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i choose a campaign plan for Good to Go


published by azure communications Š azure communications/ Joseph Donofrio/ Kari Dunham/ Sarah Gaziano/ Chris Goode/ Ashley Kanable/ Marc Khatchadourian/ Katrina Lord 2008. All rights reserved. No part of this book may be reproduced in any form or by any electronic or mechanical means including information storage and retrieval systems without permission in writing from the authors. The views expressed by the authors do not necessarily reflect the views of the publishers or of the organizations with which they are associated. This text is to be used in part as an educational fulfillment for Marquette University’s course ADPR 183.

All of the pictures in this book were taken by azure communications in Wisconsin. The content pages of this book are printed on environment Premium Recycled Papers made with 100 percent renewable energy.


i choose

a public relations campiagn for Good to Go ECOnvenience Stores produced by: azure communications: Joseph Donofrio Kari Dunham Sarah Gaziano Chris Goode Ashley Kanable Marc Khatchadourian Katrina Lord

Submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirement for ADPR 183 Fall Semester 2008.

azure

communications


table of contents


6 8 13 17 18 20 22 26 30 34 36 38 40 42 45 48 50 53 64 67 70 90

executive summary situational analysis and context environmental scan swot analysis media scan stakeholder analysis target audience goal one goal two goal three goal four goal five goal six www.ichooseGoodtoGo.com grand opening timeline budget evaluation potential issues conclusions appendix works cited


executive summary

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recycled glass slab in front of Good to Go.

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orporate social responsibility is deeply engrained in the foundations of an organization’s purpose and is not a superficial public relations façade. Good to Go ECOnvenience Centers are built on the concept of doing the right thing and as a part of its mission, Good to Go is dedicated to providing its customers with an efficient, affordable, convenient, and sustainable location to shop. It is important to define what Good to Go means by “sustainable.” Sustainability is defined as, “A system utilizing renewable resources that meets the requirements of the present without compromising the requirements of future generations or disrupting present or future environmental balance” (Stern and Ander, 2008, p. 40). Good to Go’s function centers around a sustainable business model and through that model it has developed the “i choose” campaign to help promote business but most importantly, to contribute to the community through education, business partnerships, and giving back. It is with this positioning that the ECOnvenience center will maximize its competitive advantage. The “i choose” campaign focuses on a target market who will benefit most from the goods and services Good to Go has to offer. But what is unique about the “i choose” campaign is the various partnerships it will create through the “i choose partnership” and the “i choose ECO education” programs. Each of these pro-


grams are based on a mutually beneficial relationship between Good to Go and other community entities to maximize a positive impact on the community with a social bottom line while returning a profitable monetary bottom line. “i choose” has six central goals each with a separate objective and strategy. Within those strategies this plan outlines the highly tactical nature of the “i choose” campaign and how those tactics will be carried out. The tactics involve both the aforementioned relationships, as well as media relations and business measures. In addition, the grand opening event is an exciting compliment to the tangible goals. “i choose” recognizes the potential difficulties with a sustainable business model and entering the Grand Chute convenience store market and attempts to mitigate those difficulties. Regardless of the challenges, “i choose” positions Good to Go in a competitive stance capable of presenting a formidable challenge to ordinary convenience stores. Good to Go recognizes that consumers have a choice when determining where they shop and how sustainable of a life they lead. “i choose” gives them reason to choose Good to Go!

Good to Go

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situation analysis and context

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stone surface on east side of Good to Go.

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he foundation of Good to Go’s business model is the sustainability aspect of its philanthropy, physical infrastructure, and its goods and services. There are countless intricacies and nuances surrounding a sustainable business model in the first decade of the 21st century. The following is a summary of that context. In the 1980s Americans were centrally cognizant of the idea of environmentalism, and “going green” became a phenomenon that most consumers wanted to be involved with. Companies raced to develop green products and brag about their sustainability. The problem with most of these green products was they did not work; green cleaners that would not clean, awkward colored energy efficient light bulbs, and environmentally friendly trash bags that could not hold trash are just a few examples (Grant, 2007, p. 24-25). Many of the corporations responsible for putting these products on the market were doing so for the sole purpose of improving their monetary bottom line (Grant, 2007, p. 26). The marketers’ lack of consideration for the consumers’ satisfaction created distrust and a skeptical attitude toward anything green. The situation in the 1980s is foundational to the dynamics evident in today’s marketplace where


green, once again, is a hot topic. At present, sustainability is either central or soon to be central in many business models; if it is not, companies are rushing to develop their green strategy. The United States government has recently recognized the existence of climate change and the impact it is having on the world. The U.S. Green Building Council developed its Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design standard (LEEDÂŽ) which certifies buildings on varying levels of sustainability. The LEEDÂŽ certification standard is the only universal sustainability standard in the United States.

Corporations like General Motors are seeing record losses because the demand for large, gas guzzling sport utility vehicles has dropped due to the average gas price hitting record highs of over four dollars a gallon during the summer of 2008. Because of these factors, as well as many other influencers, the new green movement is in full swing. Consumer demand of sustainable businesses has become much more critical. Because of their first encounter with green in the 1980s, many consumers are skeptical of the quality and genuineness of green products and claims (Makower, 2009, p. 16). Consumers are demanding fundamental changes in how business is done to reflect a more sustainable approach (Makower, 2009, p. 14). Additionally, consumers are looking to companies and government to help them with suggestions for their personal lives and sustainable improvements in their communities. These connotations have created a difficult reality for companies. While 79 percent of United States consumers say a corporation’s environmentally conscious actions impact their view of the organization, seven out of ten Americans say that when companies market green, they believe that it is just a marketing tactic (Makower, 2009, p. 25-27). In other words, everyday consumers demand environmental corporate social responsibility but are also skeptical of claims re-

Good to Go

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situation analysis and context continued

flecting environmental virtue. To deal with that problem, companies have learned that they must engage and educate their consumers, because the more they know, the more they will want to take action with environmental issues. (Grant, 2007, p. 33-48). As a part of that education, companies are beginning to recognize that there are some consumers who do not see the environment as a problem, therefore, it is the companies’ responsibility to help consumers not only understand the problem but also care about it (Makower, 2009, p. 45). The second key challenge companies face is the concept that green is not enough. Because of the reputation problems outlined above, and the reality that green products sometimes cost more for consumers, they must have primary benefits (Makower, 2009, p. 29). There must be some additional advantage to buying a green product; it must be a quality product, have a practical purpose, or be reasonably priced (Grant, 2007, p. 78). The sustainable characteristics of the product are almost an afterthought. To add to this issue, 66 percent of American consumers cannot identify what companies can do to be more sustainable, and two out of three consumers cannot name a green product (Makower, 2009, p. 49). These unique challenges represent the unwavering reality of today’s market. Ultimately, consum-

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ers need to understand how their purchases are going to positively impact the environment and how they fit into the larger picture of sustainability through choosing a certain company (Makower, 2009, p. 272). It is the company’s responsibility to educate consumers and instill the self-efficacy within them to make positive environmental changes, all while making a profit. Despite Good to Go’s sustainable nature, it must effectively identify the trends of the convenience store industry. The following is a description of the competitive market that Good to Go will be entering. The convenience store industry has its share of ups and downs. Many of these fluctuations are due to the volatility of gasoline prices, but there are other forces at work. In the


United States, visits to convenience stores have gone from an average of two minutes in duration to almost four minutes, and 75 percent of visiting patrons shop at least once a week (Harris J. and T. Fender, 2003, p. 1). Busier consumers are projected to look towards convenience stores to offer greater quality and a larger variety to improve their shopping efficiency; they are demanding a one-stop shop (Ledford, 2002, p. 16A-17A). Changing work patterns and different attitudes in food preparation trends are helping create these shifts in consumer behavior (Harris J. and T. Fender, 2003, p. 1). In addition to the demands for convenience and greater selection is the demand for healthier and better tasting products (Campitelli, 2007, p. 21A). One of the main focuses of better product options is the introduction of gourmet coffee, which provides businesses the opportunity to charge higher premiums for fresher goods (Campitelli, 2007, p. 21A). However, coffee is not the only product that sells at a premium. Despite the decreasing long-term sales outlook, tobacco sales increasingly account for a large fraction of in-store sales due to the increase in cigarette prices (Campitelli, 2007, p. 20A). Also facing increased costs for businesses are lottery customers who bring higher average profits to convenience stores than non-lottery customers due to

their tendency to spend more time in the store, visit more often, and buy higher-margin products than the average consumer (Taneia, p. 1999, p. 108). Furthermore, the undeniable impact of gasoline sales on convenience store sales holds both positives and negatives for businesses. Convenience stores will benefit from relatively low gasoline prices, which will encourage consumers to enter stores to purchase higher margin goods. However, higher gasoline prices will, predicatively, have the opposite impact (Cox, 2001, p. 17A). Overall, while there has been minimal growth over the past five years, convenience store industry sales are projected to grow 4.3 percent through 2007 (Campitelli, 2003, p. 21A). There is a projection for a tighter retail market in the near future with the increase in the number of small grocery stores that focus on offering convenience to customers (C-Stores losing gas, 2008, p. 1). Wal-Mart and Sam’s Club are carrying out plans to expand their gasoline programs by offering the greatly desired one-stop shop for consumers at many of their locations (Ledford, 2002, p. 16A). This influx of outside business and a general increase in the number of convenience stores since 1993 is creating additional industry competition adding to increasing consumer demands (Cox, 2001, p. 30).

