Bodice patterns on the folds before cutting the sleeves and ruffle. Refer to Pattern and Fabric Layout (page 25) for instructions on preparing the folded fabric.

Selvage edge

Materials

Note: Use a fabric marker or chalk to trace the empire cutting line on both cut pieces. Draw 3 more lines above the first one, each 1/4˝ away from the previous line Also, mark a line 1˝ up from the hem of the top, all the way around for the ruffle placement.

Sleeve

Cutting layout

Sleeves Trace the corresponding size Sleeve from the pattern pullout (page P1) and trace the line for the Flutter-Sleeved Peasant Top. Using that line as the bottom edge of the sleeve, cut 2 from your fabric. Mark the sleeve’s front and back.

Ruffles

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Size

2

3

4

5

6

Ruffle (Cut 4.)

4˝ × 281/2˝

4˝ × 29˝

4˝ × 293/4˝

4˝ × 303/8˝

4˝ × 311/8˝

Lit tle Girls, Big St yle

Fold

Trace the appropriate size of the Front and Back Peasant Bodice patterns from the pattern pullout (page P2). Place each on the fold of the fabric and cut 1 of each.

Selvage edges

Peasant Bodice


Construction Refer to Techniques A to Z (pages 17–31) for specific information on the techniques used in this project.

1. Fold the bottom edge of a sleeve 1/4˝ to the wrong side of the fabric; then fold another 1/4˝ and press well. Stitch close to the edge. Repeat with the second sleeve.

7. To finish the neckline, follow Classic Peasant Top/ Dress Construction Steps 9–11 (pages 70–71).

8. Match the right side seams of the bodice front and back, with right sides together and unfolding the underarm edge. Sew the sides together with a 1/2˝ seam; finish and press.

9. Refold the sleeve’s underarm edge and topstitch from the edge of the attached sleeve, around the curve of the arm, to the other side of the sleeve.

Hem edge

Hem sleeve.

2. Match the front sleeve edge of 1 sleeve to the upper arm edge of the front bodice, right sides together. The top edges will align, but the sleeve will not extend the full length of the armseye (the armhole opening). 3. Pin and sew with a 1/2˝ seam allowance. Repeat with the second sleeve. Finish the seams and press toward the bodice, including the raw edge of the armseye below the sleeve.

4. Match the back upper sleeve edge of 1 sleeve to the upper arm edge of the back bodice, right sides together. Pin and sew. Do not repeat with the second sleeve at this time. Finish the seam and press it toward bodice.

5. Fold the neckline edge 1/4˝ to the wrong side of the bodice/sleeve unit and press. Fold another 1/4˝ and press again. Do not sew the fold down yet. With your fabric marking pen and ruler, mark a line all the way around the neckline 1/2˝ down from the edge. This will serve as your guide for shirring the neckline.

Topstitch under sleeve.

10. Reload your sewing machine with elastic bobbin thread, adjust the stitch length and tension, and use the previously drawn lines on the bodice to shirr 4 rows of elastic around the chest, with the fabric right side up. The empire line should be the bottom row of shirring. When you are done, change the bobbin back to regular sewing thread. Then readjust the stitch length and the thread tension to their normal positions.

6. Follow Classic Peasant Top/Dress Construction Steps 6 and 7 (page 70) and the shirring instructions (page 27) to sew 3 lines of shirring around the neckline.

Flutter-Sleeved Peasant Top

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11. Match the open side edges, sew, finish the seams, and press. Repeat Step 9 to finish the unfinished edge under the sleeve.

12. Finish the raw edge of the hem by serging, zigzagging, or pinking it. Set aside.

13. Match the short ends of the 2 ruffle strips, right sides together. Sew and finish the seams. Press.

14. Turn the lower edge of the ruffle 1/4˝ toward the wrong side of the fabric; press. Turn another 1/4˝ and stitch all the way around the bottom of the ruffle, close to the inner folded edge. Repeat with the top edge of the ruffle.

15. Sew a row of gathering stitches 1/2˝ below the ruffle’s top edge. Then sew a second row of gathering stitches 1/2˝ lower, parallel to the first row. 16. Line up the ruffle’s top edge with the line you marked above the hem of the bodice. The wrong side of the ruffle should be against the right side of the bodice. Gather the ruffle to fit the bodice; pin.

Align top edge of ruffle with mark above hem.

17. Sew the ruffle to the bodice using a line of stitches between the gathering stitches. Use your seam ripper to remove the gathering stitches from the ruffle.

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Ruffled-Neck Peasant Top Ruffled-Neck Peasant Top

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little bit of patchwork on the lower panel and a ruffled neckline make this version of the peasant top almost unrecognizable from its “sisters.” For a more casual take,

use one fabric instead of the mix-and-match patchwork style.

Materials

Cutting Instructions

1/3 yard fabric for the Front and Back Peasant Bodice

Note: Lay out and cut the Front and Back Peasant Bodice on the fold before cutting the Neckline and Hem Ruffles. Refer to Pattern and Fabric Layout (page 25) for instructions on preparing the folded fabric.

1/2 yard total 3 different fabrics for the Patchwork rectangles in the Lower Panel 1/4 yard fabric for the Neckline Ruffle

Fold

Peasant bodice back

Fold

Peasant bodice front

Selvage edge

30˝ piece 1/4˝-wide elastic for the neckline

Selvage edge

1/2 yard fabric for the Hem Ruffle

Cutting layout

Top Trace the appropriate size of the Front and Back Peasant Top patterns from the pattern pullout (page P2) to the empire cutting line. Place each on the fold of the fabric and cut 1 of each.

Lower Panels You will cut 4 pieces from each of 3 fabrics (for a total of 12 patchwork pieces) to make the patchwork panel. Size

2

3

4

5

6

Lower Panel Patchwork Pieces (Cut 4 from each fabric.)

6˝ × 51/8˝

61/4˝ × 51/8˝

61/2˝ × 51/8˝

63/4˝ × 51/8˝

63/4˝ × 51/8˝

Note: All dimensions are listed length x width.

Ruffles

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Size

2

3

4

5

6

Hem Ruffle (Cut 4.)

4˝ × 25˝

4˝ × 251/2˝

4˝ × 26˝

4˝ × 265/8˝

4˝ × 273/8˝

Size

2

3

4

5

6

Neckline Ruffle (Cut 1.)

31/2˝ × 40˝

31/2˝ × 40˝

31/2˝ × 40˝

33/4˝ × 40˝

33/4˝ × 40˝

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Construction Refer to Techniques A to Z (pages 17–31) for specific information on the techniques used in this project.

Peasant Bodice and Sleeves

1. Place the bodice front and back with right sides together and side seams matching. Sew with a 1/2˝ seam allowance, finish the seams, and press.