Good to Go

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“We continue to obsess about the future...” ” page 12

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environmental scan

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here are numerous factors that will impact Good to Go’s success in the Grand Chute and Appleton communities. The three most paramount elements impacting success are the consumers’ economic concerns and desire for value, the balance of sustainability and a solid competitive advantage, and the convenience store competition. To begin with, there are approximately nine gas station-convenience stores within a close proximity of Good to Go’s Grand Chute location. In order to better understand the challenges that Good to Go will face in Grand Chute, it is first important to understand the positioning of some of its competitors. One primary competitor is Kwik Trip. Kwik Trip has positioned itself quite well in the market. The corporation has invested a significant amount of resources aimed at learning what their customers want (Hebets, 2006, p. 8). In addition, they actively work with employees to help stay on top of their competitors (Hebets, 2006, p. 8). Kwik Trip understands the need for as much convenience as possible but also recognizes a desire from the consumers to have fresh items like salads and hot food options (Hebets, 2006, p. 9). Finally, Kwik Trip offers a free $25 gas card with the activation of a store card (Hebets, 2006, p. 9). This strong positioning and relationship building, in addition to Kwik Trip’s convenient location next to

the interstate, will present formidable competition for Good to Go. Good to Go must recognize that there are several options for a gas station-convenience store and car wash within a close proximity to its location which present many choices for consumers. Furthermore, economic concerns are central to the target market creating an unmistakable need to offer value to the customer. Primary research indicated that individuals in the Grand Chute and Appleton communities are concerned about the environment and prefer socially responsible organizations, however, most times they have no choice but to choose the more economic options for themselves and their families or businesses (Reference Appendix: Primary Research). Good to Go’s business plan indicates it wants to offer customers, amongst several things, greater value for their dollar (Business Plan, p. 18). This economic advantage is imperative to communicate and deliver. Given the strong connotations

Good to Go

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environmental scan continued

of green products outlined in the previous section, Good to Go must be cognizant of the idea that it cannot simply advertise its goods and services as green or sustainable and expect that characteristic to be a competitive advantage. But it must communicate other advantages of shopping at Good to Go before capitalizing on the sustainable aspect of the business (Esty and Winston, 2006, p. 300-301). Often times, consumers believe they will have to sacrifice quality or value in order to purchase a sustainable product (Stern and Ander, 2008, p. 61-62). Good to Go must prove that assumption false. With that stated, Good to Go should recognize that helping consumers understand and reduce environmental problems may strengthen loyalty amongst the customer base and attract increasing sales (Esty and Winston, 2006, p. 300). The respondents in the primary research also indicated that they believe a local business must be a part of the community in order to succeed (Reference Appendix: Primary Research). Finally, long term expectations must be such that at some point, sustainability will become the new minimal standard of operations, and the sustainability aspects of a business will not deviate from the status quo because of the diminished inflection point (Stern and Ander, 2008, p. 5). Ultimately, Good to Go’s ability to recognize

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and communicate advantages of its goods and services in addition to its sustainability will determine its success in the convenience store market.


Good to Go

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“...because we can’t afford to o forget abou ut how we impact life on Earth today.” ” page 16

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swot analysis strenghs

weaknesses

Good to Go’s major strength is its creative twist on a new convenience store. It has all the amenities that any other convenience store would carry, but the customer is independent. Staff is alerted to any shortage in products, the automated merchandising system has a high success rate, and the just-in-time stock saves money on unnecessary asset inventory. It requires little maintenance and is primarily unstaffed, as such, labor wages will be incredibly small. Good to Go also offers the added benefit of providing the customer with a sustainable shopping opportunity.

Running an entire business on the automated merchandising system may create problems with consumer comfort, and there is potential for technical complications. Reliance on a machine for all of the business transactions is a risk. If the machines malfunction, continuity of operations would be lost, adversely impacting sales. Good to Go must also recognize that there are other convenience stores in the United States under the name “Good To Go”. A Google search outlined two stores, one located in Chesterton, IN and the other in Enterprise, AL. This commonality can cause brand confusion when Good to Go launches additional stores in other states.

opportunities

threats

Grand Chute holds great opportunity for Good to Go’s first location. The Grand Chute and Appleton communities are generally open to the idea of a sustainable movement and are curious about how to get involved. Business partnerships are also a strong opportunity because of the positive impressions consumers have of community-based relationships. The target market is also one that likes to “show off” how sustainable they are, which is a great way for Good to Go to get their logo and message out to the mass media. Also, since this target is savvy with technology reaching them through social media will be a tremendous opportunity.

Most importantly, there are individuals who do not care about the sustainable movement, however, they can still be a target market. Because Good to Go is new, there is no history or credibility associated with it, thus making the consumer weary about shopping with a new business. While Good to Go is an innovative business, the sustainable convenience store idea has already been established. There are other sustainable convenience stores in the country, which could draw business away from Good to Go. Currently, the locations of the other sustainable convenience stores are not in close proximity to Good to Go. The rise in popularity of the electric car, potentially making gas obsolete, could also be a threat to Good to Go.

Good to Go

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media scan

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pervious concrete in front of Good to Go.

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media scan was executed by searching online databases for articles from both local and national newspapers, magazines, Web sites, and blogs. We also looked at databases such as ProQuest for articles from scholarly journals. Search topics included, but were not limited to: Good to Go, ethanol fuel, LEEDŽ building certification, sustainability, vending machines, automated merchandising systems, and convenience stores. Most of the articles pertaining to Good to Go focused on the general facts of the convenience store, automated merchandising system, car wash, alternative fuels, green rooftops, and the LEEDŽ certification. All of these hits had positive mentions of the services offered, both from the consumer’s perspective as well as the positive impact they have on the environment and the community. By reading these articles, a reader will discover that there is a large emphasis from Good to Go to spread the word on their mission of sustainability. All of these articles have shown that there is an interest from the media to cover Good to Go specifically, whether it is from the sustainability angle or because of the uniqueness of the automated merchandising system. Another issue that receives a large amount of media attention is the impact ethanol fuel has on the


environment and the economy. There are some articles that focus on the positives as well as the negatives of such use and the consequences of implementing a full-on switch to ethanol. While there are several pieces that are adamant about not switching over to such fuel sources, there are very few articles that specifically point to the affirmative characteristics of using ethanol based fuel. Reasons for avoiding the switch to ethanol presented include the dependence on government funding and the negative effects from the production of such fuels, including an excessive amount of pollution. There is also the concern that the need for so much extra corn can cause an increase in food prices. The positive aspects presented for using ethanol fuel are just as compelling. The articles state the most obvious reason includes the lack of dependence on fossil fuels and the costs that could be saved from using other fuels. Another idea presented in the media is that using fuels that are made from corn grown in the United States could potentially help the domestic economy. Finally, the media places a significant emphasis on sustainability, both in terms of helping the consumer and also being a vehicle for education. Some examples include the transformation that has occurred in the United States in terms of the push for

more sustainability. There is an interest among the consumers to hold corporations more accountable for the impact they have on the environment and the business practices that they can improve on in order to ease their impact. Education of the environment is also a larger topic discussed. Certain programs being implemented in schools include Community Action For A Renewed Environment. This program aims to bring attention to health issues arising in children due to the weakening natural environment and the ways that young people can be actively involved in the solution.

Good to Go

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stakeholder analysis

owners and shareholders: Owners and shareholders enter the picture with an already positive attitude regarding the business. These individuals have invested a significant amount of time with Good to Go, and it is understood that they have monetarily invested in the business. These individuals have a direct stake in whether or not the business succeeds due to any profit sharing or dividend arrangement. Because of their role in the orcommunication with owners and ganization, regular egu shareholders is expected. Upon a significant positive or negative event, they must be communicated with punctually and diligently. Detailed communication regarding the scope and parameters of the initiative should be outlined for them prior to any marketing action being taken.

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current and potential customers: In number, this group of stakeholders is one of the largest. The consumer base has a significant stake in the success of the business depending on whether or not Good to Go is offering them the goods and services they desire. Customers in the loyalty program will have a larger stake than the average customer given any relationship they may have built with Good to Go. If customers have a negative experience, they will be worked with promptly to resolve the issue. If the issue is not resolved, there is a potential that Good to Go will lose more than individual customers; multiple customers could be lost due to negative word-of-mouth. If the campaign is perceived positively from the consumers’ point-of-view, they will react well to Good to Go becoming a member of the community.


Grand Chute and Appleton communities: The Grand Chute and Appleton communities will only stand to gain from Good to Go as one of its community members. Through the giving back programs, outlined in the goals and objectives section to follow, Grand Chute and Appleton will see positive outcomes through Good to Go’s mission and will be directly impacted by its success. business partners: Business partners will be an intricate part of this initiative (outlined in the goals and objectives section). These business partners have a large stake in the success of Good to Go because their business relationships are based on mutual benefit. Good to Go and its business partners only stand to gain from the lucrative alliance, which will be formed through this campaign. As such, the business partners will be coordinated with prior to the launch of any campaign.

sustainable conscious consumers: One of Good to Go’s aspirations is to build a positive relationship with those who are advocates of sustainability and corporate social responsibility. These individuals also present a potential threat to Good to Go’s sustainable positioning, as many businesses have been sharply criticized for falsely claiming green virtue. Good to Go can help mitigate criticisms of its business plan and operations through transparency and honesty. Good to Go’s demonstration of genuine respect for the environment will be invaluable in the communications with these individuals. Support from green conscious consumers will be incalculable.

Good to Go

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target audience

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sun shade over Good to Go patio.

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he “i choose” campaign is aimed at women, particularly mothers, ages 25 to 44. Together, the 25 to 34 and the 35 to 44 populations comprise 31.2 percent of the Grand Chute population (U.S. Census Bureau, 2000). Out of the total population, 29.6 percent of households have children under the age of 18. Within the Grand Chute community, children ages one to eight are the largest school population with 2,005 which indicates a large amount of “young” families. These numbers create a strong opportunity to target through the various efforts of the “i choose” campaign. Women within this age group need convenience, efficiency, and economy in their purchases. In general, over 80 percent of women in this age group have attended or graduated college and the majority of these women hold professional, executive/administrative positions, or clerical/sales positions mostly working fulltime (Mediamark Research Inc., 2001, p. 1). The vast majority of the women in this target are married and live in a household with one or two children under the age of 17 (Mediamark Research Inc., 2001, p. 1). The majority of the individuals in this group read the newspaper daily and watch cable TV, with a greater majority reading the Sunday newspaper (Mediamark Research Inc., 2001, p. 2). Over half of


the target audience listen to the radio on weekdays during their morning commute and nearly half listen to radio during the evening commute usually tuning into adult contemporary or talk radio stations (Mediamark Research Inc., 2001, p. 2-3). Television viewing in this target is most significant on the following networks: A&E, The Discovery Channel, Fox Family Channel, Lifetime, The Weather Channel, and WGN (Mediamark Research Inc., 2001, p. 4). Visits to convenience stores of individuals spending up to $30 are most frequent among members of the 25-34 and 35-44 age groups respectively greater than any other age brackets (Mediamark Research Inc., 2001, p. 1 and Mediamark Research Inc., 2001, p. 11). Generally, full-time workers are increasingly visiting convenience stores to pick up items for their families for dinner (Mediamark Research Inc., 2001, p. 86). From a sustainability perspective, mothers specifically are more likely to make sustainably motivated decisions if they understand how those choices will benefit their families (Dolliver, 2008, p. 31). That motivation to act sustainably is derived from the sense of responsibility towards setting a positive example for their children and doing the right thing (Dolliver, 2008, p. 31).

Good to Go

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goals and strategies

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Good to Go

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goal one goal one: Involve local businesses in sustainability efforts and create community partnerships.

objective: Increase the amount of partnered organizations every year. strategy: Create partnerships with local businesses and organizations using the “i choose” campaign. The movement will be branded the “i choose partnership.” tactic one: Implement the “i choose partnership” to identify participating organizations and create information boards in businesses describing to customers how to live more sustainably and offer discounts to the partnering businesses and organizations. tactic two: Develop and implement a Web site that will be a location where businesses can share best practices and work together towards sustainability. tactic three: Target local media with a feature piece on the “i choose partnership.”

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B

ased on the primary research, one of the key factors in community members’ ability to recognize and support a new business is that business’ ability to be an active member of the community. That sense of community partnership is inherent in all of the goals for this campaign, however, goal one specifically highlights the need to form a group of organizations and businesses that share a common philanthropy of supporting the community they are a part of. To begin with, Good to Go will implement a branded movement called the “i choose partnership” that will launch throughout the Grand Chute and Appleton communities. Involved organizations will have a poster at their place of business, which will outline the program and how it will help the community; it will list the partnering organizations and the sustainable options available at that business’ location. Lastly, the Good to Go Web site will be listed as a location where consumers can access more information regarding how they can make sustainable choices in their lives. The in-store posters will be coupled with window clings with the campaign logo so consumers can recognize that the organization is part of the “i choose partnership” from a distance. In addition, where applicable, the partnering

businesses’ vehicles will have a branded car magnet or window cling identifying the campaign and its commitment toward supporting the community. Those partnering organizations will receive discounted goods inside the store and discounted car washes. As a result of the Web address being posted on the “i choose partnership” materials, traffic will be pushed to Good to Go’s Web site where the consumer can learn a number of things and redeem Good to Go coupons. Primarily, Good to Go and its partners will teach consumers how they themselves can make sustainable lifestyle changes. The secondary research indicated that consumers are looking to corporations and government to lead the way and help them make personal improvements. The support of this idea is foundational to Good to Go’s motives as defined in the business plan (Good to Go ECOnvenience Centers, p. 1). Moreover, the Web site will provide a discussion board for individuals to talk about those lifestyle changes they have made and ask questions of Good to Go or other consumers. The social media aspect of the Web site is key because the social media initiatives are primarily useful in supporting the creation and support of a community. The “i choose partnership” will have access to the customer discussion board so they can

Good to Go

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goal one continued

see customer comments, post their own thoughts, or offer their own promotions. This initiative will increase the traffic to the Good to Go Web site because customers of businesses in the “i choose partnership” will be posting on Good to Go’s Web site. There will also be a business portion of the Web site where the current and potential businesses of the “i choose partnership” will be able to view Good to Go’s work, partners, and share best practices. This online community will transfer to the physical knowledge of Good to Go. Through the social media efforts and the partnerships with other businesses, Good to Go will build a name for itself as the business capable and willing to help consumers make lifestyle changes and supporting the community. That brand recognition and appreciation of Good to Go’s philanthropy, will help make Good to Go the convenience store of choice in the Grand Chute and Appleton communities. When customers shopping at other businesses see

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Good to Go and the “i choose partnership” logos, they will begin to recognize the widespread community efforts of Good to Go and become interested in examining its social responsibility. To garner media attention, “i choose” will target local media outlets with a feature news release highlighting the unique existence and format of the “i choose partnership.” In that release, we will have business partners comment on what they are doing in the partnership and why they choose to be a part of it. The release will emphasize Good to Go’s creation and support of the program and communicate the idea that Good to Go is not simply interested in a monetary bottom line. The image on this page illustrates the window cling that will be placed on the front window of participating organizations. The magnets and window clings will be branded consistently along with the consumer magnets and clings that will be discussed in the following pages. On the page to the right is a sample poster that would appear in a participating “i choose partnership” store or business. The poster outlines sustainable options the customers have at that particular store. The function of the poster is to describe to the customers how they themselves can make sustainable changes in their own lives. For those


individuals interested in further information regarding the “i choose partnership” and sustainability, Good to Go’s Web site, www.ichooseGoodtoGo.com, is listed in conjunction with Good to Go’s logo. Additionally, the logos of other “i choose partnership” participants are listed on the poster. Corporate discounts for participating organizations will be arranged individually, however, those benefits will include discounted car washes and items in the store. This program is based off the idea of mutual benefit for both Good to Go and partnering organizations. Other businesses will benefit from greater publicity as a community partner with their logo associated with the “i choose partnership” and discounts on car washes and in store items at Good to Go. Centrally, Good to Go will benefit from the “i choose partnership” through association and recognition of the program’s creator; brand exposure on each of the “i choose partnership” posters, window clings and magnets, and increase in business traffic from the corporations that take advantage of the “i choose partnership” discounts at Good to Go.

Good to Go

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goal two goal two: Encourage customers of Good to Go to make environmentally conscious lifestyle choices.

objective: Teach 25 percent of daily customers how to make lifestyle changes. strategy: Offer information to consumers about how to make lifestyle changes. tactic one: Offer sustainable lifestyle information through consumer Web site and “i choose partnership” information boards. tactic two: Enhance community through visual campaign with free “i choose” car magnets and window clings. tactic three: Use a social media initiative to help answer customer questions and clarify uncertainty about sustainability and Good to Go. tactic four: Use customers’ positive testimonials to create feature pieces through social media.

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O

ne of the most important aspects of Good to Go’s philosophy is to make a positive impact on the community (Good to Go ECOnvenience Centers, p. 1). Good to Go is doing its part, and it is imperative for Good to Go to encourage others to help in that process to truly make a large scale sustainability impact. Goal two focuses on the communications with consumers. As discussed in goal one, the underlying theme of Good to Go’s outreach efforts is to become identified as the business that is helping consumers lead the way in sustainability through education and mutual support. By offering sustainability information to consumers it allows them to make personal changes but also associate a positive community impact with Good to Go. There are two aspects to creating a community cognizant of sustainability and supportive of Good to Go. The first of those components is a visual identity association. Those who shop at Good to Go frequently will get free car magnets and window clings to put on their vehicles. These magnets and clings will look like the logo’s yin and yang. One side will say “i choose…” and the other side will have many options for customers to choose such as: “sustainability”, “to recycle”, “to reduce”, “to reuse”. This visual association will be looked at as a positive relationship because of the genuine nature of Good

fto Go’s philosophy and efforts to support the community. The second aspect of the communitybuilding concept is the implementation of social media. Outlined in the description of goal one, social media will help create the foundaomer tion of a supportive customer he base. The focus behind the social media tactics in goal two is to clear up much of the confusion behind sustainability. Many of the individuals in our target market, as well as anyone who lived through the 1980s and 1990s, recognize that this is not the first time there has been a green movement. The problem with the first green movement, however, was that consumers had to sacrifice quality, speed, and dependability (to name a few) in order to use green products. On the whole, these sacrifices are no longer necessary and the connotations and concerns behind utilizing recycled water in the car wash, for example, can be clarified and concerns mitigated through the proposed implementation of the Web site and social media. Through the online

Good to Go

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goal two continued

discussion board, Good to Go representatives can explain how the consumers will not have to sacrifice convenience and, in fact, Good to Go is faster and more convenient due to the state-of-the-art car wash technology and automated merchandising system. This discussion board will present the opportunity for Good to Go to connect with its current and potential clientele. The tactics within goal two will help increase store traffic and interest in Good to Go because of the segment of the target audience that deeply cares about the community responsibility of a business. The community developed through the social media discussion board and the “i choose” campaign will help give Good to Go a competitive advantage over other convenience stores. If members of this market segment had a choice between another convenience store and Good to Go, they will choose Good to Go because of its genuine mission to be a positive community member, therefore increasing store traffic and improving the return on the investments for the tactics of goal two. To help support the promotion of education to consumers about sustainable lifestyle changes, Good to Go will contact several customers who have successfully made lifestyle changes as a result of Good to Go’s efforts. Good to Go will then encourage custom-

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ers to make posts on the discussion board describing a personal story about sustainability encouraging other individuals to learn more about sustainability and how to make changes in their own lives. These testimonials will be aimed at building trust for the “i choose” campaign and help bring new customers to Good to Go as a result.


Good to Go

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goal three goal three: Give to the communities of Grand Chute and Appleton and raise awareness of Good to Go through the “i choose community” program. objective: Give five percent of yearly profits to the Grand Chute and Appleton communities for sustainable education. strategy: Create sustainability outreach initiatives and educational opportunities. tactic one: Partner with Jefferson Elementary School and provide funding to educate youth on sus tainability. tactic two: Partner with Community Herbs and provide funding and support to help the local grown community garden. tactic three: Contribute to community beau tification projects by planting trees. tactic four: Use news releases to local media to increase awareness about the giving back program.