5. Match and pin the seam of the neckline ruffle to the center of the bodice back. The wrong side of the ruffle should be against the right side of the bodice front, with raw edges matching.

6. Match and pin the center of the neckline ruffle to the center of the bodice front. Continue to pin the ruffle along the edge of the front neckline out to each side. The excess ruffle forms the “sleeve” at the top of the armhole.

2. Fold over the edge of the armseye by 1/8˝; then fold another 1/8˝ and press well. Topstitch close to the edge. Repeat with the opposite armseye. Set aside.

Fold over edges of armseye.

3. Fold the neckline ruffle piece in half, right sides together to match the short edges. Pin the short edges and sew; then finish the seam and press.

4. Press the lower edge of the neckline ruffle 1/4˝ toward the wrong side of the fabric and then another 1/4˝. Stitch all the way around the bottom of the ruffle, close to the inner folded edge.

Start pinning neckline ruffle in center of each piece; then work out to edges.

7. Baste along the pinned edge, no more than 1/4˝ from the edge. Repeat with the other half of the ruffle and the back of the bodice.

8. Follow Ruffled Empire Peasant Top/Dress Construction Steps 3 and 4 (page 75) to make the neckline elastic casing. Set aside.

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Patchwork Panel 1. Arrange your patchwork pieces for the lower panel in a way that you find pleasing. Pay special attention to the fabric that will be on the side seams; avoid having the same fabric on either side of a seam. You will have 2 panels of 6 patchwork pieces each. 51⁄8˝

51⁄8˝

51⁄8˝

Arrange strips for lower panel.

2. Make sure your pieces are all oriented in the same direction, with the 51/8˝ measurement as the width of each piece. To make a panel, use 1/2˝ seams to sew 6 pieces side by side. Repeat for the other panel. Finish the seams and press. 3. When finished, place your 2 panels right sides together (make sure they’re both oriented in the same direction) and sew the side seams with a 1/2˝ seam allowance. Finish the seams and press in the same direction as before. If you’ve been topstitching along the seams, do so again here for a consistent, polished look. Set aside.

4. Place the hem ruffle strips right sides together and match the short edges. Sew them together end to end and finish the seams to make a continuous circle. Press.

5. Press the ruffle’s lower edge 1/4˝ toward the wrong side of the fabric and then another 1/4˝. Stitch all the way around the bottom of the ruffle, close to the inner folded edge.

6. Sew gathering stitches to the top edge of the ruffle. Pin the ruffle’s gathered edge to the bottom edge of the patchwork panel, with right sides together and raw edges matching. Gather to fit and sew with a 1/2˝ seam allowance.

7. Finish the seam and press it up toward the patchwork panel. Topstitch right above the seam at the bottom of the panel to hold the seam allowance in place.

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tip

If you wish, you can add some topstitching along each seam to secure the pressed edge and to add a decorative element.

Finishing 1. Sew gathering stitches to the top edge of the patchwork panel. Pin the gathered edge to the lower edge of the bodice, with right sides together and raw edges matching. Gather to fit, and sew with a 1/2˝ seam allowance.

2. Finish the seam and press it toward the bodice. Topstitch right above the seam along the bottom edge of the bodice to hold the seam allowance in place.

3. Use a bodkin or safety pin to feed the 1/4˝ elastic through the neckline. Refer to the instructions on page 19 to overlap the ends and secure with a zigzag stitch; then stitch closed the gap in the casing.


The Pants

P

ants deserve a little love, too. Here you’ll find options that put the “fun” in “functional.” Whether it’s a simple lace or ruffled hem or a fancy rumba leg, these stylish pants will keep her comfortable with

panache. You can cut them long, short, or in between.

The pants

89


In this section, you’ll find these related patterns:

90

Essential Pants/Capris (page 91)

Ruffled Pants (page 94)

Racing Stripe Pants (page 97)

Lace-Edged Gauchos (page 100)

Lit tle Girls, Big St yle

Tiered Pants (page 104)


Essential Pants/Capris Essential Pants/Capris

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ith these easy Essential Pants/Capris, “basic” doesn’t have to mean

boring. Let your fabric shine in this ultra-easy foundation piece. You

can make it with quilting cotton, but don’t be afraid to try denim, twill, or even corduroy. Elastic in the waist makes these pants simple to sew and comfortable to wear.

tip

7/8 yard fabric for the Essential Pants 2/3 yard 3/4˝-wide nonroll elastic Cutting Instructions Note: Cut out 2 pants legs at the same time with the fabric folded.

Pants

Fold

Selvage edges

If you cut along the Tiered Pants line, you can make a quick pair of shorts instead of pants or capris.

Materials

Essential Pants cutting line

Cutting layout

Trace the appropriate size of the Pants pattern from the pattern pullout (pages P3–P4). (Note: Attach the 2 pattern parts before tracing.) Cut 2 of each pants piece at once on folded fabric. Make sure to note the front and back of each piece. (Hint: The back of the pants pattern will have 2 notches, whereas the front will have only 1 notch.)

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Construction

Refer to Techniques A to Z (pages 17–31) for specific information on the techniques used in this project.

1. Match the inseam edges of 1

3. Turn a sewn pants leg right side out. Slide it into the other leg so the

pants leg, right sides together.

right sides of both pants legs are together and the inseams match.

Place 1 pants leg inside another, right sides together.

4. Pin and sew the rise (the big “U”

5. Pull out the inside pants leg. It

shape). Finish the raw edges of the seam. Press.

should look a lot more like a pair of pants now! Your pants will be inside out.

6. Follow the instructions under Elastic (pages 18–19) to create a waistband casing. Insert the elastic.

Match inseam edges.

7. Fold the hem of a pants leg 1/4˝

2. Pin and sew the seam with a

to the wrong side of the fabric, and then fold it another 1/4˝. Press and topstitch close to the inner folded edge. Repeat with the other pants leg.

1/2˝ seam allowance. Finish the raw edges of the seam and press toward the back. Set aside. Repeat with the second pants leg. Pin and sew rise.

Essential Pants/Capris

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Ruffled Pants 94

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W

ho doesn’t like a little ruffle? These Ruffled Pants are just a little girly and quick

to sew. Make them with either one ruffle or two. It’s easy to mix up the fabrics and

go from a conservative look with one, to more daring with two, to all-out wild with three!

Materials

Cutting Instructions

2/3 yard fabric for Pants

Note: Cut out both Pants pieces at once with the fabric folded in half; then cut out the Ruffle strips.

1/2 yard fabric for Ruffle 1 of single Ruffle Pants OR 1/3 yard fabric for Ruffle 1 of Double-Ruffle Pants 1/2 yard fabric for Ruffle 2 of Double-Ruffle Pants

tip

Before cutting the ruffles, place your ruffle fabrics on top of each other to be sure that the color of the bottom ruffle will not show through the top ruffle.