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G

iving back is one of the most genuine and important activities Good to Go will sponsor. The objective under goal three is to give back a percentage of total profits to the Grand Chute community. Through the giving back program, Good to Go will foster partnerships with two main entities: Jefferson Elementary and Community Herbs. Through the partnership with Jefferson Elementary School in Appleton, Good to Go will pay for environmental education opportunities for classes, this initiative will be called “i choose Eco education.” The education program will be in conjunction with the students’ existing science programs. Good to Go will fund course materials for these classes. One such item is a small tree sprig that every student in the class will receive. The students will bring the tree home to their parents where, together they will find a place to plant the tree. The students will be able to watch the tree grow throughout their time growing up. The tree will have an “i choose Eco education” tag that describes how they can do their part. In addition, the tree tag will have a coupon for a car wash and convenience store goods for their parents to see and use. For every five trees the students plant, Good to Go will plan one mature tree in the community as a part of tactic three: community beatification projects. When Good to Go plants its trees, the


news release theme will read, “you planted a tree, and so did we.” By including a coupon with the tree tags, this will allow parents to recognize the coupon and the tree as a part of Good to Go’s “i choose” program. The coupon will entice parents to shop at Good to Go for two reasons: number one, the benefit of the coupon and number two, the encouragement from their children to be socially responsible. Our research indicates that, when children come home from school wanting to know how their family is contributing to su sustainability, their parents feel a though the children are scruas tinizing their behavior (Dolliver, 2008, p. 31). That impression of scrutiny will help encourage pa p parents to act in environmentally rres responsible fashion, which, from tthe “i choose” tag, will suggest s shopping at Good to Go, therefore helping to increase interest in Good to Go. This tactic i consistent with the mutual is b benefit of all “i choose” initiativ tives. The school receives free supp supplies for their students and G d to t Go benefits from the exposure Good

of the “i choose program.” Tactic two outlines the partnership with Good to Go and Community Herbs with “i choose local grown.” Community Herbs is a youth organization in Grand Chute and Appleton that plants herbs and plants, grows them, then sells them to the local community. Since local grown products are a large part of sustainability, Good to Go will help Community Herbs plant a garden to expand the opportunities for more students to be involved in the program. Good to Go will have a description of that partnership on the Web site encouraging community members to purchase herbs from the group. This tactic, like those aforementioned, will create a mutually beneficial relationship between the two organizations because customers of Community Herbs will see the sponsorship by Good to Go and customers of Good to Go will see the advertising for Community Herbs and be influenced to buy from that organization. Finally, further exposure of Good to Go and the “i choose Eco education” and “i choose local grown” programs will be achieved through news releases to local media. News releases will go to media outlets before the students receive their supplies. The day the students receive their trees, media will be invited to the school to show the students receiving their trees.

Good to Go

page 35


goal four goal four: Get customers of Renew to become customers of Good to Go.

objective: Get 75 percent of the customers using the pumps each month (10,000) to become customers of Good to Go (7,500 per month, 250 per day). strategy: Offer financially advantageous promotions to customers. tactic one: Create and implement loyalty program associated with the “i choose” magnets and window clings. tactic two: Attach “i choose” clings and magnets, along with “i choose” sustainability and promotional materials to product packaging.

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i choose


S

pecific and measurable traffic objectives are necessary to the nature of Good to Go’s monetary bottom line. Part of the overall bottom line is helping the community and doing the right thing, however, goals four and five focus on monetary bottom line objectives. The first tactic within this goal is to offer promotional discounts for the car wash and items inside the store to those who use the gas pumps. Good to Go will offer a dollar off coupon for a car wash or a dollar off a large size coffee in the store with a purchase of five gallons of gas or more. In addition to the “i choose” magnets and window clings, a loyalty program will be established and implemented to reward frequent shoppers of Good to Go. There will be a car wash promotion for those participating in the loyalty program, specifically outlined in goal five. For loyalty program customers, purchasing five gallons of gas or more will qualify them for a dollar off coupon for anything in the store. By giving customers store discounts for buying gas, they will be more inclined to enter the store and purchase higher margin goods. On the sixth wash, they will validate their free wash with their “i choose” loyalty program card. Loyal members will automatically receive discounts for items in the store. Magnets and window clings will be available 24 hours for customers to take

freely. The service ambassador will also be responsible for handing out the “i choose” clings during normal business hours. In addition, any featured products will have attached “i choose” magnets and window clings to encourage sales of those items through customer desire to get a cling or magnet. Moreover, further “i choose” educational information will be attached product packaging. Our research demonstrated that product packaging is grossly underutilized for educating consumers about a business’ social responsibility (Makower, 2009, p. 87). By including these promotional materials, Good to Go will capitalize on this opportunity, further increasing its ability to educate its consumers and increasing its exposure.

Good to Go

page 37


goal five goal five: Get Renew customers and Good to Go customers to use the car wash.

objective: Get 15 percent of daily Renew customers to use the car wash. strategy: Offer financially advantageous promotions to customers. tactic one: Offer discounts to those who buy gas. tactic two: Offer corporate discounts on car washes for partnering organizations. tactic three: Place a diagram at the pump and a video screen at the car wash explaining the water recycling process.

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i choose


P

art of Good to Go’s objectives is a specific focus on getting consumers to the car wash. As mentioned in the description of goal four, consumers who purchase five gallons of gas or more will receive one dollar off a car wash and every sixth car wash, for those in the loyalty program, will be free. This financial benefit to being a frequent customer will encourage individuals to be loyal to Good to Go thus helping increase business traffic. In addition to the everyday discounts given to customers, the partnerships with organizations depicted in the first two goals will assist with the second tactic under this goal, as depicted in goal one and the description of the corporate partnerships. Corporate discounts will be offered for partnering businesses and organizations. Those organizations will be encouraged to wash their company and personal vehicles at Good to Go because of the financial benefit not to mention the added environmental benefits of the water reclamation system, therefore reducing their own organization’s carbon footprint. This relationship will emphasize the mutual benefits of being a part of the “i choose partnership.” Lastly, the third tactic under this goal, educating customers about the car wash water reclamation system, is imperative to the education and information dispelling negative connotations that may exist

about the recycled water. Education will help customers understand that the recycled water is just as clean as fresh water. The financial benefit from the aforementioned promotions, coupled with the environmentally responsible aspect of the car wash, will make Good to Go’s car wash a desired option for consumers. The education offered to the consumers is increased with a TV screen with a looping video illustrating the reclamation system and the other sustainable aspects of the Good to Go facility. The increase in comfort resulting from the education and promotions will help increase traffic through the car wash.

Good to Go

page 39


goal six goal six: Increase national awareness of Good to Go through national convenience store and sustainable trade media. objective: Get three national trade magazines to run a story about Good to Go within one year. strategy: Use unique aspects of the “i choose” campaign to gain the interest of national trade media. tactic one: Pitch the “i choose partnership” to the national trade media as a successful model for social responsibility that positively impacts the community. tactic two: Pitch the “i choose Eco education” to the national trade media as a positive example of community relationships and education through giving back. tactic three: Pitch the sustainable aspects of the LEED®™ certified business along with the uniqueness of the convenience store.

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i choose

G

ood to Go is highly interested in receiving national media attention to help the business grow to become a national organization. As a paramount precursor to regional and national growth, stories run by the national trade media will be incredibly advantageous to that horizontal growth. Tactic one describes the pitch to national trade media, outlining the “i choose partnership” and how it is helping the Grand Chute community. This pitch will be focused on trade publications that focus on social responsibility and small business owners. Publications to receive press releases include the following: Business Week (circulation of 1,087,000), Industrial Market Trends, and In Business. Online publications will include BusinessMagazineNetwork. com. The releases will demonstrate Good to Go’s sustainable business model and how their choices are helping the community. Tactic two involves the pitch to inform about the “i choose Eco education” giving back program and the advantages of the concept. Outside of the local media, press releases will be sent to the following trade publications: Business Week (circulation of 1,087,000), Industrial Market Trends, and In Business. Tactic three entails the pitch to national trade media focused on sustainable business and the focus


on environmental friendly companies. Online trade publications to be included are the following: SustainableBusiness.com, GreenBiz.com, and ENN – Environmental News Network. The following trade publications will also be included: Renewable Energy World, Industrial Market Trends, Energybiz (circulation of 24,075), sustainable facility (circulation of 30,400), Architectural SSL (circulation of 25,000), Plenty Magazine (circulation of 200,000), Green Magazine, The Green Guide – National Geographic publication (circulation of 100,000), Green@ Work (circulation of 25,000), Living Green Magazine, and Environment Design & Construction (circulation of 25,500). Pitches will also be sent to trade publications that are focused on the convenience store industry. These trade publications will include the following: Water and Wastes Digest (circulation of 90,046), Business & Industry Connection (circulation of 75,000), American Recycler (circulation of 32,944), Recycling Today (circulation of 15,800), Altfuels Advisor (circulation of 1,000), Vending Times Magazine (circulation of 16,355), Automatic Merchandisingr magazine (circulation of 15,904), Vending & OCS (circulation of 28,783), Convenience Store News (circulation of 76,926), Convenience Store Decisions (circulation of 41,424), CSP – Convenience Store/Petroleum (circulation of 48,189), and NACS (circulation of 28,783).

The largest benefit Good to Go will see through national trade media attention is awareness on one level but also a positive depiction of Good to Go’s business operations and community involvement. When looking for future convenience store locations in other communities, Good to Go can point to the articles that covered the work done in Grand Chute and that work will resonate from third party verification that Good to Go is a business communities would like to have in their area. Through national recognition and third party support (through those publications) Good to Go will have a greater chance at being successful in expanding on the national level. The strong community foundations built in Grand Chute will bode well for Good to Go on the national market because other communities will see Good to Go’s strong community roots and genuine desire to be a socially responsible business.

Good to Go

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www.ichooseGoodtoGo.com

A

comprehensive Web site provides an effective opportunity for Good to Go to communicate key messages, educate consumers, and measure goals and objectives. It is because of the strength of a Web site that customers can learn more about the “i choose” campaign. Good to Go’s Web site will educate the consumers about sustainability,

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i choose

provide discount opportunities, allow for communication between stakeholders and consumers via a discussion board, advertise Good to Go’s corporate social responsibility, and measure the effectiveness of the public relations efforts. It is ultimately aimed at increasing traffic to the store and car wash.


The Web site will have two main segments: the consumer portion and the business portion. Each portion of the Web site is aimed to specifically address and segment the audiences visiting the site. The consumer portion will focus mainly on education for individual lifestyle changes and descriptions of the “i choose” program and how they can benefit from participating in any facet of Good to Go’s promotions. One such education tool will be an impact calculator where Web site visitors can calculate the environmental impact of their actions. An important aspect of the site is the element that helps create community around Good to Go and the “i choose” campaign. Therefore, a discussion board will be established for community members and customers to talk with each other and Good to Go’s business team so those customers can be adequately informed regarding the business’ purpose and mission. For the business side of the Web site, there will be descriptions of Good to Go’s community partnerships and how other businesses can become part of the “i choose partnership”. The Web site will provide an opportunity for businesses to learn the benefits of the “i choose partnership”. Lastly, one of the most functional aspects of the Web site will be its ability to measure and report analytics. By measuring metrics of the Web site,

Good to Go can easily recognize how much exposure community members have to various educational information it is providing. It can also track the number of individuals who have actively looked for information about the “i choose” program and how the level of interest and traffic to the Web site correlates with the public relations efforts. The analytics reports will be capable of measuring: the number of visits to the Web site, the number of page views, the average time viewers spend on the site, how many new visitors there are to the site, the number of downloads, activity on the discussion board, and the amount of direct traffic to the site versus traffic from search engines or other Web sites. Further discussion of the Web site’s role in the evaluation of the “i choose campaign” will be discussed in the evaluation section of this plan.

Good to Go

page 43


“Be ecause the future does start today...�

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i choose


grand opening

T

he grand opening is a great opportunity that will gain publicity for Good to Go and help build customer interest in the business. The Good to Go grand opening will be one of the many elements incorporated into the “i choose” promotions. Good to Go will welcome Ryan Hunter-Reay, driver of the Ethanol sponsored car, from the Indy Car Series. Reay will be in Wisconsin for the Indy Car Race Weekend at the Milwaukee Mile and will be attending multiple media junkets throughout his time. Raey will be accompanied by the number 17 Ethanol car and will be available for picture opportunities and autographs. He will be giving away free tickets to the Milwaukee Mile’s Indy race that weekend. This event will appeal to the demographics of the area, including the identified target audience, because NASCAR and recreational vehicles are the third and fourth top ranked lifestyles for the area (SRDS Media Solutions 8). Further promotions will involve giving away $25 in free gas to the first 100 people to sign up for the loyalty program. Good to Go will be giving away E20 and E85 gasoline for all those who sign up for the “i choose” loyalty program. The money will be automatically deposited onto their personal loyalty card. Good to Go will also be offering free car washes during the four hour event. A disc jockey will provide music to keep the crowd interested and encourage them to stay for

an extended time period. The longer customers stay the more likely they will develop a relationship with Good to Go and its mission. The event will offer free hotdogs and hamburgers provided by a local organic grocery store. An additional focus of the event will be on familiarizing customers with the automated merchandising system in order to help them become comfortable with the machine. There will also be an engineer and/or LEED® certified expert answering questions about the sustainability of the building. Good to Go will also have information about the “i choose” partnership and other places within the community that customers can purchase sustainable products. Customers will be offered materials with tips on helping them live a more sustainable life. They will be encouraged to visit www.ichooseGoodtoGo.com for more detailed information, blogs, and other tips. Good to Go will have the Web site on display at the event so that customers can calculate their carbon footprint on the impact calculator. Media coverage for the event will include news releases prior to and after the event to all major radio stations and television stations in the Appleton/ Grand Chute community. Ideally these stations will do “shout outs” to the event the week before during the morning and afternoon commutes.

azure communications

page 45


page 46

i choose


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Good to Go

page 47


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T

he “i choose� campaign extends from May of 2009 until April of 2010. Throughout that time azure communications will be under retainer until October 2009. For the remainder of the campaign azure will be used strictly for maintenance of the Web site and evaluation. Most media relations tactics will take place before October 2009. The grand

page 48

i choose

opening event will take place at the end of May, coinciding with the Indy Car race at the Milwaukee Mile. Good to Go will be open for nearly a month creating a general knowledge of the store in the community before the grand opening. Good to Go also plans on being a vendor at the farmer’s market in Appleton during the summer months.


Good to Go

page 49


budget likely budget

T

he likely budget is closest to the goal budget and fulfills all requirements for Good to Go. The likely budget is missing the kiosk. The kiosk is outside of the scope for the project, however the value to complete a common use for a gas station, stopping for directions, will bring value. Goal Budget: $50,000.00 Total Expenses

page 50

Event: Site Site staff Licenses Other Misc. Total

Estimated Actual $280.00 Free $1,000.00 $1,280.00 $0.00

Event: Decorations Outdoor Banner Total

Estimated Actual $200.00 $200.00 $0.00

Event: Refreshments Food & Drinks Grill & Equipment Serving Supplies Total

Estimated Actual $2,000.00 $123.00 $120.00 $2,243.00 $0.00

Miscellaneous* Telephone Media/News Releases Transportation Stationery supplies Media Kit Preparation Web Site Salaries Business Taxes Buffer (10%) Main Retainer Sub Retainer to cover evaluation months Total *covered by the retainers

Estimated

i choose

$2,743.00 $18,000.00 $3,000.00 $23,743.00

Actual

$0.00

Estimated

Actual

$51,326.00

$0.00

Event: Entertainment DJ Travel Gas Promotion Coffee Promotion Coffee Promotion Printing Car Wash Promotion Total

Estimated Actual $325.00 $500.00 $2,500.00 $100.00 $62.00 $50.00 $3,537.00 $0.00

Business Partnership & Loyalty Program Information Cards Paper and Printing Supplies Networking Efforts "i choose" Posters "i choose" Car Magnets "i choose" Loyalty Card Kiosk $1 off Car Wash Promotion "i choose" Loyalty Car Wash Promotion "i choose partnership" Window Sticker Total

Estimated Actual $2,460.00 $115.00 $1,000.00 $160.00 $10,000.00 $2,000.00 Dependency Dependency $100.00 $15,835.00

$0.00

Community Responsibility Estimated Actual "i choose ECO education" Materials Profit-based "i choose community" Beautification Project Profit-based Information Sheet at Pumps $138.00 Donations to Community Herbs $2,000.00 Outdoor Television $2,200.00 Vendor at Appleton Market $150.00 Total $4,488.00 $0.00


low budget

T

he low budget has the extremities omitted for funding reasons. Three items omitted from the budget are the coffee promotion, coffee promotion printing materials (coupons), and the kiosk. The reasoning for leaving the latter items is due to the lack of core values to the plan. Even though these items are not mandatory to the plan, they do bring

value to the high and likely budgets. The low budget is the streamlined budget and should be used only if mandatory.

Goal Budget: $50,000.00 Total Expenses

Event: Site Site staff Licenses Other Misc. Total

Estimated Actual $280.00 Free $1,000.00 $1,280.00 $0.00

Event: Decorations Outdoor Banner Total

Estimated Actual $200.00 $200.00 $0.00

Event: Refreshments Food & Drinks Grill & Equipment Serving Supplies Total

Estimated Actual $2,000.00 $123.00 $120.00 $2,243.00 $0.00

Miscellaneous* Telephone Media/News Releases Transportation Stationery supplies Media Kit Preparation Web Site Salaries Business Taxes Buffer (10%) Main Retainer Sub Retainer to cover evaluation months Total *covered by the retainers

Estimated

$2,604.00 $18,000.00 $3,000.00 $23,604.00

Actual

$0.00

Estimated

Actual

$49,795.00

$0.00

Event: Entertainment DJ Travel for Ryan Hunter Reay Gas Promotion Car Wash Promotion Coffee Promotion Coffee Promotion Printing Total

Estimated Actual $325.00 $500.00 $2,500.00 $50.00

Business Partnership & Loyalty Program Information Cards Paper and Printing Supplies Networking Efforts "i choose" Posters "i choose" Car Magnets "i choose" Loyalty Card Kiosk $1 off Car Wash Promotion "i choose" Loyalty Car Wash Promotion "i choose partnership" Window Sticker Total

Estimated Actual $1,230.00 $115.00 $1,000.00 $160.00 $10,000.00 $2,000.00

$3,375.00

Dependency Dependency $100.00 $14,605.00

$0.00

$0.00

Community Responsibility Estimated Actual "i choose ECO education" Materials Profit-based "i choose community" Beautification Project Profit-based Information Sheet at Pumps $138.00 Donations to Community Herbs $2,000.00 Outdoor Television $2,200.00 Vendor at Appleton Market $150.00 Total $4,488.00 $0.00

Good to Go

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budget continued high budget

T

he high budget differentiates from the low and likely budgets by one key factor, the kiosk. The purpose of the kiosk is to replace the human contact commonly used for directions. The kiosk would be set up to MapQuest.com so that the customer may use the Web site for directions. As the kiosk is not a determinant in the plan, the kiosk is the easiest

line in the budget to remove if monetary provisions are a concern. The high budget brings a little extra to not only the cost but to the end result.