Fold

Selvage edges

2/3 yard 3/4˝-wide nonroll elastic Pants

Capri Pants cutting line

Cutting layout

Pants Trace the appropriate size of the Pants pattern from the pattern pullout (pages P3–P4). (Note: Attach the 2 pattern parts before tracing.) Mark the capri line. Cut 2 pants pieces to the pattern line marked “Capri,” making sure to note the front and back of each piece.

Single-Ruffle Pants Size

2

3

4

5

6

Ruffle 1 (Cut 2.)

5˝ × 25˝

51/4˝ × 26˝

51/2˝ × 265/8˝

57/8˝ × 271/2˝

61/8˝ × 281/2˝

Double-Ruffle Pants Size

2

3

4

5

6

Ruffle 1 (Cut 2.)

31/2˝ × 25˝

33/4˝ × 26˝

37/8˝ × 265/8˝

4˝ × 271/2˝

41/4˝ × 281/2˝

Ruffle 2 (Cut 2.)

5˝ × 25˝

51/4˝ × 26˝

51/2˝ × 265/8˝

57/8˝ × 271/2˝

61/8˝ × 281/2˝

Ruffled Pants

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Construction Refer to Techniques A to Z (pages 17–31) for specific information on the techniques used in this project. Follow Essential Pants Construction Steps 1–6 (page 93). Do not hem the pants. Set them aside.

Single-Ruffle Pants 1. Fold the ruffle strip in half, with

Double-Ruffle Pants 1. Follow Single-Ruffle Pants Construction Steps 1–4, but use the shorter of the 2 ruffle strips (Ruffle 1). Attach this ruffle to the pants leg with a 3/8˝ seam, but do not finish the seam, press, or topstitch it.

2. Follow Single-Ruffle Pants Construction Steps 1–4 to make the Ruffle 2 strips.

3. Gather Ruffle 2 to fit the pants leg, pin, and then sew with a 1/2˝ seam allowance. Finish the seam and press it up toward the pants leg. Topstitch right above the seam along the bottom edge of the pants leg to hold the seam allowance in place. Repeat with the other Ruffle 2 and pants leg.

right sides together and short edges matching. Sew with a 1/2˝ seam allowance, finish, and press. Repeat with the second ruffle strip.

2. Turn the bottom edge of the ruffle strip 1/4˝ to the wrong side, then another 1/4˝, and press. Stitch close to the inner folded edge. Repeat with the second ruffle strip.

3. Sew gathering stitches along the top edge of each ruffle. Match the ruffle’s side seam with the inseam of the pants, right sides together. The ruffle’s gathered edge should line up with the bottom edge of the pants leg.

4. Gather the ruffle to fit the pants leg and pin. Sew with a 1/2˝ seam allowance.

5. Finish the seam and press it up toward the pants leg. Topstitch right above the seam along the bottom edge of the pants leg to hold the seam allowance in place. Repeat with the other ruffle and pants leg.

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Gather and attach ruffle to pants leg.


Racing Stripe Pants Racing Stripe Pants

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ick it up with a cool pair of Racing Stripe Pants. I love the touch of pattern and color

that the stripe adds to the pants leg. It’s so easy, you’ll be tempted to add them to

every pair of pants you sew! Here, she’s wearing the pants with the Side-Tied Smock in coordinating fabrics (page 45).

Materials

Cutting Instructions

2/3 yard fabric for Pants

Note: Cut out both Pants pieces at once with the fabric folded in half. The Stripe should be cut with the grain of the fabric.

1/3 yard fabric for Ruffle 2/3 yard fabric if using a one-way print for the Side Strip OR 1/4 yard if using a nondirectional fabric for the Side Strip

Selvage edges

2/3 yard 3/4˝-wide nonroll elastic

If you’re using a nondirectional print, you can cut the stripes perpendicular instead of parallel to the selvage.

Fold

tip

Pants

Capri Pants cutting line

Cutting layout

Pants Trace the appropriate size or the Pants pattern from the pattern pullout (pages P3–P4). (Note: Attach the 2 pattern parts before tracing.) Cut 2 pants pieces to the pattern line marked “Capri,” making sure to note the front and back of each piece.

Ruffles Size

2

3

4

5

6

Ruffle (Cut 2.)

31/2˝ × 281/2˝

31/2˝ × 29˝

31/2˝ × 293/4˝

31/2˝ × 303/8˝

31/2˝ × 311/8˝

Stripe

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Size

2

3

4

5

6

Stripe (Cut 2.)

161/4˝ × 21/2˝

17˝ × 21/2˝

177/8˝ × 21/2˝

185/8˝ × 21/2˝

191/2˝ × 21/2˝

Lit tle Girls, Big St yle


Construction Refer to Techniques A to Z (pages 17–31) for specific information on the techniques used in this project.

3. Place 1 pants leg right side up on your work surface; then place a stripe, right side up, on the piece. Match the edges with the drawn lines on the pants leg.

1. Fold each pants leg in half, wrong sides together, and match inseams and hems. Measure over 1˝ on either side of the fold and mark a line down each side. Repeat with the other pants leg.

Place stripe on pants leg, using marks as guide.

4. Pin carefully, alternating pins between the 2 long sides of the stripe as you work your way down. Repeat with the second pants leg.

5. Stitch close to the edge on one long side of the stripe

Mark placement of racing stripe.

2. Fold under 1/4˝ of the long edges of each stripe and press.

to secure it to the pants. Repeat with the other side of the stripe, making sure to sew in the same direction as the first stitching line. Repeat with the second pants leg.

Sew stripe to pants leg. Turn under long edges of each stripe.

6. Follow Essential Pants Construction Steps 1–6 (page 93). Set aside.

7. Follow Single-Ruffle Pants Construction Steps 1–5 (page 96) to sew and attach the ruffle to the bottom of each pants leg.

Racing Stripe Pants

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Lace-Edged Gauchos 100

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hese pants couldn’t be easier to sew. The lace is attached before the inseam is sewn,

which makes for easy construction. I think they look especially cute when worn

with the Pocket Pinafore (page 52). And they’re perfect for fall when paired with tights. A contrasting pocket adds a fun touch.

Materials

Cutting Instructions

2/3 yard fabric for Pants

Note: Cut out both Pants pieces at once with the fabric folded in half.

Pants

Fold

2/3 yard 3/4˝-wide nonroll elastic

Capri Pants cutting line

Pocket

Selvage edge

Selvage edge

1 yard 1˝-wide cotton Cluny or crocheted lace

Selvage edges

1/4 yard fabric for contrasting Pocket (or cut Pocket from excess Pants fabric)

Cutting layout

Trace the appropriate size of the Pants and Pants Pocket patterns from the pattern pullout (pages P3–P4). (Note: Attach the 2 Pants pattern parts before tracing.) Cut 2 each of the Pants pieces to the pattern line marked “Capri,” making sure to note the front and back of each piece. Cut 1 Pants Pocket piece.

Lace-Edged Gauchos

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Construction Refer to Techniques A to Z (pages 17–31) for specific information on the techniques used in this project.

2. Stitch down at the sides of the pocket from the folded edge to the lower edge of the top hem, using a 1/4˝ seam allowance. Repeat on the other side of the pocket top edge.

1. Finish the pocket’s top raw edge. I used a serger, but you can also zigzag or pink the edges. Fold over the top edge of the pocket 1˝ toward the right side of the fabric.

Stitch down top hem of pocket.

3. Trim the corners, taking care not to clip into the seam allowance. Turn the hemmed edge right side out, poke out the corners, and press. Press under the remaining raw edges of the pocket 1/4˝ to the wrong side of the fabric. Fold over top of pocket.

4. Topstitch across the top edge of the pocket 1/2˝ down from the top. 5. Measure up 2˝ from the bottom edge of the right pants leg. Place the bottom edge of the pocket on that mark, centering it on the pants leg.

Place pocket 2˝ up from hem.

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6. Pin around the bottom and sides

7. Match the top edge of the lace with the raw hem edge of the pants leg,

of the pocket and stitch close to the pinned edge, leaving the top edge open. Be sure to backstitch at the beginning and end of the stitching to reinforce the sides of the pocket opening.

right sides together. Pin and sew the lace to the pants, using a 1/2˝ seam allowance. Repeat with the other pants leg.

tip

Add a touch of lace to the top of the pocket edge when you topstitch. Place the bottom edge of the lace 3/4˝ from the top edge; then topstitch. Add a second row of topstitching 1/4˝ from the top edge of the pocket to further secure the lace. Tuck in the lace behind the folded top edge and fold in the sides over the lace before sewing the pocket to the pants leg.

Match top edge of lace with hem of pants.

8. Press the seam allowance toward the pants leg. To hold the seam allowance in place, topstitch above the lace, close to the edge, from one side seam to the other. Repeat with the other leg.

Press seam allowance toward pants leg.

9. Follow Essential Pants Construction Steps 1–6 (page 93) to finish the pants.

Lace-Edged Gauchos

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Tiered Pants 104

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hese have to be the most fun pants I’ve ever seen—or sewn. The rumba-style pants

legs are full, which makes them sort of swirl as she walks. If she can stop dancing in

them, that is!

Materials

Cutting Instructions

1/2 yard fabric for Pants

Note: Cut out both Pants pieces at once, with the fabric folded in half.

1/3 yard fabric for Tier 1 2/3 yard fabric for Tier 2

2/3 yard 3/4˝-wide nonroll elastic

tip

Pants

Fold

Selvage edges

5/8 yard fabric for Tier 3 (sizes 2–3) OR 1 yard fabric for Tier 3 (sizes 4–6)

Tiered Pants cutting line

You can use denim, twill, or corduroy for the pants body. However, I recommend sticking to quilting cotton for the tiers to keep the pants from getting too heavy.

Cutting layout

Pants Trace the appropriate size of the Pants pattern from the pattern pullout (page P3). Mark the tiered line. Cut 2 Pants pieces to the pattern line marked “Tiered Pants,” making sure to note the front and back of each piece.

Tiers Size

2

3

4

5

6

Tier 1 (Cut 2.)

41/4˝ × 26˝

41/2˝ × 265/8˝

43/4˝ × 271/2˝

5˝ × 283/8˝

5˝ × 293/8˝

Tier 2 (Cut 4.)

41/4˝ × 223/4˝

41/2˝ × 233/8˝

43/4˝ × 24˝

5˝ × 24˝

5˝ × 255/8˝

Tier 3 (Cut 4 for sizes 2 and 3.)

41/4˝ × 40˝

41/2˝ × 40˝

Tier 3 (Cut 6 for sizes 4–6.)

43/4˝ × 28˝

5˝ × 29˝

5˝ × 30˝

Tiered Pants

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Construction Refer to Techniques A to Z (pages 17–31) for specific information on the techniques used in this project.

1. Follow Essential Pants Construction Steps 1–6 (page 93) to sew the main body of the pants. Set aside.

2. Organize your 3 tiers so you have 3 stacks of rectangles for each pants leg. You’re going to work from the bottom tier up, attaching all 3 gathered-and-sewn tiers to the completed pants upper section.

3. Match the short edges of half of the Tier 3 strips and sew with a 1/2˝ seam allowance to create a continuous circle. Finish the seams and press. Repeat with the remaining Tier 3 strips.

4. Repeat Step 3 with the strips for Tier 2 and then the strips for Tier 1. 5. Fold the bottom edge of a Tier 3 piece 1/4˝ to the wrong side, then another 1/4˝, and press. Stitch close to the inner folded edge. Repeat with the other Tier 3 piece.

6. Sew gathering stitches along the top edge of a Tier 3 piece. 7. Match the gathered edge of Tier 3 to the bottom edge of Tier 2, right sides together. Be sure to match the side seams of the Tier 3 piece with the side seams of the Tier 2 piece; pin.

8. Gather Tier 3 to fit Tier 2 and sew with a 1/2˝ seam. Finish the seam,

9. Repeat the process, gathering

press it toward the Tier 2 piece, and topstitch right above the seam at the bottom of Tier 2 to hold the seam allowance in place.

10. Pin Tier 1’s gathered edge to

and attaching Tier 2 to Tier 1. the bottom edge of a pants leg, right sides together.

11. Gather Tier 1 to fit the pants leg and sew with a 1/2˝ seam allowance. Finish the seam and press it up toward the pants leg. Topstitch right above the seam along the bottom edge of the pants leg to hold the seam allowance in place.

12. Repeat Steps 5–11 to complete the other pants leg. Gather Tier 3 and attach to Tier 2.

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The Skirts

S

kirts are a sewing staple for me. They’re quick, easy, and so fun to wear. We pair them with leggings or tights in cooler months and practically live in them during warmer weather. Make these your own

by mixing up the details: Add the hem band to a twirl skirt or insert smaller ruffles between the tiers of a twirl skirt.

the skirts

107


In this section, you’ll find these related patterns:

108

No-Hem Skirt (page 109)

Treasure Skirt (page 111)

On-the-Border Skirt (page 114)

Apron Skirt variation (page 117)

Double-Layer Twirl Skirt (page 119)

Twirly Girly Skirt (page 123)

Lit tle Girls, Big St yle


No-Hem Skirt No-Hem Skirt

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love anything that makes things sew up fast, and this is just the project for me.

The No-Hem Skirt sews up so quickly you’ll want to make a dozen.