Goal Budget: $50,000.00 Total Expenses

Event: Site Site staff Licenses Other Misc. Total

Estimated

Actual $280.00

Free $1,000.00 $1,280.00

Event: Decorations "i choose" Outdoor Banner Total

Estimated

Event: Refreshments Food & Drinks Grill & Equipment Serving Supplies Total

Estimated

$0.00 Actual

$200.00 $200.00

i choose

Estimated

Business Partnership & Loyalty Program Information Cards Paper and Printing Supplies Networking Efforts "i choose" Posters "i choose" Car Magnets "i choose" Loyalty Card Kiosk $1 off Car Wash Promotion "i choose" Loyalty Car Wash Promotion "i choose partnership" Window Sticker Total

Estimated

Actual $0.00

Actual $325.00 $500.00 $2,500.00 $50.00 $100.00 $62.00 $3,537.00

$0.00

$0.00 Actual

$2,000.00 $123.00 $120.00 $2,243.00

Miscellaneous* Estimated Actual Telephone Media/News Releases Transportation Stationery supplies Networking Media Kit Preparation Web Site Salaries Business Taxes Buffer (10%) $5,042.80 Main Retainer $18,000.00 Sub Retainer to cover evaluation months $3,000.00 Total $26,042.80 *covered by the retainers

page 52

Event: Entertainment DJ Travel Gas Promotion Car Wash Promotion Coffee Promotion Coffee Promotion Printing Total

Estimated $55,620.80

$0.00

$0.00

Actual

$2,460.00 $115.00 $1,000.00 $160.00 $10,000.00 $2,000.00 $1,995.00 Dependency Dependency $100.00 $17,830.00

Community Responsibility Estimated Actual "i choose ECO education" Materials Profit-based "i choose community" Beautification Project Profit-based Information Sheet at Pumps $138.00 Donations to Community Herbs $2,000.00 Outdoor Television $2,200.00 Vendor at Appleton Market $150.00 Total $4,488.00

$0.00

$0.00


Good to Go

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evaluation

F

or each tactic measurement, three levels of achievement will be established: “exceeded expectation”, “met expectation”, or “did not meet expectation” goal one: Involve local businesses in sustainability efforts and create community partnerships. tactic one: Track Web site analytics for downloads and page views of “i choose partnership” information on the Good to Go Web site. Track increases of sustainable product purchases at partnered organizations. Track the number of customer or organization inquiries about sustainability. exceeded expectation: >20 percent of customers produce a page view or download on the “i choose partnership” page(s). met expectation: >5 percent <20 percent of monthly customers produce a page view or download on the “i choose partnership” page(s).

pervious concrete east of Good to Go.

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i choose

did not meet expectation: <5 percent of monthly customers produce a page view or download on the “i choose partnership” page(s).


tactic two: Track analytics on social media. The number of participants in the social media should correlate with the number of participating organizations and businesses. Track frequency and volume of social media use respective of the number of participating organizations. exceeded expectation: >3 customers per participating business in the “i choose partnership” post discussion board comments once or more per month. met expectation: >2 customers or <3 customers per participating business in the “i choose partnership” post discussion board comments once or more per month.

tactic three: Measure number of stories or references published in local media about Good to Go’s “i choose partnership”. exceeded expectation: >3 stories or references in local media per six month period. met expectation: >2 stories or references and <3 stories or references in local media per six month period. did not meet expectation: >2 stories or references in local media per six month period.

did not meet expectation: >2 customers per participating business in the “i choose partnership” post discussion board comments once or more per month.

Good to Go

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evaluation continued

goal two: Encourage customers of Good to Go to make environmentally conscious lifestyle choices. tactic one: Track the number of hits and page views on sustainable lifestyle pages on Web site, mainly inquiries through social media discussion board and downloads of sustainability information. Track sales of environmentally friendly products at Good to Go. exceeded expectation: >20 percent of customers produce a page view or download on the Web site. met expectation: >20 percent of customers produce a page view or download on the Web site. did not meet expectation: <5 percent of monthly customers produce a page view or download on the Web site. tactic two: Track the number of “i choose” car magnets and window clings given out and requested. exceeded expectation: Any increase in sales of featured store items with “i choose” clings and magnets attached and noticeable requests for clings and magnets at store.

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i choose

met expectation: Any increase in sales of featured store items with “i choose” clings and magnets attached. did not meet expectation: No increase in sales of featured store items with “i choose” clings and magnets attached. tactic three: Track the number of questions social media users ask regarding sustainable lifestyle changes. exceeded expectation: >10 percent of Web site visitors make a discussion board post or inquiry. met expectation: >5 percent or <10 percent of Web site visitors make a discussion board post or inquiry. did not meet expectation: <5 percent of Web site visitors make a discussion board post or inquiry. tactic four: Track media publication of feature stories about lifestyle changes of customers. Exceeded expectation: >3 stories or references in local media per six month period. met expectation: >2 stories or references and


<3 stories or references in local media per six month period.

goal three: Give to the Grand Chute and Appleton communities and raise awareness of Good to Go.

did not meet expectation: >2 stories or references in local media per six month period.

tactic one: Record number of schools/classes requesting program materials. The number of classes that will receive materials correlates directly with Good to Go sales. exceeded expectation: Any requests for program funding and >10 percent of coupons given through “i choose ECO education” program used at store. met expectation: Any requests for program funding and >5 percent of coupons given through “i choose ECO education” program used at store or <10 percent of coupons used. did not meet expectation: No requests for program funding and <5 percent of coupons given through “i choose ECO education” program used at store. tactic two: Track number of coupons used from Community Herbs partnership. Track increases in sales of Community Herbs.

Good to Go

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evaluation continued

exceeded expectation: >10 percent of Community Herbs customers take advantage of coupon discounts at Good to Go. Any increase in business for Community Herbs. met expectation: >5 percent of Community Herbs customers take advantage of coupon discounts at Good to Go or <10 percent of Community Herbs customers. Any increase in business for Community Herbs. did not meet expectation: <5 percent of Community Herbs customers take advantage of coupon discounts at Good to Go. No increase in business for Community Herbs. tactic three: Amount of materials given to community beautification projects correlates directly with Good to Go profits. (Dependent on Good to Go profits). tactic four: Track media publication of stories and references about program. exceeded expectation: >3 stories or references in local media per six month period.

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i choose

met expectation: >2 stories or references and <3 stories or references in local media per six month period. did not meet expectation: >2 stories or references in local media per six month period.


goal four: Get customers of Renew to become customers of Good to Go.

customers participating in the loyalty program by the end of the six month retainer period.

tactic one: Track increase of sales to Good to Go during promotions periods and participation in loyalty program.

did not meet expectation: <1500 customers participating in the loyalty program by the end of the six month retainer period.

exceeded expectation: >7,500 customers per month from Renew become customers of Good to Go.

tactic three: Track changes in number of featured products sold during featured times relative to nonfeatured times.

met expectation: >7,000 customers per month and <7,500 customers per month from Renew become customers of Good to Go.

exceeded expectation: Any increase in sales of featured products sold during featured times relative to non-featured times.

did not meet expectation: <7,000 customers per month from Renew become customers of Good to Go.

met expectation: Any increase in sales of featured products sold during featured times relative to non-featured times.

tactic two: Measure the amount of individuals participating in the â&#x20AC;&#x153;i chooseâ&#x20AC;? loyalty program.

did not meet expectation: No increase in sales of featured products sold during featured times relative to non-featured times.

exceeded expectation: >2000 customers participating in the loyalty program by the end of the six-month retainer period. met expectation: >1500 customers and <2000

Good to Go

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evaluation continued

goal five: Get Renew customers and Good to Go customers to go to the car wash. tactic one: Track the number of individuals who take advantage of the car wash discount promotion through loyalty program usage. exceeded expectation: >15 percent of daily Renew customers to go to the car wash. met expectation: >12 percent of daily Renew customer or <15 percent of daily Renew customers to go to the car wash. did not meet expectation: <12 percent of daily Renew customers to go to the car wash. tactic two: Track the number of individuals/organizations that take advantage of the corporate discount on car washes. exceeded expectation: >75 percent of partnered organizations take monthly advantage of corporate discounts. met expectation: <50 percent or <75 percent of partnered organizations take monthly advantage

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i choose

of corporate discounts. Did not meet expectation: >50 percent of partnered organizations take monthly advantage of corporate discounts. tactic three: Measure perceptions of water reclamation process on social media aspects of the Web site. exceeded expectation: Positive discussion posts and encouragement on the part of customers to go to Good to Go (Qualitative). met expectation: Positive discussion posts (Qualitative). did not meet expectation: Negative discussion and customer satisfaction (Qualitative).


goal six: Increase national awareness of Good to Go through national convenience store and sustainable trade media.

six month period. did not meet expectation: >2 stories or references in national trade media per six month period.

tactic one: Track number of reports, stories, and references relating to the “i choose partnership” and Good to Go. exceeded expectation: >3 stories or references in national trade media per six month period. met expectation: >2 stories or references and <3 stories or references in national trade media per six month period. did not meet expectation: >2 stories or references in national trade media per six month period. tactic two: Track number of national trade media reports, stories, and references related to “i choose Eco education”. exceeded expectation: >3 stories or references in national trade media per six month period. met expectation: >2 stories or references and <3 stories or references in national trade media per

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potential issues and conclusions

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Good to Go

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potential issues

T

here are several major problems Good to Go may face throughout the entirety of its campaign and certainly as long as it is open for business in Grand Chute. Primary issues deal with competitive differentiation, positioning in the local convenience store market, issues related to ownership, the negative perceptions from the perspective of the consumers that result from sustainable marketing and green products, and problems with the perception of ethanol. The central problem Good to Go may face will be how well consumers understand the advantages of shopping at Good to Go versus its competitors. With strong competitors like Kwik Trip and Exxon, some consumers may be hard pressed to find noticeable differences and advantages through shopping at Good to Go. Since a large fraction of Good to Go’s advantage is the sustainability aspect of its business, consumers will have to learn how the sustainability of Good to Go is an advantage for them. Potential customers will ask, “what is in it for me?” when deciding whether or not to frequent Good to Go. If the campaign does not adequately answer this primary question in the minds of the potential customers, Good to Go may struggle. Furthermore, there are countless potential problems inherent in presenting and marketing a sus-