The band of fabric at the bottom of the skirt is folded in half before it’s attached to the main skirt panel, eliminating the need to hem the skirt. Add a little flavor by inserting some lace, or maybe even a narrow ruffle, between the skirt and the band. You can make this skirt more voluminous simply by increasing the width of your skirt’s rectangles.

Materials

Cutting Instructions

1/2 yard fabric for the Skirt Panels

Cut out the rectangles for the skirt from your 2 fabrics.

1/3 yard fabric for the Contrast Band 2/3 yard 3/4˝-wide nonroll elastic

Size

2

Skirt Panel (Cut 2.)

10˝ × 15˝

Contrast Band (Cut 2.)

4˝ × 15˝

3

4

5

6

11˝ × 151/4˝

12˝ × 153/4˝

13˝ × 16˝

14˝ × 161/2˝

4˝ × 151/4˝

6˝ × 153/4˝

6˝ × 16˝

6˝ × 161/2˝

Note: All dimensions are listed length x width.

Construction Refer to Techniques A to Z (pages 17–31) for specific information on the techniques used in this project.

1. Place the skirt panels right sides together and sew along the short edges, using a 1/2˝ seam allowance. Finish the seams and press open.

2. Match the contrasting band strips right sides together and sew along the short edges. Press the seams open. Fold the hem band in half, with wrong sides together and raw edges matching. Press.

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3. Align the hem band’s raw edges with the skirt’s bottom edge, so the hem band is against the right side of the skirt. Pin at the seams first and then along the skirt edge. Sew together with a 1/2˝ seam allowance.

4. Finish the raw edge and press toward the main skirt panel. Topstitch right above the seam along the skirt’s bottom edge to hold the seam allowance in place.

5. Follow the instructions for Elastic (pages 18–19) to create a waistband casing. Insert the elastic.


Treasure Skirt Treasure Skirt

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y daughter is at an age when she wants pockets on everything. They’re a must-

have for holding all her treasures: cool rocks, shiny pieces of paper, pennies

she’s found. The sweet little pocket on this skirt is just the right size for toting around all the little whatnots she treasures. This skirt with its ruffled hem looks great with everything from the Basic Bodice (page 32) to a purchased jeans jacket.

Materials

Cutting Instructions

1/2 yard fabric for Skirt Panel

Note: First cut the rectangles for the Skirt and Ru�╉�ffle and then cut the 2 Pockets.

1/3 yard fabric for Ruffle and Pocket

Selvage edges

2/3 yard 3/4˝-wide nonroll elastic

Have a leftie instead of a righty? Swap the pocket to the other side of the skirt.

Fold

tip

Ruffle

Pocket

Ruffle

Cutting layout

Skirt and Ruffle Size

2

3

4

5

6

Skirt Panel (Cut 2.)

10˝ × 121/2˝

11˝ × 123/4˝

12˝ × 131/4˝

13˝ × 131/2˝

14˝ × 14˝

Ruffle (Cut 2.)

3˝ × 213/4˝

3˝ × 221/4˝

4˝ × 231/4˝

4˝ × 233/4˝

4˝ × 241/2˝

Note: All dimensions are listed length x width.

Pocket Trace the Skirt Pocket pattern from the pattern pullout (page P4) and cut 2 from fabric.

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Construction Refer to Techniques A to Z (pages 17–31) for specific information on the techniques used in this project.

1. Place the pocket pieces right sides together and stitch with a 1/4˝ seam allowance. Leave a 1˝ gap on one side for turning. Be sure to backstitch at either side of the gap.

4. Measure up 3/4˝ and make another mark. The right edge of the pocket will angle up even with this mark.

3¼˝

5. Pin the pocket to the front skirt panel, aligning it with the placement marks. Sew close to the edge around the pocket’s 3 sides, leaving the top edge open. Be sure to backstitch at the beginning and end so the pocket’s opening is reinforced.

Mark pocket placement.

6. Match the side edges of the skirt back to the skirt front, right sides together. Pin and sew with a 1/2˝ seam allowance. Finish the side seams and set aside.

7. Match the short edges of the ruffle strips and sew with a 1/2˝ seam allowance. Finish the seam. 8. Hem the ruffle by pressing under the bottom edge 1/4˝ to the wrong side and then another 1/4˝. Stitch close to the inner folded edge. 9. Sew gathering stitches to the ruffle’s top edge, using the method of Place pockets right sides together.

2. Clip the corners, notch the curve, and turn right side out. Use your turning tool to poke out the corners. Press. Topstitch the top edge of the pocket 1/4˝ from the top edge.

your choice.

10. Match the ruffle’s gathered edge to the skirt’s bottom edge. Gather to fit; then pin and sew with a 1/2˝ seam allowance.

3. Working on the right side of the fabric, measure over 2˝ from the left side of a skirt panel and make a mark with your fabric marker or chalk. Place your ruler even with the left-edge mark and measure down 4˝ from the waist. This will be the placement mark for the pocket’s left corner.

Gather and attach ruffle to bottom of skirt.

11. Finish and press toward the skirt. Topstitch right above the seam along the skirt’s bottom edge to hold the seam allowance in place.

12. Follow the instructions for Elastic (pages 18–19) to create a waistband casing; insert the elastic. Treasure Skirt

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On-the-Border Skirt 114

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his is one of my favorite skirts to sew. I especially love using a border print

fabric on the bottom panel, since it’s the perfect size for showing off a broad

expanse of my favorite bold fabrics. Finish the hem as directed, add an extra ruffle to the hem, or attach some lace for a little more oomph.

Materials 1/3 yard fabric for Yoke 7/8 yard fabric for Lower Skirt 1/3 yard fabric for Ruffle 2/3 yard 3/4˝-wide nonroll elastic 13/4 yards lace for the bottom edge (optional)

Cutting Instructions Note: Cut the skirt rectangles parallel to the selvage when using a border print. Size

2

3

4

5

6

Yoke (Cut 2.)

33/4˝ × 15˝

41/4˝ × 151/4˝

43/4˝ × 153/4˝

53/4˝ × 16˝

53/4˝ × 161/2˝

Lower Skirt Panel (Cut 2.)

7˝ × 26˝

8˝ × 261/2˝

9˝ × 27˝

11˝ × 28˝

13˝ × 29˝

Ruffle (Cut 2.)

21/2˝ × 26˝

21/2˝ × 261/2˝

3˝ × 27˝

3˝ × 28˝

3˝ × 29˝

Note: All dimensions are listed length x width.

Construction Refer to Techniques A to Z (pages 17–31) for specific information on the techniques used in this project.

1. Place the yoke pieces right sides together and sew along the short sides, using a 1/2˝ seam allowance. Finish the seams and press. Repeat with the 2 lower skirt rectangles. Set aside.

tip

You may choose to add lace to the skirt’s bottom edge. Sew one side seam of the lower skirt first, add the lace, and then sew the remaining side seam. Refer to Lace-Edged Gaucho Construction Steps 7 and 8 (page 103) for directions on adding lace.