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tainable business. By presenting to the target market the image that Good to Go is “green” and sustainable, individuals in that target market are going to be increasingly aware of “greenwashing.” Greenwashing can be defined as taking normal business operations or characteristics, making them seem green or sustainable, and then marketing them as such (Grant, 2007, p. 62). As more companies market green and sustainability to gain a monetary bottom line advantage, consumers are becoming more skeptical of green claims. As mentioned in the situation analysis and context section, seven in ten Americans responded that when companies claim a product is better for the environment, it is only a marketing tactic (Makower, 2009, p. 27). It is because of this skepticism that Good to Go must maintain transparency in its operations at all times. Additionally, Good to Go’s entire business from supply chain to physical infrastructure is not entirely sustainable to the highest standards possible. Good to Go must be careful not to point to the LEED® accredited structure, ethanol based gasoline, and fair trade coffee as evidence of overall virtue (Grant, 2007, p. 83). Consumers will likely find environmentally unfriendly products Good to Go is participating in as byproducts of doing business. According to Good to Go’s business plan, its owners have associations with other businesses and


franchises (Business Plan, p. 9). It is imperative Good to Go’s owners make the nature of these associations known to all stakeholders. If businesses within those associations are not sustainable, consumers may see a problem with Good to Go’s sustainable claims. If transparency is held paramount and these associations are disclosed out of Good to Go’s volition, it will control the message. If these details are not disclosed and others voice a problem with them, Good to Go will not control the message and will be responding to accusation. Moreover, Good to Go’s business plan states that it will achieve significant cost savings through its sustainable building design (Business Plan, p. 23). Consumers will likely realize the savings Good to Go is achieving through being eco-friendly, and they will want those savings to translate to the prices they pay in the store. If Good to Go is unable to transfer its own cost savings to its customers, it must be able and willing to explain why those savings are not transferred. Also, as highlighted in the first two sections of this plan book, we discussed the negative perceptions of consumers have of green or sustainable products. Based on previous experience, consumers believe they have to sacrifice quality, price, or economy to have and use green products. This negative

association may carry over to Good to Go’s business given that certain individuals may carry these negative perceptions until taught otherwise. Finally, Good to Go’s business partnership with Renew is an advantageous one, however, research has shown there are certain negative connotations of ethanol-based fuel. Critics of ethanol claim that the demand for ethanol has significantly raised corn prices and that it has not proven cost effective (US News and World Report, 2008, p. 1). Regardless of the economic forces at work, ethanol continues to take a public relations beating and Good to Go must be cognizant of the negative associations some have regarding ethanol (US News and World Report, 2008, p. 1).

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conclusions

T

hroughout the course of the “i choose” campaign Good to Go will develop a competitive stance in the convenience store market. The implementation of the “i choose” campaign focuses on corporate social responsibility which will help consumers differentiate between Good to Go and other ordinary stores and car washes. Good to Go will fortify its position in the market through its emphasis on the “i choose partnership”. The partnerships are based on a genuine desire to be a responsible community member and leader, but also have the by-product of a mutual benefit for Good to Go and its partnering organizations. Good to Go will see both a direct impact to its monetary bottom line and also positive image promotion and management through these partnerships. The “i choose ECO education” program will help communicate Good to Go’s genuine desire to do its part to educate the community about sustainability. Coupled with education the “i choose” campaign will allow Good to Go to give back to the community. Like the “i choose partnership”, the education and giving back programs are mutually beneficial to all involved. Good to Go will improve its monetary bottom line by making a push for a large number of returning customers through participation in the “i choose”

loyalty program and capitalizing on a strong business relationship with Renew. The loyalty program will also help attract customers who are not concerned with sustainability as they will enjoy the monetary benefits from the program. Finally, local and national media relations will bring publicity to Good to Go and the “i choose” campaign increasing awareness of the ECOnvenience store. Good to Go’s measure of success is more global than financial gain, but the general improvement of the community is considered a contribution to the success of the business. The strategic position offered by the “i choose” campaign will provide Good to Go with the essential elements of an exemplary corporate social responsibility stance helping make Good to Go a competitive force in the Grand Chute convenience store market.

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“Feel free to join us; welco ome to Good to Go.”


Good to Go ECOnvience Store

appendix

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Good to Go

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media scan list

AdWeek May 12, 2008: “Deflating a Myth” by Mark Dolliver Bloomberg July 27, 2008: “ADM Bests Exxon as Farmers Gain Influence Over Energy Policy” by Alan Bjerga Businessweek March 19, 2007: “Ethanol’s Growing List of Enemies” by Moira Herbst February 1, 2007: “Ethanol: Too Much Hype—and Corn” by Moira Herbst April 27, 2006: “Ethanol: A Tragedy in Three Acts” by Ed Wallace February 1st, 2007: “The Ethanol Debate”

Contract Magazine September 18, 2008: “U.S. Green Building Council Announces Recipients of $2 Million Green Building Research Grants” by Green Building Focus Creative Magazine June/July 2008: “ECOnvenience Center Opens First Outlet” by CREATIVE Marketing Trends CS News November 12, 2008: “The Green Spot: Good-foryour-convenience” by Barbara Grondin Francella CSPnet.com April 4, 2008: “Good to Go Is Good to Go” by CSP Information Group, Inc.

The Christian Science Monitor November 04, 2002: “Vending Machines that Match the Minimart” by Neal Learner

The Dallas Morning News August 15, 2008: “Businesses Doing More” by Angela Shah

CIO October 15, 2005: “Six Simple Rules for Successful Self-Service” by Alice Dragoon

Domestic Fuel March 20, 2008: “Delaware Company Opening ‘Go Green’ Convenience Stores” by John Davis

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Emerald 2008: “Shopper Age and the use of self-service technologies” by Dwane Dean Finance-Commerce.com September 17, 2008: “After construction, LEED® plaques pay off” by Sophia Ginis (blog) Foodservice Director August 15th, 2008: “Concordia Opens Three New Retail Concepts” Green News August 20,2008: “Green Convenience Stores” by Marina Haves Hypebeat April 15, 2008: “Onitsuka Tiger Vending Machine” by Onitsuka Journal of Environmental Health July/August 1, 2008: “Engaging Young People in Children’s Environmental Health Protection through CARE” by Ted Coopwood

M2 Presswire August 19, 2008: “Research and Markets: A Critical Report Questioning the Eco-Friendly Attitudes and Behavior in the US” Maclean’s July 16, 2008: “Why the Real Corner Gas is in Trouble” by Aleksandar Zivojinovic Madison.com August 19, 2008: “Middleton-based Sustainable times thrives while other newspapers falter” Madison Magazine September 2008: “Green Revolution: Hometown ecopreneurs are out to change their industries - one idea at a time” by Mary Ellen Gabriel Marquette Tribune May 5, 2008: “Robo-store to open near Appleton” by Robby Douthitt Milwaukee Magazine September 22, 2008: “The Green Gang” by Leah Dobkin

Kindred Spirits Organics Kindred Spirits by Connie Glasheen (blog)

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media scan list continued

Mintel March 31, 2008: “Americans Go Three Shades Greener in 16 Months” Press Release by Mintel (Also appeared in Global Warming Focus)

businesses)

National Petroleum News June 2006: “Creating Loyalty”

PR Newswire April 3, 2008: “Good To Go ECOnvenience Center Launches First Outlet” by Paul Walker

Newsfactor August 11, 2008: “Best Buy Kiosks Land at Airports” by Steve Bosak Newtown November 2006: “Standing Out in the Crowd” New York State Conservationist June 2008: “sus*tain’a*bil’i*ty: LEAVING THE WORLD A BETTER PLACE” Beth Meer and Shannon Brescher Shae The New York Times July 4, 2007: “Say ‘Hybrid’ and Many will Hear ‘Prius’” by Micheline Maynard Outpost Exchange 2008/2009 Edition: Natural choice Directory by Outpost Natural Foods Cooperative (directory of green

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Pantone “Color Psychology” Webpage by the company

Time July 3, 2008: “China and Japan: The Green Connection” by Michael Schuman July 14th, 2008: “The Green Link Uniting Old Foes” Tribune Business News January 13th, 2008: “Clean Ride” WCAX News September 3, 2008: “College Nixes Vending Machine to Save Energy” by Paul Smiths College ZoomSystems July 28, 2008: “ZoomSystems Pioneers Automated Retail, Redefines Consumer Shopping Experience” by PR for ZoomSystems


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media relations examples and details

â&#x20AC;&#x153;i choose partnershipâ&#x20AC;? fact sheet page 76

i choose


Good to Go fact sheet Good to Go

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media relations examples and details continued

grand opening news release page 78

i choose


ECO education news release Good to Go

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media relations examples and details continued

â&#x20AC;&#x153;i chooseâ&#x20AC;? loyalty program news release page 80

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media relations details

P

rint media relations are an important aspect of any awareness campaign. Since an important goal of Good to Go and azure communications is to increase awareness of the ECOnvenience store, the presence of the media is a critical element to the â&#x20AC;&#x153;i chooseâ&#x20AC;? campaign. The first step in this campaign is to create awareness specifically in the Grand Chute and Appleton communities since this will be the market bringing in profit to Good to Go. This step will be completed through two press releases: one focusing on the grand opening event and the second outlining the loyalty program. These releases will be published in the Appleton Post Crescent, Press Star, Applesource Newsletter, and numerous minor local print media which will reach the target audience through a reliable and essential news source. The press release focusing on the grand opening will be published one week before the event, and the loyalty program release will be sent out immediately upon the storeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s opening which will be a month prior to the grand opening. Another portion of the awareness campaign is to reach a national trade audience. The main idea is to create viral marketing among people in the convenience store industry. This marketing plan will cause awareness among consumers and industry leaders outside of the Grand Chute and Appleton communi-

ties so when Good to Go expands beyond this area, customers will be familiar with the company and more importantly the brand complete with its mission. A few of the publications include Business Week, Industrial Market Trends, and In Business. Online publications will include BusinessMagazineNetwork.com and others. Along with a pitch, a fact sheet will be sent to a contact at each publication who is interested or has previously written on topics such as convenience stores, sustainability, or the target audience. Press releases in these outlets are sure to create the wordof-mouth awareness Good to Go and azure communications hope to achieve. In addition to the print media, media kits will be distributed among local radio and news broadcasting stations. Grand Chute area has 12 strong AM radio stations and 20 strong FM radio stations in the area. The stations vary in music genre thus reaching various audiences. Grand Chute has 11 TV broadcast stations in a local news coverage vicinity. High dispersion numbers of media releases will be sent out in order to reach maximum media hits.