On-the-Border Skirt

115


2. Place the ruffle strips right sides together and sew along the short sides. Finish the seams and press. 3. Hem the ruffle by pressing the bottom edge 1/4˝ under to the wrong side and then another 1/4˝. Stitch close to the inner folded edge. Repeat for the lower skirt panel if you chose not to add lace at the hem.

4. Sew gathering stitches to the top edge of the ruffle strips and the lower skirt panel.

5. Match the gathered edge of the ruffle to the bottom edge of the yoke, right sides together. Gather to fit; then pin and baste.

Gather and attach ruffle to yoke.

6. Match the gathered edge of the skirt bottom to the bottom edge of the ruffle/yoke piece. Gather to fit; then pin and sew with a 1/2˝ seam allowance.

7. Finish the raw edge of the yoke, ruffle, and lower skirt seam and press toward the yoke. Topstitch right above the seam along the yoke’s bottom edge to hold the seam allowance in place.

8. Follow the instructions for Elastic (pages 18–19) to create a waistband casing. Insert the elastic.

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Apron Skirt Variation Apron Skirt Variation

117


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hange up the On-the-Border Skirt: Instead of inserting a ruffle between the yoke and bottom panel of the skirt, insert a kicky little apron.

MATERIALS

CUTTING INSTRUCTIONS

Refer to Materials for On-the-Border Skirt (page 115) for Yoke and Skirt yardages.

Refer to Cutting Instructions for On-the-Border Skirt (page 115) for Yoke and Skirt.

3/8 yard fabric for the Apron

Apron Size

2

3

4

5

6

Apron (Cut 1.)

5˝ × 143/4˝

6˝ × 15˝

7˝ × 151/2˝

9˝ × 153/4˝

11˝ × 161/4˝

Construction Refer to Techniques A to Z (pages 17–31) for specific information on the techniques used in this project.

1. Follow On-the-Border Skirt Construction Step 1 (page 115). Hem the bottom edge of the lower skirt panel by pressing the bottom edge 1/4˝ under and then another 1/4˝. Stitch close to the inner folded edge.

2. Finish the sides and bottom of the apron by pressing under 1/4˝ and then another 1/4˝. Stitch close to the inner folded edge around all 3 sides.

3. Sew gathering stitches to the apron’s top edge. Repeat with the lower skirt panel.

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4. Measure over 3˝ from each side on the yoke’s bottom edge. Match the apron to the marks and gather to fit. Baste the apron to the yoke with a 1/4˝ seam allowance.

5. Match the gathered edge of the lower skirt panel to the yoke’s bottom edge (with the apron attached). Pin, gather, and sew with a 1/2˝ seam allowance.

6. Finish the raw edge of the seam and press toward the yoke. 7. Follow On-the-Border Skirt Construction Steps 7 and 8 (page 116) to finish the skirt.


Double-Layer Twirl Skirt Double-Layer Twirl Skirt

119


T Y

here’s a peek-a-boo quality to this skirt that I just adore. It looks far more complicated to sew than it is. The gathers near the overskirt hem are made

by sewing small vertical strips of elastic to the fabric. Stretching the elastic slightly while sewing causes it to pull up the hem, revealing a bit more of the underskirt. Get into ruffle overload by adding one to the overskirt.

Materials 1/3 yard fabric for Yoke 2/3 yard fabric for Overskirt 3/4 yard fabric for Underskirt 1/4 yard fabric for Ruffle 2/3 yard 3/4˝-wide nonroll elastic Cutting Instructions Size

2

3

4

Yoke (Cut 2.)

33/4˝ × 15˝

41/4˝ × 151/4˝

43/4˝ × 153/4˝

53/4˝ × 16˝

53/4˝ × 161/2˝

Overskirt (Cut 2.)

51/2˝ × 26˝

61/2˝ × 261/2˝

71/2˝ × 27˝

81/2˝ × 28˝

91/2˝ × 29˝

Underskirt (Cut 2.)

7˝ × 26˝

8˝ × 261/2˝

9˝ × 27˝

10˝ × 28˝

11˝ × 29˝

Ruffle (Cut 2.)

3˝ × 38˝

3˝ × 381/2˝

3˝ × 39˝

3˝ × 391/2˝

3˝ × 40˝

Note: All dimensions are listed length x width.

Construction Refer to Techniques A to Z (pages 17–31) for specific information on the techniques used in this project.

1. Place the 2 yoke pieces right sides together and sew along the short sides, using a 1/2˝ seam allowance. Finish the seams and press. Repeat with the underskirt and overskirt pieces. Set aside.

2. Place 2 ruffle strips right sides together and sew along the short sides. Finish the seams and press.

3. Hem the ruffle by pressing the bottom edge 1/4˝ under to the wrong side and then another 1/4˝. Stitch close to the inner folded edge. Repeat with the overskirt.

120

Lit tle Girls, Big St yle

5

6


4. On the wrong side of the overskirt front, measure 3˝ from each side seam at the hem; make a mark with your fabric pen near the hem.

5. Measure up 41/2˝ from the marks at the hem and draw 2 vertical lines to mark elastic placement.

Mark placement for elastic.

6. Cut 2 pieces of 1/4˝-wide elastic, each 3˝ long. On the inside of the skirt, pin an end of one piece at one of the top marks and the other end to the bottom mark. The elastic is shorter than the area to which it is pinned, so the skirt will gather under the elastic when you sew it.

7. Change the stitch on your sewing machine to zigzag and center the elastic under the presser foot. Gently pull the elastic straight and flat. Zigzag over it from top to hem. Repeat pinning and sewing the remaining piece of elastic on the other side of the skirt front.

Zigzag over elastic.

Double-Layer Twirl Skirt

121


8. Sew gathering stitches to the top edges of the ruffle, overskirt, and underskirt.

9. Place the gathered edge of the ruffle at the bottom edge of the underskirt, right sides together. Gather to fit; then pin and sew, using a 1/2˝ seam allowance.

10. Finish the seam and press toward the underskirt. Topstitch right above the seam along the underskirt’s bottom edge to hold the seam allowance in place.

11. Place the right side of the overskirt against the right side of the skirt yoke, matching the skirt’s top edge to the yoke’s bottom edge. Gather to fit; then pin and baste.

12. Match the gathered edge of the yoke/overskirt unit with the gathered edge of the underskirt. Gather to fit; then pin and sew with a 1/2˝ seam allowance.

13. Finish the raw edge (yoke, overskirt, and underskirt) and press toward the yoke. Topstitch right above the seam along the yoke’s bottom edge to hold the seam allowance in place.

14. Follow the instructions for Elastic (pages 18–19) to create a waistband casing. Insert the elastic.

122

Lit tle Girls, Big St yle


Twirly Girly Skirt Twirly Girly Skirt

123


T Y

here’s nothing quite as girly as a twirl skirt. This one makes a long four-tiered

skirt, perfect for summer trips to the beach or pool. To make a shorter skirt,

drop the bottom tier. Either way, frill it up by inserting smaller ruffles between tiers. Or add a touch of ribbon above each tier when topstitching. As shown in the photograph, you can combine this skirt with a Barely Basic Top (page 34) made in coordinating fabrics to create the look of a dress.

Materials

tip

1/3 yard fabric for Tier 1

Make sure you keep the pieces for each tier in a separate pile so they don’t get mixed up before you sew them together.

1/2 yard fabric for Tier 2 5/8 yard fabric for Tier 3 3/4 yard fabric for Tier 4 2/3 yard 3/4˝-wide nonroll elastic

Cutting Instructions Size

2

3

4

Tier 1 (Cut 2.) Tier 2 (Cut 2.) Tier 3 (Cut 2 for size 2.)

41/4˝ × 40˝

(Cut 3 for sizes 3–6.)

Tier 4 (Cut 4.)

41/4˝ × 381/2˝

5˝ × 15˝

51/2˝ × 151/4˝

6˝ × 153/4˝

61/2˝ × 16˝

7˝ × 161/2˝

41/4˝ × 261/4˝

43/4˝ × 263/4˝

51/4˝ × 271/2˝

53/4˝ × 28˝

61/4˝ × 283/4˝

43/4˝ × 31˝

51/4˝ × 32˝

53/4˝ × 33˝

61/4˝ × 34˝

43/4˝ × 401/2˝

51/4˝ × 40˝

53/4˝ × 40˝

61/4˝ × 40˝

Note: All dimensions are listed length x width.

124

Lit tle Girls, Big St yle

5

6


Construction Refer to Techniques A to Z (pages 17–31) for specific information on the techniques used in this project.

1. Place the Tier 1 strips right sides together and sew the short edges with a 1/2˝ seam allowance. Finish the seams and press.

2. Repeat Step 1 with each successive tier, matching short end to short end and sewing them until the tier forms a continuous circle.

3. Follow the instructions for Elastic (pages 18–19) to create a waistband casing on Tier 1. Do not insert the elastic yet.

4. Hem Tier 4 by pressing the bottom edge 1/4˝ under to the wrong side and then another 1/4˝. Stitch close to the inner folded edge.

5. Sew gathering stitches to the top edge of Tiers 2, 3, and 4. 6. Match Tier 4’s gathered edge to Tier 3’s bottom edge, right sides together. Gather to fit; then pin and sew with a 1/2˝ seam allowance.

Gather Tier 4 to Tier 3’s bottom edge.

7. Finish the raw edge and press toward Tier 3. Topstitch right above the seam along the bottom edge of Tier 3 to hold the seam allowance in place.

8. Repeat Steps 6 and 7 with each successive tier. 9. Once you have attached and topstitched all 4 skirt tiers, finish the skirt waistband by inserting the elastic and closing the casing.

Twirly Girly Skirt

125


Resources Fabric Manufacturers There are hundreds of manufacturers; these are some of my faves. Alexander Henry Fabrics, Inc. www.ahfabrics.com

Michael Miller Fabrics LLC www.michaelmillerfabrics.com

Riley Blake Designs www.rileyblakedesigns.com

Robert Kaufman Fabrics www.robertkaufman.com

Timeless Treasures Fabrics, Inc. www.ttfabrics.com

Westminster Fibers www.freespiritfabric.com

Fabric Store Finder Project 95 www.fabricshoppersunite.com/blog/?page_id=115

Fabric Shops If you don’t have a fabric store near you, consider visiting one of my favorite online shops. A World Away aworldaway.etsy.com

Above All Fabric www.aboveallfabric.com

Banberry Place www.banberryplace.com

Bunte Fabrics www.buntefabrics.com

Cotton Patch www.quiltusa.com

Fabric.com www.fabric.com

Fabric Fairy www.fabricfairy.com

Fabrichound www.fabrichound.com

Fabritopia www.fabritopia.com

Hip Fabric hipfabric.etsy.com

Sew Mama Sew www.sewmamasew.com

Sewzanne’s Fabrics www.sewzannes.com

The Wooly Thread www.woolythread.com

Sewing Notions Coats & Clark www.coatsandclark.com

Prym Consumer USA, Inc. www.dritz.com

Wrights www.wrights.com

Clotilde (Swedish tracing paper) www.clotilde.com

Sewing Forums Sewing Mamas www.sewingmamas.com

Sew Mama Sew www.sewmamasew.com/forum

The Sewing Business The patterns in this book are intended for personal use only. If you’re interested in sewing children’s clothing as a business, check out these links:

Consumer Product Safety Commission www.cpsc.gov

Fashion Incubator www.fashion-incubator.com

126

Lit tle Girls, Big St yle


About the Author After stitching her first pillow by hand at age eight, Mary Abreu received a Holly Hobbie sewing machine for Christmas—which she quickly ignored because the toy machine only sewed a chain stitch. Mary documents her many crafting adventures on her blog, Confessions of a Craft Addict (www.confessionsofacraftaddict.com), because her family grew tired of the daily craft show-and-tell. She teaches apparel sewing classes at Intown Quilters in Decatur, Georgia, to support her fabric habit. Mary aspires to sew fantastical cosplay and Steampunk creations for herself—if only she could take a break from sewing her daughter’s wardrobe. When not sewing, she enjoys spending time with her family, especially if it means beating her husband and teenaged sons at Scrabble.

For a list of other fine books from C&T Publishing, visit our website to view our catalog online.

C&T Publishing, Inc. P.O. Box 1456 Lafayette, CA 94549 800-284-1114

For sewing supplies:

Cotton Patch Email: ctinfo@ctpub.com Website: www.ctpub.com

C&T Publishing’s professional photography services are now available to the public. Visit us at www.ctmediaservices.com.

Tips and Techniques can be found at www.ctpub.com > Consumer Resources > Quiltmaking Basics: Tips & Techniques for Quiltmaking & More.

1025 Brown Ave. Lafayette, CA 94549 Store: 925-284-1177 Mail order: 925-283-7883

Email: CottonPa@aol.com Website: www.quiltusa.com

Note: Fabrics used in the projects shown may not be currently available, as fabric manufacturers keep most fabrics in print for only a short time.

About the Author

127


Lace-Edged Gauchos Pocket

Grainline

Cut 1 for each pocket.

1�

Use ruler to measure these inchmarks to verify that printout is correctly sized.

P1


Grainline

Pocket Pinafore Pocket

Treasure Skirt Pocket Cut 2 for each pocket.