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primary research discussion

T

he research suggests that most individuals are cognizant of green products and corporate social responsibility as it relates to sustainability in businesses. All of the individuals we spoke with indicated that they did some level of green activity in their daily lives and that the idea of sustainability to help the environment was an important aspect of either their personal lives or their small business operation. Additionally, many those who are small business owners said that their products were green because the natural aspects and elements of their products made those products better. Some individuals indicated they began their businesses with a organic and natural/sustainable business agenda. Others indicated they were organic when they could be but didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t advertise the fact they were sustainable. Moreover, it seems many of the small business owners realize the benefits of organic, natural and sustainable operations, thus passing those benefits to their customers. Of the individuals who we spoke with, there were several individuals who actively look for sustainable and socially responsible businesses to shop from. Most said, if it was convenient for them, they would shop at a sustainable business and buy green products because it is the right thing to do. One el-

ement consistent in all of the respondents was the economical element. Individuals indicated they are willing to buy green products or shop at a sustainable business, however, there must be additional benefits other than the fact the products or the business is green. The overwhelmingly pivotal indicator was cost of the products that the business sells. Most people indicated that if they had a choice to pay more and be green or pay less and not be, they would be forced to pay less and not be green. In addition, some respondents indicated that the local owned aspect of a business is looked highly upon. Not only from a sustainability stand point and the environmental advantages of buying locally, but from the community aspect of locally owned businesses.

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primary research discussion continued

primary research: Appleton Farmers Market, Saturday October 11th 2008

helps and people like that recycled jars are good. Price and economic factors are the primary concern.

Live Oak Market employees: Three college-aged females People are willing to pay more for better products, specifically organic, but financial considerations come first. People realize the benefits of buying green or organic. People are willing to go out of their way to buy from socially responsible stores, but financial considerations are, once again, big considerations being college students and having debt. People notice a difference between natural and not natural products. The audience has broadened and more people are looking for organic.

small restaurant owner: Middle aged man He likes to partner with socially responsible companies and people. People are more cognizant of what is going into food. There is a noticeable difference between now and the beginning of summer, people are that much more aware. He is hearing more people who want natural products.

If the product is marketed well as a green product, younger people would be more apt buy organic or natural products. small business owner: Middle aged woman, single mother Owns business making natural spreads in recycled glass jars. Price is huge. If there was an organization that is green if the price was low and the product was green, that would help tremendously. Being a local business

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entrepreneur: Middle aged woman, single mother She goes out of her way to a certain degree to gain sustainability, but money is the big factor. “I do a little, consider it [sustainability], but there isn’t as much available to a small business owner.” Personally, she does as much as she can. farmer: Senior, male He doesn’t advertise that fact that he is mostly organic because farms that are organic go out of business. If people ask him about it, he talks about it. He only uses pesticides when he has to. Natural solutions are his first choice but sometimes


he has to use pesticides. small business owner: Middle aged woman She wants clean products especially for her daughter’s health reasons. Customers like her products and her business for being green. The reason she started with sustainability was because of natural products and health reasons. They try to be socially responsible as a business and she seeks out clean products. “I want clean products.” community members: Two middle aged females, one female in mid-twenties expecting child They look for green and sustainable products. Corporations have to be involved in the community, if they are not a part of the community they will not be successful. If they know about the socially responsible aspects of the business, they will shop there. It does depend on what the product is to warrant paying more. Money is a huge issue. Environmental responsibility makes them look at a product but some corporations use it to market themselves.

green alone would not be enough. Factors are quality and price differential. You have to be able to back a product outside of being green. local citizens: Mid to older aged couple Price makes a difference with products. They try to go local and choose socially responsible products. Social responsibility matters. They would really like to see more recycling. There is more regulation needed. But bottom line is important too, despite that, they look for corporate responsible businesses. young entrepreneur: Female She tries to be a socially responsible business when she can be but she is a business owner and will shop at Wal-Mart from time to time because of cost. Seventy percent of her customers seek her out because she is natural, but 30 percent have no idea about her natural products and don’t care. Candles are 97 percent natural.

Financial issues are still a huge consideration. Being

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promotional graphics sustainable tips brochure

front

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back


car magnets/window clings gs

Good to Go

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loyalty program

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loyalty card front

loyalty card back

keychain front

keychain back

i choose


tree coupon

front

inside front

inside back

back

Good to Go

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works cited

C-Stores Losing Gasoline Customers to Other Outlets (2008). 2008, November 14, from ProQuest. Campitelli, J. (2003). Convenience Stores: Survival of the Fittest. Chain Store Age. Retrieved 2008, November 14, from ProQuest. Critics Bash Ethanol as Fuel Source. U.S. News & World Report. (2008, August 26.) Retrieved 2008, November 16. Cobb, C. (2008). C-Stores Pursue Sales Gains with Fresh, Value-Driven Food Offerings. Nationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Restaurant News. Retrieved 2008, November 18, from ProQuest. Cox, T. (2001). Down, But Not Out: Service Station Retailers Cope with a Changing Landscape. Marketing Strategies. Retrieved 2008, November 14, from ProQuest. Dolliver, M. (2008). Deflating a Myth: Consumers Arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t as Devoted to the Planet as You Wish They Were. Brandweek. Retrieved 2008, September 14, from ProQuest. Dragoon, A. (2005, October 15). Six Simple Rules for Successful Self-Service. CIO.com. Retrieved 2008, September 25, from http://www.tabpi.org/2006/htag.pdf ESRI. ZIP Code Lookup Results. Retrieved from http://www.esri.com Esty, D., & Winston, A. (2006). Green to Gold. New Haven: Yale University Press. Good to Go Business Plan (2008). Grand Chute, WI. Good to Go ECOnvenience Centers (2008). Grand Chute, WI.

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Grant, J. (2007). The Green Marketing Manifesto. West Sussex, England: John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Harris J., & Fender T. (2003). Shopping Visits Growing Shorter. The Grocer Insight. Retrieved 2008, November 14, from ProQuest. Harris J., & Fender T. (2003). Spend in C-Stores Still on the Up. The Grocer Insight. Retrieved 2008, November 14, from ProQuest. Hebets, S. (2006). On the Road with Kwik Trip: Outstanding Customer Service and a Solid Commitment to Employees Have the Wisconsin Chain Firmly Embedded in the Midwest’s Retail Landscape. FrontEnd. Retrieved 2008, November 24, from ProQuest. Herbst, M. (2007, March 19). Ethanol’s Growing List of Enemies. BusinessWeek. Retrieved 2008, November 16, from http://www.businessweek.com Ledford, R. (2002). Convenience Stores: A Changing Landscape. Chain Store Age. Retrieved 2008, November 16, from ProQuest. Makower, J. (2009). Strategies for the Green Economy: Opportunities and Challenges in the New World of Business. Chicago: McGraw Hill. Mediamark Research Inc. Chicago 2001. Retrieved from http://www.mriplus.com Mediamark Research Inc. Shopping - Spring 2001. Retrieved from http://www.mriplus.com Stern, N.Z., & Ander, W.N. (2008). greentailing and Other Revolutions in Retail: Hot Ideas that are Grabbing Customers’ Attention and Raising Profits. Hoboken, New Jersey: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

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works cited continued

Taneja, S. (1999). C-Stores Go On Line: EDI Transaction Sets Move Lotteries Forward. Chain Store Age. Retrieved 2008, November 16, from ProQuest. Top Ten Ways to Be Green. Retrieved 2008 November 24 from Green.yahoo.com U.S. Census Bureau. Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2000. Retrieved from http://factfinder.census.gov U.S. News and World Report. Critics Bash Ethanol As Fuel Source. August 26, 2008. Background Research: Cisco. (2007). 2007 Cisco Corporate Citizenship Report: Social Responsibility and the Human Network. San Jose. Douthitt, R. (2008). Robo-store to Open Near Appleton: Futuristic Mini Mart Offers Environment Friendly Convenience. Marquette Tribune. Ecolab Launches New Green Program. Professional Carwashing & Detailing. (2008, March 27). Retrieved September 14, 2008 from ebscoind.com General Electric. (2007). GE ecomagination Report 2007: Investing and Delivering on ecomagination. Atlanta. Good to Go (2008). Request for Proposal. Grand Chute, WI: Nikolas, A. Good to Go ECOnvenience Center Launches First Outlet. PR Newswire. (2008). Good to Go is Good to Go: Company Plans to Open at Least 150 Eco-friendly Facilities by 2010. Convenience Store Petroleum. (2008). Retrieved September 14, 2008 from CSP.com

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Hayen, Rita. (2008). Green Tier Advantage: Business Advantage: Environment. Retrieved October 24, 2008. www.dnr.wi.gov Mahoney, S. (2008). Study: Boomers, Not Gen Y, Biggest Green Shoppers. Mediapost. Milwaukee Journal Sentinel. Metro Milwaukee Market Consumer Analysis 2003. 2003 Environmental Cooperation Pilot Program. (2007). Progress Report. Wisconsin. Pfizer. (2007). 2007 Corporate Responsibility Report: Strong Actions Partnering for Positive Change. New York City. Retail Merchandising June/July 2008. Creative. (2008). Retrieved September 12, 2008 from creative.com U.S. green building Council. (2008). Strategic Plan. Washington, D.C. Sun Microsystems. (2008). Corporate Responsibility Eco Responsibility. Retrieved September 11, 2008 from www.sun.com Vizu Answers. (2007). Attitudes & Behavior on Global Warming. San Francisco, CA. Budget Sources: Ace Hardware, AceHardware.com. November 9, 2008. Complete Music, cmusic.com. November 9, 2008. Displays To Go, DisplaysToGo.com. November 9, 2008.

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works cited continued

Kinkos, FedEx.com. November 9, 2008. Touch Concept, TouchConcept.com. November 9, 2008.

-end of document-

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i choose campaign  

A PR campaign for Good to Go ECOnvenience Store in Appleton Wisconsin. I designed this entire book and the supplemental campaign materials.