1�

P2


1�

Pinafore

Basic Bodice Front Cut 1. Cut 1 lining.

Fold/Grainline

Cut or fold line for Pock et

Size 2 Size 3 Size 4 Size 5 Size 6

P3


1�

Cut or fold line for Pocket Pinafore

Fold/Grainline

Basic Bodice Back Cut 1. Cut 1 lining.

Size 2 Size 3 Size 4 Size 5 Size 6

P4


Peasant Bodice Front

To make complete pattern, join P5–P7 as directed.

1�

Peasant Bodice Front Cut 1.

Empire cutting line

Join to pattern on P6.

Fold/Grainline P5


Join to pattern on P5.

Empire cutting line

Size 4

Size 3

Size 2

Peasant Bodice Front Cut 1.

Join to pattern on P7.

1�

Fold/

P6


Join to pattern on P6.

Peasant Bodice Front

P7

Size 3 Size 4 Size 5 Size 6

Peasant Bodice Back Cut 1. Join to pattern on P8.

ne

1�

Peasant Bodice Back

To make complete pattern, join P7–P9 as directed.


Join to pattern on P7.

Join to pattern on P9.

Empire cutting line

1�

Peasant Bodice Back

Fold/Grainline

P8


Join to pattern on P8.

Size 2 Size 3 Size 4 Size 5 Size 6

1�

Peasant Bodice Back

P9


Peasant Top/Dress Sleeve

To make complete pattern, join P10–P14 as directed.

1�

Join to pattern on P11.

Peasant Top/Dress Sleeve Cut 2.

Sleeve front

Flutter sleeve cutting line

Grainline

Join to pattern on P14. P10


Peasant Top/Dress Sleeve

Join to pattern on P10.

Join to pattern on P12.

1�

Short sleeve cutti

P11

Join to pattern on P13.


Size 2 Size 3 Size 4 Size 5 Size 6

Peasant Top/Dress Sleeve

Join to pattern on right.

Join to pattern on P11.

Join to pattern on P13.

Size 2 Size 3 Size 4 Size 5 Size 6

1�

P12

Join to pattern on left.


Join to pattern on P14.

Join to pattern on P12.

Peasant Top/Dress Sleeve

1�

Short sleeve cutting line

Join to pattern on P11.

P13


Sleeve back

1�

Join to pattern on P10.

ort sleeve cutting line

Join to pattern on P13.

Peasant Top/Dress Sleeve

P14


Pants

To make complete pattern, join P15–P22 as directed.

1�

Pants back

Pants Cut 2.

Join to pattern on P16.

Grain line Join to pattern on P19. P15


Pants

Join to pattern on P15.

Join to pattern on P17.

Tiered Pants Cutting Line

1�

Grain line

P16

Join to pattern on P20.


Pants 1�

Join to pattern on P16.

Join to pattern on P18.

Tiered Pants Cutting Line

Capri Pants Cutting Line

Grain line

P17

Join to pattern on P21.


Pants 1�

Join to pattern on P17.

Essential Pants Cutting Line

Grain line

P18

Join to pattern on P22.


Join to pattern on P15.

1�

Join to pattern on P20.

Pants front

Pants P19


Join to pattern on P16.

Size 2 Size 3

Join to pattern on P19.

Join to pattern on P21.

1�

Pants fr

Pants

P20


Grain line

Join to pattern on P17.

Size 2 Size 3 Size 4 Size 5 Size 6

Join to pattern on P20.

Join to pattern on P22.

Pants

1�

P21


Join to pattern on P18.

Size 2 Size 3

Size 4 Size 5 Size 6

Join to pattern on P21.

Pants

1�

P22


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Little Girls, Big Style Download Copyright © 2010 by C&T Publishing, Inc. ISBN 978-1-60705-204-3 Published by C&T Publishing, Inc., PO Box 1456, Lafayette, CA 94549. www.ctpub.com All rights reserved. No part of this work covered by the copyright hereon may be used in any form or reproduced by any means—graphic, electronic, or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, taping, or information storage and retrieval systems—without written permission from the Publisher. Acceptable uses of this ELECTRONIC PRODUCT: 1. Purchaser is entitled to print out as many copies of this ELECTRONIC PRODUCT as they wish for personal use. Photocopying, digitizing, and all other forms of copying to “share” or “distribute” the ELECTRONIC PRODUCT, whether for profit or not, is strictly prohibited. 2. Purchaser may not transfer the ELECTRONIC PRODUCT to any other person, via the Internet, email, on disk, in electronic or printed form or any other form without the written permission of C&T Publishing. Purchaser may not make the ELECTRONIC PRODUCT available over a network where it could be used by multiple computers at the same time. 3. Purchaser may not rent, lease, transfer, lend, or share the ELECTRONIC PRODUCT. Limited Warranty: Limited Warranty on this ELECTRONIC PRODUCT. C&T Publishing, Inc. warrants the ELECTRONIC PRODUCT will be delivered by C&T Publishing, Inc. free from defects in materials and workmanship under normal use for a period of ninety (90) days from the date of original purchase. C&T Publishing, Inc. will not replace the ELECTRONIC PRODUCT due to Purchaser changing computers or accidentally deleting ELECTRONIC PRODUCT or for any other loss of the file that is considered out of the control of C&T Publishing, Inc. Your exclusive remedy under this Section shall be, at C&T Publishing, Inc.’s option, a refund of the purchase price of the ELECTRONIC PRODUCT. Contact us at 800-284-1114 or www.ctpub.com for more information about the C&T Teachers Program. We take great care to ensure that the information included in our products is accurate and presented in good faith, but no warranty is provided nor are results guaranteed. Having no control over the choices of materials or procedures used, neither the author nor C&T Publishing, Inc., shall have any liability to any person or entity with respect to any loss or damage caused directly or indirectly by the information contained in this book. For your convenience, we post an up-to-date listing of corrections on our website (www.ctpub. com). If a correction is not already noted, please contact our customer service department at ctinfo@ctpub. com or at P.O. Box 1456, Lafayette, CA 94549. Trademark (™) and registered trademark (®) names are used throughout this ELECTRONIC PRODUCT. Rather than use the symbols with every occurrence of a trademark or registered trademark name, we are using the names only in the editorial fashion and to the benefit of the owner, with no intention of infringement. Note: This digital file contains patterns that may not print true to size and may require sizing adjustments (inchmarks are included on patterns for reference). Depending on your viewing application or device, printing desired page may result in multiple printed pages.


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CRAFTS/Sewing

GIVE YOUR GIRL

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• Every day is dress-up day—mix and match 4 basic patterns into hundreds of adorable outfits • Complete instructions on all the basics—finishing seams, gathering, topstitching, hemming, shirring, and more • Beginner-friendly approach to sewing “boutique” clothing for girls • Make it your own with your favorite fabrics and embellishments

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